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Type 1 Diabetes Issues Article Archives

October 2013

A DH Classic: Halloween Is More Than Scary for Parents of Trick-or-Treaters with Diabetes

(Editor's Note: We originally published this article in October 2008. Laura Plunkett's observations are timeless, and her comments elicited several interesting responses from readers.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2013

September 2013

Fighting My Lifelong Enemy, Diabetes

"For the joy of the Lord is your strength." Nehemiah 8:10

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2013

June 2013

New CVS Smartphone App Helps Manage Diabetes on the Go

The CVS Mobile app from CVS/pharmacy is a unique new interactive smartphone app that provides users with numerous personalized ways to both manage their healthcare and handle drugstore needs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2013

Fire Up the Grill for a Memorable Summer

This past Memorial day, the first holiday of the summer season, was a chance to shake off cabin fever and fire up the grill-a perfect cooking method for people with diabetes because it requires no added fat but still provides that big punch of flavor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2013

The Scariest Thing About Diabetes

Of course there are a million things that scare me about diabetes, but the one that tops the charts is the idea of losing the battle against my diabetes in my sleep. An article about the overnight passing of a beautiful and healthy young woman with type 1 diabetes is buzzing on many of my friends' Facebook walls and the mood is unavoidably somber in the diabetes online community tonight.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Juggling More Than Three Pins

I've been type 1 diabetic for 15 years. It hasn't been easy and I'm still grasping to keep my feet on the ground medically. Every time I think I've got this disease figured out, something new gets thrown at me and I stumble over and over again.  From insulin resistance to pump failures to carbohydrate/insulin sensitivity changes to exercise regimens to health insurance issues to medical bill payments to a seemingly innocent cut on the sole of my foot, etc., I'm getting worn out.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 29, 2013

Type 1 Glucose Production Pill on the Horizon

According to research out of a lab in North Carolina, there's more to worry about for type 1 diabetes than a lack of insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 23, 2013

Reduced Insulin May Prevent Exercise-Related Hypoglycemia

People with type 1 diabetes who exercise may need to reduce their insulin to counteract the effects of their workouts, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2013

New Website Aims at Type 1 Teens

When Tommy Kelley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago, while he was in eighth grade, he had a hard time finding information that related to him.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2013

If someone needs to restrict their protein intake because of kidney damage, is it safe to do a low carb diet?

The restriction of protein intake is an outdated thought. It was born of a study by Barry Brenner, at Harvard, back in the 1980s. He did a survey of the diabetologists in Boston asking, "At what blood sugars do you like to keep your diabetics?"  The collective answer ultimately was 250 mg/dl.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2013

April 2013

How Crunch Time Affects Kids’ Health

Although there are small hints that the American obesity epidemic may be slowing a little, one in every three American kids is overweight or obese. To find out why, National Public Radio, together with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, looked at what goes on in American households between school and bedtime-a period they call "crunch time."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2013

An Interview With My Husband, Rick

I wanted to interview my husband about my diabetes. He played a huge part in helping me accept my type 1 diabetes and he has never made me feel inferior for having it. Rick and I just celebrated the 15th anniversary since our first date, and since I've only had diabetes for 18 years, he's been there for most of it.  He was there during the times I was out of control and in denial, and he's been there while I work on treating myself right and trying to take good care of myself. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2013

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin, shots, meter, blood 
Emotions are about to flood
DKA - Hospital stay
I just don't know what to say

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2013

Is it dangerous to continually have low-grade ketone levels in your blood?

Low-grade ketones are not a problem; it's part of the survival system that humans have for getting through famines. We don't have many famines nowadays, but if they're not eating overnight, a large percent of the population is going to have ketones in their blood in the morning.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2013

What meds do you recommend to control elevated cholesterol?

In my experience the most common cause of elevated cholesterol is low thyroid. High blood sugars also have an effect on LDL that can be very dramatic. If someone has elevated cholesterol, diabetic or not, the very first thing you do is check their free and total T3, and free and total T4. When you give them adequate thyroid replacement, the LDL usually normalizes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2013

Five Simple Ways to Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There's talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans.

comments 9 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2013

We’re Not Bad, We’re Human

I've had type 1 diabetes for 18 years and whenever I hear bad news about someone with diabetes it hits me hard.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2013

How do you evaluate the studies that show that strict control of A1c does not have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular events?

This person is referring to the ACCORD study, which in its initial unsophisticated scoring supposedly showed that a large group of elderly diabetics who had existing heart disease, died sooner when their A1cs were brought down.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2013

March 2013

Are very low-carb diets safe for children? Is it something you recommend?

The effect of carbohydrate on blood sugar will be multiplied in inverse proportion to childrens' weight. This means that the smaller they are, the greater effect a little bit of carbohydrate will have on them. It's been shown that children with elevated blood sugars (usually due in part to high carbohydrate intake) have diminished brain volume and lower IQs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2013

Can you please explain the dawn phenomenon, and how best to manage it?

Dawn phenomenon is the situation where the liver removes insulin from the blood in the morning hours, which causes morning blood sugars to go up, even if breakfast is skipped.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2013

Introducing Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Can over-hydration or dehydration affect blood sugar level?

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2013

February 2013

Sisterhood Is Powerful (and Redesigned)

I interviewed Brandy Barnes in late 2011 ("Support on the Diabetes Journey," article 7400 on the Diabetes Health website) about the inspiration for her 2008 launch of DiabetesSisters (www.diabetessisters.org). The rapidly growing organization of women with diabetes has struck a chord with its optimistic message of sisterhood and loving mutual support. As Brandy prepares for two major conferences this year, I got her to hold still long enough to give us an update.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2013

Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself as a Newly Diagnosed Teen

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault." You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2013

Sean Glass: Dancing—and Juggling Life—to His Own Tunes

Sean Glass learned about the time he was in kindergarten that his type 1 diabetes was ultimately his alone to manage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2013

Lilly Diabetes Supports Scholarship Fund With $100,000 Donation in 2013

Students with type 1 diabetes will have more opportunity for higher education thanks to a donation from Lilly Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2013

High Blood Sugar Can Cause Dental Problems, Too

It comes as no surprise to a person with diabetes that having high blood sugar can have a huge impact on your entire body and how you feel. But did you know it can also cause many problems in your mouth? Your teeth and gums are heavily affected by the excess glucose in your system, and without proper preventative care, people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can experience serious long-term damage to their mouths.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2013

Exenatide Bests Insulin Detemir in Head-to-Head Test

Sooner or later most type 2s face the choice of whether they should begin using insulin. As the effectiveness of metformin or sulfonylureas fades, physicians often look to insulin as the safest, most effective means of asserting control over blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2013

Mike Fisher, Competitive Snowboarder

Mike Fisher is a 23-year-old from Ontario, Canada, who's been snowboarding since he was 13 years old. At the age of 18, he was involved in a motorcycle crash that necessitated the amputation of one leg below the knee. He says, "At first, I felt that my life was coming to a crashing halt. But I just pushed myself to recover as fast as possible and get my life back on track, go to school, get back into snowboarding and motorcycles-just anything so that my life wasn't affected at all. I had a lot of support, and I would say that I was pretty optimistic about it and took it almost as a challenge. By the time that I was 19, I was happy. I was walking again, I was back in college in London, Ontario, and everything was good. The accident was a minor setback to me, and I rose above it. I was just continuing with my life."

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2013

January 2013

Reminding Myself How Serious Those Low Blood Sugars Really Are

I was having my second low of the day at work recently when I got "the headache." If you have type 1 diabetes you probably know the one. It doesn't ever go away quickly and never without having to pop a couple pain relievers. I was popping more than a couple peppermint-flavored chocolates and glucose tabs and waiting for the low to go away before I could even reach for the Advil to help ease the pounding in my head.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2013

#Six and Diabetes: Jay Cutler On Numbers

As an NFL quarterback, Jay Cutler makes his living putting a football into the hands of an open receiver before getting slammed to the ground by a huge defensive lineman.  It's a stressful occupation, all about timing, a little luck, and seeing the big picture in a split second.  

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2013

The Hidden Gift of a Diabetes Diagnosis

Michelle Gaylord has lived more than 30 years with type 2 diabetes, but the diagnosis is one that she now sees a bit like a gift.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 22, 2013

Just Don’t Do Nothing!

On September 26, 1992, my daughter Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Since that time, we have immersed ourselves in the world of diabetes with two goals: First, to ensure that Kaitlyn has the very best tools, both medical and emotional, to manage her diabetes, and second, to dedicate our unyielding efforts in pursuit of a cure. For us, it's not either/or: It's both.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2013

Each One of Us Inspires the Other

Every spring since 1999, the Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) has distributed our publication to their young campers. In honor of their youthful enthusiasm, our springtime issue always focuses on people who inspire us, from the young to the old. In this issue, we bring you the stories of people who refuse to let their diabetes limit them, people whose example re-ignites our determination to live our very best and healthiest lives. As a publisher, I am always seeking inspiration, and each of these individuals is a fresh reminder of what we can do if we put our minds to it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 19, 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

Islet Transplants May Decrease Type 1 Atherosclerosis Risk

Narrowed and hardened arteries-atherosclerosis-are a common risk associated with type 1 diabetes. Fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up to create plaque, which narrows the arteries and makes blood flow more difficult. The increased risk of blood clots often leads to heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2013

December 2012

New ADA Guidelines Revise Blood Pressure Goals, Testing Frequencies

The American Diabetes Association’s newly released 2013 edition of its annual “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” recommends two notable changes:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2012

Score With Scott M. King: A Diabetes And Life Coach

We are delighted to announce that Scott Millay King, cofounder and former editor-in-chief of Diabetes Health, is coming back to the magazine as a regular columnist.  You might remember his popular column, “My Own Injection,” in which he wrote heart-warming stories about the challenges of being a diabetic dad.  When he began the column 21 years ago, he was the only blogger giving a voice to type 1 diabetes. Many of today’s online bloggers got their start by writing for Scott and Diabetes Health (formerly Diabetes Interview).  Scott gave a stage to many voices, knowing that our readers want to hear different perspectives on how people manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2012

The Dreaded Cold and Flu Season is Back in Full Swing

Having type 1 diabetes causes me to worry excessively about getting sick. Admittedly I sometimes go overboard in my attempt to avoid these seasonal germs. I find myself avoiding people showing symptoms as though they are infected with the plague, skipping goodies in the staff kitchen at work, and dodging shared office equipment with potential sickies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2012

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years. Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips. Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town. Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2012

Halle Berry Says She's Worked Her Way Up From Type 1 to Type 2 Diabetes

No less an authority than the New York Times wrote in May 2006 that Halle Berry has type 1 diabetes, listing her as one of several "stars who have type 1 - Gary Hall, the Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer; Adam Morrison, the Gonzaga University basketball star; [and] Halle Berry."

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2012

Doctors Can Be Everyday Heroes, Too

Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu, MD, MPH, FACPM is a very interesting man. He served as the Acting Surgeon General of the United States in 2006 and was made Chairman of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in October 2007. The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is designed to serve as a home for the diabetes family and a trusted place of diabetes learning that will inspire diabetes innovation, improved care, and better outcomes worldwide. Through the Institute, Johnson & Johnson is opening and operating state-of-the-art instructional facilities around the world to provide health professionals with education and training aimed at improving diabetes patients' outcomes by working at the community level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2012

Children with Diabetes, You Are My True Inspiration

Jay Hewitt is 41 years old and has lived with type 1 diabetes since 1991. He is an elite Ironman triathlete (2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike ride, 26.2 mile run) and three-time member of the U.S. National Team for Long Course Triathlon. He is a lawyer, the father of a 16-month-old daughter, and a motivational speaker. He speaks to people with diabetes and others all over the world on fitness, nutrition, and achieving goals in life and business. Jay is also captain of Team Joslin at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, MA. Visit Jay's website at www.jayhewitt.com.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 12, 2012

Incorporating Exercise Into a Busy Life

I would exercise if I had more time... if I had a health club membership... if it didn't hurt so much... if I knew what exercises to do... if I could do it with my family... if I could control my blood sugar...

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2012

Study Shows DAFNE Helps Type 1s Manage Their Diabetes

Education as part of routine care is the key to successful treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2012

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2012

Five To-Do’s for People Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

There are ways to live with diabetes that allow for optimal health and relative freedom from complications. But to obtain them requires knowledge and know-how.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2012

Behind the Wheel, But Still in Control

Last May, 24-year-old Charlie Kimball was in Car #35, taking Turn 3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the Firestone Freedom 100. He was in radio contact with his pit crew, who informed him that he had a headwind coming out of the turn and onto the 5/8 mile "straight." Charlie kept an eye on the car next to him, moving closer and beginning to crowd it on the inside. Having raced professionally for six years, he knew that he had to make a move, and soon. He shifted into sixth gear and accelerated.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 4, 2012

November 2012

Type 1 Onset Linked to Low Vitamin D?

A report in the December issue of the journal Diabetologia says that a study of 1,000 active-duty military personnel who later developed type 1 diabetes showed that low levels of vitamin D significantly increased the chances of developing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2012

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam.'

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 29, 2012

Study Says Iron May Contribute to Type 2 Onset

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 28, 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

Type 1 For a Day

I recently learned of a JDRF campaign to increase type 1 diabetes awareness, in which people without diabetes can sign up to experience “virtual diabetes” for a day. During that day, they receive up to 24 texts prompting actions that simulate the frequent blood sugar testing, insulin injections, and dietary choices that people with type 1 diabetes must endure. JDRF thoughtfully notes on its website that “while no virtual campaign can re-create the many needles required or the physical and financial tolls of this serious disease, T1D for a Day seeks to deepen understanding of the many heroic steps our friends and loved ones with T1D take each day.”

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2012

Penny Hildreth: Finally Facing Diabetes

It was more than two decades ago, and Penny Hildreth was already feeling overwhelmed by life when she learned that she had type 1 diabetes. She was pregnant with her second child and worried about the baby’s safety after a car accident that had left Hildreth with a broken collarbone, a broken rib, and a punctured spleen. It was the spleen injury that ultimately led to her diagnosis of diabetes, but she was more concerned about the baby, a little girl who was born healthy despite the automobile accident. “I always say that she’s my miracle,” says the 46-year-old Portland resident.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2012

October 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In response to a post that I wrote on October 19, 2012, asking readers to contribute their opinions, John M wrote to me asking for more information. After exchanging a few emails, we came up with an idea that we think you will like: a new column by readers who write in about experiences they have had with diabetes and who are curious to know if anybody else has experienced the same thing. The new column will be called "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" The idea is for you to send in your question, in response to which other readers will share similar and not-so-similar experiences through our "Comments" section. (Take note that comments take one to two days to post because they all need to be read and approved.)

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2012

Why Is My Health Insurance Coverage Getting Worse Instead of Better?

I’m not sure how everyone else is feeling about health insurance in the United States of America right now, but I know I’m worried. Ever since my type 1 diabetes diagnosis at 18 years old, I’ve been concerned about the possibility of losing my health insurance. But now, I’m even more worried by the fact that, despite my health insurance, my healthcare costs seem to be rising by the minute. It strikes me as colossally unfair that you can faithfully stick with your employer and still end up with health insurance that’s much worse than what you started with.  I feel overwhelmed by the new costs I’m seeing, and I’m sure I’m not the only one.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 22, 2012

Oral Agents for Lowering Blood Sugar in Type 2 Diabetes

Author’s note: Throughout this series, I will inject my own opinion, which frequently differs from that of the medical establishment in this field. Having had diabetes for more than 66 years, I place my emphasis on the well-being of fellow patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2012

Spreading Diabetes Awareness Isn’t as Easy as It Looks

You might not realize this, but I'm actually pretty shy. I often find myself wishing that I had my husband's confidence. He doesn't worry about drawing attention to himself at parties or work. He embraces the mindset that if you don't like him, it's your problem, not his, and he shows himself to everyone just as he is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

September 2012

Israeli Scientists Develop Promising Beta Cell Transplant Technique

Israeli researchers believe that they have found a way to increase the survival and effectiveness of insulin-producing pancreatic cells transplanted into diabetic mice. The technique, developed by scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, involves surrounding the transplanted beta cells with a three-dimensional latticework of nurturing blood vessels called "engineered tissue."

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 10, 2012

August 2012

A Dramatic Life Expectancy Increase for Type 1s

A 30-year study of life expectancy among people with type 1 diabetes showed a dramatic increase during the second half of the study, say researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Type 1s diagnosed between 1965 and 1980 have a life expectancy of 68.8 years—15 years more than type 1s diagnosed between 1950 and 1964. In the same period, general life expectancy for US residents increased by less than one year.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2012

Social Media, Partnerships Are Top Topics at AADE12

As diabetes climbs to epidemic levels in the United States, and finding adequate resources to fund future U.S. healthcare remains in question, the need for an already existing "boots on the ground" group that can address the disease is greater than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2012

A Reckless Summer

As teenagers, most of us did some reckless and irresponsible things. It's part of growing up, right? But if you're a teenager with type 1 diabetes, acting reckless becomes a bit more tricky. I had a reckless summer of my own ten years ago, right after high school graduation, when I traveled down south to spend a month with my mom. I hadn't lived with her since the age of 16, so I wanted to get to know her and my younger brother again. Unfortunately, I also used that time to take a break from my diabetes regimen. It had been only four years since my diagnosis, and I wanted to feel that even though I had a disease, I was still a normal teenager who was capable of an adventure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2012

July 2012

Score With Scott M. King: A Diabetes And Life Coach

We are delighted to announce that Scott Millay King, cofounder and former editor-in-chief of Diabetes Health, is coming back to the magazine as a regular columnist.  You might remember his popular column, “My Own Injection,” in which he wrote heart-warming stories about the challenges of being a diabetic dad.  When he began the column 21 years ago, he was the only blogger giving a voice to type 1 diabetes. Many of today’s online bloggers got their start by writing for Scott and Diabetes Health (formerly Diabetes Interview).  Scott gave a stage to many voices, knowing that our readers want to hear different perspectives on how people manage their diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 30, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

Fire In My Veins: A Story of Ketoacidosis

I've had type 1 diabetes for 14 long years. During that time, I have had five episodes of ketoacidosis, two of which were brought on by emotional stress.  The one that happened eight years ago, shortly after the meltdown of a serious relationship, lives vividly in my memory.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2012

Diabetes: Hospital Bills Cost U.S. $83 Billion A Year

Diabetes affects nearly 25 million Americans, and that number is expected to grow substantially every year. It's the fifth leading cause of death in America, more than breast cancer and AIDs combined. And according to a report released last week from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), it's a disease that’s costing Americans $83 billion a year in hospital fees — 23 percent of total hospital spending.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2012

June 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds

SAN DIEGO - June 15, 2012 - Dexcom, the leader in continuous glucose monitoring, is proudly sponsoring the efforts of the Diabetes Formation Flight USA(DFFUSA.org) - three pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes using Dexcom's Seven Plus as part of their effort to set new transcontinental world speed records while raising funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Another Day, Another Battle

Last year, I gave birth to my daughter and shared my pregnancy and birthing experiences with you. The pregnancy was a very difficult but extremely rewarding experience. A few months after our daughter was born, my husband and I discussed whether we'd have another child. On one hand, I went through several insulin shock comas, severe insulin resistance, and pre-eclampsia, ending in an emergency cesarean section. Because my first pregnancy was so tough, we weren't sure if we wanted to risk another one. On the other hand, if we did have two children, we wanted them to be very close in age so that they could bond well. We figured that if the two children were around fifteen months apart, then my daughter would be too young to feel any tension about having another baby in the house. We hoped they'd be close enough in age that they would always have one another as a companion.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 13 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Type 1: FDA OKs Levemir for Two- to Five-Year-Olds

