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October 2014

Study Finds Not All Diabetes Patients Know Enough About Sodium

While sodium intake is a concern for those with diabetes and can lead to high blood pressure and stroke, among other complications, a new study finds that most diabetics have no idea how much salt they should be eating – and many are taking in too much.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2014

Treating Gestational Diabetes With Medication

According to the results of a new study, toddlers born to moms who develop gestational diabetes that requires medication are 22 percent more likely to be diagnosed with autism.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2014

Study debunks link between low vitamin D and type 2

While previous research has linked low levels of vitamin D to the onset of type 2 diabetes, new research finds no evidence that high levels of vitamin D prevent the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2014

Indulging Makes Dieting Success More Likely

If you’re trying to lose weight, depriving yourself of the foods you love may seem virtuous, but could make you more likely to fail in the long run.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2014

College Students Do Gain Weight

Students do tend to pack on a few extra pounds during the college years, experts say, but the so-called “freshmen 15” might be a bit of an overstatement.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2014

“We Are Not Waiting”

I have a fear of Dead in Bed Syndrome. It’s an ailment which many diabetics are afraid of, but not everyone has experienced it. I, unfortunately, have been in more than fifteen insulin shocks in my 16  years with type 1 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2014

New Pen Needle Offers Innovative Design

One of the leading manufacturers of diabetes supplies has released a new pen needle designed to make injecting diabetes drugs a less distressing experience, potentially boosting drug compliance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2014

Blood Vessel Damage May Occur Even Before Prediabetes Stage

A long-term British research study shows that even before people reach a prediabetes stage of elevated blood sugar levels, damage to their blood vessels may have already occurred.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2014

In Reality, We Do Not See Fewer Diabetic Foot Infections

While statistics seems to suggest that fewer diabetics are developing foot infections in the U.S. – the numbers show that infections have dropped by half over the last 15 years – the statistics are skewed because more people are now classified as diabetic, one researcher says.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2014

Social Networking May Help Boost Weight Loss

While many of us post health and fitness goals (on Facebook or Twitter) in order to hold ourselves more accountable as we strive for our goals, a new study shows that all that social networking may offer some benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2014

September 2014

Weight Loss Can Reduce The Risk Of Kidney Disease

With kidney disease one of the most devastating complications of type 2 diabetes – and a risk for about 35 percent of those with the disease - a new study suggests that losing weight can help significantly lower the risk of nephropathy in overweight or obese adults with type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2014

Study Ties Earlier Onset Of Type 2 To More Complications

A study from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation shows that the age when a person is diagnosed with type 2 may have an effect on the complications that person later experiences. Interestingly, the study suggests a reason for the likelihood of more complications despite being younger is tied into the use of statins.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2014

CDC Predicts 40% of American Adults Will Develop Diabetes

Based on a statistical analysis of almost 600,000 American Adults in three studies, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 40 percent of all U.S. adults 20 years or older will develop type 2 diabetes in their lives. (The risk for men was estimated at 40.2 percent and for women, 39.6 percent.)For Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women, the statistical risk is higher: more than 50 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2014

U.S. Trails Two Dozen Other Nations In Physicians Per Capita

Two dozen other countries top the United States when it comes to having enough doctors to go around.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2014

August 2014

Shift Work Raises Odds of Type 2 Diabetes

Those who work shift work – both steady second or third-shift schedules or swing shifts, which include shifts that rotate between day, afternoon and night work – are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2014

FDA Lifts Restrictions on Patient Access to Avandia

The type 2-diabetes drug Avandia will again be available through retail pharmacies after a May ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The drug - a rosiglitazone-based medicine that controls blood glucose by increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin, so cells and muscles are able to use more for energy, reducing levels in the blood - was off the market in Europe and restricted in the United States for several years due to studies showing the drug raised the risk of heart disease. The FDA in 2013 reversed its earlier opinion and lifted restrictions on the drug, opening the doors for Avandia’s return to market.

Initially released in 1999, Avandia had been one of Glaxo's top-selling medicines, with sales of $3.2 billion in 2006. Sales tanked in 2010 after a review of clinical trials showed an increased risk of heart attack related to the drug – those taking the drug in the United States dropped from 120,000 to 3,000 – but last year, new trials showed no elevated risk of heart attack or death in patients being treated with Avandia compared to other diabetes drugs, causing the FDA to reverse its opinion.

“GSK welcomes the decision of the FDA and appreciates the agency’s robust review of the science about Avandia,” Glaxo said in a statement last year. “GSK maintains its view that Avandia is a safe and effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes when used appropriately.”

While the drug had previously been available only through specialty pharmacies and the patients already taking the drug or whose symptoms were not adequately controlled by other drugs, the new FDA ruling allows all patient's access to Avandia, Avandamet and Avandaryl. All of these medications contain rosiglitazone.

“Our actions reflect the most current scientific knowledge about the risks and benefits of this drug,” Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement last year. “Given these new results, our level of concern is considerably reduced; thus, we require the removal of certain prescribing restrictions.”

While the drug’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, has a marketing hurdle to overcome given the bad press the drug has received over the last few years, the British drug maker has no plans to promote Avandia in the United States, in part because its U.S. patent protection lapsed in 2011.
The drug will be available by prescription.

