See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Type 2 Issues Archives

Type 2 Issues Article Archives

October 2013

A DH Classic: Halloween Is More Than Scary for Parents of Trick-or-Treaters with Diabetes

(Editor's Note: We originally published this article in October 2008. Laura Plunkett's observations are timeless, and her comments elicited several interesting responses from readers.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 25, 2013

September 2013

Learn To Control Your Diabetes, Before It Controls You

A Diabetes Health Classic. This article originally was published on June 20, 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2013

June 2013

Looking for Mr. Good Pain

Whether because of age, weight, or lack of athletic chops, most type 2s-and I'm one of them-have settled on walking as their main form of exercise. It's the simplest, easiest exercise you can do: Put one foot in front of the other, rinse and repeat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Diabetes Is Certainly a Journey.

Diabetes is certainly a journey. The more I learn about it, the more I want to step off this path and onto a new one. So, how do you change the course of such an expensive and frustrating chronic illness?

comments 2 comments - Posted May 31, 2013

You’ve Just Been Diagnosed With Type 2: Five Things to Keep in Mind

You've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2013

Two New Promising Type 2 Drugs in the Pipeline

Two new drugs originally developed by Eli Lilly are showing promise when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2013

At the Crossroads, I Choose Insulin

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 10 years ago. My response to the news, very typical, was to begin a routine of vigorous exercise and dieting. With a beginner's enthusiasm, I lost almost 30 pounds (down from 220) and drove my A1c three months after my diagnosis down to 5.6%.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 6, 2013

April 2013

Altering Gut Bacteria Could Rival Bypass Surgery Effects

Obese patients hoping to slim down with bariatric surgery may soon be able to get the weight-loss effects of gastric bypass without going under the knife, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2013

Is it dangerous to continually have low-grade ketone levels in your blood?

Low-grade ketones are not a problem; it's part of the survival system that humans have for getting through famines. We don't have many famines nowadays, but if they're not eating overnight, a large percent of the population is going to have ketones in their blood in the morning.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2013

What meds do you recommend to control elevated cholesterol?

In my experience the most common cause of elevated cholesterol is low thyroid. High blood sugars also have an effect on LDL that can be very dramatic. If someone has elevated cholesterol, diabetic or not, the very first thing you do is check their free and total T3, and free and total T4. When you give them adequate thyroid replacement, the LDL usually normalizes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2013

Insulin Linked to Type 2 Weight Gains

Using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes could lead to weight gain, according to a new study from Tulane University.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2013

Five Simple Ways to Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There's talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans.

comments 6 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2013

We’re Not Bad, We’re Human

I've had type 1 diabetes for 18 years and whenever I hear bad news about someone with diabetes it hits me hard.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2013

How do you evaluate the studies that show that strict control of A1c does not have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular events?

This person is referring to the ACCORD study, which in its initial unsophisticated scoring supposedly showed that a large group of elderly diabetics who had existing heart disease, died sooner when their A1cs were brought down.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2013

March 2013

Diabetes Is No Slam Dunk

Monica Joyce had an idea. It wasn't original, but a good idea inspired by another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2013

February 2013

Diabetes-Friendly Valentine's Day Recipes (Including a Killer Chocolate Cake)

With all the heart-shaped boxes of chocolates filling every aisle of virtually every store this time of year, Valentine's Day can be treacherous for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2013

Choosing an Insulin Pump: My Personal Debate

I have decided to start using an insulin pump.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2013

January 2013

Type 2 Comedian Drew Carey Sheds 80 Pounds, Says No-Carb Diet Did It

Keep a close eye on this story. It has two elements necessary for creating a lot of buzz: a celebrity and his unconventional "cure" for a disease. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2013

Type 2: Oramed Sends Oral Insulin Test Request to FDA

Israel-based Oramed announced that it has sent an application to the Food and Drug Administration for permission to enter Phase 2 trials of its oral insulin product. The company has been working on developing a means of delivering insulin orally, which would allow people with diabetes to avoid having to inject themselves with the hormone.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

Calcium Score Predicts Cardiovascular Death Risk in Type 2

It's well known that diabetes, an inflammatory disease, increases the risk of developing heart disease and related complications-also the result of inflammation. Now there's a way of predicting which type 2s may be at the highest risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2013

December 2012

Study Says Some Type 2 Remissions Possible With Exercise, Diet

One out of nine type 2s who followed an intensive diet and exercise program for one year were able to record normal or prediabetes-level blood sugar levels, according to a study recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2012

Brown, White and Beige: Not in Fashion But in Fat

To help stem the obesity epidemic, researchers are looking at how certain hormones act on fat cells. Scientists know that "white" fat cells store fat while "brown" fat cells not only store fat but also turn it into energy, a process that goes awry in obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2012

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2012

Halle Berry Says She's Worked Her Way Up From Type 1 to Type 2 Diabetes

No less an authority than the New York Times wrote in May 2006 that Halle Berry has type 1 diabetes, listing her as one of several "stars who have type 1 - Gary Hall, the Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer; Adam Morrison, the Gonzaga University basketball star; [and] Halle Berry."