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Novo Nordisk's Levemir basal insulin for type 1 children aged two to five years. The FDA decision makes Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) the only basal insulin approved for use in this age group.
Levemir, introduced to the US market in 2006, was previously approved for older children and adults with type 1 diabetes, as well as insulin-using type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2012

A Spiritual Approach to Diabetes Care

The following article documents a very personal way of approaching diabetes.  Always check with a healthcare professional before changing your diet or your diabetes care regimen.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2012

Finding the Right Diabetes Doctor

I once had a doctor ask me what I'd do if someone offered me a drink or a cigarette. I was a teenager, recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and it was the first time that I had seen her. When I told her that I didn't drink or smoke, she kept hounding me with questions as if I were lying. I grew tired of telling her the same thing over and over. She just didn't seem to hear what I was saying. Maybe she was just trying to scare me from starting, but I left feeling annoyed and convinced that I needed to find a different doctor.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 25, 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 16 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

“Reprogrammed” Cells in Mice Reverse Late-stage Type 1 Diabetes

A successful experiment on mice with type 1 diabetes, which involved "reprogramming" their immune systems to stop attacks on pancreatic beta cells, may point the way to an eventual cure for the disease in humans.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 15, 2012

Insulin degludec

Novo Nordisk's new variety of long-lasting insulin, insulin degludec, reduces low blood sugars while improving overall control, according to a pair of studies published in the prestigious journal The Lancet on April 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2012

April 2012

All in the Family

My oldest nephew, James, has a double whammy to deal with.  His aunt, yours truly, has type 1 diabetes, and so does his father. I was in the room when my sister had an ultrasound during her pregnancy with James, and I clearly remember the doctor asking her if anyone in her family had diabetes.  We shared a look as she informed the doctor of my diabetes and her husband's diabetes.  I know we also shared a silent prayer as the reality hit us that diabetes might be passed on to her children.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Driving Safely With Type 1 Diabetes

Research has shown that a few people with Type 1 diabetes are at an increased risk for having traffic accidents due to low blood sugars.  
Possibly, we can help the diabetes community. 
Researchers at the University of Virginia are conducting a study evaluating internet tools designed to:
• • Anonymously assess risk for ALL drivers with Type 1 diabetes of being in an accident and 
• • Potentially help reduce the chance of high-risk drivers being in a future collision.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 21, 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

Sam Talbot, Top Chef

North Carolina-born chef Sam Talbot first came to national attention when he placed third in the Season 2 run of Bravo's Top Chef  TV competition. Sam, who has type 1 diabetes and wears an insulin pump, held the executive chef position at several New York City restaurants, including Black Duck, Williamsburgh Cafe, and Punch, before opening his current restaurant, the acclaimed Surf Lodge, in Montauk on Long Island.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2012

March 2012

Type 1 Diabetes Researchers Reach Important Milestone

Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international network of researchers exploring ways to prevent and delay the progression of type 1 diabetes, has reached an important milestone: screening 100,000 people to detect who among is at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This is a major achievement because it has helped researchers better predict who will develop diabetes and when it will require treatment. Earlier diagnosis helps patients avoid a severe, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Type 1s May Produce Insulin for Decades After Diagnosis

Massachusetts researchers have found that even years after they are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, some people continue to possess functioning beta cells. This finding departs from the conventional thinking that in type 1 diabetes beat cell activity inevitably ceases--the result of attacks on the cells by the body's immune system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2012

Diabetes Camp: What You Should Know

There are more than 200 diabetes camps in North America, offering more than 400 programs to more than 30,000 youths and young adults with diabetes and their families. One in 400 children has type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in children, once rare, is increasingly common due to obesity. Education and motivation are vital to healthy management of the disease. Diabetes camps empower children and their families to meet the rigorous demands of diabetes, allowing them to be healthy, active, and motivated to reach their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2012

Please Don’t Imply That I Caused My Diabetes.

When it comes to diabetes, people often blame the patient instead of the disease. I cannot think of another chronic illness for which this is the case. Much of the public seems to believe that we bring diabetes on ourselves. When people with diabetes are diagnosed with complications, uninformed observers often insist that it happened because they were "bad diabetics." Comments like "She didn't take care of herself" make me instantly defensive and angry. How can anyone know what that person went through on a day-to-day basis with her diabetes?

comments 11 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2012

Little Diabetes Warriors

Sometimes I feel like an idiot. It usually happens when I read a blog by one of my favorite "D" parents telling about how their children are handling life with type 1 diabetes. These brave kids put up with the same things that adults with diabetes do, and some are literally too young to even understand what's going on. Reading about these little warriors makes me regret even more the fact that I wallowed in self pity all afternoon just because my blood sugar didn't cooperate flawlessly during my daily walk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2012

February 2012

Girl Finds Strength in Fostering Diabetic Dog

The unconditional love of a dog can be an amazing source of strength and resilience for its owner. Eight-year-old Madalaine Hembraugh and her foster dog, Petey, are living proof of that. They both have type 1 diabetes, and they have formed a bond that is helping to heal them both.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2012

Hear Me, Doctor

During my 14 years with type 1 diabetes and my time spent interacting with the diabetes online community, I constantly hear the same theme: Doctors aren't listening to their patients, and their bedside manners are deteriorating. Every day, it seems, I hear about people who have been treated as if they are simply a number or dismissed as uneducated in their own health conditions.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2012

Neurologists Issue New Guideline for Treating Neuropathy

A team of neurologists has issued a new set of recommendations for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, including drugs and other treatments that have been found to be the most effective therapies for the condition.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2012

Gluten-Free Diet Doesn’t Lower Diabetes Risk

A gluten-free diet in the first 12 months of life does not lower the risk of later developing type 1 diabetes in children who have a family history of the disease, says a German study. Previous studies had suggested that babies whose diets included gluten in their first months of life might be more likely to develop type 1 than youngsters whose diets did not.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 22, 2012

Hypoglycemia Affects Productivity at Work

A survey of type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany indicates that more than one in every five have arrived late at work or not shown up at all because of a hypoglycemic episode the night before.

comments 16 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

An Update on Bydureon

You've heard of the blockbuster drug Byetta, a daily injection for type 2 diabetes? Byetta's sister product, Bydureon, which is injected just once a week, has just been approved by the FDA and is available in pharmacies.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

The Blood Sugar Blame Game

Wiped out and dejected, that's my state of mind this morning. I had a really low blood sugar, and it's left me feeling like I've been in a fight. My arms and legs feel heavy, and my "low" headache lingers, but I remind myself that it could be worse. I'm fine, I treated it, and my day will go on.

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2012

Keeping Up With Baby

My son learned to crawl last month. As a part-time stay-at-home dad, I found it both exciting and terrifying. Through crawling, my son has entered a new stage in life. He might have rolled or scooted a few feet before, but now he can see something in another room and make up his mind to go there.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2012

A Children’s Diabetes Fairytale: Princess Shayna’s Invisible Visible Gift

At the age of 15 years, Sheila Glazov's son Joshua was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. "In 1985," Glazov says, "our family was living in Mammoth Lakes, California. Our little mountain town had a 15-bed hospital that was efficient if you injured yourself skiing, but not if you were looking for appropriate medical care and support for your child who was newly diagnosed with diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2012

FDA OKs Sale of Combo Drug JANUMET® XR

The FDA has approved US sales of JANUMET® XR, a daily oral treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin and extended-release metformin. The drug is the fourth oral type 2 diabetes treatment introduced by Merck, which also sells JANUVIA, JANUMET, and JUVISYNC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2012

The Badge of Courage

Two years ago, I was a different woman. I was just beginning to come out of my diabetes shell, assessing my confidence with strangers by testing in public and telling friends about my disease. I can still feel the panic rising in my throat as I told people that I have diabetes and need to take injections multiple times per day. I was afraid of rejection, afraid that they would treat me like a sick person. But after eleven years of fighting for my life with type 1 diabetes, I was tired of being afraid. The more people I told, the easier it got.

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2012

January 2012

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2012

MTV’s True Life: I Have Diabetes

With the recent news of Paula Deen's battle with type 2 diabetes, diabetes has been getting some negative coverage in the media. I've even heard comments like " No wonder Paula Deen has diabetes when she eats so much sugar and butter." This is frustrating because it perpetuates the false stereotype that all people with diabetes are the same.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2012

“Grip, Rip, and Sip”

Ethan Lewis, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12, founded GlucoBrands only 11 years later. The company produces a portable, inexpensive, tasty, fast-acting glucose gel that people can take to quickly restore healthy blood sugar levels when they experience hypoglycemia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

Recovery

My baby girl had just been born. I was in the postoperation room after going through a cesarean section. My husband went to get my parents, who had been waiting for twelve hours in the waiting room. A nurse laid my little girl in an incubator next to my bed and checked her blood sugar, which was normal, in the mid-40 range. Fifteen minutes later the nurse checked her again, and it registered in the mid-30s. I watched as the nurse fed my baby her first ounces of food. I was still too numb to even know that I had legs, much less to be able to wiggle my toes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2012

Instructional Video Available for Spring Universal Infusion Set

Spring Health Solutions, Inc., has released an instructional video describing its Spring Universal Infusion Set, recently approved by the FDA and Health Canada. The video, at www.SpringUniversal.com, is designed to help consumers properly use the product.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Birthing Options

Throughout pregnancy and all the way up until labor, I was adamant that I was not having a cesarean section. I was terrified of being cut open because I know that my healing time is longer due to my lowered immune system. In 2009, I had to go to the emergency room for an infection caused by cutting my leg while shaving, so how could I possibly heal after being opened up to birth a baby?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2011

Complications in the Third Trimester

Editor' Note: This article continues Katherine Marple's series on pregnancy with diabetes as a complicating factor. For previous articles, enter her name in the search feature at the top right-hand of this website. The next installment, "Birthing Options," will appear on December 30.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2011

Diabetes Diva Amanda Lamb’s “Christmas In Love” Arrives on YouTube

Diabetes Health readers who are Amanda Lamb fans can watch her first-ever Christmas single, "Christmas In Love," on YouTube.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2011

Standing Up For Sugar, the Hypoglycemia Alert Dog  

We are a tight-knit community.  I'm not talking about my neighbors in my hometown of Chicago.  I'm talking about my worldwide neighbors in the diabetic online community.  Anyone dealing with diabetes knows the bond that it brings.  When a person with diabetes is wronged, the rest of us feel the sting.  Most of us living with diabetes have stories about people badgering our diet choices, saying inappropriate or insensitive things, and, sadly, crossing the line even further.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2011

High-Tech Pump Helps Three Type 1s Swim the English Channel

On July 21, Claire Duncan was one of three people with type 1 diabetes on a six-person relay team that swam across the English Channel. The team, swimming to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, covered the 22-mile route in 13.5 hours, starting from a beach between Folkestone and Dover in England and finishing in France near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

Diabetes Shouldn’t Be Top Secret

Many people with diabetes admit to keeping their diabetes a secret.  Less than two years ago, I was one of them.  I hated the way people treated me when they found out about my diabetes.  I hated being told that I wasn't allowed to eat things by people who didn't have a clue about diabetes.  I hated the horror stories people told about their acquaintances with diabetes.  I hated people asking me if I had the "bad" kind of diabetes.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2011

Dog Sense

Forensic scientist Mark Ruefenacht, who has type 1 diabetes, tells Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie how he realized that dogs can be a major defense against life-threatening episodes of hypoglycemia. That insight led him to found Dogs for Diabetics ("D4D"), a Concord, California-based organization that trains dogs to alert their masters when they sense low blood sugar. D4D's website is located at www.dogs4diabetics.com/

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2011

Nick Jonas Receives DREAM Award From Disability Rights Legal Center

This year's DREAM Award, presented by the Disability Rights Legal Center (DRLC), was given to Nick Jonas, the musician and actor best known as one of the three Jonas Brothers. He was among the special recipients at the DRLC's annual Franklin D. Roosevelt Dinner, held this year on November 17, 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 3, 2011

November 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

The New Girl

It's hard being the new person at work.  It's even harder when you're the new person and you have diabetes. Whenever I start a new job, thoughts race through my mind: Will I go low while I'm training?  Will I have quick access to snacks?  Will I be able to check my blood sugar without an audience?  How about taking an insulin injection at the lunch table?  It isn't easy feeling forced to expose so many personal details to people you just met.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2011

Heather Shields Raises Diabetes Awareness in the Miss California Pageant

Heather Shields was thrilled when she got the opportunity to dance with the famous Joffrey Ballet School in New York City. At 11 years old, she dreamed of one day becoming a professional ballerina, and this trip would bring her dream a little closer. A long way from home for this California girl, Heather traveled with her family to the "Big Apple" for the month of July. During that month she remembers dancing six to seven hours a day in the heat of the summer. She began losing weight, but shrugged it off, assuming she'd caught her mom's stomach bug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2011

What Not to Say to the Newly Diagnosed

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I recall the numerous comments that people blurted out in an attempt to make me feel better about my situation.  But the truth was that I just needed to be treated like everyone else.  I was in the midst of a confusing, depressing, and life-altering diagnosis.  The last thing I needed was a pat on the back that felt more like a slap in the face.

comments 11 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2011

The Final Weeks of Pregnancy- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Final weeks of pregnancy! The third trimester brings about many more ultrasound scans and measurements taken to judge the growth and health of your child. You'll likely be visiting your OB/GYN or maternal fetal medicine office twice per week for non-stress tests to ensure that your baby is healthy and active.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2011

Insulindependence

The search for a cure for diabetes is a noble pursuit, but a cure always seems to be another ten years down the road. Finding a way to be healthy in the here and now is what matters for people with diabetes. In 2005, Peter Nerothin started Insulindependence (IN), a nonprofit organization that aims to "revolutionize diabetes management" by leading experiential diabetes education expeditions for type 1 youths.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2011

Blood Sugar Extremes Can Affect Young Brains

Sometimes it feels like diabetes is driving you crazy. But what if the disease is actually changing your brain? That's the disturbing suggestion of a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study suggests that both high and low blood sugars affect the brain development of young people with diabetes, but in different ways.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2011

Preconception Counseling and Birth Control Options

Being your own advocate is imperative for women with diabetes, especially when it comes to gynecologic care. As soon as a young woman is ready to become sexually active, she needs to talk with her doctor about contraceptive options. This conversation should continue through the time when she is ready to stop taking contraceptives and prepare for a family.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

Thanks to Technology, We Never Have to Be Alone

If you've had diabetes for a number of years, chances are that you remember when there was no Internet access and no diabetes online community.  You had no way to look up information online and no instant connection to millions of others around the world living with diabetes.  Unless you had a friend nearby with diabetes, there was no one to understand how you felt when your blood sugar numbers were less than stellar, and no one to sympathize with how hard it can be to get your A1C down.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

Scary and Sweet

October is my diagnosis month. At 14 years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few weeks before Halloween. I remember thinking, at least I'm too old for trick or treating. My younger sister had been diagnosed six months earlier, however, and at 10 years old, she still loved to trick or treat. To ease her pain, my parents got creative and shifted the emphasis of Halloween off sweets and onto scary: Haunted houses, hayrides, and parties with bowls full of smushed tomatoes for witches hearts and cold grapes for eyeballs became our annual tradition. My sister and I still said no to most of the sugary sweets, but we were the first ones to say yes when the doors of the haunted house opened.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2011

The Night I Needed a Glucagon Injection

The one time I needed a glucagon injection, I didn't have any. I had never been given a prescription for it, had no idea how to use it, and was absolutely clueless about what it did.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 29, 2011

What Are Ketones, and Why Are They Important to Diabetes Self-Management?

All blood tests are tools. Some are to diagnose diabetes, some are to help you manage your diabetes on a daily or long term basis and some are to keep you safe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2011

The Second Trimester- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Welcome to the second trimester!  By now, many type 1s are experiencing fewer hypoglycemic episodes, and insulin resistance is just beginning to rear its head.  You're on the other side of the miscarriage worry hump and getting settled into the pregnancy routine.  Congratulations!  Take a few minutes each day to celebrate your successes and pat your stomach with a smile, knowing you are doing the best you can to give your growing child everything she needs.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 26, 2011

GlucoLift: An All Natural Glucose Tab for People With Diabetes

Wrongly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 30 years old, Chris Angell spent several frustrating weeks trying to make sense of his condition and not understanding why he wasn't getting any better. His diagnosis was eventually changed to type 1 diabetes, but Chris never received the necessary education to get his blood sugars in control. "I didn't know what I was supposed to be eating or how to count carbs, and I really felt isolated," he says.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 25, 2011

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Diabetes Education

Diabetes is a life-long, 24-hour-a-day disease that requires self-management, time, and lots of patience. Most people with diabetes know where their numbers should be, but many struggle to follow recommended behaviors. Despite the availability of new medications and treatment devices, as well as the emphasis placed on diabetes treatment adherence over the last decade, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data show that 45 percent of patients with diabetes have not achieved A1Cs lower than 7% (an average of approximately 150-170 mg/dL).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2011

My Quest for a Smaller Jean Size and A1C

Trying to lose weight as an insulin-injecting person with type 1 diabetes couldn't be more frustrating. It gets on my last nerve that exercise can trigger mind-numbing lows, lows that cause me to inhale a portion of those recently burned calories. That said, I don't skip exercise to avoid lows. I just check my blood sugars more often, use caution with my insulin dosing, and follow the advice of my doctors.

comments 22 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2011

Preconception Counseling and Birth Control Options

Being your own advocate is imperative for women with diabetes, especially when it comes to gynecologic care. As soon as a young woman is ready to become sexually active, she needs to talk with her doctor about contraceptive options. This conversation should continue through the time when she is ready to stop taking contraceptives and prepare for a family.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2011

Diabetes Rock Bottom: How It Led Me to the Greatest Gift of All

I'm just going to come out and say it, the way people do in addiction meetings when they have hit "rock bottom." Hi, my name is Meagan. I was a very uncooperative diabetic for a great many years. I felt lonely, and I hated being different. I rarely checked my blood sugars. In fact, there were times where I didn't even know where my meter was.

comments 12 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2011

Diabetes Show and Tell

In the eighties when I was in grade school, a classmate named Scott did a show-and-tell about his diabetes. He pulled out his syringes and testing supplies. With a bulky blood sugar meter, he tested his blood, took a shot, and explained what he had to do each day to control his blood sugar. I went up to get a closer look at the table of supplies. I remember seeing all the needles and thinking, "Thank God I don't have that."

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2011

Celebrating Caregivers

My mother died unexpectedly this summer. While her loss was sad and sudden, I have many reasons to celebrate her life and the guidance she offered me. When I was diagnosed with diabetes as a child, she took it upon herself to learn the ins and outs of diabetes care. For most of the next decade, she oversaw my treatment.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2011

Resolving Erectile Dysfunction

Dear David and Aisha, I am a 39-year-old married man who has had type 1 diabetes for 22 years. My A1C levels run around 7.5%. About six years ago, I started having trouble with erections. Now they are very rare, even with ED pills. I know you say that there is more to sex than intercourse, and my wife and I still enjoy ourselves however we can. But we both miss the erections.