To assist in the transition, a toll-free telephone number has been established for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmacies - 1-800-282-6342 – which will be staffed from 8;30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Eastern Time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2014

These Microwaves Don't Just Heat, They Count Calories

Microwaves: From carrying TV images to warming up coffee or thawing a chicken pot pie, is there anything they can't do? Probably not. Because it turns out that microwaves may soon allow us to determine the calories in the food, we eat at home simply by sliding it onto a device that measures calories using a microwave bombardment. The microwaves give a reading of the potential energy in the food and translate it into a calorie count.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2014

Insulin pumps lead to lower A1C levels for insulin-dependent type 2s

Insulin pumps can be as beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes that require insulin as they have become for those with type 1, according to a new trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2014

July 2014

BI-Lilly Alliance Creates Formidable Drug Development Combine

Pharma giants Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) and Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly) have formed the

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

May 2014

FDA Delays Decision on Inhaled Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has delayed until July 15th making a decision on whether to allow the inhaled insulin Afrezza entry into the American market.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 24, 2014

Life With Type 2: Science Catches Up to Our Experiences

Scientists will tell you that they don't consider anecdotes-personal stories about something-to be evidence that establishes a fact. Say you have 10 people swear they've been abducted by aliens, and all of their descriptions of the kidnapers match. That still wouldn't be enough for scientists to declare that aliens are real.
It would take other types of evidence, not just word of mouth, for the actual existence of aliens to be accepted as a plausible explanation for people's reported disappearances.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 14, 2014

April 2014

Robotics Allow Pharmacists to Spend More Time with Customers

There was a time when most people knew their corner pharmacist - like Mr. Gower in It's a Wonderful Life - and visits to the drug store included personal conversations to catch up on neighborhood and news, besides the dispensing of medications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 14, 2014

April 2013

BYOD Policies Could Threaten Healthcare Privacy

As technology puts smartphones into almost every hand, those technological advances may be putting your personal healthcare information at risk, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2013

February 2013

Diabetes-Friendly Valentine's Day Recipes (Including a Killer Chocolate Cake)

With all the heart-shaped boxes of chocolates filling every aisle of virtually every store this time of year, Valentine's Day can be treacherous for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2013

Take Advantage of Diabetes Health's Special Deal With Living Social

Take advantage of Diabetes Health's special deal with Living Social.  We are offering a one time off subscription rate of $15*, which is 50% savings from the current subscription price.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2013

December 2012

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years. Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips. Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town. Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2012

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2012

November 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

October 2012

Join in a Virtual Dance-a-thon, November 10, 2012!

You don't have to live in San Francisco to participate in the annual Dance Out Diabetes dance-a-thon event.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 15, 2012

September 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

August 2012

Paula Deen: Cooking Up a New Life With Diabetes

Paula Deen, a celebrity Southern chef known for her unrestrained love of butter and sugar, is no stranger to the media. She received a flurry of bad press recently when she revealed that she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes three years earlier. Shortly thereafter, she became a spokesperson for Novo Nordisk's Victoza. Following these developments, some critics said that she was a poor role model. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2012

June 2012

Short Video Shows and Tells Diabetes Basics

A short animated video narrated in a woman's reassuring tone provides a basic look at diabetes. The presentation touches on the science behind the condition and explains important terms, including "pancreas," "glucose," and "insulin." It stresses the importance of regular A1C checks and taking medication if needed, while pointing out the dangers associated with not staying on top of blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2012

May 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 16 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

April 2012

Kettlebells Offer a Unique Strength Training Workout

If you look around your health club and discover what appear to be cannonballs with handles placed in a corner, there is no need to walk away in fear: They're just kettlebells, a venerable resistance exercise tool that has been used for years by Russian athletes and has recently been taken up by actors as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 10, 2012

February 2012

Neurologists Issue New Guideline for Treating Neuropathy

A team of neurologists has issued a new set of recommendations for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, including drugs and other treatments that have been found to be the most effective therapies for the condition.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2012

November 2011

Diabetes Supply Costs Rule My Life!

There's nothing quite like wondering how you're going to pay for prescriptions.  I find it odd that we usually don't know what our out-of-pocket cost will be until we're standing in front of the pharmacy staff and praying that we have enough in our wallet to cover it.  I often feel like a reality show contestant waiting for the grand total.  My pharmacy-based reality show would probably be called "The Biggest Payer," or perhaps "The Amazing Guess," or, aptly, "Survivor."  If you've ever walked away from the pharmacy counter embarrassed, panicked, or depressed, you know the feeling I'm referring to.  It's a pain no prescription can cure.

comments 38 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2011

June 2011

Looking at Cannabis Based Type 2 Treatment

One of the classic effects of cannabis on people is raging hunger-the "marijuana munchies." The drug has been used to good effect on people with diseases that diminish appetite, helping them to regain a healthy interest in food. So it is a bit ironic that British drug maker GW Pharmaceuticals has created a cross-bred cannabis plant whose appetite-suppressing qualities could be used to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2011

Pew Report Says Consumers Turning to Internet to Track Their Health

A new report shows that increasing numbers of consumers are using the Internet to track medical information that they can apply to their own health. The report, "The Social Life of Health Information," was issued by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project and the California HealthCare Foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2011

May 2011

Maple Syrup-A Sweet Surprise

Meet the latest superfood: maple syrup.  Wait a minute...maple syrup? The super-sugary stuff poured on pancakes and waffles and used to glaze hams? That maple syrup?

comments 9 comments - Posted May 24, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

Fasting Cuts Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

Researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center's Heart Institute in Utah have found that regular fasting cuts the risk of both heart disease and diabetes. The study comes from Utah because the state's large number of Mormon residents are asked to fast at least once a month. For many of them, not eating at all has real, long-lasting health benefits.

comments 7 comments - Posted May 16, 2011

Study Says Worker Vision Benefits Save $4.5 Billion in Healthcare Costs

A study just published by VSP® Vision Care, a 56 million-member non-profit vision benefits and services company, reports that VSP has saved its clients $4.5 billion in potential healthcare expenditures via early detection of chronic eye diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

FDA Approves Indian Drug Maker’s Diabetes Drug Trial

The drug discussed below is for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 7 comments - Posted May 6, 2011

Medtronic Responds to "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?"

