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Professional Diabetes Issues Article Archives

December 2012

Doctors Can Be Everyday Heroes, Too

Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu, MD, MPH, FACPM is a very interesting man. He served as the Acting Surgeon General of the United States in 2006 and was made Chairman of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in October 2007. The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is designed to serve as a home for the diabetes family and a trusted place of diabetes learning that will inspire diabetes innovation, improved care, and better outcomes worldwide. Through the Institute, Johnson & Johnson is opening and operating state-of-the-art instructional facilities around the world to provide health professionals with education and training aimed at improving diabetes patients' outcomes by working at the community level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2012

October 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

April 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

February 2011

Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program

As announced in November, 2010, the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE), the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have created the Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program to promote careers that will lead to a Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®) designation and improve access to much needed diabetes self-management education (DSME).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2011

Some Doctors Dispute Benefits Of Early Diagnosis

In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does the opposite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2011

January 2011

New Primary Care Physicians Haven't Learned Enough About Diabetes

Your young primary care doctor may not know a lot about diabetes, according to a study led by Stephen Sisson, MD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  "When I graduated from residency here, I knew much more about how to ventilate a patient on a machine than how to control somebody's blood sugar, and that's a problem," said Sisson in a press release.  "The average resident doesn't know what the goal for normal fasting blood sugar should be. If you don't know what it has to be, how are you going to guide your diabetes management with patients?"

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

UCSF Opens High-tech Learning Center for New Era of Health Care

UCSF will launch one of the nation's first inter-professional, team-based simulation learning centers to prepare doctors, nurses, pharmacists and dentists together for the changing health care landscape.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2011

November 2010

Drug Shortage Worries the Medical Community, Calls for Emergency Action

The newest threat to patient health may not be the flu or other epidemics. It could be a major shortage of prescription drugs. The shortage has reached the level of a "national public health crisis," according to a survey conducted by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) this summer. Survey respondents said shortages in the past year were "the worst ever, without a glimmer of hope for any improvement in the near future."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2010

Could the iPad Save Your Life?

New technology is popping up all over in the medical community, from new diagnostic machines, to new ways of administering drugs, to an almost endless supply of self-monitoring devices such as blood glucose meters. But a technology often overlooked is one that could have the most impact-electronic medical records.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2010

October 2010

Patient/Provider Language Barriers Linked to Worse Diabetes Control

Patients who cannot discuss their diabetes with a doctor in their own language may have poorer health outcomes, even when interpreter services are available, according to a new study by researchers at UCSF and the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2010

September 2010

Meetings, Medications, and Meters

I’m back. I started working with Diabetes Health 10 years ago.  At that time, Diabetes Health was the one publication open enough to talk about a subject that was controversial at that time… Lower Carb Options.  That was my column, and I got a lot of slack from it. I didn’t understand why. People with diabetes want and need lower carb options. What was the problem with giving people options? That’s what Diabetes Health is all about – teaching people there are healthy options. Now it’s common to see lower carb options for people who have diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2010

August 2010

Cleveland Clinic: 2010 Medical Innovation Summit to Showcase Innovations in Treating Obesity and Diabetes

Cleveland Clinic has finalized the agenda for the 8th Annual Medical Innovation Summit, which will be held Nov. 1-3 on the Clinic's campus. The Summit draws 1,000 attendees each year, and includes panel discussions with some of the industry's top CEOs and thought leaders.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2010

Spanish for Diabetes Educators in Cuernavaca, Mexico, October 3

A week of Spanish study (5 days of classes) concentrated on your professional specialty. You will have 30 contact classroom hours, as well as opportunities outside the classroom for use of your Spanish. This course may qualify for continuing education units. Information on this is being developed. The course is arranged through Language Link, the U.S. Office for the Spanish Language Institute (800.552.2051, kay@langlink.com), and is sponsored by the AADE California coordinating body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2010

July 2010

The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute Meets the Challenge of Training Diabetes Educators Across the Globe

Looking for novel ways to help improve patient outcomes, the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is using innovative adult education techniques to train diabetes educators around the world.  While the cultural and epidemiological differences in each region can be challenging, David L. Horwitz, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, Chief Medical Officer of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute, feels confident this program can make a positive impact to help improve patient outcomes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2010

May 2010

National Plan to Improve Health Literacy

The United States Department of Health and Human Services released The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy aimed at making health information and services easier to understand and use. The plan calls for improving the jargon-filled language, dense writing, and complex explanations that often fill patient handouts, medical forms, health web sites, and recommendations to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2010

Physician Survey Reveals That Early Team Approach Is Best Medicine

Early management of type 2 diabetes with an integrated team of specialists, including a dietitian, diabetes educator, endocrinologist, cardiologist, and nephrologist, can significantly reduce the incidence of complications and lower healthcare costs, according to an online survey of more than 300 endocrinologists and family practice physicians. The survey was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., with the goal of determining the most common obstacles for physicians in treating type 2 diabetes patients and preventing complications.  Sermo, the largest physician only online community, conducted the survey.  A significant number of these physicians (44 percent) reveal that 50 percent of their patients develop at least one of the following serious complications:  cardiovascular disease, nerve pain, kidney disease, stroke, blindness, or limb amputation.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

January 2010

Walgreens Expands Health and Wellness Offerings with Walgreens Optimal Wellness

DEERFIELD, Ill. January 13, 2010 - Walgreens (NYSE: WAG)(NASDAQ: WAG) today announced the launch of the Walgreens Optimal WellnessTM program, an innovative self-care educational program for people with chronic conditions that will initially focus on people with type 2 diabetes. Walgreens Optimal WellnessTM is a significant step for Walgreens and the health care industry that capitalizes on the power of face-to-face interaction.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 14, 2010

November 2009

Opportunity Knocks for CDEs Wanting to Improve Their Spanish

"Spanish for Diabetes Educators" is a January, 2010 course arranged through Language Link, the U.S. Office for the Spanish Language Institute and the Multi-Cities chapter of the AADE (McAADE) in California.The course consists of a week of Spanish study (five days of classes) concentrated on your professional specialty.  You will have 30 contact classroom hours, as well as opportunities outside the classroom for professional use of your Spanish.  This course will qualify for continuing education units. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2009

October 2009

Doctors Can Be Everyday Heroes, Too

Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu, MD, MPH, FACPM is a very interesting man. He served as the Acting Surgeon General of the United States in 2006 and was made Chairman of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in October 2007. The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is designed to serve as a home for the diabetes family and a trusted place of diabetes learning that will inspire diabetes innovation, improved care, and better outcomes worldwide. Through the Institute, Johnson & Johnson is opening and operating state-of-the-art instructional facilities around the world to provide health professionals with education and training aimed at improving diabetes patients' outcomes by working at the community level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

Pearls From the 2009 AADE Annual Meeting and Exhibition

In August, I had the pleasure of traveling to Atlanta, Georgia to attend the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting.  I sat in on several seminars, the most interesting of which are summarized here.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

August 2009

A Good Relationship with Your School Nurse Pays Off in Dividends

Because we have good health insurance, my son sees his endocrinologist twice a year, his diabetes health educator twice a year, and his nutritionist once a year. Meanwhile, he sees his school nurse one to three times a day. As you know, this relationship can make a difference for the rest of a child's life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Considerable Risk of Cardiovascular Events May Linger Despite Achieving Target LDL Cholesterol Levels with Statins in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

May 5 - Ann Arbor, MI - In the first study of the effects of statins on the concentrations of both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; known as the "bad" cholesterol) and low-density lipoprotein particles (LDL-P) in patients with metabolic syndrome, it was shown that even though the statins lowered the concentrations of LDL-C to target levels, the patients retained considerable residual risk for cardiovascular events because LDL-P concentrations were not reduced to a similar extent.  A pre-print version of the study in Diabetes Care is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1681, and the final version will be available in print in the June 2009 issue, as well as online at the same URL.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2009

Survey Says Most Endocrinologists and Physicians See a Need for More Byetta and Januvia-Type Drugs

High percentages of endocrinologists, primary care physicians, and managed care organizations surveyed by a research firm say they would like to see additional GLP-1 analogues like Amylin/Eli Lilly's Byetta® and DPP-IV inhibitors like Merck's Januvia® available to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2009

Medtronic Recalls Its Quick-set Infusion Sets

Minneapolis-based Medtronic Inc. is recalling some lots of its Quick-set infusion sets over concerns that they may cause insulin pumps to deliver too much or too little insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 21, 2009

Dr. Trucco's Quest: Find a Vaccine Against Type 1 Diabetes Based on a Patient's Own Blood

Of all the quests that researchers have undertaken in search of a cure or decisive treatment for type 1 diabetes, the search for a vaccine has to be the boldest. But how would you develop such a vaccine, and how would it work?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2009

Roche Works for Diabetes Behavior Change/Patient Engagement

Roche Diabetes Care Announces Unique Coaching Program for Diabetes Educators as Part of Long-Term Commitment to Fight the Disease

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 8, 2009

June 2009

Primary Care Clinicians and Insulin

With Type 2 diabetes emerging as an epidemic, primary care clinicians need to become savvy at initiating and adjusting insulin. Given the nationwide shortage of endocrinologists, referring all patients on insulin for endocrine appointments is not realistic in most areas of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2009

Swine Flu is Still a Threat

The World Health Organization (WHO) is still deciding whether to declare a global pandemic

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2009

Voting Open for 3 Spots on the AADE's Board of Directors

The polls are open for voting for new members of the AADE board, AADE officers, and the nominating committee. The good news is that you can vote for three people! Diabetes Health wishes Board of Directors candidates and former DH Guest Editors, Jane Jeffrie Seley, Kim Higgins, and Deborah Greenwood, the best of luck.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2009

May 2009

Diabetes Educators and Their Supporters Asked to Rally Behind “Catalyst to Better Diabetes Care Act”

Diabetes educators and their supporters nationwide are being asked to rally behind congressional legislation that would establish a "national diabetes report card," promote better training of doctors with regard to reporting diabetes as a factor in births and deaths, and set federal standards requiring doctors to achieve a level of diabetes education before they can be licensed or certified.

comments 7 comments - Posted May 8, 2009

Resolvins, Discovered in Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Show Ability to Restore Lost Gum Disease Tissue and Bone

Dental researchers are reporting that resolvins, products derived from omega-3 fatty acids, may have the ability to restore the soft tissue and even bone lost in periodontal (gum) disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2009

Common Glucose-Control Drug May Delay or Even Prevent Onset of Type 2

Voglibose*, a generic drug often used in combination with sulfonylureas to control blood glucose levels, appears to delay or even prevent the onset of diabetes in people who are predisposed to the disease.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

Attention Healthcare Professionals: Grants Available for Integrating Patient-Recorded Observations into Clinical Care Processes

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has issued a call for proposals through its national program, Project HealthDesign: Rethinking the Power and Potential of Personal Health Records. Grant recipients will work to assess and test the potential of "observations of daily living" (ODLs) to help patients and physicians better manage chronic illnesses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

April 2009

Medtronic Jumps in to Help Deltec Pump Users

When Smiths Medical announced in late March that it was discontinuing the manufacture and sales of its Deltec Cozmo insulin pumps, the company's annual sales of that product were about $36 million. In contrast, Medtronic, manufacturer of the Minimed line of insulin pumps reported sales of $727 million in the nine months from April 2008 to January 2009.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2009

Connect with Diabetes Health on Facebook and More!

Diabetes Health has joined the social networking sphere. Join us as a fan on Facebook, talk to us on Twitter, and subscribe to our RSS feed. Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Nadia Al-Samarrie wants to hear your thoughts and she'll be reading what you have to say with great interest.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2009

Long-Acting Byetta Tops Two Other Diabetes Drugs in Direct Comparison

Results from DURATION-2, a 26-week test comparing the diabetic drugs Januvia, Actos, and experimental long-acting Byetta (Byetta LAR) show that Byetta produced lower A1c's and more weight loss than the other two drugs.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2009

Altea Partners With Amylin and Lilly to Develop 12-Hour Byetta Skin Patch

Buoyed by its recent successful phase 1 human clinical trial of a patch that delivers basal insulin through the skin, Atlanta-based Altea Therapeutics says it will work with Eli Lilly and Company and Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., to develop a daily transdermal patch that deliver sustained levels of Byetta (exenatide). The patch, in a 12- and a 24-hour form, will use the company's proprietary PassPort Transdermal Delivery System. Lilly and Amylin will fund all development, manufacturing, and marketing activities for the product. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2009

Is the FDA Helping or Hurting Us When It Comes to New Medicines?

A new research report by the Pacific Research Institute (PRI) reviews three decades of the Food and Drug Administration's performance and concludes that the agency is over-funded, over-staffed, and denies hundreds of thousands of Americans timely access to new medicines. Leviathan's Drug Problem: The Federal Monopoly of Pharmaceutical Regulation and Its Deadly Cost was authored by John R. Graham, Director of Health Care Studies at PRI. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2009

Tobacco as Medicine?

Last week we published an article about how the CDC says too many people are still smoking. The federal government has a Healthy People 2010 goal of reducing adult smoking rates to 12 percent or less by 2010. Of the 50 states, only Utah has thus far achieved that goal. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2009

Cells That “Think” They’re Not Consuming Glucose May Hold a Key to Longer Lifespan

Canadian scientists studying the effects of glucose on cellular aging have discovered an unusual effect that could change how doctors treat diabetes and even address the human lifespan. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

March 2009

Joint Statement Published from ADA and AACE on the NICE-SUGAR Study

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) released a statement last week in response to the study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine which suggested that intensive blood glucose control for critical care patients with hyperglycemia doesn't improve outcomes and is associated with an increase in deaths.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Sled Dogs’ Fat-Burning Capabilities Could Hold a Key to Type 2 Treatments

One of the most impressive feats of endurance in the animal world is performed by the sled dogs that run up to 100 miles per day in such races as Alaska's Iditarod, a grueling 1,161-mile trek from Simpson to Homer. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Drug Based on Enzyme Found in Insects Enters Phase IIa Trial for Treatment of Type 2, Other Inflammatory Diseases

AR9281, a drug developed by the University of California at Davis and now under further development by a California-based pharmaceutical company, has entered Phase II of human clinical trials.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 27, 2009

Experts Affirm That Low-Dose Aspirin Daily Can Help Prevent Heart Attack and Stroke

New guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force state that daily low doses of aspirin-75 milligrams to 81 milligrams-are as effective as higher doses (100+ milligrams) in preventing heart attacks among men and strokes among women. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2009

Still Too Many People Smoking, Says CDC

Differences in the way tobacco is marketed and promoted and differences in tobacco control programs are some of the reasons why more than twice as many adults smoke in some states as in others, according to a recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2009

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes: Who, When, And Why?

Physicians who treat people with type 2 diabetes face difficult choices when selecting the best medical therapy for each patient. The decision process is further complicated by the fact that because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, therapeutic agents that were initially successful may fail five or ten years later.

comments 159 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2009

Help on YouTube for Type 2’s Considering Insulin

Sanofi-aventis U.S., a maker of insulin as well as many other pharmaceuticals, announced last month the launch of their new YouTube diabetes channel that's designed to challenge the barriers, myths, and misperceptions about insulin use and empower people living with type 2 diabetes to make better-informed decisions for managing their condition.  The channel is part of their broader GoInsulin campaign, a multi-media resource for people living with type 2 diabetes to help dispel the myths about insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2009

Early Detection Aims to Reverse Rising Rate of Kidney Disease

A report commissioned by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is being published in this month's issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the National Kidney Foundation's journal. Led by kidney specialists Dr. Andrew S. Levey at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, and Dr. William McClellan at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, the panel of experts designed a comprehensive public health strategy to prevent the development and complications of chronic kidney disease in the U.S.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2009

At Last! Restrictions on Stem Cell Research Lifted

"Medical miracles do not happen simply by accident," said President Obama, as he signed an executive order lifting the ban on federally funded embryonic stem cell research. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) is celebrating President Obama's new policy. They recently released this statement by Mary Tyler Moore, the International Chairman of the JDRF: 

comments 12 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2009

JDRF-Funded Study Takes First Step Toward Development of Medicines That Can Regenerate Pancreases

Researchers funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation have found two chemical compounds that can trigger the growth of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The discovery could become the basis for medicines designed to regenerate the pancreas in people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 9 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2009

The Broken Safety Net

If you live in California and have been denied insurance coverage because you have diabetes, you'll probably have to wait to enroll in the state-run program that's supposed to offer you health benefits. But California Republican Senator Sam Aanestad of Grass Valley hopes to change that with legislation he introduced January 20th. Aanestad says his bill, Senate Bill 57, would alter that program in ways that will allow more people access to coverage.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 10, 2009

February 2009

Sample Request for CGM Insurance Coverage

We recently published an article about how you can avoid losing money in insurance claims. The article gave helpful hints on how to deal with your insurance company including an sample appeals letter. We promised to publish in the near future a sample CGM appeals letter. Here they are!