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2011

My Greatest Diabetes Fear

When I think about my greatest diabetes-related fear, the first thing that comes to mind isn't complications. It's health benefits. It may seem funny that my fear of health problems is second to my concerns about health insurance, but without coverage my good health would be close to impossible to maintain.

comments 17 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2011

My Experience With Team Type 1

I first met Team Type 1 in 2006, when I was 17 years old. They were competing in the Race Across America (RAAM), a 3,000-mile race from California to New Jersey, for the first time. When I signed up to be part of the support team for Team Type 1, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I was just happy to be getting a trip to California and to be away from my parents for a week. I had no idea how much work it would take.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2011

September 2011

A Type 1 Diabetes Cure in the Pipeline?

What if we could stop the body's immune system from attacking the pancreas in the first stages of type 1 diabetes? What if we could keep the pancreas producing insulin, all the while helping it recover from the autoimmune barrage?

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2011

A “Broken Pancreas” Doesn’t Stop This Photographer on a Mission

When Ken Kotch was young, he used to tell his friends that he had a "broken pancreas" to explain his type 1 diabetes. Diagnosed in 1988 at eight years old, initially Kotch had no idea what it all meant. Describing his pancreas as "broken" just made sense to him at the time

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2011

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock in the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Diabetes

A couple of factors lead to increased risk of insulin shock comas during the first trimester.  For many, insulin sensitivity increases and the pancreas isn't yet producing the hormones associated with insulin resistance.  In addition, many type 1s will be taken off of their current basal insulin if it is not yet approved for use during pregnancy.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2011

Do What You Love, and It Will Never Be Work

Being a rookie driver on the fast-paced IndyCar racing circuit is pressure enough for any 26-year-old. But for Charlie Kimball, one of four wheel men on businessman Chip Ganassi's IndyCar race team, there's the added need to manage type 1 diabetes while roaring around the track at speeds that often exceed 200 miles per hour.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 25, 2011

Reproductive Cells May Eventually Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Imagine if there were a cure for diabetes that could be found inside your own body? Wouldn't it be nice if instead of depending on durable medical equipment, we could one day heal ourselves?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 24, 2011

Do You Have a Diabetes Sick Day Plan?

It's that time of year again: flu season. I never thought much about getting a flu shot until fourteen years ago, when I ended up in the emergency room with the flu and a staggering blood sugar of over 800 mg/dL. I had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a few years before and had never discussed a sick day plan with my doctor. But during this experience, I discovered that diabetes and the flu get along about as well as a house cat and a junkyard dog.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2011

My Guardian Angel Against Low Blood Sugar

"I just read 10 sentences, but what did I read? Why doesn't it make sense to me? Is that the home phone ringing? What is happening around me?"

comments 13 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2011

More Than Just a Number: Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

So, you're pregnant!  Many who are in your shoes have worked very hard and diligently to begin this excursion.  Others have reached this milestone unintentionally.  Either way, you are about to embark on a journey that will completely challenge everything you know about your type 1 diabetes management.  These next few months will challenge your motives, your emotions, your determination, and everything that makes up who you are. So sink your heels in. Take each step one at a time.  

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2011

Swimmers with Diabetes Cross English Channel

Claire Duncan is one of many people with type 1 diabetes who wears a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump, in this case, an Animas® VibeTM. In an age of almost routine medical marvels, Duncan doesn't really seem to be an exception.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2011

We Still Have Hope

My son just turned twenty. For the first time, we didn't have a cake, ice cream, friends, balloons, or presents. He spent the day in jail. With vivid memories of his heroin-addicted evening in the ICU several months ago, we had nursed high hopes that his life would be on the mend. But healing takes time, and life doesn't always deliver the happy ending we long for.

comments 9 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2011

Comments to-There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

I want to thank you all for the many comments that you have posted.   As I said in the article, it does bother me that so many promises have been made and not kept regarding a cure. This has resulted in people just giving up hope and coming to believe that there will never be a cure for diabetes.   Such promises are still being made today.

comments 20 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2011

Together, On Our Own

"If you weren't having this conversation with me, who, other than your wife, would you be having it with?"  That question, in response to something I'd said about treating my nine-year-old daughter's diabetes, was posed to me over the phone by a friend I had made less than six months earlier. She has a daughter too, the same age as mine, who also has type 1. Their diagnosis came a couple of years before ours, so I respect her experience and opinion, and so does my wife, Franca.            

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2011

Ketones, Shmeetones.

When you live with diabetes, there's a lot to do.  Checking blood sugars.  Counting carbs.  Exercising.  Not to mention all those fun-filled doctors' appointments.  So the last time your physician or diabetes educator suggested ketone testing, it's completely understandable that your head was nodding but your mind was thinking "No way, Jack."  But before abandoning the idea completely, there are a few things you should know.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2011

A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

Combination therapy, in which doctors prescribe more than one drug to treat type 2 diabetes, is a fairly common practice. However, most newly diagnosed type 2 patients start off with metformin or a sulfonylurea and don't go on a two-drug therapy until their first drug begins to lose its effectiveness.

But combination therapy could soon become an earlier option for people with type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2011

Allie and Me

When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I was eighteen years old, scared, and confused.  Although bone thin, I was older than the usual juvenile diabetic, so the doctor didn't know if I had type 1 or type 2 diabetes.  At first, the doctor gave me pills to lower my blood sugar.  I avoided carbohydrates and threw myself into exercise, then watched helplessly as the numbers on my blood sugar meter continued to rise.

comments 10 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2011

August 2011

High Carb, Low Glycemic Diets, With Riva Greenberg

Carbohydrates have become the ugly stepsister in the family photo album of healthy eating. Standing in the grocery aisle, consumers study ingredients and food labels, counting and analyzing the carb content of their foods. In the last decade, the popularity of low carb diets rose to dramatic heights as Americans gravitated toward the South Beach, Atkins, and Zone diets. Fruits were forsaken for plates piled high with steak and eggs.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2011

There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

Will there be a cure for diabetes?  Is an artificial pancreas a cure?  Was insulin a cure?  Let's begin on the correct platform.  You may have an opinion on what a cure is that completely differs from mine, and that's okay.

comments 42 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2011

Diabetes Philosophies: Mine and Yours

I recently finished reading Amy Stockwell Mercer's book, The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes.  In Chapter 1, the author discusses a topic that I find critical to the well-being of people with diabetes: Developing a personal diabetes philosophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2011

Great News for People With Type 1 Diabetes

For people with type 1 diabetes, having the "bad" variety of the disease comes with some issues. You're constantly managing your blood sugars, warding off complications, and explaining your situation to others. But how about some good news for a change? Researchers now say that people with type 1 live nearly as long as people without diabetes!

comments 14 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2011

Diabetes and Mammograms

Many women with diabetes feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of family, work, and personal health. Balancing the minutiae of everyday life with the nonstop demands of blood glucose monitoring, exercise, and thoughtful meal planning takes time and effort. So it comes as no surprise that many women with diabetes put off talking to their doctors about breast cancer screening.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 20, 2011

There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

Will there be a cure for diabetes?  Is an artificial pancreas a cure?  Was insulin a cure?  Let's begin on the correct platform.  You may have an opinion on what a cure is that completely differs from mine, and that's okay.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2011

Metformin Helped My Type 1 Diabetes

My name is Katherine Marple, and I've had type 1 diabetes for 13 years. I'm the first in my family to have the disease, so I've done most of the research and made most of the discoveries on my own. One of those discoveries was the power of metformin (in addition to insulin) to help me control my diabetes.

comments 16 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2011

Parenting Style Impacts Control of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

As a dad, do you tend to be authoritative and have high expectations of your child's self control? Do you set clear limits and command respect, without bulldozing him or her? If so, you may be helping your child with type 1 diabetes stick to his or her treatment regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2011

Staying Motivated With Diabetes Part 2

You've successfully resisted the urge to eat that slice of cake. You've remembered to check your blood sugar that extra time. Maybe you've resisted and remembered for days, or weeks. Perhaps you now think that you've figured out how to keep yourself motivated in dealing with your diabetes. Actually, you're just getting started.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 14, 2011

Staying Motivated With Diabetes Part 1

The piece of cake sits there on the plate, daring you to eat it. The blood sugar meter rests on your nightstand, an obstacle formed of lancets and test strips. Life with diabetes is a parade of challenges, from diet temptations to healthcare hassles. You know--we all know --that the only way to say "no" to the cake and "yes" to the blood sugar check is through consistent self-motivation.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2011

Readers: Type 1 Indy Racer Charlie Kimball Needs Your Votes NOW!

Charlie Kimball, the first and only driver with type 1 diabetes in the history of the Indy Racing League to race cars at its highest level, needs your help: Just as when he's racing, Kimball finds himself neck-in-neck in a competition. In this case, he's looking to win the Firestone Tire-iffic Award and you can help him out by voting for him---but you only have till Thursday, August 11, to do so.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2011

Adult Stem Cell “Memories” Could Aid in Type 1 Treatment

Israeli researchers have found that stem cells derived from adult pancreatic cells are more efficient at making insulin-producing cells than stem cells derived from embryos.  Scientists at Tel Aviv University theorize that the cells retain a "memory" of what they were before they were coaxed into becoming stem cells. That memory includes the ability to produce insulin. Because of it, the adult stem cells are better at forming insulin-making cells than their embryonic counterparts.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2011

July 2011

A Rebellious Teenager Finds Team Type 1

I am excited to have this opportunity to write a diabetes-focused blog for Diabetes Health about living and thriving with type 1 diabetes. First of all, I am extremely passionate about racing road and mountain bicycles, running 5K runs and sprint triathlons, and doing other activities that I find to compete in for Team Type 1. But before I start blogging, I would like to tell a little about myself.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2011

Adjusting Type 1 Diabetes to a Racing Tour of America's Dairyland (Wednesday, June 22)

Anne Findlay has been racing road bikes for three years and just joined Team Type 1 this year. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1988, at age 14. For more information about Anne and Team Type 1, go to www.teamtype1.org.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 25, 2011

Before Disaster Strikes

With severe weather predicted for Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Meredith Cummings thought carefully about where to park her car-eyeing the large trees in her historic neighborhood-when she arrived home on the afternoon of April 27. As she walked to her door, she reassured herself: Those trees had been there for more than 100 years. What were the odds of them coming down today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2011

Once a Spokesperson for Juvenile Diabetes, Erin Now Suffers From Diabulimia

Erin lay on a bed in the emergency room, finally serious about getting help. Her second episode of diabetic ketoacidosis in a single year had sent her to the hospital shaking and vomiting. For the past seven years, she had been driven by one desire: to lose forty pounds. She refused to give herself her full dose of insulin, fearing weight gain. She hadn't seen her endocrinologist or checked her blood sugar for a year or two.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2011

Aussies Take Step Toward Vaccine for Type 1

Immunologists at a research institute in Melbourne, Australia, say they have successfully tested a nasal spray that suppresses an immune response in people who are genetically disposed to type 1. The test, performed by scientists at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, is the first time that the spray has been tried on humans.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2011

A New Normal

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on June 25, 2009. At the time, I was a few weeks shy of my nineteenth birthday and had just finished my first year of college at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2011

Type 2 Drug Victoza Helps Type 1s, Too

Victoza, a drug aimed at type 2 diabetes, may turn out to be a boon for type 1 diabetes patients as well. A small clinical study shows that patients with well-controlled type 1 who took Victoza daily for just one week experienced a 15 percent drop in their blood sugar levels. Patients who took the drug over a full 24-week test period needed less and less insulin, decreasing their average mealtime dose by seven units and their all-day insulin requirement by eight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2011

A Brand-New Bottle of My Insulin Went Missing

As I write this, my nineteen-year-old son is in the intensive care unit because of a heroin addiction. He is trying to stop, and the withdrawal is wreaking havoc. His body is bruised and battered beyond belief.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2011

RPI Hopes to Create a Vital Artificial Pancreas Component

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate New York is working on a new approach to blood sugar monitoring that could open the door to an artificial pancreas. The plan is to develop an automated monitoring system so sophisticated that it can take into account the often great differences in blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity among people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 48 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

Diabetes and Depression Offers Big Challenges

If you have diabetes, you're more likely to be depressed than people without the disease.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2011

Roger Hurdsman Making Diabetes A Family Affair

Roger Hurdsman lives in Roy, Utah, surrounded by women. His wife of four years, Hilary, is there, along with his two young daughters, Bonnie and Tess.  He seems to be handling the estrogen well though, perhaps because he devotes his days  to designing software for the Department of Defense. He is able to spend time with computers and gadgets before being inundated with tea parties and dress-up when he gets home.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2011

June 2011

My Lovely Little Insulin Pump

"My pump, my pump, my lovely little pump!"  My sister invented her own version of the Black Eyed Peas' song, "My Humps" to poke friendly fun at my insulin pump.   

comments 20 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2011

Father's Day Reflections

With Father's Day just around the corner, I thought it would be nice to stop for a moment and reflect on what dads do for us, especially dads who have diabetic children. The pressure and emotional aspects of diabetes can be overwhelming, not to mention the stress it can put on a family. For every needle prick, shot, and counted carb my father (and mother) helped me with, I want to say thanks.

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2011

Balancing Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Max Bruno, a freshman at the State University of New York at New Paltz, tries to get to the gym about four times a week. He says that he knows his limits for working out, but likes to push himself.  "I just have to be careful," he explains. "About an hour or so after I'm done working out, my blood sugar drops really low."

comments 14 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2011

Specialized Diabetes Camps

More than ten million kids head off to summer camp each year.  Just because your child has diabetes doesn't mean that he or she must be left out of this rite of passage.  Wherever you live, there are specialized camps to help your child have a great and safe experience.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2011

Insulin, Skin, and Needles: Oh My!

Whenever I tell someone that I have type 1 diabetes, the first words that I typically hear are "I'm terrified of needles! I could NEVER give myself a shot!" But needles are the least of my fears when it comes to my disease. I have bigger fish to fry. Concerns about daily management, combined with fears of heart problems, blindness, and kidney failure, equal one very stressful disease.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2011

Kamaal and Malcom Washington Join the Joplin Relief Efforts

Comic book creators Kamaal and Malcom Washington are not planning to take it easy this summer. Ever since Kamaal's diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in 2003, when he was nine years old, he has adopted the mantra, "I am not going to let diabetes overcome me. I am going to overcome diabetes." His determination led to an idea to create comic books that would raise awareness about diabetes and help other kids feel less frightened. The comics chronicle the adventures of Omega Boy, a time-traveling superhero, and Mighty Boy, a modern-day crime fighter who also raises awareness about diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 8, 2011

Amylin, JDRF Team to Test Symlin/Insulin Combo for Type 1

Amylin Pharmaceuticals has announced that it will collaborate with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to test a combination of Symlin and insulin in injectible form as a type 1 therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2011

Tyler’s Tips for Flying With Diabetes

I recently had the experience of flying from Tampa to Los Angeles, with a layover in Atlanta, totaling about seven hours spent in airports or up in the sky. To prepare for such a trip, you have to ask yourself a lot of "What if" questions. What if your plane is delayed? What if you miss your connecting flight? What if you have to stay over an extra night? What if your pump fails? What if you are on the tarmac for four hours and you go low?

comments 22 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2011

Type 2s on Sulfonylureas Less Likely to Take Anti-Depressants

Type 2 patients who use only a sulfonylurea are less likely to take anti-depressant drugs than diabetes patients on other medications. That's the conclusion of a report delivered recently in Honolulu at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2011

May 2011

Insulin Tumors

Swimsuit season lasts for at least five months in the South. The good news is that we live close to the beach, but the bad news is that after 25 years of living with diabetes (and three Caesareans), my body is starting to read like a map of my medical journey.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 25, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

Sexual Minority: The Invisible Diabetes Disparity

What does sexuality have to do with diabetes? A lot, according to research findings that have revealed a group of people with diabetes as large as the type 1 or gestational diabetes community. Estimates suggest that 1.3 million lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals have diabetes-at least 5 percent of the 23.6 million people with the disease in the United States.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 19, 2011

N.J. Hospital Teams With Ricordi to Find Cure for Type 1

New Jersey's Hackensack University Medical Center has announced that it will partner with Dr. Camillo Ricordi to test a surgical procedure that could hold the key to a cure for type 1 diabetes.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 18, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Dr. Jonathan Beach

Dr. Jonathan Beach is a 35-year-old emergency medicine physician who has had type 1 diabetes for 31 years. He owns and operates Urgicare, a wellness center that includes The Northeast Center for Diabetes Care and Education in Plattsburgh, New York, an isolated rural community that has few other resources for diabetes. This is his story of his life with diabetes and his professional experience with the insulin pump.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 12, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Gene Thornton

Gene Thornton was in the Army in Germany when he got type 1 diabetes. It was 1965, 46 years ago, and he was 24 years old. This is his story, in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 10, 2011

Moms of Children with Diabetes Tell Their Stories, Ask to Support Research For a Cure

HOLLYWOOD, FL -- They come from New York, Miami, Milwaukee and more. They have children of all ages with type 1 diabetes - and they're on a mission to find a cure. They're the "Real Moms of the DRI Foundation" and in honor of Mother's Day they're asking millions of moms - and others - to support the Diabetes Research Institute, a world leader in cure-focused research.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2011

Medtronic Responds to "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?"

Recently, we published an article about the implantable pump "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?" Following the appearance of this article on the Diabetes Health website, over 100 readers commented, most of them expressing a heartfelt desire for access to this technology in the U.S.A. To read the original article click on link below:
A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

comments 35 comments - Posted May 5, 2011

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 5, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Kent David

Kent David is a 47-year-old licensed civil engineer who has had type 1 diabetes since 1981. This is Kent's diabetes story in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2011

Chase Pelletier, Competitive Kart Racer

Chase Pelletier is an up-and-coming kart racer from Canada who is 14 years old. When he got type 1 diabetes just before his eleventh birthday, he recalls, "It was pretty overwhelming at first. But me and my family decided early on that we're not going to get down on diabetes in general, and we're going to try to think of positive ways to deal with it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

Highlights From the Barbara Davis Center's July Keystone Conference

Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Barbara Davis Center's "Management of Diabetes in Youth" conference, held every other year in beautiful Keystone, Colorado. The focus is on all of the latest and greatest in type 1, and it's a real treat to have so many of the best names in this field gathered in one place. The Barbara Davis Center (BDC) is one of the premier programs in the world focusing on type I diabetes management, and the one (Dr. Peter Chase, to be precise) who brought us the famed" Pink Panther" book, Understanding Diabetes - the reliable handbook of type 1 diabetes that many parents of newly diagnosed kids rely on.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2011

Store Your Teeth in a Stem Cell Bank

Every year four million baby teeth fall out, and 1.4 million wisdom teeth are pulled out of our collective mouth. Until recently, the only entity really interested in all those teeth was the tooth fairy. But all that changed in the year 2000, with the discovery that dental pulp contains adult stem cells. In the not-too-distant future, those stem cells might be used for growing new islet cells to cure diabetes. The problem is, how to keep the teeth nice and fresh until that hoped-for day. That's where Provia Laboratories comes in, with their Store-A-Tooth service.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

New Study Suggests the Effectiveness of Diabetes Education Paired With Meters With Advanced Features

A new study has proven that use of a blood glucose meter with advanced features, when paired with diabetes education, more effectively manages blood glucose than using a basic feature meter. This information was presented at the recent 46th European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 118 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

3M Introduces Cavilon

3M Health Care has introduced CavilonTM Antifungal Cream for use by caregivers and patients in incontinence settings. The cream is the latest offering in the company's Cavilon line of skincare products designed for professional healthcare providers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

Taiwanese Study Shows New Technology Nearly Three Times Better at Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Taiwanese researchers say that a technology that uses sound waves to stimulate healing in diabetic foot ulcers is almost three times more effective than conventional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The technology, called dermaPACE®, is manufactured by SANUWAVE Health Inc., a medical device company located in Alpharetta, Ga.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose sugar, glucose, has been partially changed into another type of sugar, fructose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Jeff and Natalie Kolok: The Definition of Parenting

Jeff and Natalie Kolok live in northwestern Vermont with their three children: Naomi, 16, and Johanna and Nicholas, each ten years old. Both Johanna and Nicholas have type 1 diabetes, Johanna since age four and Nick since age six.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2011

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Blog, App, and Social Media Sites

France-based pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis has announced the availability of several new media designed to help the company communicate with people who have diabetes.
• A blog, "Discuss Diabetes," offers health, nutrition, and lifestyle information, as well as a way to offer suggestions to the company. The blog is available at www.discussdiabetes.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

March 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

UltiMed Launches 50-Count Pen Needle

UltiMed, which offers the only pen needles assembled in the United States, has announced that it is now offering a 50-count universal-fit pen needle.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

Alcohol and Sex

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2011

Should States Let Inmates Donate Organs?