Recently, we published an article about the implantable pump "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?" Following the appearance of this article on the Diabetes Health website, over 100 readers commented, most of them expressing a heartfelt desire for access to this technology in the U.S.A. To read the original article click on link below:
A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

comments 35 comments - Posted May 5, 2011

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 5, 2011

Good News: Diabetes-Related Amputation Rate Falls

The rate of foot and leg amputations among people with diabetes fell by as much as 36 percent in one four-year period, according to a study of patients at Veterans Affairs clinics. Taking patients' age and sex into account, amputations-major and minor-dropped from about seven per 1,000 patients in 2000 to between four and five per 1,000 by 2004. The latter figure is a reduction of around 36 percent, with the biggest decrease coming in above-the-knee amputations.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2011

An Early Warning for Type 2? It’s Possible

Imagine knowing that you're likely to develop type 2 diabetes a decade from now. What would you do?

comments 3 comments - Posted May 3, 2011

Testosterone Replacement May Lower Death Rate Among Type 2 Men

British researchers say that testosterone replacement therapy for type 2 men with low testosterone levels could reduce their death rate significantly. Over the course of a six-year study by the University of Sheffield, only 8.6 percent of low-testosterone subjects who were given replacement therapy died, compared to 20 percent of low-testosterone subjects who did not receive the therapy.  

comments 2 comments - Posted May 2, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Chase Pelletier, Competitive Kart Racer

Chase Pelletier is an up-and-coming kart racer from Canada who is 14 years old. When he got type 1 diabetes just before his eleventh birthday, he recalls, "It was pretty overwhelming at first. But me and my family decided early on that we're not going to get down on diabetes in general, and we're going to try to think of positive ways to deal with it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Store Your Teeth in a Stem Cell Bank

Every year four million baby teeth fall out, and 1.4 million wisdom teeth are pulled out of our collective mouth. Until recently, the only entity really interested in all those teeth was the tooth fairy. But all that changed in the year 2000, with the discovery that dental pulp contains adult stem cells. In the not-too-distant future, those stem cells might be used for growing new islet cells to cure diabetes. The problem is, how to keep the teeth nice and fresh until that hoped-for day. That's where Provia Laboratories comes in, with their Store-A-Tooth service.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2011

Diabetes Linked to Higher Risk for Parkinson’s

Researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health have found that people with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Despite that finding, they say that there are too few data to support a causative link between diabetes and Parkinson's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

It’s Fun to Fend Off Pre-Diabetes at the (New York) YMCA!

If you have pre-diabetes and live in any of the five boroughs of New York City, get ready to learn a new acronym: YDPP. The initials stand for YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership under which New Yorkers can get enroll in a comprehensive low-cost diabetes prevention program at one of  the city's 27 YMCA branches and affiliates.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Taiwanese Study Shows New Technology Nearly Three Times Better at Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Taiwanese researchers say that a technology that uses sound waves to stimulate healing in diabetic foot ulcers is almost three times more effective than conventional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The technology, called dermaPACE®, is manufactured by SANUWAVE Health Inc., a medical device company located in Alpharetta, Ga.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose sugar, glucose, has been partially changed into another type of sugar, fructose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Jeff and Natalie Kolok: The Definition of Parenting

Jeff and Natalie Kolok live in northwestern Vermont with their three children: Naomi, 16, and Johanna and Nicholas, each ten years old. Both Johanna and Nicholas have type 1 diabetes, Johanna since age four and Nick since age six.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2011

Decades-Long Study Shows Second-Hand Smoke Ups Diabetes Risk

While smoking is commonly associated with a higher risk of developing a serious disease, it's not often that second-hand smoke or being an ex-smoker is considered even riskier. If the disease is type 2 diabetes, however, it is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2011

Las Vegas Will Host 2nd Annual Native American Healthcare Conference in Late May

The Second Annual Native American Healthcare Conference will take place May 23 through 24 at the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The conference will be held in conjunction with the Native American Diabetes Workshop at the same site.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 4, 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

March 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

Dr. Jane Delgado, Author of The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life

Hispanics are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have type 2 diabetes, and more than a third of working adult Hispanics do not have health insurance. For this audience, Jane Delgado, PhD, has written The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life. Available in both Spanish and English, it's a culturally sensitive and reassuring book that dispels myths and presents detailed science while gently guiding readers toward the right path in caring for their diabetes. The tone is conversational, as Dr. Delgado speaks to her readers like a family member who knows them well and has their best interests at heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2011

February 2011

Keeping the Weight Off: An Interview with Ellen Granberg, PhD

Ellen Granberg is an obesity sociologist who studies the processes that people go through when they lose weight and keep it off. As she says, "If the problem were that we don't know what people should eat to lose weight, that would be one thing, but we don't have that problem. There are a hundred weight loss plans out there that are perfectly good. We understand all about the physiology of weight loss maintenance and the metabolic impacts, but nothing about the social and emotional impacts. People who sustain weight loss over time move through a lot of different challenges."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program

As announced in November, 2010, the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE), the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have created the Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program to promote careers that will lead to a Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®) designation and improve access to much needed diabetes self-management education (DSME).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2011

New Toolkit Available for Community Health Workers To Educate People About Diabetic Eye Disease

The National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) of the National Eye Institute now has a Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit to help community health workers educate people with diabetes about diabetic eye disease. The Toolkit is available in both English and Spanish and its contents ensure that community health workers are equipped with science-based, user-friendly materials about diabetes and eye health to enable them to provide sight-saving information to groups of people with diabetes, their family, and their friends.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2011

Some Doctors Dispute Benefits Of Early Diagnosis

In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does the opposite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Walmart Plans to Sell Healthier Food

Walmart, the nation's largest grocer, averages 20 million customers every single day, so their food policies can affect a lot of people. For one thing, researchers have linked part of the rise in obesity to the prevalence of cheaper food, and Walmart is famous for cheaper food.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

January 2011

"The Hormone of Darkness" Won't Come Out in the Light

Keeping the lights on all night might keep away the monsters under the bed, but it also keeps away the "hormone of darkness," melatonin, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Melatonin, which is secreted into the blood by the brain's pineal gland at night, is involved in the circadian rhythm. Scientists believe that disrupting circadian rhythms can contribute to metabolic disease. Specifically, melatonin receptor genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant that may help prevent cancer.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2011

Vitamins C and E Affect Metabolic Syndrome in Ecuador

On the outskirts of Quito, the capital of Ecuador, meals are likely to be based on white rice, potatoes, sugar, and white bread. Given their reliance on high carbohydrate foods that are low in essential nutrients, many of the residents are overweight and malnourished at the same time.  The lack of vitamin C in their diet may contribute to metabolic syndrome, according to researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and the Corporacion Ecuatoriana de Biotecnologia. The researchers also concluded that vitamin E may have a protective effect against metabolic syndrome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2011