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2009

Lack of a Liver Molecule Skyrockets Blood Fat Levels in Type 2 Mice

Too little production of a molecule called LSR (lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor) in the liver sends blood fat soaring to pathological levels in mice with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, say scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 26, 2009

Erectile Dysfunction Pill for Men with Diabetes Enters Phase 3

Avanafil, a pill that may permit diabetic men who are experiencing erectile dysfunction to engage in intercourse without the restrictions on food or alcoholic intake associated with other ED treatments, is entering a second phase 3 study-the crucial step before a drug manufacturer seeks FDA or European approval to market.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2009

Medical ID Bracelets: The $15 Lifesavers

I admit it: I've had diabetes for seven years, and only recently did I even think about buying a medical alert ID. It's not like me to be this irresponsible, but diabetes crept up on me, rather like type 2 does, although I'm a type 1. My diabetes is a slowly progressing adult-onset form, sometimes called type 1.5.  For the first five years after my diagnosis, I controlled the disease with diet. 

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2009

Human to Animal Cloning Has Problems

Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been considered a promising way to generate human stem cells for therapeutic applications for more than a decade. The shortage of human donor eggs has led to efforts to substitute animal oocytes. However, a new study published online in Cloning and Stem Cells, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., demonstrates that animal oocytes lack the capacity to fully reprogram adult human cells. (The paper is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/clo.)

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2009

Letter to the Editor: Who’s to Blame for the Shortage of CDEs?

Dear Editor,

You are right when you wrote that CDE's were becoming an endangered species, but were you aware that the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) is part of the problem?

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2009

Liraglutide Best at Reducing A1c’s When Used in a Two-Drug Combo

Data from a phase 3 study of the Novo Nordisk drug liraglutide shows that when it is used in combination with glimepiride, it is more effective at reducing A1c's than glimepiride by itself or glimepiride in combination with the drug rosiglitazone. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2009

Surgeons Remove Healthy Kidney in Innovative Way

In what is believed to be a first-ever procedure, surgeons at Johns Hopkins have successfully removed a healthy donor kidney through a small incision in the back of the donor's vagina.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2009

A New Kind of Hospital and a Different Way of Viewing Diabetes

Can you imagine a hospital where the floors are carpeted, so you feel soothed and protected? Where the doors open silently so as not to jar your nerves? Where vending machines are filled with fresh fruits, and the healthier the meal in the cafeteria, the less it costs? How about elevator doors covered in exotic floral motifs, or a diabetes center where you never wait more than ten minutes to be seen?

comments 8 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2009

Marrow Cells Heal Neuropathy in Mice

Bone marrow cells that the body normally uses to restore blood vessels can be cultured to stop neuropathy and restore nerve function in diabetic mice, according to researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2009

Facing Tough Times, the ADA Cuts Its Workforce by 10 Percent

Responding to a slowdown in fundraising and cuts in federal funding of diabetes research, the Alexandra, Virginia-based American Diabetes Association has eliminated 86 staff positions, about 10 percent of its workforce.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 11, 2009

Scientists Find a Major Culprit in Pancreatic Beta Cell Loss

Keep this letter-number sequence in mind: CXCL10. You'll probably be reading a lot more about it. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 11, 2009

Baxter Teams with MedicAlert to Add Glucose Monitoring Alert for Dialysis Patients

Baxter International, Inc., which produces the peritoneal dialysis solution Extraneal (icodextrin), has teamed with MedicAlert Foundation International to encourage peritoneal dialysis patients to add a warning to their MedicAlert bracelets regarding the fact that icodextrin may cause false readings on non-specific glucose monitors. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2009

Adult Beta Cells Coaxed into Replicating

By introducing a protein called cdk6 into human insulin-producing adult beta cells via a virus, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have induced the cells to replicate "robustly." Previously, scientists believed that beta cells could be induced to regenerate slowly at best, and usually not at all. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2009

Sanofi-aventis U.S. Launches “Diabetes National Alliance” to Help Healthcare Pros Contend with U.S. Diabetes Epidemic

Concerned about the growing number of Americans who are developing diabetes, Sanofi-aventis U.S. has launched the "Diabetes National Alliance" to provide healthcare professionals with information on the standard of care for people living with the disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 4, 2009

Noncompliance Versus Diabetes Self Care: Are We Still Playing a Blame Game?

Back in 1993, I published an article titled "Is Noncompliance a Dirty Word?" in which I expressed sadness that people with diabetes were being blamed by their healthcare providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's "failure" might really be a failure of the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen long years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So, how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2009

January 2009

U.S. Academic Medical Centers Are Not Cutting the Mustard

A study published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine has found that the glucose control practices at academic medical centers are below par and fail to meet the current standards set by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). 

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2009

There’s A New American President...But Still More Voting To Be Done

Finalists have been announced for the 2008 Diabetes Educator of the Year contest, sponsored by American Diabetes Wholesale (ADW). A panel of judges went through hundreds of nominations before narrowing the field down to five excellent finalists. You can read about each one and cast your vote through March 20th, 2009, by visiting the ADW website.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2009

Proteins Found in Saliva May be Biomarkers for Type 2

Researchers in India have found that 65 proteins in the saliva of people with type 2 diabetes have patterns unlike the patterns of the same proteins in the saliva of individuals without diabetes. Not only may the differences be a potential way to identify type 2s, but the proteins themselves are associated with immune response and metabolic regulation-two bodily functions that run afoul in type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2009

Ohio State Study Links Polluted Air to Obesity and Diabetes

Air polluted with particulate matter at concentrations found in many U.S. metro areas may be a contributing factor in obesity and to the onset of diabetes, say researchers at the Ohio State University Medical Center.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2009

The Trojan Horse: Sneaking Insulin into the Digestive System by Hiding It in a Vitamin

Syracuse University chemist Robert Doyle has taken out a patent on something that has long been a Holy Grail for insulin suppliers and users: a reliable way to take insulin orally instead of with a needle.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2009

An Update on Salsalate, an Aspirin-Like Drug That Lowers Blood Glucose and Fights Inflammation

We first reported on salsalate, an aspirin-like drug discovered in the nineteenth century, last October. At that time, researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston discovered that it appears to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2009

Chicago Diabetes Project Collaborates Globally to Find the Cure

Nearly every time that I mention islet transplantation in a conversation about diabetes, the person I'm with responds with a sniff that it's never going to work because of the immune suppression problem.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2009

Antioxidants Relieve Pain of Chronic Pancreatitis

For patients who suffer frequent sharp abdominal pain from chronic pancreatitis, antioxidants may offer effective pain relief, according to a study recently published in Gastroenterology, the journal of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2009

The Mind Boggles

Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, agreed to pay $1.4 billion and plead guilty to promoting its antipsychotic medication Zyprexa as a treatment for dementia when it was not approved for that use by the FDA, according to the Justice Department.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 22, 2009

Pre-Existing Drugs May Restore Sensitivity to Leptin, an Appetite Suppressing Hormone

Hearts in the medical community beat with considerable excitement at the discovery of leptin in 1994. A hormone produced by fat, leptin has a very useful talent: it tells the brain when to stop eating. So hopes were high that leptin would become the basis of an anti-obesity treatment. What could be simpler than to dose an obese person with a hormone that says, "You're not hungry any more, and you want to stop eating."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2009

Synthetic “Good” Cholesterol Has Gold At Its Core

Scientists at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, have developed a synthetic version of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" cholesterol that doctors are always nudging their patients with diabetes to monitor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2009

Obama Pledges Electronic Medical Records for Everyone Within Five Years

In a speech on January 8, 2009, President-Elect Barack Obama pledged to make all medical records electronic within five years.

comments 33 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2009

What Is Diabetes?

You've been diagnosed with diabetes because there is too much glucose (a kind of sugar) in your blood. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2009

Experts Change Their Tune About Whether People With Longstanding Diabetes Should Pursue Low Blood Sugar

One of 2008's most interesting developments was the change in one long-standing recommendation for treating diabetes in people who have had the disease for a long time: Work intensely on getting blood sugar levels as low as possible. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Nursing Home Care for People With Diabetes a Mixed Bag

As the 76-million-member Baby Boomer generation ages-its oldest members are now 63-nursing homes are bracing for an unprecedented demand for their services. Along with increased pressure from the sheer number of patients, nursing homes will also have to deal with the skyrocketing number of seniors with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Read Diabetes Health in Spanish and Dozens of Other Languages!

Now you can read Diabetes Health in over 30 languages! Look for the Google Translate button in the left-hand navigational column on any of our pages. You can translate the text on the page by clicking the language of your choice in the drop-down menu.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2009

December 2008

ADA 2009 Recommendations Reaffirm Acceptance of Low Carb Diet

Every year the American Diabetes Associations revises and updates its Clinical Practice Recommendations, a publication upon which many doctors and medical caregivers depend as a primary source of diabetes treatment information.

comments 12 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Low Carbohydrate Diets: Why You Don't Want the "Experts" to Tell You What to Eat
Low Carbohydrate Diets: Why You Don't Want the "Experts" to Tell You What to Eat

Diabetes may be described as a disease of glucose intolerance: high blood glucose is both the characteristic indicator and the cause of complications.

comments 121 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Readers Challenge Insulin Manufacturers: Help Us Avoid Near-Fatal Mistakes!
Readers Challenge Insulin Manufacturers: Help Us Avoid Near-Fatal Mistakes!

Sandy was giving her son his evening dose of NPH insulin - something she had done many times. But as she finished pushing in the plunger, she said to herself, "That shot took too long." She immediately realized that she had given Joey the wrong dose. In other words, by mistake, she had given him a potentially lethal dose of insulin.

comments 61 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?
The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?

Obesity in the United States is increasing in epidemic proportions. This is true in children as well as adults. It's estimated that the healthcare costs associated with obesity and its related complications will exceed $130 billion this year.

comments 52 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Take This Test on Insulin: You May Be Smarter Than a Doctor!
Take This Test on Insulin: You May Be Smarter Than a Doctor!

Take this test on insulin and see if you can get a higher score than hospital doctors and nurses.

comments 19 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Top 10 Patient Gripes
Top 10 Patient Gripes

Most people with diabetes will tell you this: Everything about having it is a hassle, an annoyance and sometimes utterly overwhelming. Endless worrying over meal plans, carbohydrate counting, finger-stick checks, pills, injections, lab tests, prescriptions, supplies and doctors’ appointments are nobody’s idea of fun.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Parents Of Son Who Died From Type 1 Complications Establish a Professorship in Diabetes Research
Parents Of Son Who Died From Type 1 Complications Establish a Professorship in Diabetes Research

I am always impressed when people find the strength to turn their own painful experience into a way to help others. In case you are losing faith that people are out there raising money, trying to find the Cure, and taking care of each other...read on.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 8, 2008

November 2008

Diabetes Educators are Champions
Diabetes Educators are Champions

Diabetes care creates its own culture. There is a passion that surrounds the caretakers of the diabetes community. It is the small successes that spark us to keep on until the next one. Diabetes care creates champions out of all of us. I'd like to mention just a few of the hundreds of diabetes educators I have met. 

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2008

September 2008

Don’t Forget to “Step Out” to Fight Diabetes

This fall, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is inviting people across the country  to "Step Out: Walk to Fight Diabetes" by participating in their one-day fund-raising walk, being held in more than 200 cities nationwide. The routes, which range from two to six miles, will be accessible to people of all ages and levels of mobility. All along the walk, participants will be supported by volunteers offering water, snacks, entertainment, and enthusiastic encouragement. The event draws a large contingency of individuals and teams composed of families, friends, and corporation employees, all walking and raising money in support of the ADA.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2008

Who Are These People with Diabetes? Some Interesting Stats

In its ongoing Health and Nutrition Strategist™ syndicated study, Decision Analyst recently asked 9,265 respondents about various health and lifestyle issues. Among respondents 20 and older, 9.6 percent said they had diabetes. Among all ages, about 23.6 million Americans have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

The Consumer Has Spoken: “Let Me Test in Purple.”
The Consumer Has Spoken: “Let Me Test in Purple.”

The OneTouch® UltraMini® Meter by LifeScan, Inc., is now available in Purple Twilight and Blue Comet.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

Diabetes Wholesaler Announces 2008
Diabetes Wholesaler Announces 2008 "Diabetes Educator of the Year" Contest

American Diabetes Wholesale, a discount provider of diabetic supplies to individuals without insurance, announced its second annual "Diabetes Educator of the Year Award" contest at the 2008 American Association of Diabetes Educators International Conference in Washington, D.C. American Diabetes Wholesale created the award to recognize the unsung heroes of the diabetes epidemic and to honor the dedicated healthcare professionals who are committed to helping those living with diabetes.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2008

August 2008

Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators
Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators

The members of the AADE are an impassioned group who genuinely want to make a difference in their patients' lives. It was an ideal place for me to be, especially because I had a concern of my own: Why am I getting red dots every time I inject? Every educator I asked went right to work examining the problem and investigating my behavior, truly wanting to help. Unfortunately, they are dwindling in number each year, while patients are increasing in number, making their work ever more demanding.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

FiveHumans’ T-Shirts Break the Ice of Taboo Health-Related Topics
FiveHumans’ T-Shirts Break the Ice of Taboo Health-Related Topics

My eye was caught recently by a cool company called FiveHumansTM. I was drawn in by their name and logo and then happily found that their product didn't disappoint. The company's website, FiveHumans.com, explains that Dan Grunvald and Lee Fine first dreamed up the concept of producing T-shirts with slogans and information related to a variety of diseases, which they called Disease Tees, in 2001. Their goal was to raise awareness and provide a tangible opportunity for people to support a cause near and dear to them.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

July 2008

Preventing U-100 and U-500 Insulin Mix-Ups: Pass This Information on to Your Doctor & Pharmacist
Preventing U-100 and U-500 Insulin Mix-Ups: Pass This Information on to Your Doctor & Pharmacist

The non-profit Institute for Safe Medication Practices says there has been an increase in reports about mix-ups between prescriptions of insulin U-100 and insulin U-500 (U-500 is a concentrated insulin that is five times stronger than U-100).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2008

June 2008

Robert Oringer: The Entrepreneur Who Pioneered Private-Label Diabetes Products
Robert Oringer: The Entrepreneur Who Pioneered Private-Label Diabetes Products

In the 17 years I have known Robert Oringer, I can honestly say that he has a soaring entrepreneurial spirit and a fierce independence – he is a man who is hard to harness. His mind is always ticking, excited by the next innovative idea.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2008

May 2008

Med Student with Diabetes Cautions Against Unrealistic Expectations for CGMs

Dear Editor, I am a medical student in the M.D. program at Oregon Health and Sciences University and a type 1 diabetic of almost 10 years. I use a Medtronic pump and I also use their continuous glucose monitoring system (Paradigm Real-Time).

comments 34 comments - Posted May 22, 2008

Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body?  What Do You Feel In Your Mind?
Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body? What Do You Feel In Your Mind?

A word of caution about the values used below. This study was conducted using people without diabetes.  Some people with diabetes experience symptoms at higher glucose levels than the study suggests. Other people with diabetes appear to function well with blood sugars in the 30's and 40's (mg/dl). Therefore, the values in the study should only be used as an approximation. This study also used plasma glucose levels. Your values done at home might be 20 percent lower or higher than these lab values. For example, epinephrine release in someone without diabetes would begin at about 63mg/dl with a home blood glucose meter.

comments 43 comments - Posted May 1, 2008

April 2008

A Call Out to Writers of All Kinds!
A Call Out to Writers of All Kinds!

We’d like to invite diabetes professionals, persons with diabetes (and the people who love and help them) to contribute articles to Diabetes Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

March 2008

New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life
New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life

“You need dialysis” are words nobody wants to hear. But today kidney failure doesn’t have to mean driving to and from a clinic three times a week and having a lesser quality of life. Hemodialysis (HD) can safely be done in the privacy of your home in two new ways: daily and nocturnal home HD, both of which can help you feel better and live longer.

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

Can a Tuberculosis Vaccine Reverse Type 1? Phase 1 Trial Now Underway Seeks Answer

Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston have initiated a phase 1 clinical trial to reverse type 1 diabetes.  The trial is exploring whether the promising results from the laboratory of Denise Faustman, MD, PhD, can be applied in human diabetes.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

Texas Podiatrist Draws Big Funding in His Efforts To Help People Understand the Diabetic Foot
Texas Podiatrist Draws Big Funding in His Efforts To Help People Understand the Diabetic Foot

Lawrence Lavery, DPM, podiatrist at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas, clearly understands the diabetic foot.  