If a prisoner on death row wants to donate his organs, should he be allowed to do it?

comments 19 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2011

A Lightweight, Colorful Medical ID Alternative

Silicon wristbands were first popularized by the yellow LiveStrong band and then became widespread as a way to raise awareness for charities. Light, colorful, easy to wear, and inexpensive, they have now become an option for personal identification and medical alert information as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 17, 2011

Living With Type 1 Diabetes Since 1931

Edward Danielson developed type 1 diabetes 79 years ago, in 1931, only a decade after the discovery of insulin. Edward's wife of 67 years, Dorothy, recalls, "In the spring of 1930, when Edward was ten, his teacher told his mother that he ought to be checked by a doctor because something seemed to be wrong. His mother got on the streetcar with Edward and they went down to see the doctor, who said, ‘There's nothing wrong with him. He's just slow.' So they went home. In the fall of the same year, his new teacher said, ‘Something's wrong with Edward--he ought to be checked out by a doctor.' So they went back, and that doctor diagnosed him with diabetes. They kept him in the hospital for a month because the doctors then didn't know that much about diabetes 1."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 10, 2011

The Thrill of the Syringe

"Shot, mommy?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

The Great Lancing Debate

My almost 20 years as a diabetes educator have been memorable in many ways, but certain moments stand out more than others.  Because blood glucose testing is an important part of diabetes management for everyone I see, I try to assess each person’s skills and habits in this key area.  I’ll never forget the time I asked a client how often he changed his lancet.  He had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about four years earlier and was checking regularly, so it seemed like a reasonable question.  He proceeded to look at me with a puzzled expression and say, “You mean you’re supposed to change those things?”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2011

February 2011

Roche and Animas Recall

A couple of diabetes recalls are in the works, one for a group of insulin cartridges manufactured by Animas and another for the entire line of ACCU-CHEK® FlexLink Plus infusion sets, manufactured by Roche.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2011

Keeping the Weight Off: An Interview with Ellen Granberg, PhD

Ellen Granberg is an obesity sociologist who studies the processes that people go through when they lose weight and keep it off. As she says, "If the problem were that we don't know what people should eat to lose weight, that would be one thing, but we don't have that problem. There are a hundred weight loss plans out there that are perfectly good. We understand all about the physiology of weight loss maintenance and the metabolic impacts, but nothing about the social and emotional impacts. People who sustain weight loss over time move through a lot of different challenges."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2011

Regulatory Protein Lowers Blood Sugar

Researchers at the Children's Hospital in Boston, led by Umut Ozcan, MD, have found a regulatory protein that lowers blood sugar when it is high due to either lack of insulin or a decreased sensitivity to insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2011

Statins May Prevent Diabetic-Related Blindness

New University of Georgia research has found that a statin drug that is often known by the brand-name Lipitor may help prevent blindness in people with diabetes. In a study using diabetic rats, lead author Azza El-Remessy, assistant professor in the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, and her colleagues found that statins prevent free radicals in the retina from killing nerves important to maintaining vision. The results of the study are published in the March edition of the journal Diabetologia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Tyler Stevenson on Going Away to College with Diabetes

When a young person with type 1 diabetes leaves home for the first time, it's often a difficult adjustment for the parents as well as their child. Tyler Stevenson is 20 years old, in his second year at Florida State. This is what he told us about his life in college with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2011

A New Kind of Pharmacist

Ross Valley Pharmacy, tucked away inside a larger building of clinics, is not a big place, but it's very very busy. Its owner, Paul Lofholm, PharmD, has a vision of the pharmacist's role that goes far beyond simply putting pills in bottles. He sees pharmacists as integral members of the healthcare team who can fill the gaps in patients' education about their conditions and their medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2011

A New Kind of Pharmacist

Ross Valley Pharmacy, tucked away inside a larger building of clinics, is not a big place, but it's very very busy. Its owner, pharmacist Paul Lofholm, has a vision of the pharmacist's role that goes far beyond simply putting pills in bottles. He sees pharmacists as integral members of the healthcare team who can fill the gaps in patients' education about their conditions and their medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2011

Medical Food Treats Neuropathy

Of all diabetic complications, neuropathy is one of the scariest and most difficult to treat. Nerve damage in the feet, leading to numbness or pain and, in severe cases, to foot ulcers or amputations, affects up to 60 percent of diabetics, according to recent research.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2011

A Lightweight, Colorful Medic-Alert Alternative

Silicon wristbands were first popularized by Lance Armstrong's yellow LiveStrong band and then became popular as a way to raise awareness for charities. Light, colorful, easy to wear, and inexpensive, they have now become an option for personal identification and medical alert information as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2011

Tyler's Ten Objectives for Staying Healthy

Everywhere you look, there seems to be a great tasting high carb meal, dessert, or snack staring back at you. While away at college last fall, I found a t-shirt picturing a cupcake above a skull and crossbones. For me, that image really sums up how we need to deal with being diabetic while being constantly tempted by sugary treats.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Last Patient Completes the EU Phase III Study of Diamyd® Antigen Based Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

The final patient has performed the last visit of the main study period in Diamyd Medical's European Phase III study. Treatment with the antigen based therapy Diamyd® is made to investigate whether beta cell function and thereby blood sugar control can be preserved in children and adolescents with new onset type 1 diabetes. The top line results from this study are expected to be reported as planned, in late spring 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2011

Need Medicine and Have No Insurance for Your Diabetes?

Nearly one in six people in the United States has no health insurance. If you have diabetes, that's a very tough position to be in. There are, however, resources that can cut the costs that you have been paying out of pocket for medicines and supplies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Peeling a Grape Ups Your BG Test Results

According to a new study published in Diabetes Care, your finger-prick blood glucose test may be "abnormally and significantly high" if you test after handling fruit without first scrubbing your hands thoroughly and vigorously. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

Vascular Complications of Diabetes: Due to One Missing Enzyme?

Many tragic complications of diabetes, including amputations, heart attack, stroke, and blindness, are due to blood vessel damage. According to Xiaochao Wei, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, all that vascular damage may be caused by a shortage of one enzyme: fatty acid synthase, or FAS.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

New Toolkit Available for Community Health Workers To Educate People About Diabetic Eye Disease

The National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) of the National Eye Institute now has a Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit to help community health workers educate people with diabetes about diabetic eye disease. The Toolkit is available in both English and Spanish and its contents ensure that community health workers are equipped with science-based, user-friendly materials about diabetes and eye health to enable them to provide sight-saving information to groups of people with diabetes, their family, and their friends.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2011

“Artificial Pancreas” Helps Pregnant Mothers With Diabetes

It's hard enough to be pregnant, but pregnancy with diabetes is especially challenging because it's so difficult to keep blood sugar within a normal range at a time when hormones are surging. All women try their best with the tools that they have, but even so, about half of all babies born to mothers with type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese at birth because of too much sugar in their mothers' blood. Mothers with high blood glucose levels also increase their child's risk of congenital malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm delivery, and neonatal admission.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2011

Type 1 Diabetes Associated With Common Cold Virus

It's generally thought that a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes is not enough to develop the disease, but that an environmental trigger is required to activate it. Researchers are not sure what that environmental trigger is, but enteroviruses have been under suspicion for quite a while. Enteroviruses are the second leading cause of viral colds in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Lilly and the JDRF Partner to Fund Regenerative Medicine Research in Type 1 Diabetes

INDIANAPOLIS and NEW YORK - Eli Lilly and Company and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) today announced that they have signed an agreement to fund early-stage research that could enable patients with type 1 diabetes to regenerate insulin-producing cells destroyed by the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

Diabetes Health Feb/March Issue Out Now

As the new year begins, we return to an old friend in the diabetes community: rock star Bret Michaels.  You can find our current interview in this issue, but Diabetes Health first interviewed Bret in 2006. Before I talked to Bret back then, I read everything I could find about him.  From what I learned, it was clear that he did not appeal to everyone. In fact, after we printed our interview, some people canceled their subscriptions because they felt that we were promoting sex and drugs by talking candidly with Bret about a rock star's life.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2011

Diva TalkRadio Features Black History Month Diabetes Spotlight on Healthy Soulful Cuisine

Diva TalkRadio is an interactive, live internet talk-radio destination that focuses on issues and concerns of those living with, at risk of and affected by diabetes. Divabetic's founder and executive director, Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek serves as the resident host of DivaTalkRadio programs.  This month, Mr. Divabetic shines the spotlight on Constance Brown-Riggs MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN. Constance is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and a National Spokesperson American Dietetic Association. Constance has been honored with the Diabetes Care and Education Practice Group (DCE) 2007 Diabetes Educator of the Year Award. Over the course of her career, Constance Brown-Riggs has established herself as an expert on the subject of nutrition, diabetes and the cultural issues that impact the health and health care of people of color. She is not only versed in the science of medical nutrition, but also has an active nutrition counseling practice through which she sees hundreds of patients. Her ability to translate her academic and clinical knowledge into clear, understandable terms have made her a nationally renowned, sought-after speaker, educator and author. She is passionate about creating opportunities to spread the word about health and nutrition, and developing educational tools which shorten the cultural distance between patients and caregivers. Every aspect of her work supports that mission

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2011

Insulin Needle Wins Design Prize, But You Can't Buy It in the States

The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture has announced its 60th annual Good Design Awards, which honor "quality design of the highest form, function, and aesthetic." Guess which paragon of contemporary design won an award this year? An insulin needle. Called the NovoTwist and made by Novo Nordisk for use with insulin pens, this marvel of design has a bayonet fitting that allows "just twist" attachment and detachment to compatible pens, and an audible and tactile "click" that confirms attachment of the needle.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2011

January 2011

Insulin's Partner: Amylin

Insulin has a companion, and it's called amylin. Amylin is a small hormone that is released along with insulin by the beta cells of the pancreas in response to a meal. When people are insulin-deficient, they are amylin-deficient as well. Amylin wasn't even discovered until 1970, and it was not until the 1990s that scientists began to figure out what amylin does. But they now know that it partners with insulin to help control blood sugar levels, each in its own way:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 28, 2011

Getting Personal With Bret Michaels

It's Labor Day weekend in Pittsburgh, just outside of the Steelers' Heinz Field, and the Bret Michaels Band has come home for some hard-driving rock and roll.  The 20,000 screaming fans are a generational mix, shrieking 16-year-old girls side-by-side with moms and dads who have temporarily abandoned their parental roles to dance, sing the familiar words to "Look What the Cat Dragged In," and howl into the nighttime air. On stage is Bret Michaels, the boy from Butler, Pennsylvania, a coal mining town just an hour north.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2011

New Jersey - Florida Partnership to Speed Diabetes Research: A Cure for Diabetes is One Step Closer

The MOLLY and LINDSEY Diabetes Research Foundation at Hackensack University Medical Center (HUMC) and the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have joined forces to find the cure for Type 1 Diabetes.  Together they will form the Hackensack-Miami DRI Federation Project, a think tank of East Coast specialists who will fast-track the best research ideas coming out of the labs and put them to the test in clinically meaningful ways, thus shortening the path to a cure for those with type 1 diabetes.  

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

New Primary Care Physicians Haven't Learned Enough About Diabetes

Your young primary care doctor may not know a lot about diabetes, according to a study led by Stephen Sisson, MD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  "When I graduated from residency here, I knew much more about how to ventilate a patient on a machine than how to control somebody's blood sugar, and that's a problem," said Sisson in a press release.  "The average resident doesn't know what the goal for normal fasting blood sugar should be. If you don't know what it has to be, how are you going to guide your diabetes management with patients?"

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

It Takes Money to Make a Noninvasive CGM

Developing a noninvasive, wireless, transdermal continuous glucose monitor requires brilliance, commitment, innovation, and....a LOT of money. We recently reported that Echo Therapeutics, Inc. is  developing just such a CGM, called the Symphony, along with its companion skin preparation system. Fortunately, their money picture is looking bright:  Echo just raised approximately $2.5 million through "a series of private placements of the Company's stock and warrants, and it has received a binding commitment for an additional $3 million."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

The Lowdown on Downloading

It doesn't matter if you're a computer geek or complete technophobe: If you've ever made the effort to download your blood glucose meter, you probably don't have a clue about what to do with the data once you've gotten it.  That needs to change. Those of us who live with diabetes need to become more adept at analyzing our own data, to see what's working and what isn't both for our own sake and that of our time-strapped healthcare providers. .

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

Why We Underestimate Our Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

You'd think the world would be running through the streets in a movie-style panic. An epidemic of unprecedented proportions is inexorably advancing.  In our lifetimes, half of us may develop a devastating disease that could cause us to go blind, lose a leg, or die far too soon. But we aren't in a panic. The authorities are talking it up, of course, but most of us aren't doing much at all to prevent type 2 diabetes. We're getting fatter by the year, and we're moving less and less.  Many of us who already have type 2 diabetes are not making the changes that could keep its consequences at bay. Why not?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 24, 2011

Mannkind's Inhalable Insulin, Afrezza, Put Back on Hold by the FDA

MannKind Corporation has finally received a complete response letter from the FDA regarding its inhalable insulin, Afrezza. (The FDA issues a complete response letter when it completes its review of a New Drug Application, but cannot yet approve the application as is.) What the FDA wants now is a couple more clinical trials with the new form of the inhaler (one in patients with type 1 diabetes and one in patients with type 2 diabetes), with at least one trial including a treatment group using the older form of the inhaler, in order to obtain a head-to-head comparison of the two devices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2011

What do I do now, Coach?

Self-management is the key to healthy living with diabetes, but there are always challenges to maintaining optimum blood glucose levels.  Lagging motivation and focus can be obstacles, and adjusting diet and medications to meet changing conditions is challenging. If you have ever wished for a person to help you improve your skills, someone who could offer informed guidance between appointments with your doctor - you may have been wishing for a diabetes coach. Diabetes coaches are personal trainers for individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes. This unique branch of diabetes education delivers ongoing, one-on-one consulting from a trained certified diabetes educator.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2011

Interview With Nick Jonas, a Pop Star With a Conscience

"Got the news today, doctor said I had to stay, a little bit longer and I'll be fine....Waitin' on a cure, but none of them are sure,  a little bit longer and I'll be fine....So I wait ‘til kingdom come, all the highs and lows are gone, a little bit longer and I'll be fine."

comments 12 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2011

AADE Game Day Tips for People with Diabetes

Despite what many think, diabetes does not have to deter people who have the disease from enjoying Super Bowl Sunday parties along with everyone else, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). In fact, managing your diabetes is often an exercise in moderation, more than anything else. With more than 24 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, this is a very real issue, but there is no reason diabetics can't enjoy the festivities -- and the food -- at Super Bowl parties. The AADE put together the following tips for people with diabetes who want to enjoy the food - but need a little guidance about how to eat smart given all of the Super Bowl food temptations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 19, 2011

January Fizzle

Did you make any resolutions for 2011?  How many of them have you given up on already?  Many of my Facebook friends have enthusiastically boasted of their New Year's resolutions--lose weight, spend less time online, read more, worry less. While their goals are admirable, their resolutions rarely last.  Why?  I believe it's because their aim is too high or too broad, and their enthusiasm is short-lived.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

Walgreens in South Florida and Diabetes Research Institute Foundation Announce Unique Partnership

The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation (DRIF) announced a new, first-of-its-kind partnership aimed at helping the more than 200,000* Broward County, Florida, residents affected by diabetes. Diabetes Research Institute Live Well Broward County is a joint effort of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, Walgreens in South Florida, LifeScan and a cadre of local physicians that will help residents "Manage Well, Stay Well and Live Well" with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2011

New Wound Treatment for Non-healing Foot Ulcers

Results are expected by the end of the month in an efficacy study on a new drug that promises to improve diabetic wound care. Derma Sciences is wrapping up work on a phase 2 trial of DSC127, a drug already shown to speed up healing in animal tests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

Diabetes Management in Flu Season

The crowd in the small Boston theater laughed and clapped. The comedy show was a good one, and I was enjoying it from a cramped seat in the balcony. It was October 29, a Friday, and while it was brisk outside, winter hadn't yet clamped down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

Type-1 University Now Open for Enrollment

Introducing "Type-1 University" (T1U) - the online school for people with diabetes who use insulin, including parents and caregivers.  The school can be found only in cyberspace - at www.type1university.com

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Herbs, Sex, and Diabetes

Talk about a win-win situation! It seems that many aphrodisiacs--herbs that boost sexual energy and function--can also bring down blood sugar, cholesterol, and/or blood pressure.  At least four herbs have shown these double benefits in scientific studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2011

DiabetesSisters' National Conference Addresses Unique Challenges of Women with Diabetes

RALEIGH, NC- DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce that registration for the 2011 Weekend for Women Conference in Raleigh, NC will open on January 1, 2011 at 8am.  The Conference, a revolutionary national weekend conference designed specifically for women with diabetes, will take place April 29 - May 1, 2011 at the Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2011

A Personal Journey to the New York Historical Society's Diabetes Exhibit

My trip began as I flew from Dallas to my home town of Philadelphia and then caught an early Amtrak train to New York City.  Growing up in the Philadelphia area had given me an appreciation for U.S. history, but today I was going to learn something new: the history of diabetes.  My daughter, Sarah, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, yet I didn't know much about the history of the disease. Living every day with the stress and worry that many parents have, I felt I had no time to spend learning how we got to the modern treatments we have today.  I had focused only on doing my job as caregiver and supporter of my daughter.  I was looking forward to learning something new.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2011

December 2010

Divabetic's New Year Attitude: Be Healthy & Happy Too!

New York, NY - December 31, 2010 - Divabetic, one of the country's leading health and wellness nonprofits begins the New Year with an outreach jackpot of resources and tools for those affected by diabetes. With online and special events, Divabetic's mission is to provide an empowering and supportive environment so that no one living with diabetes has to cope alone or in silence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2010

Traveling With a Pump: TSA Regulations

Most holiday stories are comforting and familiar, wrapped up with the happiest of endings. But the tales that swept the nation this Thanksgiving were sometimes distressing and strange, and the one told by Laura Seay has no resolution or simple solution. Seay was one of the travelers caught in the center of the debate over the Transportation Security Administration's forceful new screening methods.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2010

Alarming Study Regarding Oral Health Care of Those With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes means a lot of change in your daily life. From blood glucose monitoring to watching what you eat to losing weight, it's hard to keep track of the changes you need to make to keep diabetes under control. One aspect of diabetes care that sometimes falls through the cracks is oral health care, which, if ignored, can lead to serious health complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2010

Pepex Trio One-Click Blood Glucose Meter

Research firm Frost & Sullivan, a leading international healthcare consulting company, released a market study analyzing and estimating the demand for Pepex Biomedical Inc.'s new biosensor technology for blood glucose monitoring for diabetes sufferers worldwide.  The researchers interviewed diagnosed diabetics, diabetes educators, endocrinologists, and manufacturers of biosensors, blood glucose meters, or other clinical diagnostic or patient monitoring equipment suppliers for the study.  The Frost & Sullivan report concluded that the Pepex Trio technology has the "potential as a new standard for measuring blood glucose levels."