Diabetes Management in Flu Season

The crowd in the small Boston theater laughed and clapped. The comedy show was a good one, and I was enjoying it from a cramped seat in the balcony. It was October 29, a Friday, and while it was brisk outside, winter hadn't yet clamped down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

December 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

One-Third of UAE Residents Could Have Diabetes or Pre-diabetes by 2020

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates-- One in three United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents could have diabetes or prediabetes by the end of the decade, according to a new analysis from international health and well-being company UnitedHealth Group, released at the World Health Care Congress Middle East meeting in Abu Dhabi.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Diabetes-Depression Connection

A 10-year study by Harvard University scientists found that diabetes puts people at risk for depression and that depression puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes. The two-way connection between the diseases was discovered in 55,000 nurses surveyed over the decade.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Celebrity Life Coach

New York, NY (Grassroots Newswire) December 6, 2010 - Kathy Dolgin a.k.a High Voltage, beloved mentor to an A-list of supermodels, singers and television personalities and named a top lifestyle and fitness coach by Vogue Magazine, will appear on Divabetic's Diva TalkRadio Diabetes Spotlight with host Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek on Tuesday, December 7, 2010, at 6 p.m., Eastern. The exclusive interview will highlight Dolgin's war on Type 2 diabetes and childhood obesity, her amazing personal journey and her nonprofit organization, Energy Up Voltage Approved (www.energyup.org).

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 6, 2010

Special Infant Formula May Protect Babies from Type 1 Diabetes

If you have a new infant in your family and a family history of type 1 diabetes, feeding your baby a special formula when weaning off breastfeeding may protect against the development of the antibodies associated with type 1 diabetes, thus potentially shielding your child from developing the disease itself. This is the finding of a new study, conducted by Finnish researchers, that was published in the November 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2010

Kaiser Permanente Announces $20,000 Grant to Support Innovative Program for Those Served by the Institute for Human Services

Kaiser Permanente presented a $20,000 grant to the Institute of Human Services to support vocational skills training in urban agriculture and an edible gardening initiative in conjunction with IHS' Rooftop Garden project at its Women's and Family Shelter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2010

November 2010

Retinal Disease Treatments Double Over 10 Years

When most people think of diabetes, the first thing to come to mind is rarely blindness, yet blindness is a very real complication of diabetes: Diabetes is actually the number one cause of  new blindness in the United States.       

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2010

The United States of Diabetes

More than 50 percent of Americans could have diabetes or pre-diabetes by 2020 at a cost of $3.35 trillion over the next decade if current trends continue, according to new analysis by UnitedHealth Group's Center for Health Reform & Modernization, but there are also practical solutions for slowing the trend.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2010

Flu Meeting Highlights the Latest in Flu Research

Scientists gathered in October to discuss a very timely topic- the flu. While influenza may not be the headline news that it was last year with the H1N1 epidemic, the flu is very much on the minds of many scientists and doctors nation- and world-wide.  The October gathering presented the newest research on the flu virus and attempts to vaccinate against it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2010

JDRF Clinical Panel Recommends Next Steps for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Testing

WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 10, 2010 --- Diabetes experts at a meeting convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) took the next step in advancing efforts toward the development of an artificial pancreas: putting forth clinical recommendations to ensure the safe and effective testing of artificial pancreas technology in real-life situations. We are pleased at today's meeting there was a strong consensus among leading clinicians, researchers and industry leaders regarding the path toward outpatient studies for both low-glucose suspend and artificial pancreas systems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

October 2010

Number of Americans With Diabetes Could Triple by 2050

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a startling new projection last week regarding diabetes:  As many as one in three U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050. The announcement on Friday represents a dramatic threefold increase in the number of Americans expected to have diabetes within the next 40 years if current trends continue.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2010

Diabetes and the Flu

As flu season approaches, many people are debating whether they should get a flu shot. As everyone knows, getting the flu is not fun. In fact, it can be downright miserable. But for those with diabetes, the flu can mean more than a cough, running nose, and body aches--it could mean more severe complications, and sometimes even death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2010

Patient/Provider Language Barriers Linked to Worse Diabetes Control

Patients who cannot discuss their diabetes with a doctor in their own language may have poorer health outcomes, even when interpreter services are available, according to a new study by researchers at UCSF and the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2010

Weight Watchers and Merck Collaborate to Help Physicians Fight Obesity Through Lifestyle Management Approach

Weight Watchers International, Inc., the world's leading provider of weight management services, and Merck, a global healthcare leader, announced today an innovative collaboration focused on fighting obesity.  The two companies will launch an initiative in which Merck will provide physicians and other health care providers with educational information about the Weight Watchers® program and its underlying clinical evidence to assist doctors in addressing the ongoing weight management needs of their patients. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2010

Reducing Health Costs Through Lower Food Prices

Reducing the cost of low-carbohydrate foods for people with diabetes could significantly reduce medical costs associated with the disease that affects more than 23 million Americans, according to a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2010

New Studies Reveal Hidden Benefits of Exercise for Local Seniors

As the weather turns and leaves begin to fall this year, new research shows that local aging seniors are well served to get up and grab a rake themselves - for more reasons than one. A group of four recent studies published in 2010 Harvard University health and medicine journals shows a surprising and strong connection between seniors, exercise, and mental and physical health, especially among aging women. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2010

Mobile Health Clinics Growing in Power and Relevance Nationwide

Imagine what it would be like to have access to basic medical care close to home or to see a trained professional without an appointment at little or no cost - even if you don't have health insurance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2010

Sleep Loss Limits Fat Loss

Cutting back on sleep reduces the benefits of dieting, according to a study published Oct. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2010

Innovative Web-Based Tool Helps Doctors Improve Care

A Web-based tool that extracts information from the electronic medical record helps primary care physicians improve care and manage their entire panel of patients. Those are the findings of two new Kaiser Permanente studies - the first to examine the effectiveness of a population care tool in a large, diverse patient population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

Dancing for the Health of It

Dance Out Diabetes is a non-profit organization that addresses a critical component missing in most diabetes programs: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY! Our mission is to help individuals prevent or manage diabetes through dance and education.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2010

Have a Holiday Heart-to-Heart

The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even the occasional family conflict.  Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health is influenced by your family-for better or for worse.  This year, why not start a conversation that benefits everyone?  Gather your family health history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2010

Are You Dealing with an Ongoing Health Condition?