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

Weekly Diabetes Health Factoids

This Week’s Diabetes Health Factoids
Number of U.S. Adults Diagnosed With Diabetes:
15.1 million

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 18, 2008

Steps You Can Take to Prevent Foot Amputation
Steps You Can Take to Prevent Foot Amputation

A Diabetes Health advisory board member offers advice on how to treat your feet well and avoid wounds and infections that could lead to amputation. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2008

The Link Between Alcohol and Blood Pressure Is Greater Than Previously Thought, Says U.K. University Study

Previous observational studies have reported that heavy alcohol intake is a risk factor for hypertension. But such studies may be confounded by factors such as diet, smoking, exercise levels and socio-economic position. Clinical trials exploring the link are difficult to implement and have limited follow-up time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2008

Infrared Light Therapy Is No Better Than a Placebo for Treating Neuropathy

Texas researchers says that an infrared light therapy that seemed to hold great promise in treating diabetic neuropathy works no better than “sham” (placebo) therapy.

comments 9 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2008

February 2008

Lilly Introduces KwikPen for Humalog and Humalog Mixtures
Lilly Introduces KwikPen for Humalog and Humalog Mixtures

Eli Lilly and Company has introduced KwikPen, a pre-filled insulin pen containing its Humalog insulin brand of insulins. The pen is the third that Lilly has introduced over the past 12 months, following in the wake of the HumaPen MEMOIR, a digital insulin pen with memory, and the HumaPen® LUXURA HD, a reusable pen for people who need insulin dosing in smaller increments.

comments 10 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2008

U.K. Study Says Older People with Diabetes Run Greater Risk of Disabilities

A British study of 800 people 65 and older concludes that people with diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to experience difficulties walking, dressing and climbing stairs.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 26, 2008

The Era of "He Said, She Said": International Study Contradicts Recent ACCORD Mortality Fears

Just after a massive U.S. study dropped its aggressive treatment of blood glucose levels because of increased deaths among type 2 patients, international researchers announced that their similar intense study of tight blood sugar control showed no increased risk of death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2008

New Journal Outlines Limb-Saving Procedure for Diabetic Foot Infections

In its first edition, the new bimonthly journal Foot & Ankle Specialist (FAS) offers a three-step treatment plan for patients with diabetic foot infections. Diabetic patients suffering from severe infections face a 25 percent risk of amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2008

African-Americans Shown to Benefit from Single Pill for Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

A Wayne State University Health Clinic study has shown that a single pill containing both a blood pressure-lowering drug and a cholesterol-lowering drug may be of particular benefit for African Americans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2008

Texas Doctor Touts Medtronic's iPro Recorder As a Breakthrough Diabetes Diagnostic Tool
Texas Doctor Touts Medtronic's iPro Recorder As a Breakthrough Diabetes Diagnostic Tool

A Texas endocrinologist who recently put the recently FDA-approved Medtronic iPro continuous glucose recorder through its paces with diabetic patients calls the tool a major step forward in doctors' ability to accurately monitor the disease.

comments 10 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2008

Blood Red Beet Juice Brings Down Blood Pressure

According to British researchers at Barts and the London School of Medicine, drinking 500 ml (about one pint) of beetroot juice every day can significantly reduce blood pressure. It's the nitrate contained in the juice that produces the effect.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2008

High Levels of "Good" Cholesterol May Be a Bad Thing

That ancient Greek advice, "moderation in all things," may apply not only to human conduct, but also to the natural world.

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2008

Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely
Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the newest continuous glucose monitoring system from diabetes management device manufacturer Medtronic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2008

Scientists Report Advances Against Diabetes at Levine Symposium in Southern California

City of Hope researchers were among the more than 50 international investigators reporting advances against type 1 diabetes at the recent Rachmiel Levine Diabetes and Obesity Symposium in Newport Beach, Calif.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2008

U.S. Suspends Study on Intense Blood Sugar Control After Increase in Deaths Among Type 2 Participants

After seeing an increase in deaths among type 2 participants, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has halted the intense blood sugar control portion of its years-long study on controlling cardiovascular risks to people with diabetes.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

Bigger Breasted Women More Vulnerable to Diabetes, Says Canadian Study

A Canadian study asserts that girls and young women with big breasts run a 68-percent greater chance of acquiring diabetes by middle age than their smaller-breasted peers.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2008

The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin
The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin

SK: We’re joined on our show by Craig Eberhard, vice president of sales at Amylin Pharmaceuticals. Hey, Craig, thanks for coming on the show. Amylin has one of the most innovative products that I’ve heard of in years. It’s called Byetta.

comments 8 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2008

January 2008

Slim Fast Scare

I just had a frightening experience. A severe hypoglycemic, I took my regular 5 units of R Humulin 30 minutes before lunch. Instead of my normal sandwich and milk at lunch, I drank a glass of Slim Fast with milk. I carefully read the label and figured out that it was almost identical to the sandwich in calories, carbs and sugars.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2008

Survey Says U.S. Healthcare System Stinks

A survey of people's experience with healthcare in seven countries - Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States - shows that we Americans don't stack up very well.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2008

Gastric Banding Reverses Impact of Type 2 Diabetes

A new world-first study by Monash University researchers has found gastric banding surgery has a profound impact on one of society's biggest health issues - diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 23, 2008

Scientists Figure Out How Alcohol Lowers Blood Sugar
Scientists Figure Out How Alcohol Lowers Blood Sugar

Swedish scientists have found that alcohol lowers blood sugar by redirecting blood within the pancreas and sending massive amounts of it to the islets.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2008

Chew on This (But Not Too Much): Sorbitol Can Cause Dangerous Weight Loss
Chew on This (But Not Too Much): Sorbitol Can Cause Dangerous Weight Loss

German doctors solved two mysterious cases of rapid - and dangerous - weight loss from diarrhea once they determined that the cause was chewing too much sugar-free gum containing the artificial sweetener sorbitol.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2008

New Jersey Law Covers Amputees' Access to Orthotics and Prosthetics

New Jersey has enacted a law guaranteeing access by amputees to comprehensive health insurance coverage for orthotic and prosthetic care. The new law mandates that health insurance plans offer coverage for orthotic and prosthetic care without caps and co-pays that restrict access to prescribed devices.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 21, 2008

Education Project Will Try to Slow Epidemic Level of Diabetes in India
Education Project Will Try to Slow Epidemic Level of Diabetes in India

Project HOPE, an international health education and humanitarian assistance organization, has launched The India Diabetes Educator Project. The four-year program will train 5,000 healthcare professionals to help counter the near epidemic level of type 2 diabetes in India.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2008

Fingers Still Crossed - Because We Still Want a Non-Invasive Meter
Fingers Still Crossed - Because We Still Want a Non-Invasive Meter

"It feels like you accidentally pricked yourself with a pin, only it's not accidental and you have to do it over and over again in the same areas."

comments 35 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2008

Insulin, Leptin, Diabetes, and Aging: Not So Strange Bedfellows

To successfully treat any disease, one must know what disease to treat. Treating only a symptom of the disease will leave the underlying disease unchecked and possibly worse. For example, we evolved the "runny" nose to help us clean out upper respiratory infections. So taking a decongestant to eradicate the symptom of a "runny" nose is actually counterproductive for the underlying disease.

comments 23 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2008

Diabetes, Depression and Death
Diabetes, Depression and Death

Startling statistics are only one reason sufferers should get help and why research into this lethal combination must continue.  On the list of deadly diseases in the United States, diabetes ranks fifth. And for so many reasons: major killers like heart attack and stroke are among a slew of diabetes' potentially lethal complications.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2008

A Spoonful of Vinegar Makes the Glucose Go Down
A Spoonful of Vinegar Makes the Glucose Go Down

Here's a sour little bit of good news for type 2s: taking two tablespoons of vinegar at bedtime can lower fasting glucose levels the next morning by as much as 6 percent.

comments 19 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2008

Stress and Staying Alive
Stress and Staying Alive

You and everybody else alive encounter stress, daily, hourly and minute by minute. As unavoidable, inscrutable, and sometimes as aggressive as the IRS, stress is part of the human condition. It is not just a sense of being tense but is any event that causes a complex physiologic response called the "stress response."

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2008

C-peptide Emerging as Significant Factor in Nerve Recovery

Because scientists often tend to dismiss what they don't fully understand, many of them used to think that C-peptide had no physiological function. But while it's true that C-peptide does nothing to lower blood sugar, recent research is finding that it might have a role in preventing diabetes complications.

comments 19 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2008

December 2007

Pig Pancreas Cells Seem to Thrive in Diabetic Monkeys

Awhile back, three macaque monkeys with type 1 diabetes received transplants of 19 pig pancreas primordia, each one smaller than the period at the end of this sentence.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2007

Bayer Recalls Test Strips After False Readings

Bayer Diabetes Care has recalled 230,000 bottles of Contour TS test strips after finding that the strips resulted in blood glucose readings 5 to 17 percent higher than actual levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2007

Sugar May Stick More Easily to Hemoglobin in Minorities

There's now plenty of evidence that U.S. ethnic minority groups tend to have higher A1c levels than whites. (Your A1c is the percentage of your hemoglobin cells that are glycated - have sugar stuck to them. The higher your blood sugars are, the more sugar sticks to your hemoglobin over time, and the higher your A1c is.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 24, 2007

Dutch Find Self-Management Course Helps Type 2 Control

Adults with type 2 diabetes who follow individually tailored self-management programs are better able to lower their blood pressure and weight and maintain them over time than adult diabetes patients who don't, say Dutch researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2007

Interesting Insulin Facts
Interesting Insulin Facts

The name insulin comes from the Latin insula, for islands. It refers to the pancreatic islets of Langerhans that contain the beta cells.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2007

Owen Mumford Aims to Delight

"Delight" is a word rarely found in company mission statements, but it's part of Owen Mumford's rather sweet and very British declaration - the company aims to "delight its customers" with its products, keeping in mind that they just might "change the life of our nearest and dearest."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 19, 2007

Gumming Up the Insulin Factory In Type 2 Diabetes

In healthy people, beta cells are like tiny factories that churn out insulin. Proinsulin, which is the raw material for finished insulin, is produced in the endoplasmic reticulum deep within the beta cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2007

Red Wine Ingredient Ups Insulin Sensitivity
Red Wine Ingredient Ups Insulin Sensitivity

Low doses of resveratrol, an ingredient found in red wine, make insulin-resistant mice more sensitive to insulin. Don't try this at home, however, because you'd have to drink almost a gallon of wine every day to get the same effect.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2007

Conversation Maps Generate Healthy Conversation about Diabetes
Conversation Maps Generate Healthy Conversation about Diabetes

Conversation Maps look like a set of very large and colorful children's placemats. Three feet wide and five feet long, each map is covered with a kids-book-style landscape painting illustrating one of five topics:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2007

Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change
Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change

To conclude our pump survey, we asked you how you'd like to see pumping improved. As usual, you came up with a plethora of intriguing suggestions, although some were a bit more visionary than others: One reader said, "I wish someone would invent a device that could be waved over a meal, and it would display the number of carbs in the meal."

comments 43 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2007

How Can We Stop the CRISIS in Diabetes Education? Tell Us How!
How Can We Stop the CRISIS in Diabetes Education? Tell Us How!

We’d like to call your attention to the superb investigative article in our Dec/Jan 2008 Professional issue, "The Crisis in Diabetes Education" by writer Amy Tenderich. Amy covers the many pressing problems in contemporary diabetes education, not the least of which is the difficult process encountered by new professionals in obtaining their CDE credential.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2007

The Diabetes Epidemic: What's Changing And What Needs To Change
The Diabetes Epidemic: What's Changing And What Needs To Change

I love that old Greek proverb, "There is nothing permanent but change," because it's so perfectly applicable to diabetes. It seems that almost every day now we're finding more causes, more treatments, and, inevitably, more problems with new treatments.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2007

Hooray! Now We Have Billing Codes for Continuous Monitors

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved new Healthcare Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS, known as "hickpicks") codes for continuous glucose monitoring.

comments 8 comments - Posted Dec 12, 2007

David Kliff: An Outspoken Advocate for People With Diabetes
David Kliff: An Outspoken Advocate for People With Diabetes

I have to admit that the first time I met David Kliff, I didn't know what to make of his forthright manner. He immediately told me exactly what was on his mind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2007

GSK-3: The Less the Better

Scientists have been having fun again making themselves specially engineered mice. This time they knocked the gene that makes glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) right out of their ever-accommodating mice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2007

Why the Ethnic Disparity in A1c's?
Why the Ethnic Disparity in A1c's?

Hispanics and African Americans have higher A1c's than whites. That disparity contributes to the unfortunate fact that in the U.S., approximately ten percent of racial differences in mortality have been attributed to diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2007

Inflammatory Cytokines Carry Message of Future Type 2 Diabetes

Messenger molecules are the letter carriers of your body's postal system. You are probably already familiar with hormones, which are messenger molecules that travel about your bloodstream carrying letters from your organs. Neurotransmitters deliver mail on another route: they transmit messages between your nerves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2007

It's Not a Bad Thing to Be Double Blind

You often hear studies described as randomized, double blind, and crossover. That's supposed to be a good thing, but what exactly does it mean?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2007

Diabetes Is Not A Disease Of Blood Sugar

Diabetes is not a disease of blood sugar. It is a disease of insulin and, perhaps more importantly, leptin signaling. Until that truth is accepted, we will continue to see epidemic growth in type 2 diabetes and obesity, growth that underscores the inadequacy of current conventional medical treatment and the falsity of prevailing nutritional advice.

comments 27 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2007

New Enzyme Blocks Pancreatic Insulin Production

Scientists from Sydney, Australia, recently identified and mapped the structure of an enzyme that cuts down insulin production in diabetes. Called protein kinase C epsilon (PKCe), it is regulated by fat. For that reason, it may be the missing link that relates obesity to type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 2, 2007

November 2007

Why Smaller Shots of Insulin Get Absorbed Faster, Peak Sooner, and Are Out of Your System Quicker

For my contribution this month, I wanted to share an important lesson I learned about twenty years ago from Peggy Wong at the UCSF Diabetes Teaching Center. It concerns how long insulin lasts after you push down that plunger and create a "depot" of insulin under your skin.

comments 12 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2007

Is Alzheimer's a Form of Diabetes?

Insulin resistance specifically in the brain is being proposed as the reason for the memory loss that characterizes Alzheimer's disease. Because Alzheimer's may be caused by insulin-related dysfunction, some scientists are calling Alzheimer's by a new name: type 3 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2007

Novo Touts Levemir as a 24-Hour Insulin

Novo Nordisk's Levemir, which came out about five years after sanofi-aventis's Lantus, constitutes about twenty percent of the long-acting basal insulin sold worldwide. Lantus, the only other long-acting insulin analogue, makes up the other eighty percent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2007

Our 5th Annual Product Reference Guide
Our 5th Annual Product Reference Guide

Over the course of the year, we meticulously update all our charts to bring you the most accurate information about hundreds of products, services, and medications. Now we've gathered every one of those charts, from humble lancets to sophisticated continuous glucose monitors, into one handy place.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 26, 2007

Study Explains Why I'm Fat and You're Not: Over-Eating Linked to Low Dopamine

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter; that is, a molecule that carries messages between neurons in your brain. It's a feel-good neurotransmitter that makes you think "I want that! I'm going to get it! And wow, that was great!"

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2007

Most Diabetes Clinical Trials Ignore Everything But Blood Sugar Control

Most diabetes drug trials focus strictly on the medication's effect on blood sugar levels, but ignore that medication's impact on other outcomes that are important to patients, such as quality of life and the risk of complications.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2007

Mice Cured of Type 1 Diabetes: But Will It Work in Humans?

A study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has found that to restore normal glucose levels in type 1 diabetic mice, it's not enough to halt the destruction of their beta cells. You also have to reverse the muscle and fat inflammation that prevents insulin from transferring glucose into those tissues.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 22, 2007

Our Healthcare System:  Too Broke to Fix?
Our Healthcare System: Too Broke to Fix?

According to a May 2007 CNN opinion poll, 64 percent of us think that our government should provide a national health insurance program for all Americans, even if it would require higher taxes. So what's in the works?

comments 15 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2007

Tethys Bioscience's New Way to Predict Type 2 Diabetes

Many tests try (and many fail) to accurately predict whether a person will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. But they often test for single conditions, like impaired glucose tolerance, that don't appear until the road to diabetes is already well begun.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2007

Januvia Okayed for Use With Sulfonylureas

Januvia, also known as sitagliptin phosphate, is a DPP-IV inhibitor. It prevents, or inhibits, DPP-IV from inactivating GLP-1. GLP-1 is a naturally produced hormone that increases insulin secretion in response to food.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 20, 2007

Insulin on the Brain Makes For A Shorter Life?

Fact One: Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is a protein that sits on cell surfaces; its job is to allow those cells to respond to insulin.
Fact Two:
Starved mice, which have low blood levels of insulin and heightened insulin sensitivity, live longer than well-fed mice.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2007

The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It
The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It

Diabetes educators are no less than a lifeline for patients, providing vital insights into the self-care behaviors that keep diabetes in check: managing blood sugar, dosing medications and insulin, exercising, and understanding all the numbers involved.

comments 30 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2007

November 14 is Diabetes Day. Wouldn't it be nice not to need one?

As you may know, November is Diabetes Month and today is Diabetes Day, at least in New York City. The day kicks off in front of the United Nations, and even the Empire State Building will be bathed in blue light, the official diabetes color, to honor the occasion. As much as I love it that we now have our own month and day, I'm thinking: wouldn't it be nicer if we didn't need one?