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2010

Diabetes and YouTube

University of Alaska Anchorage nursing student Ben McCormack was excited when a professor showed a YouTube video in his pathophysiology class.  "She tries to bring in a lot of multimedia stuff to each unit," he reports.  "And ‘Diabetes Rap' actually has all the information about [type 1] diabetes right in the video." "The Diabetes Rap," starring diabetic Luke Widbin, was the 2008 winner of the World Diabetes Day Young Voices video contest, thanks in part to Luke's willingness to make rhymes like "Sugar overdoses give me ketoacidosis."  With well over 100,000 views, this video does an educational and entertaining job of relating the facts about diabetes. See it here. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2010

One-Third of UAE Residents Could Have Diabetes or Pre-diabetes by 2020

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates-- One in three United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents could have diabetes or prediabetes by the end of the decade, according to a new analysis from international health and well-being company UnitedHealth Group, released at the World Health Care Congress Middle East meeting in Abu Dhabi.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Charlie Kimball to Pilot New IndyCar Entry

Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, has partnered with Chip Ganassi Racing, LLC to create the Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing team for the 2011 IZOD IndyCar season. The team will sponsor a new entry in the series driven by American racecar driver Charlie Kimball. This partnership makes Kimball one of the first drivers from the 2010 Firestone Indy Lights series to move up the official "Road to Indy" with a full season sponsorship.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2010

Life and Long-term Care Insurance Becoming Increasingly Available for Those With Type 1 Diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, you know that the process of obtaining life insurance or long-term care insurance has been a long, tough road, most often leading to the dead end of declined coverage. In fact, most insurance companies have classified anyone with type 1 as an automatic decline, without any consideration of each case individually.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2010

Stem cells used to make pancreas, gut cells

(Reuters) - Stem cells can be transformed into the pancreatic cells needed to treat diabetes and into complex layers of intestinal tissue, scientists demonstrated in two experiments reported on Sunday.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

JDRF Applauds Congress for Passage of $300 Million for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Thanks Supporters for Advocacy Efforts for Special Diabetes Program Renewal

"Congress passed a multi-year renewal of the Special Diabetes Program (SDP), ensuring that studies on promising diabetes treatments and avenues toward a cure continue uninterrupted. As the father of a son living with type 1 diabetes, and as CEO of JDRF, one of the leading advocates for the renewal of this program, I applaud the U.S. government for its continued commitment to end this disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

Holiday Travel Tips for People With Diabetes

"Don't leave home without it" has a whole new meaning this holiday season. With holiday travel up from last year and increased security- and consequent delays- at airports, it's more important than ever for those with diabetes to properly prepare for their holiday travel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2010

Valeritas Receives FDA Clearance for the V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device

Valeritas, Inc., a medical technology company committed to the development and commercialization of innovative drug delivery solutions, announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has cleared the company's V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device for the continuous subcutaneous delivery of insulin in preset basal rates and with on-demand bolus dosing for adult patients requiring insulin.  V-Go devices will be available in a preset basal rate to deliver 20, 30 or 40 Units of insulin in one 24-hour period (0.83 U/hr, 1.25U/hr or 1.67U/hr respectively) and on-demand bolus dosing in 2 Unit increments (up to 36 Units per one 24-hour time period).

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 9, 2010

Nick Jonas' Holiday Dog Tag Challenge

This holiday season, Nick and Bayer have issued a dog tag challenge!  You can help them reach the goal of 50,000 tags by purchasing one for yourself or giving one as a gift this holiday season.  Proceeds from each tag sold will go to the Jonas Brothers Change for the Children Foundation to help others.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2010

Special Infant Formula May Protect Babies from Type 1 Diabetes

If you have a new infant in your family and a family history of type 1 diabetes, feeding your baby a special formula when weaning off breastfeeding may protect against the development of the antibodies associated with type 1 diabetes, thus potentially shielding your child from developing the disease itself. This is the finding of a new study, conducted by Finnish researchers, that was published in the November 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2010

A Gift of Love. A Gift of Hope...For the Holidays.

Celebrate the season with an eCard and help support the Diabetes Research Institute! Send your family, friends or business colleagues A Gift of Love...A Gift of Hope. They will feel special knowing you are supporting research to find a cure for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2010

November 2010

When Diabetes Steals Your Livelihood

Too often our preconceptions of work-limiting disabilities are confined to suddenly devastating conditions, such as spinal cord injury or stroke. We rarely consider how diseases such as diabetes can be just as debilitating and just as costly to a family. With November being recognized as National Diabetes Awareness Month, we should remember the people who are unable to work due to the complications of diabetes and who need the benefits to which they are entitled under Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2010

Echo Therapeutics' Needle-Free Symphony Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

The competition for a continuous glucose monitoring system that can replace the classic finger prick blood tests for diabetes is heating up. Several new products have come to the market this year that use various techniques to test blood glucose levels continuously without the need for a blood test, but several have faltered with complaints of inaccurate readings and skin irritation.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 29, 2010

Christopher Gorham Grabs Silver and Bronze Medals At International Karate/Kickboxing Championships

Insulet Corp., the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, recognizes the outstanding achievements of Christopher Gorham, age 12, of Waterford, Michigan for bringing home both silver and bronze medals in the Sparring and Forms competitions at the 2010 World Karate/Kickboxing Council World Championships held in Albufeira, Portugal. Chris is a 2nd degree black belt in training for a 3rd degree black belt; he has been in martial arts since he was four years old, competing all over the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2010

A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes

A new drug for type 2 diabetes started showing up in drugstores this week, according to manufacturer Santarus. The FDA-approved drug, called Cycloset, takes an distinctive -- and not well understood -- approach to reducing blood sugar levels. The pill apparently works by increasing dopamine activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain. Dopamine is a brain chemical that plays a big role in people's behavior, mood, and ability to sleep. Scientists theorize that glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may in part result from abnormal activity of this chemical, and that upping dopamine activity may iron out these problems.That's the theory, at least: the drug's exact workings aren't known.  But it seems to do the trick.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2010

At a Loss?

A friend of mine recently remarked that she wants her family to eat healthier, but she just doesn't know that much about nutrition. Though I can sympathize with her in some ways (nutritional education is a daunting and never-ending process), I do feel that the overall American attitude toward food is that ignorance is bliss. It reminds me of the preteen character in the movie Son-In-Law, who puts his sister's bra cups over his ears and tells his parents in a taunting voice, "I can't hear you!"  Unfortunately, what you don't know CAN hurt you, and not just you, but also your family. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2010

Flu Meeting Highlights the Latest in Flu Research

Scientists gathered in October to discuss a very timely topic- the flu. While influenza may not be the headline news that it was last year with the H1N1 epidemic, the flu is very much on the minds of many scientists and doctors nation- and world-wide.  The October gathering presented the newest research on the flu virus and attempts to vaccinate against it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2010

Diabetes and Pregnancy: The Battle to Have a Baby

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 23 years ago, I remember being told that having children would be a very difficult challenge.  I was seven years old at the time - still a child myself - and had no interest in becoming a mom.  My own mother was very distressed at this news, but I didn't pay it any mind.  I had other things to focus on:  trees to climb, bikes to ride, and friends to play with.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 18, 2010

Screening Practices and Management of Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

Both celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune diseases. In CD the immune response is triggered by the ingestion of gluten, resulting in chronic inflammation and villous atrophy in the small intestine. Treatment requires permanent elimination of gluten from the diet. In T1D, pancreatic islet beta cells are damaged resulting in loss of endogenous insulin production. Treatment includes daily insulin injections combined with meal planning and exercise. Nutrition management of the individual with both T1D and CD can be challenging for both the patient and the dietitian.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2010

Solianis Working on Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Patients With Diabetes

Solianis Monitoring AG is developing a groundbreaking device for the diabetes community- a noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring system that delivers reliable and consistent data. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2010

JDRF Clinical Panel Recommends Next Steps for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Testing

WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 10, 2010 --- Diabetes experts at a meeting convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) took the next step in advancing efforts toward the development of an artificial pancreas: putting forth clinical recommendations to ensure the safe and effective testing of artificial pancreas technology in real-life situations. We are pleased at today's meeting there was a strong consensus among leading clinicians, researchers and industry leaders regarding the path toward outpatient studies for both low-glucose suspend and artificial pancreas systems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

Is Correcting Low Blood Sugars Caused by Exercise Making You Fat?

Over the years, I have had many exercisers with diabetes ask me why they're gaining weight instead of losing it. There are two possible answers to that question. One answer is that muscle is heavier than fat, so if you are gaining muscle while losing fat-especially in the early stages of a new exercise program-your scale weight probably doesn't reflect your positive changes in body composition (i.e., less fat, more muscle).

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

"Be Part of the Cure" Campaign Kicks Off National Diabetes Awareness Month

HOLLYWOOD, FL- Beginning today, thousands of people who want to help put an end to diabetes can be part of the cure by participating in the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation's online campaign at BePartoftheCure.org.  Kicking off National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Be Part of the CURE campaign is a fun and meaningful way for people living with diabetes, their family and friends, and anyone concerned about curing this devastating disease to literally participate in the "CURE."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2010

October 2010

Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose in Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2010

Surgeons Create Functional Artificial Pancreatic Tissue

In a proof-of-concept study presented at the 2010 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons, the researchers note that the matrix not only helps to understand the micro-architecture of the pancreas, but also prolongs the survival and preserves the function of the islets. Islets survived longer in the bio-artificial matrix than in conventional transplantation sites, and they produced significantly more insulin when challenged with glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2010

Number of Americans With Diabetes Could Triple by 2050

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a startling new projection last week regarding diabetes:  As many as one in three U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050. The announcement on Friday represents a dramatic threefold increase in the number of Americans expected to have diabetes within the next 40 years if current trends continue.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2010

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Tarra Robinson was afraid that she was going to lose her job. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 18 months old, Tarra had recently developed hypoglycemic unawareness, which  affects about 17% of type 1 diabetics. Tarra was passing out at work, and once she even crashed her car when her blood sugar dropped unexpectedly. She went on a pump and tried a CGM, but nothing seemed to help. She was still having frequent, dangerous lows.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2010

Diabetes and the Flu

As flu season approaches, many people are debating whether they should get a flu shot. As everyone knows, getting the flu is not fun. In fact, it can be downright miserable. But for those with diabetes, the flu can mean more than a cough, running nose, and body aches--it could mean more severe complications, and sometimes even death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2010

Dermagraft

It sounds like science fiction: a substitute for human skin, derived from human cells and used to treat difficult-to-treat diabetic foot ulcers. But it's a real product, called Dermagraft, manufactured and sold by a real company, Advanced BioHealing. The Connecticut-headquartered company is expanding its operations in Tennessee, part of an aggressive growth strategy to spread the word about its existing product and develop new ones.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Calibra Gains FDA Clearance to Market Finesse

Calibra Medical has announced that it received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its FinesseTM insulin patch-pen for up to three-day use with Novo Nordisk's Novolog® rapid-acting insulin. This much-anticipated step closer to market release follows the announcement in January that Calibra received FDA clearance for the device for use with Eli Lilly's Humalog® rapid-acting insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 18, 2010

Early Research Reveals New Clues to Origin of Diabetes

University of Michigan scientists have identified events inside insulin-producing pancreatic cells that set the stage for a neonatal form of non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and may play a role in type 2 diabetes as well. The results point to a potential target for drugs to protect normally functioning proteins essential for producing insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2010

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Consensus Statement Released by AACE

JACKSONVILLE, FL - October 13, 2010 - The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) today published a consensus statement for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) online, and will be published in the next issue of the association's official medical journal Endocrine Practice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Seven Habits of Highly Effective People with Diabetes

What do you get when international best-selling author Dr. Steven Covey joins forces with Bayer Diabetes Care and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE)? You get an inspirational booklet that is a simple, practical resource guide to help people get started in managing their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2010

Can You Keep A Secret?

The day I learned that I had type 1 diabetes was no doubt one of the most heart-wrenching, confusing, and angry days of my life. But I quickly decided that I had to channel those feelings into something productive, something worthwhile. I gained confidence as a person with diabetes, and even though, yes, the shots stung, I wasn't going to flinch. Welcome to my life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2010

The Cost of Diabetes

In July, I went to order a refill of my pump and was refused. My account was overdue, and my pump company wouldn't issue a refill until I could pay at least $400 of the $1200 I owed. I didn't have $400. I am a freelance writer and stay-at-home mom with a knack for stretching my husband's paycheck. I'd been making small monthly payments of about $50 because that was all we could afford, but now they wouldn't send me any more. So I went to the pharmacy and bought a box of syringes for $25. I didn't want to go back to multiple daily injections, but I didn't see that I had a choice.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2010

AlertPaws Launches

Have you ever worried that in case of emergency, first responders will not know that you or a loved one has diabetes? Or concerned that a low blood sugar may be interpreted by law enforcement officials as intoxication--especially behind the wheel of a vehicle? What if you wear a Medical ID, but they cannot get to you right away in the case of an accident?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2010

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Coming Release of BGStar and iBGStar Blood Glucose Meters

Last week, sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose meters BGStar® and iBGStarTM (developed by sanofi and its partner AgaMatrix), which should be available in early 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 4, 2010

Diabetes Awareness: Just for a Month, or All Year Long?

Twenty years ago, when I opened Sugar Happy Diabetes Supplies in San Francisco, people would open the front door, lean in, and ask, “I’m curious. Are there enough people with diabetes for you to stay in business?”  My reply was always, “You would be surprised by how many people have diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

September 2010

Meetings, Medications, and Meters

I’m back. I started working with Diabetes Health 10 years ago.  At that time, Diabetes Health was the one publication open enough to talk about a subject that was controversial at that time… Lower Carb Options.  That was my column, and I got a lot of slack from it. I didn’t understand why. People with diabetes want and need lower carb options. What was the problem with giving people options? That’s what Diabetes Health is all about – teaching people there are healthy options. Now it’s common to see lower carb options for people who have diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2010

Glucose Meter Plug-in for iPhone

Sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose monitoring (BGM) devices BGStar® and iBGStarTM, developed by sanofi-aventis and its partner AgaMatrix. Due to their convenience, accuracy and ease-of-use, BGStar® and iBGStarTM will help the decision-making process for people with diabetes and their healthcare professionals, with the aim of improving patient self-management. iBGStarTM connects to the iPhone® or iPod touch®. This is an important step towards sanofi-aventis' vision of becoming the leader in global diabetes care by integrating innovative monitoring technology, therapeutic innovations, personalized services and support solutions. BGStar® and iBGStarTM are planned to be made commercially available in the first markets in early 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

UCSF Diabetes Symposium Marks Decade of Research Advances

Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient's ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

The Scarlet 'D'

Do you ever wish you could leave your diabetes at home?  Maybe you're at a holiday party, chit chatting with your buds gathered around the bar enjoying an adult beverage (or two), maybe grazing at the table of cookies, cakes and other tempting morsels.  "Oh, I think I'll try one of those.  Maybe one of those too.  I didn't bring my diabetes with me, so I don't have to think about it tonight."  Diabetes is not last year's outfit you can leave at home, or a bad relationship you can dump and move on.  It is more like a tattoo.  It goes everywhere with you.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2010

"What's For Dinner?"

"What's for dinner?" is a commonly asked question in many households.  As children, spouses, friends, and others stream into your home after work, school, or a day of errands, they are eager to sit down, enjoy a meal, and unwind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Insulindependence

In late July, five teenagers and five adults hiked to the summit of Mount Shavano, one of Colorado's famed 14,000-foot peaks.  For this particular group, the journey to the top of Shavano was designed to be an intensive educational experience on the topic of diabetes management.  Each teenager had type 1 diabetes, and the adults were mentors dedicated to helping the teens feel more in control of the disease. The team made it to the summit by performing countless blood sugar tests, counting carbs, and experimenting with insulin pump basal rates. The outfit behind the expedition was Testing Limits, an outdoor adventure club just for people with diabetes, operated by the non-profit Insulindependence. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Joslin 50-Year Medalists Give Clues to Cures

In type 1 diabetes, the body relentlessly attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. But a study by Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now has firmly established that some of these cells endure for many decades in a small group of people with the disease-offering clues to potential treatments for preserving and even restoring the crucial cell population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Living His Dream of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez

On July 2, 2010, when Lt. Jose Lopez took the podium at the recent Children With Diabetes Friends for Life Annual International Conference in Orlando to speak to the parents of children with diabetes, his goal was to use his own story to reassure them about their children's future. "What I most wanted to convey to them was that people with diabetes, especially children, can do normal stuff and live their dreams. I am not a super hero - and I did it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Immune System Genes Show Links to Type 1 Diabetes

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but international researchers have found a link between the blood sugar disorder and a network of immune system genes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2010

Fantastic Fall Foods and Fun: A Guide to Healthfully Enjoying Fall

Fall is a welcome season, full of bounty and beauty.  The heat of summer gives way to calmer days and crisper evenings.  We trade our shorts and swimsuits for jackets and jeans and enjoy campfires, hayrides, and holiday celebrations.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2010

The Highs and Lows of Going Back to School

Going back to school can be a little scary for someone with diabetes. There are a lot of things to think about when it comes to making it through the school day without having problems with your blood sugar levels. In school, we strive for that all important "A" on a test; to score 100. The same is true about blood sugar/glucose levels; the closer I come to keeping my blood sugar level at "100," the better for my health and the better for my grades; high and low blood sugars aren't helpful in keeping a clear, quick-thinking mind. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2010

No BG Deal: Today's Meter Innovations Leave Many Yawning for More

In my office, there is a box.  Nothing fancy, just a plain brown box filled with a collection of "old school" diabetes stuff:  "boil and re-use" syringes, urine test tape, screw-driven insulin pumps, medieval injection aids and lancing devices, and so on.  Of course, no such collection would be complete without an array of classic blood glucose meters.  The oldest one I have is a plug-in-the-wall model called a "Dextrometer" that featured test strip rinsing solution and a red LED display that could burn the retina of anyone within six feet.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2010

Type 2 Diabetes Raises Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are two distressing, but increasingly common, diseases seen in our aging population. At some point in the future, they may well overwhelm the healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2010

August 2010

THE Diabetes Dude Ramps Up an Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The Flamingo Flock diabetes awareness campaign is the brainchild of 9-year-old Noah Brokmeier, "The Diabetes Dude."  Noah's blue flamingos are landing on lawns nationwide and appearing at big events like the Boston Marathon. Wherever they go, the birds pose for pictures, which are then posted on Noah's website, www.thediabetesdude.com. The location of the birds is also flagged on his "official flamingo tracking map," to show the progress and growth of the campaign.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2010

MannKind Corporation Providing AFREZZA to JDRF for Artificial Pancreas Project

MannKind Corporation announced that the company will supply its novel, ultra rapid acting insulin AFREZZATM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) for use in a study being conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) as part of its Artificial Pancreas Project. The planned two-year study in patients with type 1 diabetes will leverage the unique rapid action of AFREZZA for use in a closed-loop blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery system, termed the "artificial pancreas" by the JDRF. The study will be managed in conjunction with the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2010

iGlucose

Working toward the goal of unifying patients' diabetic treatment information in a single place, the PositiveID Corporation hopes to patent a new device that monitors insulin pens. The Insulin Tracker would attach to a user's insulin pen and record the times and amounts of injections. That information would then be sent to a database that allows for comprehensive monitoring. Insulin pens come in disposable and cartridge-replaceable flavors; the tracker can be moved easily from one pen to another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2010

'Sugar Crush' (Diabetes Dietary Supplement) Clinical Research Presented at the 37th Annual AADE Meeting

NaturEra, (http://www.NaturEra.com) a dietary supplements emerging leader, this month announced the launch of its new Sugar Crush dietary supplements would take place at the American Association of Diabetes Educators meeting in San Antonio, Texas.  Sugar Crush research has been accepted for Poster presentation at the AADE meeting.  The full clinical research study (http://www.naturera.com/Manuscript.pdf) shows that NaturEra's 'Sugar Crush' and 'Sugar Crush Daily' dietary supplement formulas used in combination lower and maintain healthy blood sugar levels for people with diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 26, 2010

THE Diabetes Dude

Hi Everyone! Just wanted to let everyone know about a big event I have coming up!  Next Thursday, August 26th, I am chartering a bus that I am filling with 50 of my closest friends with diabetes and traveling from Taunton, MA to New York City to invade the Today Show on NBC with my blue flamingos!  This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to make a HUGE impact on people and let everyone know about my campaign!  I hope that by doing this, people will realize that diabetes is a REAL disease that effects so many of us, young and old, and I hope to encourage people from all over the country to get out and do something to help raise diabetes awareness just like me and my friends!  