Better Choices, Better Health is the new online version of Stanford University's Chronic Disease Self Management Program (CDSMP).  This six-week, interactive workshop is designed for people with a range of chronic health conditions, including diabetes.  It is free for people in seven pilot states, thanks to a grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

Link Between Diabetes and Air Pollution Discovered

A national epidemiologic study finds a strong, consistent correlation between adult diabetes and particulate air pollution that persists after adjustment for other risk factors like obesity and ethnicity, report researchers from Children's Hospital Boston. The relationship was seen even at exposure levels below the current EPA safety limit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

September 2010

Instant Recess

(HealthDay News) -- Think recess, and you'll probably smile. What wasn't to like about a break in the school day set aside for running and playing, for friends and fun? Now fast-forward to your adult life. What if your workplace started offering recess on the job?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2010

How the New Health Care Law Impacts YOU!

San Francisco - Six months after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, patients and families are beginning to reap rewards.  The nation's new health care law is now delivering protections and cost benefits; yet it will affect consumers differently, and that may cause confusion.  Understanding will contribute to its effective implementation and this will involve all ends of the spectrum.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2010

UCSF Diabetes Symposium Marks Decade of Research Advances

Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient's ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

NIHSeniorHealth Site Offers Tips on Creating a Family Health History

At your next family reunion or gathering, consider discussing a different type of family tree-the family health history. Find out how to collect, organize and use information about your family's health at Creating a Family Health History, the newest topic on the NIHSeniorHealth website. NIHSeniorHealth is a health and wellness website designed especially for older adults from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2010

Hillary Clinton, Ban Ki-Moon Launch Global Nutrition Initiatives

NEW YORK (Sept. 21, 2010) - Millions of children's lives could be saved as a result of the long-awaited global focus on nutrition announced today, Save the Children said.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

Rogue Protein May Trigger Diabetes

The presence of amyloid protein may produce a chain reaction which destroys vital insulin-producing cells. Researchers based in Dublin, writing in the journal Nature Immunology, say future drugs could target this process. Amyloid is implicated in many other diseases - most notably Alzheimer's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Immune System Genes Show Links to Type 1 Diabetes

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but international researchers have found a link between the blood sugar disorder and a network of immune system genes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2010

The Highs and Lows of Going Back to School

Going back to school can be a little scary for someone with diabetes. There are a lot of things to think about when it comes to making it through the school day without having problems with your blood sugar levels. In school, we strive for that all important "A" on a test; to score 100. The same is true about blood sugar/glucose levels; the closer I come to keeping my blood sugar level at "100," the better for my health and the better for my grades; high and low blood sugars aren't helpful in keeping a clear, quick-thinking mind. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2010

August 2010

NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

Doctors have long known that different populations have different risks for chronic illness. Certain ethnic groups, for instance, are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others. But why? The National Institutes of Health aims to find out. It's Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health will take a broad look at factors that influence disease and aim to make positive changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Health Insurance Costs Rise Sharply For Unemployed As COBRA Subsidy Ends

Jennifer Richards of Park Ridge, Ill., is angry that her family's monthly health insurance bill tripled in August to $1,250 after her husband lost his job and health benefits. But as bad as that is, what really upsets her is the inaction of Congress.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2010

Wouldn’t it be Great if You Could Pop a Pill and Lose Weight?

And wouldn't it be great if that pill weren't something advertised on late-night TV, but rather a legitimate treatment? A drug called rimonabant, introduced in Europe, seemed to fit the bill at first, but it was pulled from the market in late 2008 due to concerns about psychiatric side effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2010

Health Leaders Announce Initiative Bringing Diverse Voices Together to Tackle Critical Healthcare Innovation Issues

The Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC) - a coalition of chief executives representing all sectors of American healthcare - announced the formation of the National Dialogue for Healthcare Innovation (NDHI), a forum in which leaders from private sector healthcare, government, academia and patient and consumer organizations can work toward consensus on the most important issues affecting healthcare innovation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

July 2010

Pump and Sensor Combo Beats MDI Decisively in Medtronic’s STAR 3 Study

A massive study involving 485 people with type 1 diabetes at 30 locations across North America shows that the combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor helps patients achieve significantly lower A1c levels than multiple daily insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years.  Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips.  Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town.  Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2010

Ignorance Is Bliss or Knowledge Is Power?

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the disease became my entire life. I was drowning in paperwork telling me who to pay, what to eat, how to medicate, and what to do if I got sick. But as months and years passed, diabetes management became just a part of my goal to live healthfully. I realized that I couldn't compartmentalize my health. I cannot pinpoint when my obsession with all things healthy started, but once it did--well, I've never looked back. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

June 2010

Double Transplantation Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

City of Hope researchers have found that bone marrow transplantation with islet cell transplantation shows promise as a treatment for late-stage type 1 diabetes. This combination may enable patients to make their own insulin again.  Results from laboratory research led by Defu Zeng, MD, associate professor in the departments of Diabetes Research and Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope, were published online this month in the journal Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2010

Diabetes and Cancer: A Consensus Report

The American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society have issued a joint consensus statement that acknowledges some links between diabetes and cancer but also notes there are numerous questions that have yet to be answered.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

Meat Preservatives, Not Meats Themselves, May Increase the Risk for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, some medical researchers have pointed the finger at meat consumption as a major factor in the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, a meta-analysis conducted by the Harvard School of Medical Health has concluded that it may be the salt and chemical preservatives used in processed meats that lead to health problems, not the meats themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

FREE iPhone Diabetes Applications

With the rise of the iPhone and the creation of hundreds of thousands of iPhone applications, it's only natural that several wonderful apps have appeared to make life easier for diabetes patients. Here is a quick look at 10 FREE applications, in no particular order, to help you choose the right ones for you.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 2, 2010

May 2010

America’s Favorite Farmers Markets

American Farmland Trust (AFT) is pleased to announce its 2010 "America's Favorite Farmers Markets" online contest kicks off on June 1 at http://www.farmland.org/vote. The contest is a nation-wide challenge to see which farmers markets can rally the most support from its customers. The goal is to promote the connection between fresh local food and the local farms and farmland that supply it.  