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2007

Company Reports that Pig Cells are Producing Insulin in Two People

Living Cells Technologies (LCT) has announced that their Moscow trial of pig cell implantation, which began in June, is well underway: In September, the second of six type 1 patients was injected with 5,000 "islet equivalents per kilogram" of Diabecells into the peritoneal cavity.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2007

Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults
Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults

A study of 2543 obese Mayo Clinic patients has revealed that only 505 of them were formally diagnosed as obese. If they were diagnosed, it was more likely to be done by a resident than by a staff physician.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2007

Sitagliptin and Metformin a Useful Combo For Type 2s

A recent study has found that the combination of metformin and sitagliptin lowers A1c's better than either drug alone, apparently because their different mechanisms work together synergistically.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2007

Leptin: Could It Be The Connection Between Obesity and Diabetes?

The word leptin comes from the Greek word leptos, meaning thin. A hormone produced by fat cells, it binds to a spot in the brain known as the satiety center, thereby announcing to the brain that the body has had enough to eat, that plenty of energy is stored in the fat, and that there is no need to eat any more right now. In short, its effect on the brain is to reduce appetite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2007

Managing Your Diabetes During a Natural Disaster
Managing Your Diabetes During a Natural Disaster

Floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, and fires strike fast, creating challenges that can be especially difficult for people with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2007

New Antibody Predicts Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers have discovered a fourth antibody, ZnT8, that helps predict who will get type 1 diabetes later in life. By using the three previously known antibodies, scientists already could predict disease with ninety percent accuracy. By adding this fourth antibody, the prediction rate rises to 98 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 8, 2007

Is It Really Diabetes If You Don't Have Complications?

I have been injecting insulin into my body since 1963, after an infection with a coxsackie virus (mumps) when I was nine years old. Admittedly, I am insulin-dependent. On the other hand, everyone is insulin-dependent. I just need to inject someone else's insulin (insulin from E.coli in my case).

comments 21 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2007

What's a Glucose Clamp, Anyway?

In research reports, they're always talking about glucose clamps. Two types of clamps are quite commonly used, but they have nothing to do with the common definition of the word clamp. Instead, they are used to measure either how well you metabolize glucose or how sensitive you are to insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2007

High Blood Pressure Triples Likelihood of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers recently followed 38,000 healthy women for ten years to learn if their initial blood pressure influenced whether they developed type 2 diabetes later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2007

Americans Fattening Faster Than Ever, Especially In the South
Americans Fattening Faster Than Ever, Especially In the South

The research group Trust for America's Health has released its fourth annual report card on the state of obesity in the states of America, and the country got a big fat F.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2007

Warning About Byetta and Pancreatitis

The FDA has received thirty reports of acute pancreatitis (rapid-onset inflammation of the pancreas) in type 2 patients taking Byetta. Twenty-seven of the thirty patients had one or more risk factors for acute pancreatitis, such as gallstones or alcohol use.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 5, 2007

You Can Only Resist So Much Temptation: Study Shows That Self Control Can Get Depleted
You Can Only Resist So Much Temptation: Study Shows That Self Control Can Get Depleted

According to recent research, we have a finite amount of temptation-resisting resources. If we use up all our self-control resisting one temptation, we don't have any left to use against another temptation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 4, 2007

A Time For Reflection: National Diabetes Month and International Diabetes Day
A Time For Reflection: National Diabetes Month and International Diabetes Day

Nearly 21 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, and another 54 million people are knocking at that door. Diabetes is the fifth deadliest disease in the nation and may well be the most serious health problem facing America today. Nevertheless, the public doesn't seem to grasp the gravity of the situation, at least not like they did with polio, for instance, or AIDS.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2007

October 2007

More Technology Patients Won't Use
More Technology Patients Won't Use

This morning, a major meter manufacturer announced that its blood glucose meters will now operate on Microsoft's HealthVault. HealthVault is an online service that allows a patient to store and manage his health records without paying a fee.

comments 32 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2007

Exubera Blows It
Exubera Blows It

Exubera, the inhalable insulin, has been, to speak bluntly, a real bomb. Pretty much the entire diabetic population can say with honesty that they never inhaled.

comments 8 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2007

Black Box Warning For Actos and Avandia

The FDA has spoken: the heart risk warnings on labels of Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone) will now be surrounded by an emphatic black outline known as a black box. Black boxes will also be added to the warnings on Avandaryl (rosiglitazone and glimepiride), Avandamet (rosiglitazone and metformin), and Duetact (pioglitazone and glimepiride).

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2007

The Third World Kidney Day: Looking Back and Thinking Forward
The Third World Kidney Day: Looking Back and Thinking Forward

March 13, 2008, heralds the third annual World Kidney Day - an event that will be celebrated in more than 60 countries. We take this opportunity to recount how this concept has gained worldwide traction and momentum and to reflect on the challenges faced by its creators and supporters.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 29, 2007

Infectobesity: Catching Obesity From A Virus

Human adenovirus-36 (AD-36) is an unwelcome visitor already because it causes colds, infections like pink-eye, and small intestine inflammation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2007

Two Compounds Supported by JDRF Donations Sell to Lilly and Glaxo for Staggering Sums of Money

On January 6, 2007, the JDRF announced that it was giving $2 million to MacroGenics, a private biotechnology company, to fund a phase II/III clinical trial of teplizumab, a compound owned by MacroGenics. Teplizumab is an antibody engineered to disarm immune T cells once they're set to destroy islets, so it may preserve beta cell function in newly diagnosed diabetic patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2007

Stevia and the Food and Drug Administration: A Tangled Tale

Stevia is a natural sweetener made from the leaves of a South American herb, Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, commonly known as sweetleaf or sugarleaf.

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2007

One More Time: Research Shows that Poverty and Type 2 Diabetes Are Bedfellows

More data linking poverty and type 2 diabetes is out, this time from the national Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2007

It's Not Your Imagination: Diabetes and Depression Are A Disabling Duo

Depression, according to new research just published in The Lancet, is more damaging to your everyday wellbeing than chronic diabetes, angina, asthma, or arthritis. But the most disabling of all is the combination of depression and diabetes: If you have both, you are living at the equivalent of only sixty percent of full health.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2007

A Sweet Tooth in Your Intestine?
A Sweet Tooth in Your Intestine?

Taste buds have little receptors to sense the lovely taste of sugar, but now scientists have found that tasting sweets doesn't end with your tongue.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2007

The Burden of Self-Care is a Heavy Burden Indeed

Recently, researchers from the University of Chicago interviewed 701 adults with diabetes in order to quantify and rank their feelings about diabetes-related complications and about the self-care necessary to avoid those complications.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2007

Is the Glycemic Index Really Reliable?

When calculating glycemic index (GI) values, glucose is arbitrarily given the highest GI value: 100. To assign a GI value to another type of carb, a complex process is used to compare the blood sugar response elicited by the test carb to the blood sugar response provoked by glucose.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research
A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research

The take-home message from the Tufts study is that the GI value of white bread is 70. That's nothing new: The same value has been found in dozens of other studies around the world (1).

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

Why Some Obese People Don't Get Type 2 and Some Lean People Do

Whether or not you get fat is not the critical factor in developing type 2 diabetes, according to a recent mouse study by Texas researchers; instead, it's where that fat is packed away.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 16, 2007

Cancer Med In Trial Against Type 1 Diabetes

First a little background: T cells are white blood cells that attack and eat infected cells or tumor cells. They're told what to attack by other white blood cells called B cells. The B cells "introduce" the T cells to their targets by presenting little pieces of target cells, called antigens, to the T cells. Once the T cells have been properly introduced and know what to target, they can do their deadly work.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2007

Risk of an Obese Child Rises With Mother's Glucose Levels During Pregnancy

The higher your blood glucose is during pregnancy, the greater your child's chances of growing up to be obese, according to a recent study published in Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2007

Two Nurses Pack Diabetes Gift Baskets

Suppose someone you know has been diagnosed with diabetes and you'd like to do something, but you don't know what to do. You might consider giving them a Diabetes Gift Basket, packed with 1001 Tips for Diabetics, special foot lotion, diabetic socks, a Reiki health candle, sugar-free candy, and a diabetic cookbook.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2007

Australian Diabetes Care Is Buried in Paperwork
Australian Diabetes Care Is Buried in Paperwork

Three million Australians have diabetes, and the disease costs Australia more than three billion dollars a year. In contrast, Australian general practitioners are paid only forty dollars to manage a diabetes patient for a full year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2007

A Bit of Exercise, But a Lot of Benefit
A Bit of Exercise, But a Lot of Benefit

There's been a plethora of research lately documenting the health benefits of any sort of exercise, no matter how modest. The most recent documents a twelve-week study of 106 sedentary middle-aged folks who were assigned to one of three regimens: walking thirty minutes three days a week; walking thirty minutes five days a week; or doing nothing at all.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2007

Symlin Promising as Weight Loss Drug
Symlin Promising as Weight Loss Drug

Symlin, or pramlintide, is synthetic amylin, a natural hormone that slows stomach emptying and leads to a feeling of fullness. Currently Symlin is used to dampen blood sugar rises in people with diabetes, but it's showing potential as a weight loss drug as well, according to a recent study.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 12, 2007

Actos and Avandia Cost Plenty

According to Greek researchers, Actos and Avandia were behind a tripling of the cost of medicines used to treat Athenians with type 2 diabetes over the past eight years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2007

Micronutrient Supplementation May Ease Neuropathic Pain
Micronutrient Supplementation May Ease Neuropathic Pain

Our diet has changed a great deal since our days as hunter-gatherers on the African plains. Not only do we eat more carbs and fats, but we may also be getting far fewer of the micronutrients that were abundant in the primitive diet.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2007

September 2007

Have Type 2 Diabetes? You're Likely to Have Sleep Apnea Too
Have Type 2 Diabetes? You're Likely to Have Sleep Apnea Too

In obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the upper airway narrows or collapses during sleep, cutting off breathing. People with OSA may be aroused hundreds of times each night, just enough to start breathing again.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2007

A1c Closer to Becoming ADAG

In August, a number of august organizations agreed to report the A1c in a new way, as a number called an A1c-derived average glucose, or ADAG.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2007

An Oxygen Sandwich Helps Pancreatic Stem Cells Become Beta Cells
An Oxygen Sandwich Helps Pancreatic Stem Cells Become Beta Cells

Despite their best efforts, researchers have been having a hard time getting pancreatic stem cells to grow up into beta cells that can be used for transplantation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2007

The International Diabetes Federation Announces Post-Meal Glucose Target

Until now, there were only two blood sugar numbers you had to worry about: your A1c and your fasting glucose level. The first, according to IDF guidelines, should be 6.5% or below, and the second 100 mg/dl or below.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2007

A Heart Full of Fat Precedes Type 2 Diabetes

Studies of rats, those ever-useful creatures, have already shown that a fatty heart accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the heart fat produces toxins that cause heart cell death and then heart failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2007

What's Afoot in Creams and Lotions, Salves and Potions
What's Afoot in Creams and Lotions, Salves and Potions

For people without diabetes, fancy skin cream is often a sheer indulgence. For people with diabetes, however, it's a far more serious matter.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2007

If You're Rich, You're Probably Thin: Low Property Values Predict Obesity

Your zip code can predict whether your zippers zip, according to a Seattle study that analyzed neighborhood property values by zip code. After examining data from over 8,000 people, researchers from the University of Washington found that for every $100,000 drop in average home prices, obesity rates rose by two percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2007

Three Inflammatory Compounds Predict Type 2 Diabetes

In a recent study out of the University of California at Los Angeles, high blood levels of three cytokines, or messenger proteins, were found to be early markers that predicted the development of type 2 diabetes six years down the road.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2007

Diabetes Related to Hip Fracture

A review of sixteen studies, examining 836,941 people who sustained a total of 139,531 hip fractures, has found that diabetes, especially type 1, makes you more likely to break your hip.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2007

Calling All Diabetic Exercisers: Help Write a Book

Sheri Colberg, PhD, is writing the 2nd edition of her book, The Diabetic Athlete. Updated throughout, it will cover the use of the newest insulins, new medications like Symlin and Byetta, and all the latest devices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2007

Research, Rivalry, and Investing in the Cure
Research, Rivalry, and Investing in the Cure

Since the 1950s, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded almost all diabetes research worldwide. From its headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland, the NIH oversees a $28 billion annual medical research budget. More than $1 billion of those taxpayer dollars go specifically toward diabetes research. Still, a cure remains frustratingly elusive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2007

Spend Seven Minutes to Improve Driving Safety
Spend Seven Minutes to Improve Driving Safety

Researchers from the University of Virginia, with funding from the National Institutes of Health, are conducting a study on driving safety with regard to people with type 1 diabetes, and they need your help.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2007

A Single Gene Controls Whether We Get Fat

What do we have in common with worms, flies, and mice? All of us, even flies, get fat. And we all share an ancient gene, aptly named Adipose, which apparently controls whether or not we do get fat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2007

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Major Advance in Blood Sugar Control
Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Major Advance in Blood Sugar Control

Life in the trenches with type 1 diabetes is challenging. Unpredictable blood sugars can leave a person with diabetes (PWD) feeling frustrated and helpless. The acute toxic effects of abnormal blood sugars also contribute to depression, anxiety, irritability, and food cravings.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2007

Lower A1c Means Lower Risk of Heart Surgery Complications

In the August 2007 edition of The Lancet, Argentinian researcher Dr. Diego Lowenstein reported that the higher your A1c, the higher your risk of major complications after heart bypass surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2007

Diabetes Educator of the Year Contest:  Enter Now!
Diabetes Educator of the Year Contest: Enter Now!

Do you know an extraordinarily dedicated CDE, nurse, physician, or other diabetes healthcare professional? Nominate him or her for the first annual "Diabetes Educator of the Year" contest.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 4, 2007

Mitochondrial DNA Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

Every one of us has two kinds of DNA. Standard DNA is housed in each cell nucleus and is inherited from both parents. Mitochondria, the little cellular power plants found in every cell, have their own independent set of DNA that is inherited from your mother only.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2007

Heart Attack Ups Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Heart Attack Ups Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A study published in the August 2007 Lancet examined 8291 Italians who'd recently had a heart attack. Three years later, a full third of them had developed either type 2 diabetes or impaired fasting glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2007

August 2007

Retasure:  Now Your General Practitioner Can Look Deep Into Your Eyes
Retasure: Now Your General Practitioner Can Look Deep Into Your Eyes

Diabetic retinopathy, a condition in which bleeding inside the eye causes damage to the retina, is the leading cause of blindness among working age adults. Early treatment is key to keeping you from that dark path.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2007

Taste Cues May Be Distorted By Diet Foods

Researchers from Alberta have found that when they fed baby rats diet foods and drinks, the little rats' ability to assess how much energy is in foods was thrown out of whack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2007

Save A Few Billion: Buy Generic Drugs

Americans spend 275 billion dollars on prescription medicines every single year, sixty percent of it on generics. But in the next five years, the twenty-year patents are going to expire on enough brand-name medicines to account for about 60 billion dollars of that total. And the generics that spring up to replace those drugs will be thirty to eighty percent cheaper.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2007

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People with Diabetes
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People with Diabetes

Dr. Stephen Covey is a mesmerizing lifestyle guru who has revolutionized business management with his seven principles of living life effectively. When his wife was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was shocked to learn that four out of five people don't know how to manage their diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2007

Avandia Avalanche Continues
Avandia Avalanche Continues

MedPage Today, a medical news service for physicians, has published the results of a reader poll about Avandia attitudes. Only nine percent of respondents said they would continue prescribing it without reservations, and one in four said it should be taken off the market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 23, 2007

Diabetes Health TV Is Off and Running: Three New Live Shows Coming Right Up
Diabetes Health TV Is Off and Running: Three New Live Shows Coming Right Up

You may as well get into the habit of tuning in to Diabetes Health TV at noon Pacific time, because we're rolling out new shows at a rapid clip.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2007

Low Carb Diet Alters Hormone Levels to Fight Metabolic Syndrome
Low Carb Diet Alters Hormone Levels to Fight Metabolic Syndrome

Recently, four men and sixteen women with metabolic syndrome, weighing an average of 200 pounds, were put on the low carb South Beach diet for three months.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 17, 2007

It's Time to Tune In!
It's Time to Tune In!

Friday at 12:00 noon Pacific time, Diabetes Health's flagship TV show, Diabetes Live, is coming to you live on our website at DiabetesHealth.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2007

Hemochromatosis and Bronze Diabetes: Caused By Iron Overload

Hemochromatosis is the most common single gene disease in the United States, more common than cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease, and muscular dystrophy combined.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2007

If You're Hospitalized for Trauma and You Have Diabetes - Watch Out!
If You're Hospitalized for Trauma and You Have Diabetes - Watch Out!