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2010

The Fruit Factor

In the early days after my type 1 diabetes diagnosis, I sentenced a lot of foods to what I came to think of as my personal DO-NOT-EAT list, often with only slight provocation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Novo Nordisk Creates "App" to Help Doctors Dose Insulin

Novo Nordisk announced today the availability of NovoDoseTM - the first-ever mobile insulin dosing guide for physicians to look up dosing guidelines and blood glucose goals for their patients with diabetes, a disease that affects nearly 24 million Americans. The guide is available as an application on iTunes and is specific to Novo Nordisk's modern insulin analog portfolio: Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection), NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection), and NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2010

Evolution May Have Pushed Humans Toward Greater Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Gene variants associated with an increased risk for type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis may confer previously unknown benefits to their human carriers, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. As a result, the human race may have been evolving in the recent past to be more susceptible, rather than less, to some complex diseases, they conclude.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2010

Finally, the Pump.

"Absolutely not. I'm not going to mess with that."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2010

Can I Have Laser Eye Surgery If I Have Diabetes?

Laser eye surgery is becoming increasingly popular as more and more people look to free themselves from their glasses or contact lenses. There are two main types of laser eye surgery, Lasik and Lasek. The vast majority of people choose to have Lasik because it has a far quicker and more comfortable recovery period. Most people can return to work and normal activities within 48 hours of having Lasik, whereas it can take up to a week to recover from Lasek surgery. In some instances your surgeon may insist that you have Lasik--if, for example, you are involved in contact sports.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 16, 2010

The Sanford Project Launches Research Study to Find a Cure

"The objective of this clinical trial (research study) is to determine if the medications can rescue the few beta cells that remain soon after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; and whether new beta cells can even be regenerated," commented Alex Rabinovitch, MD, Principal Investigator of the trial and Associate Director of The Sanford Project. "The investigational combinations of these medications could possibly allow patients to decrease or no longer need to inject insulin to keep their blood levels under proper control."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2010

Ten Reasons to Test Your Blood Sugar

We can all come up with plenty of excuses not to test our blood sugar. For one, yeah, it stings a little (No pain, no gain, the angel on my shoulder whispers in my ear). For another, testing isn't convenient, no matter how quickly the meter works or how small it is. While seemingly everyone else is carelessly enjoying a meal or leaping into the swimming pool, you are on the sidelines trying to ignore your diabetes. And of course, sometimes, we just do not want to know what the number will be. It's easier to ignore the ugly truth than face it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2010

July 2010

Diabetes Health Digital Edition for August/September Available Now!

We are always investigating new ideas, research findings, treatment options, and educational materials to share with you. This issue is very exciting because we were able to talk with experts and those with diabetes, and write about everything from traveling with type 1 in Italy to investigating why hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are so dangerous.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Making an Ordinary Day Extraordinary

Now that it's summer, I'm enjoying a typical teacher's vacation: summer break. I have three months of freedom, which for many is a dream come true. However, I live in the sweltering Midwest, where it's typical to see mid-summer temperatures of one hundred degrees or more, with an even higher heat index.  These oppressive temperatures can continue into late October.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works for More than One Year

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and GlySens Incorporated have developed an implantable glucose sensor and wireless telemetry system that continuously monitors tissue glucose and transmits the information to an external receiver. The paper, published in the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, describes the use of this glucose-sensing device as an implant in animals for over one year. After human clinical trials and FDA approval, the device may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Dental Care Deserves More Than a Brush-Off

Unfortunately, dental treatment and vision care are rarely included in basic health insurance plans. I don't know how insurance companies concluded that the eyes and the teeth are not parts of the body, but they managed it somehow. If you have diabetes, however, it's especially important to realize that contrary to the rationalizations of insurance executives, both your eyes and your teeth require attention and care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2010

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2010

New York Historical Society Brings to Life the Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin

NEW YORK, NY, July 26, 2010 - Recalling the desperate fight for life that used to be waged by juvenile diabetes patients, and commemorating the events of 1921 that inaugurated a new era of hope for them and their families, the New York Historical Society will present the exhibition Breakthrough: The Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin from October 5, 2010 through January 31, 2011. Exploring the roles of science, government, higher education and industry in developing and distributing a life-saving drug, the exhibition will bring to life the personalities who discovered insulin and raced to bring it to the world and will tell the story of one extraordinary New York girl-Elizabeth Evans Hughes, daughter of the leading statesman and jurist Charles Evans Hughes-who was among the very first patients to be saved.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2010

The Power of Being Positive

I was in the parking lot of the mall, walking past wheelchair parking, when I noticed a man using the lift gate of his specially equipped van. There he was, lowering himself and his motorized wheelchair down to the ground all by himself. As I walked through the mall that day, I couldn't get the man in the wheelchair off my mind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2010

Please Help! What To Do When You're Deemed a Diabetes Expert

Hardly a day goes by that I am not asked a question related to diabetes. I'm a "heart on my sleeve" diabetic. Because one of my jobs, writing articles and guest blog posts, centers on the subject of diabetes, I'm known, in part, by my disease.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2010

Video Games for Kids with Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes often strikes children. Children love to play video games. Putting two and two together, diabetes educators have created a string of diabetes-themed video games over the years. The latest evolution of that simple equation--the Bayer Didget meter-game combination--arrived in U.S. drugstores this year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2010

Nutraceuticals and Natural Supplements for Treating Type 2 Diabetes: An Overview

From environmentally friendly hybrid cars and heating with solar power to organic or natural foods, our culture is increasingly embracing green strategies. "Using natural dietary supplements to support healthy blood sugar levels and minimize the impact of glycation is a rational continuation of this green philosophy," says Steven Joyal, MD, vice president of Scientific Affairs and Medical Development for the Life Extension Foundation in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (www.lef.org). He is also author of the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2010

Medtronic Launches First Free Safe-Driving Program for Teens with Diabetes in Los Angeles July 19

Medtronic, Inc. announced today that Test B4U Drive, the first-ever, free program for teens with diabetes combining advanced driver skills training with diabetes management education, will be held July 19-21 at The Forum in Los Angeles. In partnership with the Juvenile Diabetes No Limits Foundation, Medtronic will continue the program throughout the summer across the country to teach teens with diabetes that good diabetes management is a key to staying safe behind the wheel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2010

Sweet Escape

There's nothing quite like a dip in the Mediterranean Sea at sunset. The warm, clear water, shimmering clouds, and sound of families enjoying aperitifs at beachside cafes--it was the perfect start to a late-summer Italian holiday. We were visiting my boyfriend's brother, who had moved from England to Genoa a few years prior. It was my first time across the Atlantic, so my boyfriend Dunstan and I tried to make it count with 10 days filled with dinners, family celebrations, a road trip to Rome, hiking, and plenty of swimming.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Pump and Sensor Combo Beats MDI Decisively in Medtronic’s STAR 3 Study

A massive study involving 485 people with type 1 diabetes at 30 locations across North America shows that the combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor helps patients achieve significantly lower A1c levels than multiple daily insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

HHS Secretary Sebelius Announces New Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced the establishment of a new Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) that will offer coverage to uninsured Americans who have been unable to obtain health coverage because of a pre-existing health condition. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2010

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years.  Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips.  Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town.  Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2010

Ignorance Is Bliss or Knowledge Is Power?

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the disease became my entire life. I was drowning in paperwork telling me who to pay, what to eat, how to medicate, and what to do if I got sick. But as months and years passed, diabetes management became just a part of my goal to live healthfully. I realized that I couldn't compartmentalize my health. I cannot pinpoint when my obsession with all things healthy started, but once it did--well, I've never looked back. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

AFREZZA Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy with Type 2s

AFREZZA TM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder, a well-tolerated, investigational ultra rapid acting mealtime insulin, as part of a diabetes treatment regimen, provides long-term glucose control comparable to usual insulin therapy but with a significantly reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a two-year study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Traveling Wisely With Diabetes

Summer has arrived, and for many, that means it's time to take that long-awaited vacation. Visions of sunny beaches, gourmet meals, mountain resorts, adventurous excursions, and campgrounds dance in our minds. The word "vacation" is typically a synonym for "letting it all go."  No worries. No cares. Just pure indulgence. But for people with diabetes, an upcoming vacation can bring on anxiety and stress. For many of us, our disease thrives on routine and predictability, and vacations do not adhere to our everyday lives.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2010

June 2010

Diabetes Health is the First Diabetes Magazine to Launch iPhone and iPod Touch Applications, DH Mobile

It is official! Today at the World's largest Diabetes Congress, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 70th Scientific Sessions (Booth 305) in Orlando, Florida, Diabetes Health Magazine (www.diabeteshealth.com) launched the first diabetes magazine Mobile Application, Diabetes Health Mobile (DH Mobile.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Getting Back to Basics When Life Gets In the Way

One day as I was multi-tasking (making dinner, washing dishes, supervising my daughter, returning phone calls), I suddenly grew very annoyed at the music we were listening to. I had recently purchased a children's CD for my daughter, and it hit me that all the songs sounded the same.  What a waste of twelve dollars, I thought, as I headed toward the CD player to shut it off.   As I reached down to hit the "off" button, I noticed a small, unfamiliar icon on the display screen. I crouched down to further examine and then laughed aloud.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2010

Judge Rules Only Nurses Can Administer Insulin Shots to California Schoolchildren

A Sacramento Superior Court judge has ruled that only school nurses can give insulin shots to children in public schools who have diabetes. The decision by Judge Lloyd Connelly overturned a 2007 California State Department of Education decision that allowed trained school staff, as well as nurses, to administer such injections.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2010

Double Transplantation Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

City of Hope researchers have found that bone marrow transplantation with islet cell transplantation shows promise as a treatment for late-stage type 1 diabetes. This combination may enable patients to make their own insulin again.  Results from laboratory research led by Defu Zeng, MD, associate professor in the departments of Diabetes Research and Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope, were published online this month in the journal Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2010

Scientists Have Found the Peptide Trigger for Type 1 Diabetes in Animal Tests

Researchers from the National Jewish Health and University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found a specific protein fragment, or peptide, that stimulates an immune system attack resulting in diabetes. Their experiments in mice contradict conventional wisdom about such peptides and support work by scientists studying autoimmune diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

California Chronic Care Coalition is Seeking Stories

The definition for a chronic illness is one lasting 3 months or more (U.S. National Center for Health Statistics). Seventy-five per cent of our health care spending is on people with chronic conditions. These persistent conditions - the nation's leading causes of death and disability - leave in their wake deaths that could have been prevented, lifelong disability, compromised quality of life, and burgeoning health care costs. The facts are arresting:

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2010

Wholly Healthy

Diabetes is often perceived as a physical disease, an issue with one's body.  But those of us with diabetes know that it affects every area of our lives, including our emotional, spiritual, and mental health. People with diabetes are more likely to experience depression than the average person, and it doesn't take a doctor to explain why. Diabetes is daunting, complicated, and confusing.  There's no one-size-fits-all explanation or treatment plan, and even when we arrive at something that works, diabetes throws us a curveball and we are forced to reinvent our treatment regimen---time, and time, and time again. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Academia, Biotech and the Pharmaceutical Industry Have Joined Forces to Fight Diabetes

IMIDIA ("Innovative Medicines Initiative for Diabetes"), a public private consortium funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), announced today the launch of a project focusing on pancreatic islet cell function and survival. Academia, biotech and pharma industry have joined forces to develop biomarkers and tools to pave the way for improved disease management and ultimately provide a cure for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Italian Scientists Find a Viral Link to Type 1 Diabetes

Italian researchers have found a link between a common virus and type 1 diabetes that may open the door to answers about what triggers the disease in children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2010

Tyler's Guide for a Successful Vacation

As a type 1 diabetic, I have found that it's a good idea to plan for the unexpected when traveling. Life is full of surprises, and so are vacations. The flight is late. The flight has been cancelled.  We had a flat tire or ran out of gas. There is an accident on the highway, and the traffic isn't moving. Who would have ever thought that airline flights would be grounded for five days in most of Eastern Europe because of volcanic ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland? If a diabetic had planned on going for a week-long vacation in England or France and had taken limited insulin, syringes, or infusion sets, he might have been in big trouble. Trying to replenish medical supplies in a foreign country could prove to be very difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Olympic XC Skier Kris Freeman Brings Story of Spirit and Tenacity to Campers with Diabetes

One of the most inspiring personalities of the 2010 Vancouver Games, Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman sheds his skis and poles this week to kick off his 6th annual diabetes summer camp tour with Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly Diabetes). Freeman, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 10 years ago at age 19, will share his amazing comeback story from coast to coast and encourage children with diabetes to continue pursuing their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2010

DKA and Infection Risk

Diabetic ketoacidosis poses enough of a threat on its own. But in a small number of cases, it leaves sufferers open to a potentially fatal infection called mucormycosis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

I Can't Look at Chips as Just Chips

I am that mom.  The one who buys organic foods, bakes her own bread, bans high fructose corn syrup and trans fats, and always totes around healthy snacks.  I don't drink soda, my toddler has never consumed fish sticks, and not once since her birth have we visited McDonalds for a "value" or Happy Meal.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2010

BD Launches World's Smallest Pen Needle

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, announced today the launch of BD Ultra-FineTM Nano-the world's smallest pen needle. The BD Nano pen needle is proven to be as effective as longer needles for patients of all body types and proven to offer a less painful injection experience for the more than 5 million people in the United States who inject insulin or GLP-1 to manage their diabetes.[1]

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2010

The Other: How Spouses of Diabetics Deal

It's a cool Sunday evening, and I'm sitting in a lively Italian restaurant. My husband is across the table.  We've just placed our orders, and we're engaged in easy conversation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2010

MACUGEN® Improved Vision in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

Results from a Phase 3 study demonstrate MACUGEN® (pegaptanib sodium) significantly improved vision in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), a complication of diabetes that is a leading cause of blindness in people of working age.¹ In the study, 37 percent of patients treated with MACUGEN gained two lines, or 10 letters, of vision on the ETDRS eye chart at 54 weeks, compared to 20 percent of patients who received a sham (placebo-like) procedure which consists of anesthesia and a simulated injection in the eye (p=0.0047). The data were presented at the World Ophthalmology Congress in Berlin by Frank G. Holz, an investigator in the trial and director of the University Eye Hospital at the University of Bonn in Germany.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2010

10 Tips for Being the Good Patient

I've been told by my medical team, those who work hard to make sure I live a healthy life with my diabetes, that I am a "good patient."   They are pleased that I do what I am supposed to:  check my blood sugar, keep my appointments, eat healthy foods, and exercise. They also remark that they wish all their patients took their diabetes management as seriously as I do.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2010

FREE iPhone Diabetes Applications

With the rise of the iPhone and the creation of hundreds of thousands of iPhone applications, it's only natural that several wonderful apps have appeared to make life easier for diabetes patients. Here is a quick look at 10 FREE applications, in no particular order, to help you choose the right ones for you.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 2, 2010

BD Announces U.S. Launch of BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set with Pre-Attached Holder

BD Diagnostics, a segment of BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), announced today the U.S. launch of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set with Pre-Attached Holder. The ready-to-use product has been designed to help protect healthcare workers from accidental needlestick injuries (NSIs) during the blood collection process and to prevent reuse of the tube holder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

Ironman Jay

It's early on a Thursday morning in a hotel ballroom in downtown Oakland, and attendees at a breakfast of the annual meeting of the California Dietetic Association are still working on getting fully awake. That problem is solved two minutes after Jay Hewitt, the breakfast's inspirational speaker, takes the stage. Hewitt, a 41-year-old lawyer who was diagnosed with type 1 in 1991, knows his audience is an experienced group of professional dietitians that has dealt with every type of patient and heard every kind of excuse for failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

May 2010

Knowledge Is Power

Investigate. Inform. Inspire. This statement is not only our commitment to you, the readers of Diabetes Health, but also a call to action. In our June/July print issue (available online June 1 under the Digital Edition tab), we've done some investigating. We tracked down educational agencies, websites, software, and applications, and we've listed them for you in our 2nd Educational Resource Guide.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2010

National Plan to Improve Health Literacy

The United States Department of Health and Human Services released The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy aimed at making health information and services easier to understand and use. The plan calls for improving the jargon-filled language, dense writing, and complex explanations that often fill patient handouts, medical forms, health web sites, and recommendations to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2010

Bret Michaels - Type 1 Diabetes Patient and Celebrity Apprentice Winner

It was a great win for diabetes on Sunday night as Bret Michaels, lead singer for the rock band Poison and reality TV star, was crowned the latest Celebrity Apprentice winner after struggling with several medical scares in the past month. Just as impressive is that throughout the season, Michaels' various wins raised more than $390,000 for the American Diabetes Association, including the final challenge prize from Snapple, worth $250,000. The 47-year old Michaels has lived with type 1 diabetes since he was six years old.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Abbott Receives FDA Clearance for New, Easier-to-Use FreeStyle Lite® Test Strips

Abbott announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new FreeStyle Lite blood glucose test strips. The new FreeStyle Lite test strips minimize interference during blood glucose testing and are designed to offer a better testing experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

Nick Jonas and Bayer Diabetes Care Announce 'Give Back. Simply Win'

A new contest, "Give Back. Simply Win." sponsored by Bayer Diabetes Care will shine a spotlight on people with diabetes who are making a difference in their local communities. Three grand prize winners will meet international singing sensation Nick Jonas and Bayer will donate $5,000 to three not-for-profit charitable causes, one selected by each winner.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2010

Jonas Brothers Help Raise $250,000 for Diabetes

Grammy-award-nominated teen pop sensations the Jonas Brothers helped raise more than $250,000 at the annual "Rock For Diabetes" benefit on May 16, held at the home of Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman. More than 200 people attended this year's benefit, which raised funds for the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Health Literacy and Safety Risks

People with diabetes who have limited health literacy are at higher risk for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, CA.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2010