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

April 2010

National Physical Activity Plan Seeks to Reduce Chronic Illness and Obesity

Increasing physical activity for greater health among the American public will take center stage on May 3 with the launch of the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP or Plan).  The signature events of the launch will be a press conference at the National Press Club and briefings with members of Congress in Washington, D.C.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina are providing the organizational infrastructure for writing the plan.  The implementation of the plan will be coordinated by the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity (NCPPA).  The goal of NPAP is "to encourage everyone to be more physically active, reduce barriers to inactivity, and make sure our communities and institutions provide opportunities to move." 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 29, 2010

May is National Correct Posture Month: Did You Do Your Posture Exercise Today?

May is National Correct Posture Month, so take a look at how hours of computer hunching, slouching while cell phone texting and video-game slumping is affecting your posture.  It's not just kids with backpacks or cane-carrying seniors---studies show poor posture is a major cause of back and neck pain for all ages, and over time often contributes to digestive and cardiopulmonary problems.  The good news: there are easy things people can do to strengthen posture.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2010

National Conference on Diabetes

Conference Task Force Members will meet with policymakers, healthcare providers, payers, patients, and other stakeholders to discuss how to tackle the diabetes epidemic and reverse its economic impact on our nation's healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

December 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

In patients on statins, raising good cholesterol with niacin (Niaspan), but not reducing bad cholesterol with ezetimibe (Zetia), decreases plaque build-up

ORLANDO, Fla. Nov. 16, 2009 - In combination with statins, adding a medication that raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was more effective in reversing artery wall plaque buildup and in reducing heart disease risk than adding a drug that lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, researchers reported today at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 19, 2009

Pesticides in Your Food: How To Avoid the Worst Culprits

Do you ever stand in the fruit and vegetable section of your food store and wonder if it's really worth it to buy organic produce? Or do you wonder which conventionally grown items you can buy to save money and which items you should absolutely buy organic? I sure do. And I always resent standing there at the market, having to choose between a piece of fruit that has been exposed to chemicals and one that hasn't. Who should have to make a choice like that? Especially if you are taking that food home to your children. No one wants to eat poison.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2009

AACE Releases New Algorithm for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the College of Endocrinology (ACE) released online a one-page resource for physicians and healthcare providers for the management of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

October 2009

Diabetes Conversation Map

Montreal, Canada - 20 October 2009 - This October marks the one-year anniversary of the international launch of the ground-breaking diabetes Conversation MapTM education tools. Created by Healthy Interactions, a global leader in health education, in collaboration with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), Eli Lilly and Company and other leading diabetes experts, the unique Conversation MapTM education tools have been implemented in 68 countries, excluding the United States, in 31 different languages in the last 365 days. To complete the global launch, redesigned diabetes Conversation MapTM education tools will be unveiled throughout Canada in January 2010, along with a new Map designed for parents and children to learn together. New tools will also be introduced to several Sub-Saharan African countries by early next year.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

International Diabetes Federation calls for more education to stem diabetes epidemic

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF), established in 1950, is an umbrella organization that includes over 200 national diabetes associations in over 160 countries. It is currently holding its World Diabetes Conference, a biennial event, in Montreal, as well as preparing once again to sponsor World Diabetes Day on November 14. "Diabetes education and prevention" is the theme of the World Diabetes Day campaign for the next five years.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 23, 2009

Should You Get a Seasonal Flu Shot and an H1N1 Flu Shot? Yes!

The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health (CDC) recommends that everyone, especially people with diabetes and other diseases, get both a seasonal flu vaccination and an H1N1 flu ("swine flu") vaccination this year.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2009

September 2009

Exercise, Even Without Weight Loss, Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Teens

Even if they don't lose weight, a moderate aerobic exercise program can improve insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents who are sedentary.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2009

A Healthy Tax on Soft Drinks Could Fund Programs and Lower Consumption

We're drinking so much sugar-sweetened soda that it's become a taxing problem, according to a Health Policy Report published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. Between 1977 and 2002, Americans doubled their intake of sugary beverages. Unfortunately, that's not good news for anyone but the beverage companies. Although high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and fruit juice concentrates are naturally derived sweeteners (as opposed to artificial low- or no-calorie sweeteners), this added sugar has been linked to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

comments 24 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2009

Continuous Glucose Monitors: Even More of a Good Thing

For a while now, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) has been conducting clinical trials on the effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with type 1 diabetes. Last year, they issued their first two reports on their findings, showing that CGMs can improve control even for people who already have A1c's below 7%.  That information has already had a powerful impact: It's convinced a number of large health insurers (including Aetna, Cigna, Kaiser Permanente, United Healthcare, and Wellpoint) to cover CGMs for type 1s, and it's led to the inclusion of CGMs in national standards of care for type 1 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2009

High Fat Hangover

Those of you who are familiar with the South know what kudzu is. An Asian vine that can grow a foot taller every day, it was brought to the American Southeast in the 1930s in a sadly boneheaded attempt to control erosion. Unfortunately, the little green visitor liked it here so much that in the decades since, it has colonized 10 million acres of farms and woods, becoming a massive and costly nuisance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2009

Forming a Partnership with Your Healthcare Team: Tips From a Type 1 Pharmacist

I remember it like it was yesterday. It was the night before Thanksgiving, and my family and I were driving to my parents' house for the holiday weekend. I am usually the one who drives, but this time my wife insisted on taking the wheel because I was so dizzy and light-headed that I could hardly stand upright. Over the course of the previous week, I had not been feeling well. I had been getting up frequently at night to use the bathroom, was insatiably thirsty, and had been so dizzy that I had actually fallen down several times.