Studies have already shown that people with diabetes do worse than non-diabetics after being hospitalized for stroke, heart attack, and heart surgery. Now researchers have found that they do worse after being hospitalized for trauma (a physical injury) as well.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2007

Another Type 1 Diabetes Gene Found

Another gene implicated in type 1 diabetes has been discovered, called KIAA0350. When added to the four genes already known, it brings us one step closer to finding all fifteen or more gene mutations that may interact with each other to cause type 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2007

A New Kind of Diabetes Drug

Both Bristol-Myers Squibb and GlaxoSmithKline are developing new drugs that block the re-absorption of excess glucose by the kidneys, allowing it to be excreted by the body instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2007

What Were They Thinking?  How Doctors Choose Your Type 2 Medicine
What Were They Thinking? How Doctors Choose Your Type 2 Medicine

It's a complex mental process that your doctors go through when they choose your medicines, according to a recent survey of several hundred physicians.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2007

The Latest About Avandia and Actos

On July 30, 2007, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel voted 22 to 1 to keep Avandia on the market, right after agreeing by a vote of 20 to 3 that Avandia does increase heart risks. Now the FDA will decide what kind of warning should appear on the Actos and Avandia labels. It has already called for a black box warning, the sternest possible, on Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2007

July 2007

Statins and Fibrates Help Stop Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy (limb nerve damage) eventually afflicts fifty percent of people with diabetes; worse still, it leads to an amputation every fifty seconds world-wide. At the moment, nothing is approved in the U.S. to treat peripheral neuropathy, only to alleviate the pain that it causes. That might change soon, however.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2007

Making Mice Fat or Thin with an Injection
Making Mice Fat or Thin with an Injection

Stressed mice get fat, according to a study out of Georgetown University Medical Center. And now they know the mechanism that does it; in fact, they can manipulate that mechanism to make the mice fat, or they can block the mechanism and keep the mice from getting fat no matter how stressed they may be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2007

Good News For Once: Americans Are Managing Diabetes Better

In 2001, just over a third of Americans had their diabetes well controlled, based upon an A1c of seven percent or lower. In 2006, however, more than half of them had their diabetes well controlled. These are the results of a study of nearly 5 million patients performed from 2001 to 2007 by Quest Diagnostics Inc. and analyzed by Dr. Francine Kaufman of the University of Southern California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2007

More Evidence Linking Insulin Resistance to Alzheimer's Disease

Diabetes and pre-diabetes are associated with a seventy-five percent increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. Research has already shown that insulin resistance, with its accompanying high levels of circulating insulin, increases brain and spinal cord inflammation markers and neurotoxic peptides (molecules that cause brain and nervous system damage), just like early Alzheimer's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2007

Lilly, IDF and ADA announce U.S. launch of
Lilly, IDF and ADA announce U.S. launch of "Inspired by Diabetes" Creative Expression Competition

Chicago - Eli Lilly and Company, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) today announced the U.S. launch of the Inspired by Diabetes Creative Expression Competition, a global and national contest asking people with diabetes, as well as their family and friends, to express how diabetes has had an impact on their lives - and share those stories with others around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2007

This Month's Charts: Fast-Acting Glucose, Syringes, Pen Needles and Lancing Devices
This Month's Charts: Fast-Acting Glucose, Syringes, Pen Needles and Lancing Devices

This issue, we lay out the many devices with which diabetic people must poke themselves: syringes, pen needles, and lancing devices. And we top them off with a sprinkling of sugar: a chart outlining all the sources of fast-acting glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2007

Preventing Blindness in Diabetic Patients Is Goal of Cutting-Edge Eye Exams at UVa

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA, July 24, 2007 - Although they have a greater than average risk of developing retinal problems and blindness, many people with diabetes never visit their eye doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2007

Students Invent a Protective Pouch to Hold Transplanted Beta Cells

A team of five seniors and two freshmen at Johns Hopkins University has devised a little "pouch" to hold microcapsules of beta cells in the portal vein, from which the cells can send out insulin while safely protected inside. It's made by sandwiching a porous cylinder of nylon mesh between two cylindrical metal stents, similar to the ones that are used to keep clogged blood vessels open.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2007

New $500 Mail-In DNA Test Reveals Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
New $500 Mail-In DNA Test Reveals Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

The average person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes is about seven percent. Now an Icelandic biotech company has developed the deCODE T2™ test, an assessment that tells you if your risk is double that.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2007

Do You Know a Diabetes Hero?
Do You Know a Diabetes Hero?

We are seeking stories of people who are diabetes heroes. You know them: they've struggled against adversity and overcome it with grace. They've gone above and beyond to help others, or they're simply an inspiration to everyone they meet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2007

If You've Exposed Your Paradigm Pump to an MRI, You Need to Read This

If your Paradigm pump has been not been exposed to powerful magnetic fields, such as those found near MRI machines, you have nothing to worry about. Go about your merry way and keep up the good work. In the unlikely event that such exposure has occurred, however, you need to be aware that it may cause the pump's motor to malfunction and significantly over-deliver insulin, causing severe hypoglycemia.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2007

A Reaction to Aspartame?

An article in New Zealand's Dominion Post has reported that a young woman in Wellington, New Zealand, was nearly poisoned to death by the aspartame in her chewing gum.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2007

Diabetes Death Rates Drop, But Not For Women

Apparently death doesn't have a glass ceiling. After examining data from 20,000 people who were followed from the seventies through the nineties as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, researchers have found that diabetic men are dying less, but diabetic women aren't.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2007

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 122 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2007

Nurses Identify Barriers to Diabetes Self-Care and Strategies to Overcome Them

Nearly four billion dollars: That's how much it cost for a single year (2001) of diabetes-related inpatient care. Two-thirds of that was for preventable conditions. Why that prevention isn't happening was the topic of a recent symposium on the "State of the Science on Nursing Best Practices for Diabetes Self-Management," sponsored in Philadelphia by the American Journal of Nursing (AJN).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2007

Low Carb Hormone Discovered in Mice

The low carb diet definitely has its party faithful, but how exactly does the low carb diet cause your body to burn fat? Earlier studies have shown that feeding rodents a low carb, high fat diet caused fat usage and weight loss, but the mechanism of the process wasn't known.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 14, 2007

Amid Accusatory Debate, FDA Puts Black Box Warning on Avandia and Actos

In a congressional hearing on June 13, 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revealed that it has called for a black box warning, the sternest possible, on both Actos and Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2007

Gestational Diabetes Definition Soon to Change

How elevated does your blood sugar have to be before you're diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Not near as elevated as we used to think, according to the findings of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2007

June 2007

The World's Tiniest Surgeons: Maggots Are All Over Foot Ulcers
The World's Tiniest Surgeons: Maggots Are All Over Foot Ulcers

In days of yore, along about the time when bloodletting was considered a legitimate cure, maggots were a popular tool in the surgeon's black bag. In the Civil War, doctors employed busy maggots to clean rotten tissue from wounds that might otherwise have led to amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2007

GLUTs and Glucose: Two More Pieces Found in the Insulin Resistance Puzzle

In the complex process that moves glucose from your blood across cell membranes into your cells, the glucose transporters called GLUTs are primary players. They hand off glucose from one side of a cell membrane to the other by exposing a glucose-binding site toward the outside of the cell.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2007

Presenting PRESENT Diabetes: An Online Clinical Diabetes Conference Debuts on the Web
Presenting PRESENT Diabetes: An Online Clinical Diabetes Conference Debuts on the Web

The world's first online clinical conference for diabetes treatment, research, and education has opened for business. On this new site, which is free, health care professionals and diabetes advocates around the globe may "attend" virtual lectures, network with colleagues, and discuss cases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2007

Pay a Little, Save a Lot: Improving Diabetes Care Proves a Sound Investment
Pay a Little, Save a Lot: Improving Diabetes Care Proves a Sound Investment

A University of Chicago research team reports that spending less than $500 per patient to improve care could reduce patients' risk of diabetes complications, including blindness, kidney failure, and coronary artery disease, which can cost $44,000 per patient annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2007

A Year of Anti-Clotting Medicine Reduces Stenting Risk in People
A Year of Anti-Clotting Medicine Reduces Stenting Risk in People

Patients with diabetes are less likely to have a heart attack or die if they stay on anti-clotting medication for a full year after a stenting procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2007

Diabetes Drug Spending Slated to Balloon 70 Percent
Diabetes Drug Spending Slated to Balloon 70 Percent

Medco, a pharmacy benefit managing company, has released its 2007 Drug Trend Report, and diabetes drugs are big news. The report projects that between 2007 and 2009, there could be a near 70 percent increase in spending on endocrine and diabetes drugs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2007

Drug Company Funding of Drug Trials Greatly Influences Outcome

University of California, San Francisco - In head-to-head trials of two drugs, the one deemed better appears to depend largely on who is funding the study, according to an analysis of nearly 200 statin-drug comparisons carried out between 1999 and 2005.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2007

Type 2 Diabetes Associated With Increased Parkinson's Risk

If you've got type 2 diabetes, you're eighty-three percent more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than people without diabetes. This somber finding by Finnish researchers, published in Diabetes Care, was derived from a study of more than 50,000 Finns over 18 years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2007

May 2007

Updated: Analysis Associates Avandia With Greater Risk of Heart Attack

Analysis of several recent studies indicates that Avandia (rosiglitazone), a type 2 diabetes medication that's been taken by more than six million people worldwide, is associated with a 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and with a borderline-significant increased risk of heart attack-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2007

Misreading Avandia

The recent ruckus over the drug rosiglitazone (Avandia) has been portrayed as another case of Big Pharma foisting a dangerous drug on the public while the overworked FDA can't keep up.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2007

ACP Unveils Internist Tools for Clinical Practice: Patient Workbook, Physician Guide, and Web Site Engage Physicians and Patients
ACP Unveils Internist Tools for Clinical Practice: Patient Workbook, Physician Guide, and Web Site Engage Physicians and Patients

PHILADELPHIA, April 19, 2007 - Eat right. Exercise. Monitor blood sugar. Take medication regularly. This is the advice physicians give the more than 20 million Americans affected with diabetes. Yet implementation of these recommendations is often far from ideal, putting patients at greater risk for damage to the heart, kidneys, eyes, and feet.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 3, 2007

April 2007

Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.
Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.

If food groups were sporting leagues, carbs would be the NFL. You've got your low carb teams, your high carb vegan teams, and your middling carb teams—and each team believes that truth is on its side.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat
Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat

Carbs and carbs alone, not fat, increase body weight. It doesn't matter whether the carbs are from sugar, bread, fruit, or vegetables: They’re all rapidly digested and quickly converted to blood glucose.  A short time after a carb-rich meal, the glucose in your bloodstream rises rapidly, and your pancreas produces a large amount of insulin to take the excess glucose out.

comments 26 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Vegan Diet is Best
Why the Vegan Diet is Best

Remember the big picture: Populations that stick to traditional high-carbohydrate diets (for example, Asian rice-based diets) typically have low rates of obesity and diabetes. When they abandon traditional rice-based diets in favor of meatier Western fare, carbohydrate intake falls, but weight problems and diabetes increase.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Low Carb Diet is Best
Why the Low Carb Diet is Best

When I developed diabetes in 1946, physicians thought that the high illness and death rate of diabetics was due to dietary fat and the supposedly resultant elevation of serum cholesterol. Since the DCCT trial, the scientific literature overwhelmingly supports the role of elevated blood sugar in all long-term diabetic complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan
Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan

Let’s be realistic and take a long-term perspective in this “which diet is best” debate, rather than wasting time quibbling over extremes—from low-carb to vegan. You’ll have type 2 diabetes for the rest of your life, and you’ll likely struggle with weight management throughout your life as well. The major challenge in weight loss, and even more so in weight maintenance, is long-term adherence.

comments 13 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

OneTouch® Meter Upgrade Offered To OneTouch® Users At No Charge
OneTouch® Meter Upgrade Offered To OneTouch® Users At No Charge

Milpitas, CA, March 30, 2007 – LifeScan, Inc., maker of OneTouch® Brand Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems, is offering customers that own one of several models of OneTouch Brand Systems a no-charge meter upgrade to one of the company's latest, most innovative meters.(1)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2007

Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education
Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education

The story of Doug Burns’ arrest during a low blood sugar episode has generated a lot of comments from the diabetes community. How did it happen, why did it happen, and how could it have been handled differently?

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 19, 2007

GlucoLight's OCGM Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitor In Clinical Trials.

GlucoLight's continuous, non-invasive device is a novel approach to glucose monitoring in the acute care environment.  Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the device is able to measure blood glucose levels through a unique anatomical area in the skin that shows physiological changes that directly correlate to changes in blood glucose.  The GlucoLight monitor displays real time glucose measurements with an initial single point calibration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2007

Dr. Hering Pig Islet Pioneer
Dr. Hering Pig Islet Pioneer

Dr. Bernhard Hering of the University of Minnesota is recognized the world over as the premier expert on pancreatic islet transplants. He sees islet transplantation as the best hope for the cure of type 1 diabetes, and his optimism is supported by his research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2007

March 2007

Have your say!
Have your say!

Diabetes Health continues to roll out exciting changes to our newly redesigned website. All articles now have a comments field where you can speak your mind. If you choose to register as a Diabetes Health community member, your comments will post immediately, allowing you to interact with other members of the Diabetes Health community in real time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2007

Interview with a Pediatric Endocrinologist: Dr. Morey Haymond
Interview with a Pediatric Endocrinologist: Dr. Morey Haymond

Q: Please describe your background.

Morey Haymond: A pediatric endocrinologist by training, I have been involved in metabolic studies of kids, infants, and adults for 35 years. I work with children who have disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, including diabetes and hypoglycemia. Understanding the regulation of those processes has been a focus of my research, and I have looked at amino acid and fat metabolism as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 29, 2007

Dr. White Answers Your Medication Questions

Q: Are there any long-term side effects of the popular drugs to treat type 2 diabetes?

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2007

EuroSocks Unveils New Sock For Diabetic Foot Care: Doctors Applaud the Non-medical Appearance For Encouraging Use
EuroSocks Unveils New Sock For Diabetic Foot Care: Doctors Applaud the Non-medical Appearance For Encouraging Use

Warwick, R.I. - EuroSocks North America, a top producer of sport-specific performance and compression socks, has introduced Euros Rx for Diabetics. Developed in collaboration with a team of physicians, the patent-pending dual-tone technology design comes in white and dark dress sock colors while preserving the patented white bottom to allow diabetics to easily monitor the condition of their feet.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 14, 2007

World Decision-Makers Confront Diabetes Pandemic at Novo Nordisk Forum: Former President Bill Clinton, keynote speaker at the Forum

New York, NY - March 13, 2007 - Former President Bill Clinton joined global diabetes leaders today in New York City to discuss ways to break the curve of the diabetes pandemic at a forum hosted by Novo Nordisk and supported by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2007

Diabetes Health Launches New Web Site
Diabetes Health Launches New Web Site

Approximately a million people a day look to the Internet for answers about diabetes. Now Diabetes Health, a long-time leader in patient advocacy through Diabetes Health magazine, has launched the best site on the web for finding those answers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2007

New Joslin Study Reveals How a Specific Fat Type Can Protect Against Weight Gain and Diabetes

BOSTON - March 1, 2007 - A new study from Joslin Diabetes Center may shed light on why some people can eat excessive amounts of food and not gain weight or develop type 2 diabetes, while others are more likely to develop obesity and this most common form of diabetes on any diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2007

Duane Reade Establishes Flagship Diabetes Resource Center in New York City

NEW YORK - Feb. 28 - Duane Reade Holdings, Inc., the leading drug store chain in the New York metropolitan area, today announced the launch of the Diabetes Resource Center, a comprehensive training and educational facility for patients with diabetes mellitus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2007

Low Carb Questions and Answers From an Atkins Proponent
Low Carb Questions and Answers From an Atkins Proponent

Are ketones a healthy or an unhealthy sign?
Ketones in the urine can be a danger sign if your blood sugar is too high and insulin levels are too low. It can indicate acidosis, an abnormal condition usually occurring in people with out of control type 1 diabetes requiring immediate medical attention. Ketones can also occur because of other metabolic conditions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2007

February 2007

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at Novo Nordisk Forum on Urgent Need of Worldwide Change in Diabetes Care

PRINCETON, N.J. - January 25, 2007 - Former President Bill Clinton will be the keynote speaker at the Global Changing Diabetes Leadership Forum, taking place on March 13, 2007 in New York City hosted by Novo Nordisk and supported by the International Diabetes Federation.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2007

National Foundation For Infectious Diseases Urges Increased Influenza Vaccination Rates For Persons With Diabetes

BETHESDA, MD - February 21, 2007 - The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is calling for the medical and public health community to increase alarmingly low influenza vaccination rates among persons with diabetes – the fifth deadliest disease in the U.S.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2007

10 Reasons You Love Your Meter So Much
10 Reasons You Love Your Meter So Much

Many people think of their blood glucose meter as a sort of sophisticated electronic toy. But the numbers it displays after you check your blood really are meaningful.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Making a Difference: A New Column
Making a Difference: A New Column

You might know me as the publisher of Diabetes Health. I’m also a mother of two, the daughter of a woman who died of type 2 diabetes, and a theater buff. But from now on, I hope you’ll come to know me as someone who brings important stories to you every issue, stories about people who are making a difference in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

New Editor in Town
New Editor in Town

I’d like to thank Diabetes Health for inviting me to be the professional editor of this issue of Diabetes Health Professional. I’ve enjoyed a long and rewarding relationship with the readers and staff of Diabetes Health in the past, and I’m delighted to be walking down this new path. So much of what I love about being a diabetes educator is the sense of connection I feel not only with patients, but also with other healthcare professionals. I hope that with this column, Diabetes Health can foster that vital sense of community among us all.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Starting the Conversation
Starting the Conversation

We’ve made big strides on our new Web site since I last wrote to you, and it’s shaping up into an exciting and dynamic community gathering place. Once it’s been inaugurated, you’ll want to drop in on a daily basis and check out what’s happened since the day before. We’re going to be posting all our articles hot off the press, and the input from you will be right there as well, ready for the lively back-and-forth that already animates your letters to the editor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

January 2007

To All Our Diabetes Educator Friends
To All Our Diabetes Educator Friends

We’re putting out a new edition just for professionals, with even more of the valuable content you’ve come to expect from the editors of Diabetes Health (formerly Diabetes Interview). We still offer the same honest comparison charts and provocative information that you won’t see anywhere else. What’s different? The Professional edition has a different cover design, different advertisements, and additional content especially for you, the professional.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2007

December 2006

Dry Mouth and Diabetes
Dry Mouth and Diabetes

We often take our teeth for granted, but the mouth is the first part of the digestive process. It’s amazing how what we put into it and what comes out of it can get us in so much trouble.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

November 2006

Introducing the Diabetes Health magazine Digital Advantage

Diabetes Health magazine, a leading and highly valued source for diabetes awareness and education, is doing its part to honor National Diabetes Month by offering (for a limited time) free subscriptions to its newly launched digital magazine, “Diabetes Health Digital Advantage™.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2006

October 2006

Is It Really Research When a Pharma Company Pays For It?
Is It Really Research When a Pharma Company Pays For It?