Glucose Monitoring Medical Tattoo

Tattoos aren't just an art form or a way of making a personal statement anymore: They are beginning to save lives.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2010

$3.3 Million Grant to Study Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children

A husband-and-wife research team at the UC Davis School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to lead the first prospective, nationwide, multi-site clinical study of how to prevent the neurological injuries and, in rare cases, death caused by brain swelling in children in diabetic crisis.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2010

Ethnic Disparities Found in A1c Test

A new study released by the Children's Hospital of New Orleans has found that black children with type 1 diabetes scored higher on A1c tests than white children who had similar blood glucose levels. Such ethnic disparity has already been shown in previous studies with adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

IDF Launches World Diabetes Day 2010 Campaign

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has kicked off its World Diabetes Day campaign under the slogan "Let's take control of diabetes. Now."  Led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations, World Diabetes Day is celebrated every year on November 14. Created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to growing concerns about the escalating threat of diabetes worldwide, it reaches a global audience of over 1 billion people. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

CVS Loyalty Program for People with Diabetes

Rhode Island-based CVS/pharmacy, which operates more than 7,000 pharmacies and drug stores in the United States, has announced three diabetes-related initiatives:

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Pain Is Worst Late at Night for People With Diabetic Neuropathy

Most people who have diabetes quickly learn that one of the worst side effects of the disease is pain caused by damage to the hands and feet. High blood sugar inflames nerves, leading to tingling and numbness, and often, severe pain. Researchers at the Comprehensive Pain Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland have learned that onset of nerve pain may have a daily rhythm, with the worst occurring late at night around 11 p.m. Their study, which they characterized as "preliminary," tracked 647 people with diabetic neuropathy. The results showed that the typical pattern for people with the condition was to experience the greatest pain from it after sunset, peaking at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 14, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 13 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

FDA’s Bad Ad Program

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched a "Bad Ad Program," an outreach effort aimed at educating healthcare providers and urging them to report misleading drug advertisements. The Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications (DDMAC), in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, administers the program.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

Recruiting Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Dr. Richard Hays announced today that he is now recruiting children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes for Protégé Encore, a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III clinical trial. This is the second of two Phase III studies testing the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug called teplizumab. The first study, known as Protégé, has completed enrollment of more than 530 subjects with type 1 diabetes. There is currently no approved therapy to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2010

New Agents That Keep Insulin Working Longer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have developed a molecule that can block the breakdown of insulin. Their discovery could lead to development of a new class of drugs to help treat diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2010

Avoiding Post-Race Hypoglycemia

I woke up on the floor of my living room, soaked in sweat.  I could not stand, or even sit up.  I could not raise my arms or control my hands enough to grasp anything. Forget reaching for the telephone, even if my brain could have formulated the thought to try.  I could not speak, but I lived alone, so there was no one to hear anyway.  I did not know what day it was, but the hot July 4th late afternoon sun was shining brightly through the windows.  After an unknown period of time, my brain must have had a flash of coherence that I was having severe hypoglycemia. 

comments 8 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

Osiris Therapeutics announced that it has been granted Orphan Drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Prochymal as a treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. The FDA instituted the Orphan Drug Act to promote the development of treatments for underserved patient populations. To be eligible for Orphan Drug designation, the treatment must target a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 new patients per year in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

D-TREAT

Diabetes Education and Camping Association's (DECA's) young adult leadership team "DLEAD" takes on Boston at "D-TREAT" - a unique 3-day event at Northeastern University, May 28-30, 2010 - to encourage young adults with diabetes to network, share insights and meet peers during an awesome event.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 6, 2010

Bret Michaels: Rock Star, Celebrity Apprentice, and Type 1 Diabetic

Bret Michaels suffered a brain hemorrhage last week, and his official website states that he remains in critical condition in ICU under 24-hour supervision by doctors and medical staff.  His doctors are hopeful that he can make a full recovery, but that could take weeks or months.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2010

Combination Drug-Laser Therapy Shows Great Promise in Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Clinical studies at 52 different sites nationwide have shown that combining standard laser treatments with injections of the drug ranibizumab (Lucentis) offers substantially better results for treating macular edema than laser treatments alone. The research showed that almost 50 percent of patients treated with the combination therapy showed substantial improvement in their vision after one year, compared with 28 percent of patients who had been treated solely with laser.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2010

April 2010

SafeSittings Diabetes Babysitting Service

Are you the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes? Do you often wish that you could find a babysitter who understands the "ins-and-outs" of type 1 so that you could enjoy an evening out, assured that your child is in good hands? Or are you a teenager with type 1 who is looking for a way to help children manage their disease, while making a little extra money at the same time?  Then look no further than www.SafeSittings.com. Launched over six years ago in Manhattan by teenager Kimberly Ross, www.SafeSittings.com is a free online service that matches type 1 families with babysitters who also have the disease. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2010

Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Specially Bred Pigs

NEW YORK, April 27, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation announced today that it is partnering with Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand-based biotechnology company focused on developing cell based therapeutics, in a Phase II clinical trial to study the safety and effectiveness of transplanting encapsulated insulin-producing cells from pigs as a treatment for type 1 diabetes with significant hypoglycemia unawareness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2010

FDA Launches Initiative to Reduce Infusion Pump Risks

Last week the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced an initiative to evaluate safety problems that may occur with external infusion pumps.  These devices are used to deliver fluids or medications to patients in a controlled manner. Insulin pumps, for example, release insulin into the body at a controlled rate to compensate for a lack of insulin production in people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2010

Bayer Diabetes Care Introduces DIDGET

Bayer Diabetes Care today announced the introduction of the DIDGETTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.  The DIDGET meter is unique because it is the only blood glucose meter that connects directly to Nintendo DSTM and DS Lite gaming systems to help kids manage a lifelong disease by rewarding them for building consistent testing habits and meeting personalized blood glucose target ranges. Bayer's DIDGET meter is now available for purchase in the U.S. through CVS.com, Drugstore.com and Walgreens.com.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Smart Insulin

A team of researchers from Case Western University published an article revealing their invention of a "smart" insulin molecule that binds considerably less to cancer receptors and self-assembles under the skin. To provide a slow-release form of insulin, the compound self-assembles under the skin by "stapling" itself together with zinc ions. Zinc staples connect the pieces of the insulin puzzle together to create a functional protein.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

No More Slow-to-Heal Wounds

Researchers at Loyola University have discovered a group of immune system cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells that slow the wound healing process. Their findings pave the way for potential new treatments to accelerate the healing process in slow-to-heal wounds that can occur in people with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2010

What People with Type 1 Diabetes can Learn from Type 2s

Admit it, Type 1s. In weaker moments, you look down your noses at the Type 2 diabetics. You know that their disease can result from poor lifestyle choices. You know that their treatment regimen, compared with yours, is simple.

comments 36 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

Artificial Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Works in Clinical Trials

The first human trials of the latest design of an artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes found the device worked without causing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2010

Urgent Support Needed for Type 1 Diabetes Legislation

Diabetes Health was curious to explore the progress of the proposed legislation to renew the Special Diabetes Program, also known as the SDP (H.R. 3668 in the House of Representatives and S. 3058 in the Senate.)  These bills would renew the SDP for five years. We were pleased to note that the JDRF's "Promise to Remember Me" campaign, which aims to facilitate meetings between representatives and senators and their constituents in their local districts, has resulted in JDRF Advocates already completing over 300 meetings with members of Congress. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2010

Four

Four risk factors-all of them preventable-reduce life expectancy among U.S. men by 4.9 years and among U.S. women by 4.1 years, according to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. (According to U.N. figures, current U.S. life expectancy is 75.6 years for men and 80.8 years for women.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2010

Roche acquires Medingo Ltd., makers of the Solo MicroPump

Roche and Elron Electronics Ltd. announced that they have signed an agreement under which Roche will acquire 100% of Medingo Ltd., a majority-owned subsidiary of the Elron group. Medingo Ltd. is engaged in the development of a semi-disposable insulin patch pump (Solo MicroPump). Under the terms of the agreement, Roche will pay Medingo Ltd.'s shareholders an upfront payment of US$ 160 million as well as up to 25% of the upfront payment in performance related milestones.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2010

A Promising New Drug for Treating Diabetic Macular Edema

Successful clinical trials of a topical drug called mecamylamine may lead to a potent new treatment for the diabetes-induced eye disease known as macular edema. Diabetic macular edema* involves the part of the retina called the macula. High blood sugar levels inflame its blood vessels, leading to leakiness and fluid accumulation. Left uncontrolled, those symptoms can lead to blurriness, impaired vision, and even blindness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 14, 2010

Sea Urchin Proteins Might Lead to Eventual Treatment for Rare Form of Diabetes

A gene that mutated half a billion years ago and now shows up in modern sea creatures could hold the key to understanding a rare form of diabetes. The disease, called diabetes insipidus (not to be confused with diabetes mellitus), causes sufferers to urinate more than three-fourths of a gallon every day. An estimated 41,000 U.S. patients suffer from diabetes insipidus.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2010

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis for Type 1 Therapy

The idea of parasitic worms causes a shudder in most people. The very thought of some wriggly segmented thing latching onto an internal organ and ransacking it for nourishment is not pleasant. But the scientists who study the creatures may be on to a whole new tack in the fight against type 1 diabetes. It turns out that people who suffer from parasitic worms experience an unexpected beneficial side effect: the worms exert control over the human immune system that seems to protect against several inflammatory diseases, including asthma, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, allergies, and... type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2010

Generic Drug Salsalate Continues to Show Promise

We continue to monitor the progress of studies to determine the effectiveness of salsalate, a generic aspirin-like drug, to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.  As previously reported here in October 2008 and January 2009, researchers from the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard University are conducting clinical trials to determine if this well known and proven drug for joint pain can be added to the list of diabetes drugs.  Recently, results from a three-month trial were announced online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, showing that those who took salsalate demonstrated significantly improved blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2010

Insulin-Producing Beta Cells Can Be Reborn

Healthy, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas have a relatively long life and typically do not replicate under normal conditions. Any loss of beta cells, therefore, is usually permanent. In the case of type 1 diabetes, for example, the destruction of beta cells by the body's own immune system is permanent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2010

Nanoparticle Vaccine Stops the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes in Mice

Using a sophisticated nanotechnology-based "vaccine," researchers were able to successfully reverse type 1 diabetes in mice and slow the onset of the disease in mice at risk for the disease.  The study, co-funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, provides new and important insights into understanding how to stop the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes, and could even have implications for other autoimmune diseases.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2010

Flowers and Cards and Faux Pas... Oh My!

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, someone said brightly to me, "Well, at least you don't have cancer!" Others told me with naïve confidence, "You can beat this thing!"  Another person remarked to my mother, "If anyone could do a good job with diabetes, it's Rachel!  I'm too scared of needles."  Not one of these comments, nor about ninety percent of the others I received, was helpful, encouraging, or beneficial. 

comments 18 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2010

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Industry Resource for Information on Diabetes and Chronic Disease

Novo Nordisk, a global healthcare company and leader in diabetes care, announced the launch of the Novo Nordisk BlueSheet, a resource for information on diabetes and chronic disease, highlighting key issues in diabetes prevention, detection, treatment and care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2010

Ask Nadia!

Diabetes Health is excited to welcome you to "Ask Nadia", a new column by founder and editor-in-chief, Nadia Al-Samarrie. Nadia's adeptness in diabetes health comes from more than 20 years experience as a caregiver, managing the myriad of Type 1, Type 2 and pre-diabetes related issues in her own family, as well as from the knowledge acquired through her devoted and passionate tenure as the publisher of the prominent Diabetes Health Magazine. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2010

Reluctance to Reach Out to Others Can Boost Mortality Rate 33 Percent Among People With Diabetes

People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who find it difficult to trust others or reach out for emotional support may be shortening their own lives. That's the conclusion of a five-year University of Washington study that showed a 33 percent higher mortality rate among diabetes patients who did not interact well with their healthcare providers or other people.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2010

Our Kids and Camps: April/May Digital Edition Is Now Available

While the words "diabetes" and "camp" may not sound like they belong in the same sentence for most people, they sure do for thousands of kids across the country. Diabetes camp is their time to share experiences, learn, and have fun with other kids who have diabetes. You'll find the usual camping activities like hiking, arts and crafts, boating, swimming, and sitting around the campfire, but also lessons on adjusting your insulin pump to compensate for sports and how to give yourself an injection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

Summer Fun for Kids!

The Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) mission is to "promote communication, provide education, share resources, and serve as a worldwide voice to advance diabetes education and camping programs that meet the diverse needs of individuals and families."  DECA provides an international databse of diabetes camping organizations, and "Best Practices" tools for diabetes camp management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

March 2010

"I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream!"

I do not conceal the fact that I love dessert. I believe that it is something that I deserve, a reward for working out that morning, keeping my blood sugar in check, monitoring my carbohydrate intake, going to work, and taking care of household duties. 

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

Texas Researcher Poised to Test Leptin as a Replacement for Insulin Among Type 1s

A University of Texas researcher who genetically modified mice with type 1 diabetes to control their disease with leptin instead of insulin is now ready to extend his experiment to human test subjects. Dr. Roger Unger, a researcher at the UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, will begin the tests as soon as leptin manufacturers can assure him of a steady supply of the hormone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2010

The Story of GAD

You may not have heard of GAD, but it's a hot topic in the world of type 1 diabetes research. GAD, which stands for glutamic acid decarboxylase, is an enzyme in the brain and the pancreas that plays several roles in the body. As an enzyme, it converts the excitatory amino acid glutamate into the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, which nerve cells use to communicate.  But it also has a less helpful role, as an autoantigen (an element of self that provokes the generation of antibodies) in autoimmune diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2010

Medtronic Receives FDA Approval for Industry's Most Advanced Integrated System for Diabetes Management

MINNEAPOLIS - March 17, 2010 - Medtronic, Inc. today announced it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, the next generation of the industry's only integrated diabetes management system (insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and diabetes therapy management software). The system incorporates new innovative CGM features including predictive alerts that can give early warning to people with diabetes so they can take action to prevent dangerous high or low glucose events.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2010

Our Journey to Hope and Beyond

I grew up around the corner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In high school, long ago, I thought that NIH scientists were "bad guys" who mistreated animals in the name of medical research. I later moved to the West Coast and became a registered obstetrical nurse. Over the years, along with sharing the joys of new moms and new babies, I cared for patients with devastating conditions like cancer and quadriplegia, people whose lives could potentially be saved or improved by medical research., Yet it wasn't until many years later, after moving back to the DC area, that I really began to see the NIH in a new light.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

FDA eyes improvements for diabetics' glucose devices

At a two-day meeting (March 16 and 17, 2010) to review blood glucose meters, Food and Drug Administration officials and staff pointed to a number of issues that can prevent people from getting proper treatment and sought input from medical experts and industry on ways to improve test results with the widely used devices.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Mom Says 'Just a Phone Call Away', Just Not Good Enough

Allen, Texas - When Pam Henry's daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, she never even thought she would be part of something that could revolutionize health care. "When Sarah was diagnosed, my only goal was to do all I could to keep her as healthy as possible.  What I created was something just to help keep her that way." 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Money Money Money: Diabetes Research Funding

The demand for diabetes research funding clearly exceeds the funds available. In the United States, 23.6 million children and adults (7.8 percent of the population) have diabetes, and we spent $174 billion on diagnosed diabetes alone in 2007 (the most recent year for which data are available). It is imperative that we take action, but where is the research funding coming from? Can it possibly be sufficient, and how is it being spent? 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2010

Mind, Body, and. . . Spirit?

When I was undiagnosed and sick, I was very angry with God.  I didn't understand why I was weak, fatigued, constantly thirsty and hungry, scarily thin, and mentally foggy.  I prayed and prayed for an answer.  I cried, I cursed, and I yelled.  Nothing.  For a year and a half.  When I received my diagnosis in a local emergency room, I felt instant relief.  Finally, I had an answer, a name, and some hope.  But soon after, the anger reappeared, this time because God had failed to pass over me.  I had done nothing to earn this fate. Why me? 

comments 18 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2010

Discovery of a Suspect Enzyme in Humans Could Lead to Powerful Type 1 Therapy

An enzyme that destroys pancreatic beta cells in lab mice has now been observed in human beta cells. Because scientists already know how to delete the mouse gene that produces the enzyme, they are hopeful that the same therapy can eventually be applied to people with type 1 diabetes. If so, it would be one of the most powerful therapies yet for addressing the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells that causes type 1.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2010

February 2010

FDA Gives Novo the Go-Ahead to Market Victoza® in the U.S.

Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has received Food and Drug Administration permission to begin marketing its type 2 drug Victoza® in the United States.
Victoza, the brand name for liraglutide, is a GLP-1* analog that is taken one a day by injection to help control blood sugar-and in some cases, help with weight loss-in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2010

Happy (?) Anniversary

My four-year-diabetes-diagnosis anniversary is almost here.   It falls on March 24th, a day just like any other to most people, but a day full of sadness, loss, and victory for me.  Will I celebrate?  I'm not sure if reflection is a form of celebration.  I'd much prefer a birthday-like affair featuring balloons, cards, and, of course, something sweet to eat. But I also feel as if the impending date is much like a funeral on the calendar, a time for mourning as well as reflection.

comments 28 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2010

JDRF Launches Program to Support Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

As part of an extensive program to support the needs of adults with type 1 diabetes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International announced the introduction of a key support program, the JDRF Adult Type 1 Toolkit, to meet an immediate need for resources and community for adults more recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes - a chronic autoimmune disease often first diagnosed in children.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women Conference Filling up Fast

The North Carolina-based not-for-profit DiabetesSisters (DiabetesSisters.org) is pleased to announce that registration for the first annual Weekend for Women conference to be held May 22-23rd in Raleigh is two-thirds full, and will likely close by April 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2010

JDRF-Funded Research Advances Potential for Regeneration as a Possible Cure for Type 1 Diabetes

A hormone responsible for the body's stress response is also linked to the growth of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, according to JDRF- funded researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California. The findings are the latest advances to underscore the potential for regeneration as a key component of a possible cure for type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

Embracing a New Diet: Vegetarianism

For as long as I can remember, I have disliked meat.  I believe it started with my sensitive gag reflex as a child.  I could hardly chew and swallow pork chops, pineapple, or anything else that didn't go down easily. In high school I became best friends with a girl who didn't eat meat.  It seemed like a really cool lifestyle, so I joined ranks with her.  Instead of eating meat, we consumed french fries, fruit punch, and snack cakes.  This became our definition of vegetarianism. Then, during my junior year of high school, my doctor informed me that my chronic low blood sugars might be improved by more protein consumption, so I forced myself back into the life of a carnivore, not knowing then that protein consumption didn't have to equal a slab of meat at every meal. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2010

Handing down the Genes. Part 3 (of 3)

This is the third - and final - installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part III: "Nutrition and Exercise Tips"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 19, 2010

Artificial Pancreas Project Update

Feb. 11, 2010 - At the 3rd International Conference on Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD) in Basel, Switzerland, Roche Diabetes Care, the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute announced their expanded collaboration in the Artificial Pancreas Project sponsored by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

Newly Found Protein and Enzyme Duo May Hold Key to a Cure for Retinopathy

Thwarting a protein that carries an otherwise benign enzyme into the nuclei of cells in the retina, where the enzyme kills the retinal cells, may hold the key to preventing blindness in patients with diabetes. That's the conclusion of a two-year study by researchers at Michigan State University seeking a way to treat retinopathy, the disease that often leads to blindness in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2010

Kris Freeman Today Show Interview

Kris Freeman, a member of the United States cross-country ski team has a story unmatched in Olympic competition history. Freeman, 28, is the first athlete with Type 1 diabetes to compete in an Olympic endurance event.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 2 (of 3)

This is the second installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part II: "Preventing Type 2 in Children"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 13, 2010

California Parents of Children with Diabetes and Care Advocates Hail Isadore Hall, III Legislation to Fight Diabetes

Sacramento- February 10, 2010 -- Assistant Speaker pro Tempore Isadore Hall, III (D- Compton) today introduced AB 1802, which would clarify existing law by allowing, but not requiring, a parent/guardian-designated teacher, administrator or school employee to administer insulin to a diabetic student while on a school campus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2010

Researchers Discover Protein that Triggers Islet Cell Rejection

Researchers at RIKEN and Fukuoka University have pinpointed the mechanism responsible for early rejection of transplanted pancreatic islet cells in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. A new system based on this mechanism has been shown to vastly increase transplant efficiency, setting the stage for the development of powerful new treatment techniques.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

What’s the Deal with Steel-Cut Oats?