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2009

AHA's Call for Reduced Sugar Consumption Provides Some Sour Statistics

The American Heart Association, noting a direct link between sugar consumption and the development of such conditions as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, has called upon Americans to drastically reduce their consumption of "added sugar." Added sugar is defined, reasonably enough, as sugar added to foods during processing, cooking, or at meals.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2009

The DCCT Lives On! Intensive Glucose Control Halves Complications

The famous Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, known to its friends as the DCCT, was the first to prove the power of "intensive control" of  blood glucose to reduce the complications of diabetes. Although the ten-year study ended in 1993, researchers have continued to follow about 90 percent of the nearly 1,500 original DCCT volunteers. And the follow-up study, called the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), is measuring up to its illustrious parent in terms of demonstrating the value of tight control.  According to results published in the July 27, 2009 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, microvascular and cardiovascular complications of type 1 diabetes are cut in half for patients with near-normal glucose. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

Heat Stress & Diabetes Are a Dangerous Combination

Even though autumn is just around the corner, many places in the country still have a couple of hot spells left. And those surprise heat waves can be bad news for people with diabetes. It’s no secret that the elderly, the obese, and people with heart disease or respiratory conditions are vulnerable to heat-related illnesses. It’s less well known, however, that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to suffer heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and heat cramps.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 3, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 2, 2009

August 2009

High Fat Hangover

Everyone knows that eating only high fat food is unhealthy way down the road, but we don't really worry that eating a burger will hurt us by next week. Unfortunately, however, it turns out that a high fat diet damages our health (and our brain functioning) a lot sooner than we would like to think. In fact, new research shows that the effects are felt within only ten days. As far as I'm concerned, this was already shown conclusively in the film "Super Size Me," in which director Morgan Spurlock personally examined the effects of fast food on the human body. For one month, he ate only at McDonald's, ordering everything on the menu and "super-sizing" his order whenever asked. Right before our eyes, Spurlock began looking sicker and sicker.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

CGM Continues to Elicit Strong Opinions

In our last issue, we published a letter from reader Sheila Payne, who wrote that we had been far too positive about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in our June/July article Get the Facts on Continuous Glucose Monitoring. But her opinion provoked a stack of letters from people who believe that the benefits of CGM substantially outweigh its negatives.  To let you in on the debate, we are reprinting Ms. Payne's thought-provoking letter here, followed by two equally thoughtful responses from readers.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

Gut Hormone That Controls Glucose Production Could Become Diabetes Therapy

Canadian scientists have reported that a hormone found in the gut has the power to lower glucose production by signaling the brain and liver to do so. When the researchers activated its receptors in lab rats, they found that the hormone, called cholecystokinin (CCK) peptide, rapidly lowered the animals' blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2009

FDA Issues Warning About Test Strips That Can Give False Readings, Lead to Insulin Overdoses

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against the use of GDH-PQQ blood glucose test strips by people with diabetes who are taking medications that contain non-glucose sugars. [Note: GDH-PQQ is the abbreviation of "glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone," a chemical that reacts with the non-glucose sugars maltose, galactose, and xylose, which are contained in some therapeutic products.]

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2009

Type 1 Diabetes Appears to Increase the Risk of TB

South African researchers have found that in areas where tuberculosis is endemic, nearly one in three children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes tests positive when given a skin test for the disease. Although the positive test results do not mean that these young people will inevitably develop active TB, they do run a very high risk of doing so.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2009

July 2009

Hormone-Based Drug Drops Rats' Weight by a Quarter in Just Seven Days—Precursor to a Human Weight Loss Drug?

For obese people, who often go on to develop type 2 diabetes, the magic bullet would be a drug that causes weight loss without surgery or the misery of drastic diets that often fail. So, news about a drug that produced dramatically slimmer lab rats in just a week should make them-and people with diabetes-perk up.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2009

Cardiologists Say Give Statins to People Even If They Don't Have Heart Disease

An analysis of ten trials involving statin therapy among 70,000 participants has led an international team of cardiologists to recommend that that the cholesterol-lowering drugs be prescribed for people who do not have heart disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2009

Discovery of Link Between Obesity and Type 2 Opens Path to Possible New Treatment

Obesity has always been one of the major precursors to type 2 diabetes because of its ill effects on the body's ability to properly use insulin. But until now, scientists haven't been able to say with certainty just what happens in obese people to increase their insulin resistance. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2009

An Old Asian Standby, Red Yeast Rice, May Lower Cholesterol in People Who Are Statin-Intolerant

A 24-week study of the effects of red yeast rice on the cholesterol levels of people who cannot take statins shows that the ancient Asian food could be a viable statin alternative.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2009

June 2009

Foot Amputation Risk in Type 2s Reduced 36 Percent By Blood Fat-Lowering Drug

Patients with type 2 diabetes reduced their risk of having a foot amputated by 36 percent when they took fenofibrate, a drug designed to lower blood fat levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2009

Swine Flu is Still a Threat

The World Health Organization (WHO) is still deciding whether to declare a global pandemic

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2009

Duodenal Switch Surgery Better Against Type 2 Diabetes Than Gastric Bypass

Over the years, gastric bypass surgery has proven an effective means of controlling-and even reversing-type 2 diabetes in
"super-obese" patients (those with a body mass index of 50 or above; usually more than 200 pounds above ideal body weight).

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2009

Restored Leptin Sensitivity in Lab Mice Produces Normal BG, Increased Activity—Without Need for Weight Loss

Obese lab mice with severe type 2 diabetes had their blood glucose levels restored to normal and experienced a doubling in physical activity when sensitivity to the hormone leptin was restored to a portion of their hypothalamus.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2009

May 2009

Too Much Food Is Responsible for Most of the U.S. Rise in Obesity Since 1970, Says Study

Sometimes complex problems have simple answers. Take the alarming rise in obesity in the United States since 1970. Researchers have speculated in the past that the cause might be a combination of factors, perhaps a lack of exercise working in concert with the spread of cheap high-calorie junk food.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 23, 2009

Is It Harder to Kick the Habit if You Have Diabetes?