Rezulin, the first thiazolidinedione drug, was withdrawn from the market in 2000. Just three years earlier, the FDA had approved Rezulin through a “fast track” approval process, marking January 1997 as the beginning of a new era in type 2 diabetes management by helping type 2s make use of their own insulin more effectively.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

September 2006

Annual Research Extravaganza
Annual Research Extravaganza

Fresh from the ADA Scientific Sessions in Washington, D.C., we present over 30 diabetes studies from scientists around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

April 2006

Anne Phillips, MD, FRCPC, is the vice president, clinical, North America, CV-Metabolic for GlaxoSmithKline
Anne Phillips, MD, FRCPC, is the vice president, clinical, North America, CV-Metabolic for GlaxoSmithKline

What would you tell endocrinologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) about Avandia (rosiglitazone maleate), Avandamet (rosiglitazone maleate and metformin HCl) and Avandaryl (rosiglizatone maleate and glimepiride) as treatment options for diabetics?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Interview With William Marshall, president of BD Medical—Diabetes Care
Interview With William Marshall, president of BD Medical—Diabetes Care

Why are today’s insulin syringes and pen needles better than ever?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Suresh Rao, PhD, is the manager and clinical liaison for Abbott Diabetes Care
Suresh Rao, PhD, is the manager and clinical liaison for Abbott Diabetes Care

Why are today’s meters better than ever?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Alan Moses, MD, is the medical director for Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals
Alan Moses, MD, is the medical director for Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals

With the new basal-bolus insulin landscape, what is the most important thing that endocrinologists and primary care physicians need to know so that their insulin-using patients can follow the best possible regimen?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Byetta Changes How You Can Treat Your Type 2 Patients
Byetta Changes How You Can Treat Your Type 2 Patients

John H. Holcombe, MD, is a clinical associate professor of pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine and medical fellow, diabetes, for Eli Lilly and Co.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Do Your Insulin-Using Patients Know About Insulin Pens?
Do Your Insulin-Using Patients Know About Insulin Pens?

If you are an endocrinologist or primary care physician who works with diabetics, you have undoubtedly heard of the insulin pen. You probably know of their popularity in Europe or have heard testimonials from pen users about their ease of use.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Professionals Should Get Sharp About Choosing the Right Syringe for Their Patients
Professionals Should Get Sharp About Choosing the Right Syringe for Their Patients

For diabetes patients who inject insulin through a syringe, the people at Becton-Dickinson (BD) say that they should always know exactly which brand, dose capacity and needle size to use and why.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Where We Stand With Insulin Pumping and Continuous Glucose Monitoring
Where We Stand With Insulin Pumping and Continuous Glucose Monitoring

An interview with Alan Marcus, MD, FACP, the global medical director at Medtronic Diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night
The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night

Mary is a 64-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for 14 years. She is obese at 220 pounds. Mary has been treated with a sulfonylurea (a medication that stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, such as glypizide and glyburide) for the past 10 years. Her glucose control for the past three or four years has not been good. A recent A1C was 9.5% (normal range is 4% to 6%, with a goal of 7%). Metformin (Glucophage) and rosiglitazone (Avandia) were added to her sulfonylurea. Both her pre-meal and post-meal glucose values improved and her A1C came down to 7.8%. However, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the upper 100 mg/dl to low 200 mg/dl range. She was afraid of “the needle” and did not want to start on insulin. In addition, Mary was recently diagnosed with early diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) and nerve disease (neuropathy).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

The Case for Insulin and Insulin Pens
The Case for Insulin and Insulin Pens

Several months ago, I met Sophia, a woman in her mid-40s who had been struggling to manage her type 2 diabetes for years. Her blood glucose levels were typically well above 300 mg/dl, and she had an equally high A1C of 12.5%. She made it clear that the last thing she wanted was insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Actos and Lifestyle Changes Made All the Difference
Actos and Lifestyle Changes Made All the Difference

Last fall, Bob was surprised when his primary care doctor called to tell him that his recent blood tests showed that he had type 2 diabetes. The doctor immediately put Bob on 15 milligrams of Actos each day and advised him to stay away from sugar and to come back in three months for more blood work.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Life Before and After Starting Pump Therapy
Life Before and After Starting Pump Therapy

At age 25, Dee was initially diagnosed with gestational diabetes in 1972. After giving birth, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Insulin was started with a daily injection of morning NPH and progressed to twice-daily doses. Dee did not have good control with either regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Lois Jovanovic Making Research Breakthroughs in the Area of Diabetes and Pregnancy
Lois Jovanovic Making Research Breakthroughs in the Area of Diabetes and Pregnancy

Lois Jovanovic, MD, is currently the CEO & chief scientific officer at The Sansum Diabetes Research Institute along with being an adjunct professor of Bimolecular Science and Engineering at The University of California-Santa Barbara and a clinical professor of medicine at The University of Southern California-Keck School of Medicine. Dr. Jovanovic has devoted her career to diabetes and diabetes-related research. Her expertise is in intensified insulin delivery, continuous glucose monitoring and the creation of an artificial beta-cell system. Her favorite research projects are in the field of diabetes and pregnancy—both type 1 diabetic pregnant women and gestational diabetic woman.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Specialist vs PCP Care Makes a Difference in A1Cs

Diabetics who visit a diabetes care specialist have better A1Cs than those who visit a primary care physician.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Elevated A1C and C-Reactive Protein—A Bad Combination for Carotid Atherosclerosis
Elevated A1C and C-Reactive Protein—A Bad Combination for Carotid Atherosclerosis

High blood glucose coupled with inflammation is a one-two punch that researchers say is associated with an “advanced early carotid atherosclerosis progression and increased risk of new vascular events in diabetic as well as nondiabetic subjects.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

DASH Diet Found to Reduce Metabolic Syndrome Risks
DASH Diet Found to Reduce Metabolic Syndrome Risks

For patients with the metabolic syndrome, Iranian researchers say the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet can likely reduce most of the risks associated with the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Lower-Fat Dairy Food Could Reduce Your Patients’ Hypertension Risk
Lower-Fat Dairy Food Could Reduce Your Patients’ Hypertension Risk

For patients who have hypertension or who are at risk for it, Spanish researchers say that low-fat (but not whole-fat) dairy food consumption is associated with a lower risk of hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Tell Your Patients About Fiber’s Cardioprotective Role
Tell Your Patients About Fiber’s Cardioprotective Role

French researchers say that dietary fiber plays a protective role against cardiovascular disease, and they are calling for increased fiber consumption.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Egg-Based Breakfasts Can Help Your Patients Reduce Calories
Egg-Based Breakfasts Can Help Your Patients Reduce Calories

One way to get overweight patients to consume fewer calories is to get them to eat egg-based breakfasts. Researchers say that compared to a bagel-based breakfast, the egg-based breakfast induced greater satisfaction of hunger and significantly reduced short-term food intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

More and More Diabetes Patients Getting Turned On to Insulin Pens
More and More Diabetes Patients Getting Turned On to Insulin Pens

Although they are equally effective when it comes to delivering insulin, more insulin-using patients expressed a preference to continue using an insulin pen after trying one.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Patients Prefer Pens With Auditory and Sensory Confirmation
Patients Prefer Pens With Auditory and Sensory Confirmation

Because people with diabetes sometimes suffer from visual impairment as well as reduced manual dexterity, Japanese researchers assessed the reliability of dose selection and setting of five insulin devices by patients using auditory and sensory confirmation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diovan Found to Reduce High Blood Pressure and Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2
Diovan Found to Reduce High Blood Pressure and Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2

Valsartan (Diovan) significantly reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure at dosages of 60 mg/dl and has a “significantly greater effect” in reducing micro- and macroalbuminuria in people with type 2 who have albuminuria.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Do Avandia and Actos Offer Heart-Protective Benefits?
Do Avandia and Actos Offer Heart-Protective Benefits?

Researchers at the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine wrote a paper discussing the heart-protective properties of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) such as Avandia and Actos.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

PKC Inhibitor Maintains the Kidney Health of Your Type 2 Patients

For type 2s who suffer from kidney disease, treatment with ruboxistaurin was shown to reduce albuminuria and maintain estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for more than one year. Ruboxistaurin—a PKC inhibitor manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company—may have added benefit in established therapies for diabetic kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Adding Amaryl to Insulin Therapy Gets BG Control on the Right Track
Adding Amaryl to Insulin Therapy Gets BG Control on the Right Track

Adding the sulfonylurea glimepiride (Amaryl) to insulin therapy results in “sustained improvement of glycemic control in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes,” according to researchers at the department of endocrinology and metabolism at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Can Statins and TZDs Prevent and Treat Inflammation?
Can Statins and TZDs Prevent and Treat Inflammation?

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammation marker that can be an underlying cause of a host of metabolic conditions, among them insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. CRP, according to researchers at the State University of New York Health Sciences Center, also has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Actos Alone or Combined With Oral Meds Improves Your Patient’s BGs and Lipids

New Zealand researchers say that in clinical trials of people with type 2 diabetes, Actos as stand-alone therapy or in combination with metformin, repaglinide, insulin or a sulphonylurea induced “both long- and short-term improvements in [blood glucose] control and serum lipid profiles.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Patients Taking High Doses of Insulin May Benefit From the Pump
Patients Taking High Doses of Insulin May Benefit From the Pump

A group of Buffalo, NY, researchers recommend that patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes who take extremely high doses of insulin give the insulin pump a try.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Pump Therapy Called Safe for Toddlers

Pump therapy in preschool children, according to researchers at Texas Children’s Hospital, is “feasible and safe.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Pump Therapy Safe and Effective for Pediatric Patients
Pump Therapy Safe and Effective for Pediatric Patients

Spanish researchers claim that in most studies of small children with diabetes, insulin pump therapy resulted in improved A1Cs and a decreased rate of hypoglycemia without an abnormal increase in body mass index (BMI) and without adversely affecting psychosocial outcomes in young people with type 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

10 Tests a Day Recommended for Pregnant Patients With Diabetes

Dutch researchers say that treatment of diabetes in pregnant women should be aimed at achieving A1C levels within the range of 6% or less. They add that “a minimum of 10 self-monitored blood glucose determinations daily is necessary to obtain adequate information of all daily glucose fluctuations.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

What’s the Difference Between Palm and Fingertip Testing?
What’s the Difference Between Palm and Fingertip Testing?

LifeScan researchers say that at any given time, “there may be differences between palm and fingertip glucose values because of glycemic instability and/or test methodology.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

BG Estimating: Not Recommended for Diabetic Patients

A majority of diabetes patients cannot accurately estimate their blood glucose levels, leading researchers to suggest that home testing is a necessary part of diabetes self-care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Telling Type 2 Patients to Test Could Decrease Problems for Them
Telling Type 2 Patients to Test Could Decrease Problems for Them

For people with type 2, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is associated with decreased diabetes-related problems, leading researchers to suggest that SMBG “may be associated with a healthier lifestyle and/or better disease management.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Is Levemir the Better Basal Insulin? Researchers Think So
Is Levemir the Better Basal Insulin? Researchers Think So

Compared with other basal insulins, French researchers suggest that insulin detemir (Levemir) may offer a “better reproducibility.” In addition, it may also reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and lead patients to titrate their insulin doses more easily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Lantus Combined With Oral Meds Can Save Your Patients Money

For people with type 2, Lantus in combination with oral medications can be a cost-equivalent alternative to conventional insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Premixed Insulin Analogues Help Your Patients Reach BG Goals

In three comparative randomized trials, researchers at the department of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, demonstrated that type 2s who used premixed insulins were more likely to reach blood glucose goals than those using only Lantus once daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Fatty Liver Disease Called Heart Risk in Type 2s

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is significantly associated with a moderately increased cardiovascular disease risk among type 2s, according to Italian researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Type 2s With Kidney Disease Better Off Seeing a Pharmacist-Diabetes Specialist Team

Hong Kong researchers say that if you have type 2 and suffer from kidney disease, you may be better off getting structured care from a pharmacist-diabetes specialist team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Some 'Adherence Aids' Work Better for Your Type 2 Patients

Although people with diabetes use many different approaches to help them adhere to treatment regimens, researchers say that there is little evidence that they are effective. However, in a study they conducted, they found that some “adherence aids” do work and lead to better diabetes control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Erectile Dysfunction Can Affect Quality of Life in Type 2s

For men with type 2 who suffer from erectile dysfunction, quality of life can decrease over the course of three years, according to the results of a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Byetta Added to Type 2 Regimens Improves Control
Byetta Added to Type 2 Regimens Improves Control

A recent study compared the effect of adding exenatide (Byetta) or insulin glargine (Lantus) to type 2 patients’ treatment regimens. The type 2s previously had been taking metformin and a sulfonylurea with little success.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diabetic Patients Advised to Take Good Care of Their Teeth
Diabetic Patients Advised to Take Good Care of Their Teeth

If you have patients with diabetes, advise them to maintain good dental hygiene. A recent report states that people with diabetes have a higher severity of periodontal disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

CAM Therapy Associated With More PCP Visits
CAM Therapy Associated With More PCP Visits

If you are a primary care physician, chances are that half of the diabetes patients who pay you a visit use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Report Urges Diabetes Professionals to Advise Breastfeeding for Diabetic Moms

A recent report in The Practicing Midwife suggests that women with diabetes should be “encouraged and supported to breastfeed their babies from birth by giving them an understanding of the general and specific benefits this will provide.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diabetes Patients at Greater Risk for Decline in Cognitive Function

Compared to nondiabetics, Canadian researchers say people with diabetes have a greater rate of decline in cognitive function and a greater risk of cognitive decline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

AGE Therapy Called Important in Treating Diabetic Patients

Australian researchers emphasize that therapies that inhibit the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) or that “remove established AGE modifications” will be an important part of treating diabetics with kidney problems.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

High Body Mass Index Now Called Risk for Kidney Disease
High Body Mass Index Now Called Risk for Kidney Disease

Healthcare professionals are advised to tell their patients that a high body mass index (BMI) is a “common, strong and potentially modifiable risk factor for end-stage kidney disease.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Type 1 Puts Your Type 1 Patients at Risk for Fractures
Type 1 Puts Your Type 1 Patients at Risk for Fractures

Having diabetes, especially type 1, puts you at an increased risk for all non-vertebral fractures—in particular, hip fractures.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

What You Should Tell Your Type 1 Patients About Exercise and BGs
What You Should Tell Your Type 1 Patients About Exercise and BGs

For pediatric patients with type 1, researchers are saying that prolonged moderate exercise results in a “consistent reduction in plasma glucose and the frequent occurrence of hypoglycemia when pre-exercise glucose concentrations are less than 120 mg/dl.” They add that treatment with 15 grams of oral glucose is “often insufficient to reliably treat hypoglycemia during exercise in these youngsters.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Is an Artificial Pancreas on the Horizon for Type 1s?
Is an Artificial Pancreas on the Horizon for Type 1s?

Transplant experts at the Section of Transplantation in the University of Chicago Department of Surgery say that an artificial pancreas has promising potential as an approach to preventing or reversing complications associated with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

What is the Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease?
What is the Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease?