Steel-cut oats are whole grains, made when the groats (the inner portion of the oat kernel) are cut into pieces by steel. Also known as coarse-cut oats or Irish oats, they are golden and look a little like small pieces of rice. They gain part of their distinctive flavor from the roasting process after being harvested and cleaned. Although the oats are then hulled, this process does not strip away their bran and germ, allowing them to retain a concentrated source of their fiber and nutrients.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 1 (of 3)

This is the beginning of our three part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part I: "When to Worry-and When Not to-About Your Child's Increased Risk for Diabetes."

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Cost the U.S. $218 Billion in 2007: En Route to $336 Billion by 2034

A study commissioned by healthcare company Novo Nordisk has reported that the cost of diabetes and pre-diabetes to the U.S. economy in 2007 was $218 billion. The study, conducted by The Lewin Group, projected that by 2034, the two conditions will cost the economy $336 billion per year.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 3, 2010

Scared of Lows

Dear Diabetes Health, I'm 26 years old and engaged to a woman I've known since college.  We live together, love each other, and have good sex, but now I'm having doubts. A year ago, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She started taking insulin, and it has been rough. Four times now she has started sweating and shaking and saying strange things. Twice this happened during sex. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2010

January 2010

DiabetesHealth Feb-March Print and Digital Edition Available Now!

On Monday, take a look at our new Feb\March digital edition. DiabetesHealth sat down to talk with Kris Freeman, the first Olympian with type 1 diabetes to compete in the endurance sport of cross country skiing. He has shared his story about what it is like to follow your dreams regardless of the obstacles in place. Working with Eli Lily, Kris spends time traveling around the country talking with kids about their aspirations and diabetes. He wants his story to inspire other people with type 1 diabetes to follow their own dreams. "Diabetes doesn't have to hold you back."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2010

Kris Freeman Skis for Gold at the Vancouver Olympics

Thousands of elite athletes from around the world are making their final preparations for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Every snowboarder, short track speed skater, ski jumper and hockey player shares a dream of standing on the medium wearing an Olympic gold medal.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2010

Let's take care of one another: random acts of kindness

Altruism is unselfish concern for the welfare of others. It is a traditional virtue in many cultures, and a core aspect of various religious traditions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism among others.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Changes in the Position of Conventional Insulin Pumps Shown to Significantly Impact Accuracy of Insulin Delivery

Researchers at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and University of California, Santa Barbara have concluded that changing the height of a conventional insulin pump in relation to its tubing and infusion set can significantly impact expected insulin delivery rates. Such changes can occur during routine daily activities like dressing, sleeping or showering. The study, "Siphon Effects of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pump Delivery Performance," evaluated the siphon or hydrostatic pressure action effects on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and was published in the January issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2010

Ten Tips For Baking Wisely

I have a long-standing obsession with baking. The art of creating cookies, bars, pies, and cakes got me through some of the most stressful times in my life, including holidays, college final exams, and a new job.  After I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of twenty-four, however, I learned that my traditional ingredients, including white flour, sugar, and excessive amounts of chocolate, lead to high blood sugars and of course, fatigue, fogginess, and other undesirable side effects. 

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2010

Newly identified genes influence insulin and glucose regulation

An international research consortium has found 13 new genetic variants that influence blood glucose regulation, insulin resistance, and the function of insulin-secreting beta cells in populations of European descent. Five of the newly discovered variants increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2010

JDRF and BD Collaborate to Improve Insulin Pump Delivery

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) announced today an innovative program aimed at improving the treatment of type 1 diabetes by developing novel insulin delivery products to enhance the use of insulin pumps. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2010

Moving Toward a Healthcare Bill: What People with Diabetes Need to Know

The effort underway in Washington, D.C., to draft a healthcare bill is often described as "trying to get a handle on so many moving parts." At issue is this: the House passed a 1,990 page bill in December followed by the Senate passing a 2,074 page bill on Christmas Eve. Now, those two versions are being merged into one with a conference committee that would be composed of House and Senate Members while, at the same time, the White House has been pushing for a deadline by the State of the Union Address, now scheduled for Wednesday, January 27.  So far, all sides believe there will be a health care bill in front of the president within the next few weeks. What it looks like is one of the "moving parts."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2010

Diabetes Ups Risk of Dementia for Mildly Impaired

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diabetes may hasten progression to dementia in older people with mild thinking impairment, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2010

Diabetes Success Story: Tyler Curry Stevenson

Many meaningful events, experiences, and accomplishments have gone into making me the person that I am today. In my life, most of the important milestones came and went as they do for every kid. But for some of us, life throws a curveball and introduces a trauma or an unexpected event that will forever change our lives. When my most meaningful event occurred, on May 22, 2000, there were no cheers, applause, or laughter in the room. That was the day I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 21 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2010

2010 Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award

Diabetes Health Magazine (www.diabeteshealth.com), a local Marin Publishing Company, is proud to have successfully nominated Lisa Shenson for a prestigious award. Shenson, a true humanitarian, will be honored by the Marin Human Rights Commission and awarded its 2010 Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award at an annual Gala Dinner on January 21st, and to be held at the Sheraton Four Points in San Rafael. Mother turned activist, Shenson has been fighting for the human and civil rights of children with diabetes, especially in the schools, for over a decade. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 18, 2010

Pancreas Transplant Program Opens at Montefiore Medical Center

NEW YORK, Jan. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Montefiore Medical Center continues to expand its portfolio of options for patients in need of organ transplantation. The new Pancreas Transplant Program will treat patients with severe, end-stage diabetes. As the only Pancreas Transplant Program in the Bronx and Westchester, and one of only several in Greater New York, patients will be able to receive world-class care close to home. The program currently has nine patients medically approved and waiting for a pancreas transplant.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2010

JDRF Forms Partnership with Animas to Develop First-Generation Automated System for Managing Type 1 Diabetes

NEW YORK, January 13, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation today announced an innovative partnership with Animas Corporation to develop an automated system to help people with type 1 diabetes better control their disease - the first step on the path to what would be among the most revolutionary advancements in treating type 1 diabetes: the development of an artificial pancreas, a fully automated system to dispense insulin to patients based on real-time changes in blood sugar levels. 

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2010

ProtoKinetix Anti-Aging Glycopeptides Show Promise Against Diabetes

One potential avenue for the treatment for type 1 diabetes is to transplant insulin-producing islet cells into the body. The Edmonton Protocol is a method of implanting pancreatic islets into the liver for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The protocol is named for the islet transplantation group at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, where the protocol was first devised in the late 1990s.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Study Finds Tight Blood Sugar Control not so Important if Other Medical Problems are Present

A five-year study of 2,613 people treated for diabetes at Italian clinics shows that tight blood sugar control may not be the number-one priority for patients who have other medical problems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Out of Love

Dear Diabetes Health, I hope you can help me. I am 49 years old and was diagnosed with type 2 five years ago.  My husband still wants sex. I don't even want him to touch me.  He is very mean to me. He yells at me and calls me names.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2010

Insulet and Ypsomed Sign International Distribution Agreement for the OmniPod Insulin Management System

BEDFORD, Mass. and BURGDORF, Switzerland, Jan. 5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Insulet Corporation (Nasdaq: PODD), the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, and Ypsomed AG (SIX Swiss Exchange: YPSN), a leading independent diabetes specialist and technology provider of innovative injection systems for self-medication in Europe, today announced an exclusive agreement for the distribution of the OmniPod Insulin Management System in nine countries across Europe, as well as China and Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2010

Diabetes Technology and Intimacy

The first time that my fiancé Richard and I got, um, "intimate," I had some explaining to do. "Er, that's for my diabetes. So's that. And this thing. Oh, and this too." Richard was a bit overwhelmed. I think his exact words were, "Are you bionic or something?"

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2010

The Doctor says,

"You have diabetes."  Have you just heard these words?  Or maybe you recently heard it about your son or daughter.  The oxygen rushes out of your body.  A knot forms in your stomach.  "What now?"

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women: May 22-23

DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce OPEN REGISTRATION for the Weekend for Women Conference hosted by DiabetesSisters and TCOYD on May 22-23, 2010 at Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2010

Laser Deemed Best Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Steroid injections into the eye slowed diabetes-related eye disease, though lasers remain the treatment of choice because of side effects related to the steroids, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2010

December 2009

Tasty Tips and Tricks from Marlene

According to Marlene, finding the perfect mix of ingredients is key when creating healthier versions of your favorite foods. From composing a healthier sandwich to perfecting pasta dishes and creating delightful desserts, Marlene reveals some of her tastiest ingredient tips:

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Resolutions vs. Changes: Make 2010 Count!

I have never been one to make New Year's resolutions.  This probably stems from my life experiences.  Every year at my fitness club, the place is flooded with new faces from January until late February.  Then, as the days tick by, the club becomes less and less crowded. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2009

Relieving Stress on Insulin-Producing Cells May Prevent Diabetes

BOSTON, Mass. - Dec. 23, 2009 - Cells in your body are constantly churning out poisonous forms of oxygen (oxidants) and mopping them up with a countervailing force of proteins and chemicals (anti-oxidants). This balancing act of oxidative stress is particularly likely to go haywire in beta cells, the insulin-producing cells that malfunction and then start to die off in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

An American in the UK: Healthcare for Type 1

As an American living abroad, I tried to follow the debate over healthcare reform in the US, but I had to drop it for my own sanity. How could so many of my fellow Americans say that people like me, with chronic diseases we never asked for, should pay more for healthcare because they don't want to participate in the risk pool? How could people like me, who live in fear of losing health insurance, be blind to how badly Americans with type 1 diabetes can get ripped off? I had to remind myself, "It's okay. I don't live there anymore."

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

Senate Passes Health Care Reform

"The passing of health reform in the Senate is a historic moment for our nation and for all people affected by diabetes," commented George J. Huntley, Chair of the Board, American Diabetes Association.

comments 13 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2009

Novo Enters Phase 1 Test of an Insulin Pill

Denmark-based Novo Nordisk A/S has begun phase 1 testing of an insulin pill that, if successful, could replace injections as the primary means of blood sugar control for millions of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The company has enrolled 80 volunteer German test subjects in the study and expects to have preliminary results by the first half of 2011. The test group consists of both people with diabetes and people without it.

comments 12 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2009

Cancer Drug May Slow Body's Rejection of Beta Cells in Type 1

Rituxamab, a drug that treats lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis, may soon be used to help combat the destruction of pancreatic beta cells in newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes. Researchers at Indiana University have found that the drug, originally developed and sold by Genentech as Rituxan, temporarily slows or stops the destruction of the 10 or 20 percent of beta cells that type 1s typically have remaining when they are first diagnosed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2009

JDRF Announces Diabetes Research Program with Johnson & Johnson

NEW YORK, Dec. 17, 2009 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide, said today that it will begin working with The Johnson & Johnson Corporate Office of Science and Technology, and its affiliates, to speed the development of drug targets and pathways to promote the survival and function of insulin-producing cells in people who have diabetes.  The program will look to fund research at academic centers around the world that could eventually lead to novel drug targets and industry collaborations for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 19, 2009

Good Insulin Injection Practices

Good injection practices - such as proper injection technique, site rotation, and appropriate needle use - are as important to your glucose control as your type and dosage of insulin (1). But over time, you may have developed your own injection technique, which may not exactly accord with professional guidelines and standards.  For instance, you might reuse your needles. It's a very common practice, despite the fact that guidelines issued by regulatory agencies call for all insulin injection needles to be labeled single-use only. However, changes to injection technique can alter insulin absorption and may lead to problems down the road.  So maybe it's time for a refresher in the official line on appropriate insulin injection practices - injection technique, site rotation, and proper needle use (2).

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2009

Bears Quarterback Jay Cutler and Eli Lilly Will Send 44 Kids to ADA Camps Through the Touchdowns for Diabetes Campaign

CHICAGO, Dec. 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Chicago Bears' quarterback Jay Cutler and Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly) have already helped send 44 children to American Diabetes Association diabetes camps next summer - with four games left in the NFL season.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 18, 2009

Joy and Jolly: Making Your Holiday Less Stressful

‘Tis the season to be jolly? The most wonderful time of the year? Joy to the world? Between Black Friday, meal preparations, decorating, dealing with clashing family members, and party after party, the holiday season can be one of the most stressful times of the year. The joy and jolly that we sing about in Christmas carols hardly resonates in our lives as we prepare for and then attempt to survive the stress of the holidays.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2009

Eliminating Endocrinologist Consultations

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Dec. 7 -- A survey just conducted by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) indicates that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) decision to eliminate consultation codes will force four out of five endocrinologists to reduce the number of Medicare patients seen in their practices.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2009

Mobile Phone Technology may Address Unmet Needs of Parents of Children with Diabetes, Sending Blood Sugar Readings Via Text, to Help Manage Child's Illness

BOSTON, DECEMBER 8, 2009 -- In a recent study conducted by the Center for Connected Health, a division of Partners HealthCare, new data revealed that parents of children with diabetes were receptive to using novel health technology - such as a mobile phone that could collect and transmit the child's blood sugar readings to a doctor - to help manage their child's diabetes. This study was published in the November issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2009).

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2009

Are You Prepared to Handle Diabetes During a Disaster?

If you have diabetes and are wondering whether you're prepared for a unexpected disaster, then head for the website of the American Association for Diabetes Educators. There you'll find a Diabetes Disaster Response Toolkit that contains an abundance of information on nearly every aspect of getting prepared and helping your local diabetes community do the same. The toolkit, which was put together by the Alamo Association of Diabetes Educators in Texas, will help any educator or member of the public get ready to handle diabetes during a flood, earthquake, or any other natural or human-made disaster.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

Is Testosterone the Wonder Drug?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 57 years old. About five years ago, I saw my doctor because I was feeling tired. My waist size was up, and I was not interested in sex. I almost never got an erection. The doctor diagnosed type 2 diabetes and put me on metformin. He also prescribed Viagra, which helped sometimes, but not all the time.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

Review of Clinical Trials of Oral Insulin: Oral-lyn

WORCESTER, Mass., Dec 3, 2009 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX News Network) -- Published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, an independent review of clinical trials of Generex Oral-lyn(TM) shows that the oral insulin spray has a faster onset of action and shorter duration of action than insulin delivered subcutaneously.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2009

Etiquette for People Without Diabetes

Dr. Bill Polonsky, PhD, CDE, knows diabetes. Among other things, he has served as Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, as a Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is the founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute (BDI) in San Diego, California, and a member of Diabetes Health's Advisory Board.

comments 19 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2009

Cardiovascular risk in youth with type 1 diabetes linked primarily to insulin resistance

Chevy Chase, MD- According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), youth with type 1 diabetes have now been found to have abnormal insulin resistance. Having abnormal insulin resistance appears to negatively affect heart, blood vessel and exercise function in this population.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

Sink or Swim?

The road to my diabetes diagnosis was anything but easy.  Over Thanksgiving break during my first semester of graduate school, I fell ill with a horrific stomach virus. I was too busy to be sick, swamped with student essays to grade and papers to write for my own classes. But as the following year and half progressed, I felt worse and worse.  I suffered from chronic sinus infections, drastic weight loss, extreme thirst, and constant fatigue.   As I bounced from doctor to doctor, I grew increasingly discouraged.  No one could figure out what was wrong with me.

comments 16 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

IBsolvMIR®, a Drug That Prevents Islet Transplantation Rejection, Receives FDA -Orphan Drug- Status

A Swedish biotechnology company, TikoMed AB, has received notice that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is granting orphan drug designation to its IBsolvMIR® drug for preventing the rejection of transplanted pancreatic islet cells in type 1 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

Pharmacists, Drug Wholesalers Offer Solutions to Avoid Disruption for Medicare Beneficiaries

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (Dec. 1, 2009) - Seniors may find that many common prescription drugs that Medicare Part D has covered for years may suddenly be denied due to a new policy being implemented by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

Pancreatic Islet Autoantibodies as Predictors of Type 1 Diabetes

Many autoimmune diseases, such as lupus erythematosis and type 1 diabetes, are caused by autoantibodies. An autoantibody is an antibody (a protein) produced by the immune system of an individual, which is directed against a different protein of the the same individual.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2009

Diabetes Population to Double and Diabetes Costs to Nearly Triple in 25 Years, New Study Shows

PRINCETON, NJ (November 27, 2009) - The diabetes population in the United States will almost double over the next 25 years and annual medical spending on the disease is projected to hit $336 billion, up from $113 billion today, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.  The National Changing Diabetes® Program (NCDP), a program of Novo Nordisk, commissioned the analysis by a team from the University of Chicago.

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2009

Nutrisystem Steps Up to Help Stop Diabetes with $100,000 Pledge

HORSHAM, Pa.-- (BUSINESS WIRE)--Nutrisystem, Inc. (NASDQ: NTRI), a leading developer of weight loss products and services, today announced its company-wide support for the recently launched Stop DiabetesSM  movement from the American Diabetes Association. On the heels of the successful launch of Nutrisystem D, its program designed to help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight, Nutrisystem has implemented a $5.00 contribution for every person who shares their story on the American Diabetes Association's Stop Diabetes website, up to $100,000 through December 31, 2009.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

Food Insulin Index Predicts Insulin Demand of Mixed Meals

Dr. Jennie C. Brand-Miller, from the University of Sydney stated that, "The food insulin index (FII) may provide a better way to adjust insulin dose in Type 1 diabetes.... In time, it may also enable us to design diets to prevent diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

New Accu-Chek Diabetes Link Launched

The official site launch for Accu-Chek Diabetes Link Canada was Monday November 16, and is the first of many proposed sites being developed by Roche to link people with diabetes to various resources.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2009

Portion Distortion: Take Charge!

We hear it all the time, from the diet ads on television to the lectures from our doctors and dietitians.  What matters is not only what you eat, but also how much you eat.   But how can you control your portions?  Is it possible to have a healthy relationship with food?  How can you make sure you are full, but not stuffed? Can you keep your blood sugars under control?  The answer to all these questions is yes! 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2009

The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years, diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. A Greek by the name of Aretaeus described its destructive nature in the first century AD, naming the affliction "diabetes," the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold, in his text "Aretaeus the Cappodacian," described Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain, and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body, while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2009

Q & A: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have  type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

New GoMeals

Bridgewater, NJ, November 19, 2009 - Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today that GoMealsTM, a new iPhone application (app) designed to help people living with diabetes make healthy food choices, is now available for download at the iTunes App store.  GoMealsTM is a food trac