Smoking increases the harmful effects of diabetes by increasing insulin resistance and worsening diabetes control. It raises the likelihood of microvascular and macrovascular complications associated with diabetes. The risk of death from heart disease and stroke is increased, as are the possibilities of neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy. 

comments 3 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

Wanna Quit Smoking?

1. Don't smoke any number or any kind of cigarette. Smoking even a few cigarettes a day can hurt your health. And if you try to smoke fewer cigarettes but do not stop completely, soon you'll be smoking the same amount again.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

October 2006

Exercise a Good Protector Against Heart Problems in People With Type 1

Australian researchers say type 1s who regularly exercise are protecting themselves against cardiovascular disease “through the preservation of vascular compliance.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

October 2004

Joints, Muscles, Tendons, and Bones

The term “musculoskeletal system” refers to your joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

Evaluating the Heart and Lungs at Work

Are you all worked up because your physician has ordered you to have a stress test?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

July 2004

The Devil We Know

“I’ve had diabetes for 35 years,” read one e-mail message to our Islet Service at DiabetesPortal.com. “I only have retinopathy and mild neuropathy, but I am having trouble feeling lows [hypoglycemia]. I want a cure that doesn’t require anti-rejection drugs.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

July 2002

Walk Away

Seven out of every 10 Americans do not exercise regularly, according to a report issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and announced by HHS Secretary Tommy H. Thompson on April 7, 2002—World Health Day. In addition, the report claims, four out of 10 Americans are not active at all.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

Caffeine Shown to Lower Insulin Sensitivity

Caffeine, a component of many popular dietary sources such as coffee, tea, colas, and chocolate, decreases insulin sensitivity by 15 percent in people without diabetes, say researchers in the Netherlands.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

May 2002

To Snack or Not to Snack

It is not uncommon to read an article about physical activity that advises you to eat a snack before you exercise. Sometimes the article also advises you to perform the exercise after a meal or to avoid activity while insulin is peaking.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

January 2002

Precautionary Measures

While exercise is good for you, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) cautions that some forms of exercise may not be good for some people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Personal Training Myths

Enlisting the services of a qualified exercise professional to help you set up an exercise program is an intelligent decision. Exercise professionals offer the knowledge, guidance, accountability and support that should help you achieve your goals in a safe and expedient manner.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

It All Adds Up

Exercising for short bursts burns the same amount of calories as working out for one longer period of time, say researchers from the University of Wisconsin. Publishing their results in the October 2001 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, researchers found that women who worked out for three 10-minute periods, two 15-minute periods or one 30-minute period lost the same amount of body weight and fat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

October 2001

Arm Yourself for the Cold and Flu Season

It's that time of year again—the cold and flu season—when millions of people run to their medicine cabinets for relief.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Working With An Exercise Professional

If you want to learn how to play tennis or golf, you take lessons from a pro. Learning how to perform resistance exercise is no different, but many people don't believe they really need someone to teach them how to exercise. This is unfortunate, as working with a qualified exercise professional will extend to you several advantages.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

You Could Learn Alot From A Dumbell

As we age, we tend to get heavier, weaker, slower and more prone to injury, disability and chronic disease. This decline in health has traditionally been viewed as one of the inevitable consequences of aging. However, many of the changes that we experience as we get older may not be attributed to aging itself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

August 2001

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Like many people with diabetes, Gayle Hoover Thorne of Sacramento, California, was led to her type 2 diagnosis by water—or rather, the feeling that she couldn't get enough of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

Come On In, The Water’s Fine

Although it may seem as though the medical community cannot agree on anything at times, physicians are in agreement on at least one thing: practice the motto "first do no harm" when treating patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

April 2001

Man Says His Retinopathy Went Into Remission After Taking Pycnogenol

Editor's Note: DIABETES HEALTH encourages every person with diabetes to see an eye doctor at least once per year. A treatment like the one featured here should never replace professional care, and you should always notify your doctors when you take a non-prescription treatment. Only a professional has the tools to assess the health of your eyes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

December 1999

Walking Your Way to Health — Study Says One Hour a Day Will Do It

In the October 20 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Frank Hu, MD, of the Harvard School of Public Health, writes that people can cut the risk of type 2 diabetes nearly in half by engaging in one hour of moderate-intensity activity each day, which doesn't have to be all at once. This moderate-intensity activity can be accomplished with a walk to the bus stop in the morning, a walk up several flights of stairs in the afternoon, and housework in the evening.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

March 1999

Diabetes Educators Don't Sell Exercise Well Enough

Exercise has always been prescribed as a companion therapy to insulin, drug, or diet therapy in individuals with type 1 and 2 diabetes, yet, in the past two decades, the importance of exercise has been reexamined time and time again.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

March 1998

Exercise Your Options—Hot Trends & Tips for Training & Trimming

If you're thinking about joining the battle of the bulge you may want to check out the latest fitness and exercise equipment options available to you. In today's fitness crazed world, the choices are nearly limitless, and many of today's hottest exercise trends have actually been around for decades.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

August 1997

How To Spot Anorexia and Bulimia

If you have an eating disorder and need help, contact the American Anorexia/Bulimia Association (AABA) at (212) 575-6200 or write them at 165 West 46th Street, Suite 1108, New York, NY 10036. You can also contact psychologist William Polonsky, PhD, CDE, for referrals at (619) 965-5659 or he can be contacted by e-mail at WHPolonsky@aol.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

October 1994

Why is weight loss emphasized for Type 2s?

Q: Why is weight loss so emphasized for people with type 2 diabetes?  A: Excess body fat increases insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is primarily a condition of resistance to insulin. Approximately 80% of the people with type 2 diabetes are overweight at diagnosis. Consequently, weight loss tends to reverse this disorder in most people and some are able to eliminate medication and rely solely on exercise, diet, and blood glucose monitoring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1994

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