“The prevalence of celiac disease is increased in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus,” according to Turkish researchers. “Since many patients may be asymptomatic, it is suggested that all diabetic patients should be screened for this disease.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Levemir, Apidra and Lantus—Oh My! How Do the New Insulin Analogues Affect the Care of Your Patients?

In 1998, Eli Lilly & Co.’s rapid-acting insulin analogue lispro (Humalog) appeared on the U.S. market, followed in 2000 by Novo Nordisk’s rapid-acting counterpart aspart (NovoLog). Joined now by sanofi-aventis’ glulisine (Apidra), these rapid-acting insulins offer both convenience and improved blood glucose control to your patients who require bolus insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Use of Insulin Pumps in Patients With Type 2: An Endocrinologist’s View
Use of Insulin Pumps in Patients With Type 2: An Endocrinologist’s View

Recent developments in the treatment of diabetes mellitus have shown that “tight” control and intensive therapy are necessary to prevent complications, increased morbidity and mortality. We are all familiar with the findings of the DCCT and various UKPDS studies and sub-studies. The importance of these “landmark” studies does not need any further discussion at this time.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Why Patients and Doctors Are Struggling With Meter Reimbursement
Why Patients and Doctors Are Struggling With Meter Reimbursement

Blood glucose meters have become too much of a good thing. It’s nearly impossible to keep track of the many different meters now available. My directory at www.mendosa.com/meters is the most comprehensive, and I think that there are currently 50 different meters from 15 different vendors on the American market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

December 2005

Donald D. Dumoulin is the vice president and general manager of Diabetes Care at Roche Diagnostics
Donald D. Dumoulin is the vice president and general manager of Diabetes Care at Roche Diagnostics

What is Roche Diagnostic’s position in the diabetes care industry?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

November 2005

Weighing the Risks - Do Antipsychotic Medications Cause Diabetes?
Weighing the Risks - Do Antipsychotic Medications Cause Diabetes?

While treatment options for severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia have improved greatly over the past few decades, there is increasing concern among clinicians and researchers that a certain class of antipsychotic medication may have disturbing side effects.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2005

‘Ala-Ala’-Lujah!

Diabetes researchers from Columbia University, the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) and the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases studied the effects of Ala-Ala—a humanized Fc-mutated anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody—on the progression of type 1 diabetes in patients with recent-onset disease. The study was a follow-up to an article by a team that included UCSF’s Jeffrey Bluestone, MD, and Columbia University’s Kevan Herold, MD, that appeared in the May 30, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

September 2005

Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff
Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff

Diabetes professionals from all over the world descended on San Diego, California, this past June for the 65th Annual American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions. Some brought with them the latest drugs, meters, pumps and software. Others came armed with research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

August 2005

Alan Moses is the associate vice president of medical affairs for Novo Nordisk Inc.
Alan Moses is the associate vice president of medical affairs for Novo Nordisk Inc.

How does Novo Nordisk continue to evolve in the diabetes care industry?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

Breathe Easy
Breathe Easy

Although the incidence of some types of cancer has been reported to be higher in diabetics, this is not the case with lung cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

July 2005

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Molly-Jayne Bangert, BSN, RN, CDE
Diabetes Educator of the Month: Molly-Jayne Bangert, BSN, RN, CDE

Molly-Jayne Bangert, BSN, RN, CDE, working in the rural Southwestern United States, is passionate about increasing diabetes awareness and reducing risks associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

Sarah Hanssen is vice-president and general manager of Disetronic Medical Systems, Inc.
Sarah Hanssen is vice-president and general manager of Disetronic Medical Systems, Inc.

What is Disetronic’s role in the pump market right now?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

Good News for Diabetic Men

Diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer, but only several years after diagnosis of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

May 2005

Blood Glucose Brain Drains
Blood Glucose Brain Drains

In many adults with diabetes, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) is associated with mild cognitive dysfunction.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

April 2005

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Chris Reichert, RN, MS, CDE
Diabetes Educator of the Month: Chris Reichert, RN, MS, CDE

Chris Reichert, RN, MS, CDE, is the director of the Diabetes Care Center at Parkview in the Parkview Medical Center in Pueblo, Colorado. In 1990, she developed the diabetes program at Parkview and became a certified diabetes educator in 1992.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

February 2005

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE
Diabetes Educator of the Month: Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE

Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE, was named Diabetes Educator of the Year by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

January 2005

Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Medications

The risk of cardiovascular disease is greatly increased in people with diabetes. To address the problem of diabetes complications, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has developed “The ABCs of Diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

What’s Better and Why—Taking Long-Acting Insulin or Going on the Pump?
What’s Better and Why—Taking Long-Acting Insulin or Going on the Pump?

The insulin pump remains the gold standard for optimal control of type 1 diabetes and for anyone who needs intensive insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

Bob Guezuraga is the president of Medtronic MiniMed
Bob Guezuraga is the president of Medtronic MiniMed

What are the biggest challenges facing the insulin pump market today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

December 2004

Khoso Baluch, Vice President of U.S. Diabetes Care and Family Health at Lilly
Khoso Baluch, Vice President of U.S. Diabetes Care and Family Health at Lilly

What are the biggest challenges facing the insulin market today?

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Frida Theros
Diabetes Educator of the Month: Frida Theros

This month, we feature Frida Theros, RD, CD, CDE, who works with the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah in Cedar City, Utah.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

September 2004

Professional Educator of the Month: Allen Bennett King, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE
Professional Educator of the Month: Allen Bennett King, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE

This month, we feature Allen Bennett King, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE, assistant clinical professor at the University of California Natividad Medical Center. Dr. King is the cofounder and medical director of the Diabetes Care Center in Salinas, California. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2004

Tips for Staying in Control While Consuming Alcohol
Tips for Staying in Control While Consuming Alcohol

Alcohol tends to lower blood glucose. This means you do not need to take extra insulin or medication to cover the alcohol you drink. In fact, it can be dangerous to do so.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2004

August 2004

‘The War’ Against Type 2

Recent studies predict that the worldwide incidence of diabetes will increase by 60 percent to over 300 million cases by the year 2025. The overwhelming majority will be type 2 cases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

July 2004

Telecare and Type 1 Diabetes

One of the promises of technology is to be connected to other people without actual physical contact.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Continuity of Care Improves Outcome Quality

If you want the best quality care for your type 2 diabetes, see the same physician at each visit to your diabetes outpatient clinic (DOC), especially if that physician specializes in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

April 2004

Action About A1Cs

When your last A1C registered at more than 7 percent, did your primary care physician take action to lower it?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Clinician Guide Offers Practical Advise on Diabetes

The American Academy of Family Physicians now publishes a diabetes treatment guide for clinicians that offers what it calls “practical advice for treating patients with diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

March 2004

Low-Carb Guru Weighs In On Controversy

I struggle to understand why you are publishing information recommending low-or no-carb meals for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Diabetes Care Better Served on Older People

People with diabetes aged 65 and older receive better diabetes care than do younger patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Drug Giant Creates Resource for Diabetes Professionals

Because physicians constantly require updated knowledge to help treat their type 2 patients, Pfizer has developed PfizerDiabetes.com (dead link: Aug 2010).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

February 2004

People with Diabetes More Satisfied with Doctors who Adhere to Guidelines

Healthcare professionals who adhere to clinical practice guidelines have more satisfied patients, according to a recent Israeli study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Two New Tools for Diabetes Professionals

At the August 2003 conference of the American Association of Diabetes Educators in Salt Lake City, Utah, HealtheTech Inc. of Golden, Colorado, showcased two of its new products for diabetes healthcare professionals:

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

May 2003

Help Wanted: Pediatric Endocrinologists

"Now is a wonderful time to consider a research career in childhood diabetes," says Georgeanna Klingensmith, MD, who heads the Division of Pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. "We need young people with energy and enthusiasm to take these new findings in molecular biology, genetics, and immunology and put them together to move the field ahead."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

April 2003

Guidelines Set for Doctor-Patient Emails

"Substantive" e-mails between patients and doctors should occur only in the context of a pre-existing patient-doctor relationship, cautions the eRisk Working Group for Healthcare, which recently announced a set of guidelines for such communication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

March 2003

New Presentation Provides a Resource for Diabetes Educators

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) has developed a new resource for diabetes educators who want to spice up their patient and community group presentations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Fewer Deaths With Metformin Than With Sulfonylurea Alone

Death rates are lower among people new to oral anti-diabetes medications if they take either metformin alone or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea, as opposed to taking a sulfonylurea alone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Whats Your Type?

Q: I was wondering whether you could have someone discuss "type 1.5." I am especially interested in how diabetes "type" and C-peptide numbers are related. I was 28 when I first started having symptoms of diabetes (thirst, weight loss, fatigue). Two years later, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After a year or two, some confusion arose about what type of diabetes I had. (I needed a rather low total daily insulin dose of 25 units for my weight of 140.) A C-peptide test was run. My blood sugars were kind of high at the time, and the C-peptide came back as 0.2. The doctor told me I was definitely type 1. I am still requiring rather low doses of insulin (a daily total of 30 units for a weight of 170).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

December 2002

Questions and Answers

Is BMI the Gold Standard?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Eli Lilly, Amylin to Collaborate on Potential Diabetes Treatment

Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana, and Amylin Pharmaceuticals of San Diego, California, have formed a global agreement to collaborate on development and sale of a potential new treatment for type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Urinary Tract Infections

Postmenopausal women who have diabetes and take oral diabetes medications or insulin are more likely to have acute, symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) than women who don't have diabetes, women who manage their diabetes by lifestyle changes—or even women with untreated diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Specialist Care Leads to Fewer Diabetes Complications for Type 1s

Receiving more of one's medical care from a board-certified endocrinologist, a diabetologist or a diabetes clinic equals delayed development of some diabetes complications, say researchers conducting the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Complications Study. This study has followed 429 subjects with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes for a 10-year period, beginning in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Could U Be in Danger?: Insulin. The #1 Drug Error in Hospitals

It's fortunate that Gillian Larner was at her 11-year-old son's bedside in the hospital after his surgery in May 2002.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

An Epidemic of the Times: Physicians Urged to Monitor for Insulin Resistance Syndrome

A committee of experts from the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) reports that as many as one in three Americans have Insulin Resistance Syndrome, or pre-diabetes - a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

Aging Gracefully With Diabetes in Your Golden Years

As a nation, we are aging. By the age of 65, two-thirds of us take one or more medications a day—and a lot of us take as many as three.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Aging Gracefully With Diabetes: The Golden Years

As a nation, we are aging. By the age of 65, two-thirds of us take one or more medications a day-and a lot of us take as many as three.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

August 2002

A Research Extravaganza

Once again, Diabetes Health has read through more than 2,500 abstracts of research presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual Scientific Sessions and selected a few of the more interesting ones to pass along to you as part of our annual "Research Extravaganza" feature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

You’re Not Imagining It

Doctors specializing in internal medicine, including attending physicians and those in training, are less likely than primary care doctors to accept the seriousness of type 2 diabetes, value the need for good glucose control or believe that people with the disease need special training in diabetes self-care. These findings held regardless of the doctors' age, gender or level of training.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Diabetes Epidemic

Saying "type 2 diabetes is not a ‘mild' form of diabetes," Sir George Alberti, president of the International Diabetes Federation, called for "more aggressive control of the whole blood-glucose profile."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

July 2002

Practicing What He Preaches

When Charles H. Raine III, MD, director of the Diabetes Control Center in Orangeburg, South Carolina, learned he had type 2 diabetes, he went straight to insulin as his preferred method of control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

Diabetes Masks Signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) might not be detected by standard testing methods in people with diabetes, according to researchers in the United States and Canada, who urge doctors to evaluate clinical symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

Practicing What He Preaches: Diabetologist Touts Type 2s as Pumping Candidates

When Charles H. Raine III, MD, director of the Diabetes Control Center in Orangeburg, South Carolina, learned he had type 2 diabetes, he went straight to insulin as his preferred method of control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

May 2002

What’s Up, Doc?

It is important for every person with diabetes to find a doctor who suits his or her particular needs. For teenagers with diabetes, however, this is especially critical.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

March 2002

How Can I Persuade My Doctor to Put Me on Intensive Insulin Treatment

Q: I am a 52-year-old person with type 1 diabetes who is at least 40 pounds overweight. I have tried many ways to lose the extra weight, but I can never seem to get my blood glucose under good enough control so that I don't have too many lows.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

January 2002

The "Best Practices" Debate

When it comes to a textbook definition of what is best for a patient with type 2 diabetes, physicians will often go against conventional wisdom, according to a report in the September/October 2001 issue of Effective Clinical Practice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Great Pump Docs

You might be seeing a great pump doc now, even if you aren't using insulin pump therapy. An endocrinologist or diabetologist will suggest a pump if you meet the criteria for insulin pump therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

Why Are My Pump Patients Gaining Weight?

Q: I am a diabetes educator, RD, and insulin-pump trainer. I have trained many patients on the pump (using Humalog) and have instructed them on eating soundly and exercising regularly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

November 2001

Nine Out of 10 People Who Get Type 2 Don’t Need To

A study published in the September 13 issue of New England Journal of Medicine says that 90 percent of type 2 cases could be prevented if people exercised more, ate healthier food, stopped smoking and adopted other healthy behaviors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

September 2001

Keeping Doctors and Patients In the Know

Retailers should not switch the brand of diabetes supplies without first informing patients or their healthcare providers, according a recent survey sponsored by Becton Dickinson (BD) of Franklin Lakes, New Jersey. The vast majority (90 percent) of doctors and nurses surveyed said that they don't approve if a retailer changes a syringe from a prescribed brand to a store brand without telling them or the user.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

August 2001

To Sell or Not to Sell: The Controversy Surrounding Live Kidney Sales
To Sell or Not to Sell: The Controversy Surrounding Live Kidney Sales

After four years on dialysis, with no sign that he was nearing the top of the transplant waiting list, Moshe Tati decided to buy a kidney. This was easier than he had imagined. Several months previous, the name and telephone number of an organ broker had been passed, furtively, around his dialysis group. At the time, Moshe did not think he would use the telephone number. He thought he would wait.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

Innovative Education

Kelly Van Horn, RD, CDE, of Sammamish, Washington, received the Creative Nutrition Education Award from the American Dietetic Association for her innovative product that teaches educators and their patients about nutrition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

June 2001

Boy’s Father Takes Part in His Diabetes Management

Carlos's HbA1c had been above 10.2% for the last three clinic visits. We were frustrated because he was 16 years old, had a great personality and knew a lot about diabetes management. Every time he came to clinic without his blood-sugar records, he would promise to bring them next time and also promised to get his HbA1c down. It was hard not to believe him because he was such a nice guy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

The 'Holy Grail' of the Immune System

Scientists in Canada believe they have clinched the "Holy Grail" of the immune system: a gene that turns off the signal that triggers diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

May 2001

Treating Your Feet

The most recent statistics say 86,000 people with diabetes suffer from lower-limb amputations. Experts, however, say that half of them could be avoided.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

April 2001

New Ruling Causes 1,000 Education Programs To Lose Funding

On December 29, 2001 the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) issued its long-awaited final ruling on how funding for diabetes education will be spent. The decision, a follow-up to its two-year-old proposed ruling, became effective on February 27, 2001.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Control In Motion—Get On Board the “Diabetes Bus”

For Kim Hanchette, MEd, CDE, keeping up with the diabetes Joneses has never been a problem. With the conclusion of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial in 1993, Hanchette says most doctors in her hometown of Raleigh, North Carolina, had come to embrace the concept of self-management. As a CDE at an outpatient clinic there, Hanchette had her work cut out for her, with patients flowing in at a steady stream for classes on nutrition, glucose levels, exercise and medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

February 2001

A Rebellious Phase

Children experience insulin resistance during puberty whether or not they will develop type 2 diabetes in adulthood, according to a new study by researchers in California and Alabama, who said changes were consistent across all subgroups of gender, ethnicity and obesity. Findings suggest the possibility of preventing type 2 diabetes during this phase of adolescence through dietary and physical activity intervention, says Michael I. Goran, PhD, of the University of Southern California. Dr. Goran and colleagues published their findings in the November 2001 issue of Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

December 2000

Wanted: CDEs and RNs

Even if the closure of diabetes programs can be halted, some diabetes professionals see a hidden danger that could make quality diabetes care hard to come by: a shortage of qualified educators and nurses. They say that, despite what looks like a shrinking job pond, good catches are becoming harder to find.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Setting the Standard

The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) has yet to issue a final ruling on its standards for Medicare reimbursement. For many, however, the writing on the wall is clear: to qualify, it's the ADA's way or the highway.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

October 2000

Dan Uses His Computer to Improve His BGs

Many of you probably record your blood glucose in a diary or logbook, which you bring to your healthcare team on routine visits. This logbook has been an important component of diabetes treatment programs since the days of Dr. Elliot Joslin (Joslin Diabetes Center), the late pioneering diabetes specialist. Dr. Joslin believed important events in a person's life and diabetes treatment should be entered into a diary that both that person and his health care team could refer back to for treatment decisions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

Improving Diabetes Through Exercise

People with type 2 diabetes are capable of increasing their physical activity levels, according to a recent survey of doctors in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

September 2000

Diabetes—an Environmental Cause?

I recently went to hear yet another brilliant and well-known research physician speak to yet another lay audience about what is new in diabetes research, and why it's important for them to send more money.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

AADE Seeks Passage of House Resolution—Will Add CDEs as Medicare-recognized Providers for Diabetes Education

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) is seeking passage of House Resolution (HR) 3003, which will add Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) as Medicare-certified providers for diabetes self-management education services.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

June 2000

Acceptability of Pig Xenografts by Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and the General Population

In a French survey of attitudes toward xenografts (transplants of animal organs in humans), it was found that people with type 1 diabetes were more in favor of xenografts than were a sample of the general population. Type 1s were also more receptive than the general population to the idea of receiving a pig xenograft. For the same reasons, type 1s were also more conscious of the risks of disease transmission inherent in such xenografts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Three A.M. and All is Well

Jean Betschart MN, RN, CDE is a pediatric nurse practitioner in the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. She has also written many books and articles for children with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

December 1999

Doctors Urged to Not Treat Type 2 Diabetes as

Dr. David Matthews, chairman of the Oxford Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, says beta-cell deterioration is "virtually inevitable" in persons with type 2 diabetes. He urges doctors who treat type 2s to refrain from telling them that they only have "mild diabetes," and instead tell them that they are still at considerable risk for diabetic complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

November 1999

My Sugars are Normal... What’s Causing my Frequent Urination?

Q: I thought that people with diabetes experience frequent urination only when their BGs are high. Is this incorrect? Could frequent urination even when a person has consistently normal BGs be an indication of another medical problem?

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Researcher Says Gene Therapy will Cure Type 1 Diabetes within 5 to 10 Years

Dr. Ann Simpson and colleagues at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia, have found a way to genetically engineer liver cells to mimic the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas. The process, known as gene therapy, involves implanting the human insulin gene into liver cells, giving the cells the ability to synthesize, process and store insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

October 1999

Meeting Gives Diabetes Educators Look at New and Future Products

How do diabetes nurse educators keep up on the latest information? First of all, they read Diabetes Health. That's what they tell us every year at the Annual Meeting and Educational Program for the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). This year's convention, the 26th for the AADE, was held in Orlando, Florida.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

August 1999

Diabetes Educator Says “Diabetic Diet’ Is a Myth

Instead of a sugar-free diet, people with diabetes might do better on a hang-up-free diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

Is Hypoglycemia a Problem?

Several years ago, I had a severe insulin reaction while vacationing in the mountains. This was the result of exercising a lot more than usual. Pharmacists often spend eight to 12 hours a day, six days a week behind the prescription counter. On vacation, however, with the combination of increase in exercise, altitude, less stress and changes in food patterns, I went into a convulsion around 3 a.m. My wife could not awake me, and I had forgotten to inform her that I had a Glucagon injection with me. I awoke just in time for her to tell me the paramedics were on the way. I drank orange juice, ate glucose tablets, used a tube of Insta-Glucose and scolded her for telephoning for help.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

July 1999

Good Intentions: HMO Covers Only One Brand of Meter and Syringe—Patients, Educators Challenge Policy and Create Change

Imagine if a free glucose meter showed up at your door. You'd be thrilled, right? Well, it happened to David Fogarty, but he wasn't thrilled. This Berkeley, California, father was fuming mad. Fogarty's HMO, Health Net, sent a free Precision Q.I.D. meter to his 11-year-old son, Lucas, and to all its other members with diabetes. The catch was, Health Net would soon stop covering strips for Lucas's One Touch Profile.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

April 1999

Can a Vitamin Prevent Type 1?

B vitamins may prove to be more helpful than we thought they were. According to scientists, one B vitamin, niacin, also known as nicotinamide or B3, could even prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

ADA Says Fruits and Vegetables Should be “Core” of American Diet

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and other national health care groups are requesting that the United States government stress fruits and vegetables more strongly in its health care guidelines for Americans. They want the government to bring fruits and vegetables to the "core" of the American diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

March 1999

Diabetes Educators Don't Sell Exercise Well Enough

Exercise has always been prescribed as a companion therapy to insulin, drug, or diet therapy in individuals with type 1 and 2 diabetes, yet, in the past two decades, the importance of exercise has been reexamined time and time again.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

November 1998

Fiber Fends Off Ketoacidosis

According to the August 1998 issue of Diabetologia, a study revealed that an increase in the intake of fiber has beneficial effects in preventing ketoacidosis in people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

August 1998

Research Raises Eyebrows

It's impossible to pick out the "best" research, particularly when there is so much interesting scientific work to choose from. My choice of what to include in this report, while necessarily arbitrary, was guided by what seemed most interesting to me. So if you've been involved in a particular research project that I've omitted, please accept my apologies. Here are the new findings that I would like to share.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

July 1998

Does Type 1 Play a Role in Pubertal Growth?

The role that type 1 diabetes may or not play in the growth of kids with type 1 diabetes has been studied for some time. According to a study in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the timing of the pubertal growth is normal in type 1 children, but the magnitude of this growth is reduced in girls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

April 1998

Father of Modern Diabetes Research Dies

Rachmiel Levine, MD, known as the "father of modern diabetes research," died of heart failure recently at the age of 87 in Boston. Levine is credited with demonstrating that insulin lowers BG by stimulating the transport of glucose into the cell. This discovery, known as the "Levine Effect" or the transport theory, introduced a new era of research in which scientists began to study the modification of cells by hormones.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

December 1997

Immunization Timing May Increase Type 1 Diabetes

The number of cases of type 1 diabetes occurring before age 15 might be greatly reduced by immunizing children with common pediatric vaccines at birth, rather than waiting until eight weeks of age, according to a new study from LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City and Classen Immunotherapies in Baltimore, Md.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Health Care Professional Calls to Save Insulin

Health Care Professional Calls to Save Insulin

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

October 1997

Educator Cindy Onufer 'Czechs' Out Diabetes Care in Central Europe

I recently visited the Golden Triangle of Central Europe (the cities of Vienna, Budapest and Prague) with seven friends. In the golden city of Prague I had the immense pleasure of meeting much of the staff at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine's Diabetes Clinic, the Klinika Diabetologie. Everyone I met in Prague exuded such hospitality and such a optimistic outlook for these changing times in this historical city. The staff at the Klinika was no exception.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

September 1997

These "Magic" Questions Promote Behavioral Change

The following is the behavior change protocol presented by Funnell and Anderson. These questions are intended to be asked of patients by health care professionals, but they can be used individually and can be helpful to keep in mind when trying to make significant lifestyle changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Has Your Doctor-Patient Relationship Broken Down?

No one can "get" people with diabetes to do anything. If change is needed, it must be inspired and directed by the individual if it is to be truly effective.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

August 1997

The One-Two Combination

Metformin and troglitazone were both shown to improve glycemic control of type 2 diabetes. In addition, using them in combination proved to be safe and to provide additional benefit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

July 1997

Tragedy Strikes a Young Man with Diabetes

Adam Greiner's story as told to DIABETES HEALTH by his mother, Barbara Greiner-Read, RN, CDE from the Valley Health System in Hemet, Calif.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

June 1997

When Things Go Wrong

Warning: Read at your own risk. The following case study is a true story about one person's fatal encounter with diabetes and may not be suitable for all readers. While the information is unpleasant we feel that it provides a valuable lesson. Most of our case studies have been success stories in the past, but Dr. Marcus and DIABETES HEALTH feel that the information herein can help to save lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

November 1996

A Child’s Illness is a Family Affair

When a child is born with or develops a chronic illness, such as diabetes, no one turns to the parents and says, "Be careful! Your marriage is now at risk." Yet, it is true. Despite the parents' deep love for their child and for each other, long-term issues of worry, fatigue and expense will, inevitably, put a great strain on their relationship.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

July 1996

Education Programs Can Help Lower Blood Sugars

People with diabetes who have trouble keeping their HbA1c levels down often have complex psychosocial problems within their families. A recent study, led by Christina Preis, showed that a diabetes education program which focuses on family therapy can help lower HbA1c levels and reduce the risk of severe hypoglycemic episodes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

Immediate AIC Tests Make A Difference

A new study shows that providing physicians with glycated hemoglobin readings during patient visits can improve glycemic control in those patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

Potential Type 1 Trigger, Vaccination Timing Linked To Diabetes

Controversial new research linking the timing of vaccinations to type 1 diabetes has recently captured the attention of federal health officials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

June 1996

Diabetes Educator Launches New Line of Frozen Dinners

A new line of frozen dinners specifically designed for people with diabetes is now available.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1996

Holistic Workout—Nurse Combines Mind and Body Care Into One

Not satisfied just working 40 hours a week in diabetes care, Eva Bradley, RN, BSN, CDE, designed a remarkable new exercise routine for people with diabetes in her spare time. The program, which Eva calls "Spiritualcise," combines the physical needs of self-care with the emotional needs of self-esteem.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1996

Dealing With Great Expectations—Emotional Problems in Diabetes Often Go Unrecognized

In caring for diabetes, the important role of emotions is often overlooked. It's so much easier to deal with a patient's physiology than to deal with the patient's feelings.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 1996

May 1996

Immunization Timing Linked to Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes may be linked to the timing of child immunization, according to a new study done by Classen Immunotherapies.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

February 1996

Educator of the Month:  Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE
Educator of the Month: Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE

Forget the uptight approach to diabetes management. When patients come to Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE, at the Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, Idaho, they are taught to trust their bodies instead of fight them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

Blood Glucose Awareness Training, How To Identify Low Blood Sugars, BGAT Training

When you have a hypoglycemic incident, does it usually catch you by surprise? Probably-hypoglycemic symptoms are not always easy to recognize. For example, you more than likely have had hypoglycemic episodes when you just did not feel as many warning symptoms as you usually do. You may also have had episodes when you felt symptoms, but thought they were caused by something other than your blood glucose. If symptoms can be so hard to recognize, what can you do to improve your ability to tell when your blood glucose is too high or too low?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

December 1995

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Liz Grabowski

Managing the only diabetes facility of its kind in the state of Kentucky is not an easy job, but Liz Grabowski, RN, CDE, MSN, ARNP, loves it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

November 1995

School Districts Not Educating Educators About Diabetes

Earline Edwards, RN, of Omaha, Neb. recently published a report called "Diabetes Care in the Schools: A Challenge for the Diabetes Educator." Information in her report supports Cynthia Halvorsen's contentions about the treatment her son has received in school.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

October 1995

Educator Of The Month: Persistence Pays Off: Nurse Persuades HMO To Augment Patient’s Plan

How many times have you skipped a blood sugar test because you didn't want to waste a meter strip?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

September 1995

Prevent Complications: Will it be Possible?

The causes of diabetic complications are not yet completely understood, but there are some strong suspicions about certain changes in tissues and organs. It seems almost undeniable (especially after the recent DCCT) that hyperglycemia plays a major role in triggering the mechanisms that ultimately lead to diabetic complications. Two of the suspected mechanisms are osmotic effects from the hyperglycemia itself and glycosylation (glucose sticking to other molecules) of various important proteins-like hemoglobin, and the tissues of the eye, kidney, nerve, and blood vessels. Also suspected is the accelerated action of some enzyme systems when they are fed by extra glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

July 1995

MiniMed Offers Pump Classes... for Doctors

Physicians are invited to attend one of the MiniMed Insulin Pump Therapy Symposia being offered around the United States. Four symposia are scheduled during the next several months. They will take place in Seattle, Rochester, N.Y., Little Rock, Ark., and Houston.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Educator Of The Month

Eileen Corkery started her career as a visiting nurse, bringing healthcare into peoples' homes. Fifteen years later, she's still educating, but now people come to her.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Metformin: Who Should Take It?

Several prominent endocrinologists gathered in San Diego this past January to develop guidelines for prescribing metformin. Speaking at the American Diabetes Association Post-Graduate course were: Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Houston's Baylor College of Medicine; Ralph A. DeFronzo, MD, Chief of the Diabetes Division of the University of Texas Health Center in San Antonio; and Jay S. Skyler, MD of Miami.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Researcher Suggests Sweeping Changes in the Way Doctors Treat People with Diabetes

Most doctors are trained to control patients' medical problems. When doctors take charge of diabetes, they often try to direct their patients in the same way parents do their children. When patients don't do what they are told, doctors often label them "non-compliant." Bob Anderson, EdD, views this as "a health care professional's term for disobedience."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

June 1995

April 1995

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Jean Konrady, RN, CDE

Jean Oswald Konrady, RN, a diabetes educator at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla., died in August. She was 43 when she lost her battle with breast cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1995

February 1995

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Laurinda Poirier, MPH, RN, CDE

Nomination Letter:
It is our great pleasure to recommend our colleague, Laurinda Poirier, MPH, RN, CDE, Director of Clinical and Educational Services here at the Joslin Diabetes Center, for your "Educator of the Month.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1995

December 1994

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Martha Teter

Martha Teter, RN, M. Ed., CDE was selected as the Diabetes Educator for Western Ohio in 1991, and is a member of the Dayton Area Diabetes Association. She is presently the coordinator of the Diabetes Education program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Fairborn, Ohio.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1994

November 1994

Over 31% Of Women With Diabetes Skip Their Insulin On Purpose

As many as 40.2 percent of women with type I diabetes between the ages of 15 and 30 intentionally take less insulin than they need. This is according to a study that took place at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and was published in Diabetes Care (October 1994).

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1994

October 1994

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Phyllis Furst

Phyllis Furst, RN, MA, CDE is a diabetes nurse educator in Long Island, New York. She is the Diabetes Education Director at the Endocrinology and Diabetes Associates of Long Island in Rockville Center, a 3 physician diabetes and endocrinology practice, and has had type I diabetes for 22 years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1994

September 1994

Don’t Eat If Your Blood Sugar Is Over 150 mg/dl

Q: Recently I read an article in Post Graduate Medicine ("Effective Insulin Use," Vol. 95, No. 8, June 1994, pgs. 52, 54, 58-60, 63-64, and 67). The article suggests the patient not eat if the blood glucose is greater than 150 mg/dl. I would appreciate you reading this article and giving me your opinion.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1994

August 1994

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Evelyne Fleury-Milfort

Evelyne Fleury-Milfort, RN, MSN, CDE, FNP, is a diabetes nurse educator in Los Angeles, California. She works at the University of Southern California University Hospital and at a low-income clinic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1994

June 1994

Professional Views On DCCT

The letters we received in response to Joan Hoover's article "The DCCT Offers Nothing to Diabetic Patients" were surprising in a number of ways. Firstly, they were primarily from health professionals: doctors, researchers, nurses. Secondly, almost all of them were opposing Ms. Hoover's viewpoint. We are printing the letters (some have been edited for length) because such a response deserves consideration, but also because the letters touch on many of the reasons behind the DCCT study. Also interesting is that each letter has a different view on the DCCT.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1994

Diabetes Educator of the Month: Sue Thom

Susan Thom, RD, LD, CDE, is a dietician and diabetes educator in Cleveland, Ohio. She runs a private practice called Diabetes Associates with her partner, an RN, and is involved in many local programs as well as national ones. Susan Thom is also the incoming president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1994

April 1994

The DCCT Offers Nothing to Diabetic Patients

(Excerpt from "DCCT Report Proposes that Diabetic Patients Try Harder" by Joan Hoover ©6/93.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1994

What Was The DCCT All About

Dr. Alan Marcus is a diabetes specialist who practices in Laguna Hills, California. He is a medical advisor to MiniMed Technologies, a spokesperson for Novo Nordisk, and an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the USC School of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1994

Outstanding Nurse Educator: Margrette Wilkman

Margaret J. Wilkman, RN, CDE, is a clinical nurse specialist at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. She is part of a consulting team, consisting of an endocrine specialist, a dietitian, and a clinical nurse specialist, that sees patients with diabetes who were admitted to the hospital for reasons other than diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1994

December 1993

Diabetes Educators Pioneer Successful Program with 'Royal' Participation, Top Tongan Assists 'Culturally-Sensitive' Program

In Tonga, a small island kingdom in the South Pacific with a population of about 100,000 people, girth is a sign of success. Western-style medical care tends to be utilized only for illnesses related to the West, and hospitals are viewed as places for people with life threatening illnesses; as many as 70% of the patients go there to die. These insights gained by Ruth Breitenbach, a nurse and diabetes educator at Redwood City Kaiser in California, and her colleague Donna Wright, MA, RN, have helped them pioneer a successful, culturally sensitive diabetes education program aimed at the Tongan population in Redwood City. Tongan-Americans comprise a large percentage of the patients treated for diabetes there.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1993

July 1993

DCCT : Educator Standard Of Diabetes

We contacted Suzanne Strowig, MSN, RN, CDE, of the University of Texas in Dallas, in a phone interview regarding the recently completed Diabetes Control and Complications Trials (DCCT). Suzanne was the Trial Coordinator for the Texas area which included 22 people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1993

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