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2012

Incorporating Exercise Into a Busy Life

I would exercise if I had more time... if I had a health club membership... if it didn't hurt so much... if I knew what exercises to do... if I could do it with my family... if I could control my blood sugar...

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2012

Taking Linagliptin May Protect Kidney Function

Taking linagliptin seems to help protect the kidneys in people with type 2 diabetes. The drug, usually used along with diet, exercise, and sometimes other medications, lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2012

Five To-Do’s for People Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

There are ways to live with diabetes that allow for optimal health and relative freedom from complications. But to obtain them requires knowledge and know-how.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

The study, conducted by Pei-Chun Chen, Ph.D., of the National Taiwan University College of Public Health in Taipei, and colleagues, followed two groups: one consisting of an equal number of people with and without diabetes, and the other consisting of equal numbers of people with and without clinical depression.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

New research reveals that those suffering from depression might be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

My Tricks for Great Holiday Eating

While daily meal planning can be tricky when someone in the family is living with diabetes, the holidays can be especially challenging.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2012

November 2012

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam.'

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 29, 2012

Study Says Iron May Contribute to Type 2 Onset

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 28, 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In this new column, "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" readers send in observations and questions, and, in response, other readers share similar and not-so-similar experiences by posting in the "Comments" section.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms Three Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2012

Gut Bacteria Can Indicate Who Has Type 2

A Chinese study of 345 patients divided between non-diabetics and people with type 2 diabetes concludes that gut bacteria between the two groups differs substantially-so much so that the bacteria can be used to accurately determine who has or doesn't have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2012

Gum Treatments Can Lower Diabetes-Related Medical Costs

People with diabetes who receive treatment for gum disease can enjoy substantial reductions in hospitalizations, doctor visits, and annual medical expenses according to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and dental insurer United Concordia Dental.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2012

Study Reports That “Fat but Fit” Is Not an Oxymoron

While there is an almost constant media drumbeat about the dangers of obesity and overweight, it's a pleasure to learn that not everyone who is overweight is in bad health or runs the risk of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2012

Stan Bush: Managing Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs

Stan Bush wasn't really surprised to find out he had type 2 diabetes. An unhealthy diet that regularly featured containers of ice cream before bed had left him primed for the disease. But how he handled the news was a surprise, at least to his doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2012

October 2012

Under Physical Stress, Insulin-Producing Cells Regress

Scientists generally think that decreased insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is due to the death of the organ's beta cells. However, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center report that the beta cells do not die, but instead revert to a more basic cell type.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

August 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2012

An Interview With Robert Cuddihy, MD, of Sanofi US

Endocrinologist Robert Cuddihy, MD, joined Sanofi US over a year ago to be the company’s Vice President and Medical Diabetes Head in the United States. He is responsible for developing and executing the US strategy for Sanofi’s Diabetes Division, including pharmaceuticals, devices, and other technologies. He previously served as the medical director for several organizations, including the International Diabetes Center-Park Nicollet in Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2012

July 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

Type 2: Early Therapy Helps Retain Beta Cell Function

Immediately starting intense therapy for newly diagnosed type 2s preserved their beta cell functioning for 3.5 years, according to a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2012

Type 2: Diabetes Recurrence After Bariatric Surgery May Depend on Diabetes Duration

Bariatric surgery, which alters or blocks portions of the digestive system, has produced long-term remission of diabetes symptoms in many type 2 patients. However, a small study of obese type 2 patients who underwent bariatric surgery shows that the longer they had diabetes, the greater the chances that their disease recurred after surgery. The retrospective study, conducted by Yessica Ramos, MD, at the Mayo Clinic Arizona, found that patients who had had diabetes for five years or longer were nearly four times as likely to experience a recurrence of the disease after the remission brought on by the surgery.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2012

Diabetes: Hospital Bills Cost U.S. $83 Billion A Year

Diabetes affects nearly 25 million Americans, and that number is expected to grow substantially every year. It's the fifth leading cause of death in America, more than breast cancer and AIDs combined. And according to a report released last week from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), it's a disease that’s costing Americans $83 billion a year in hospital fees — 23 percent of total hospital spending.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2012

Obesity Problems Fuel Rapid Surge Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Children

Annie Snyder figured she'd be out of the pediatrician's office in 30 minutes, tops. Then she'd head home, tuck the medical permission for YMCA summer camp in her bag and finish packing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2012

June 2012

ADA Sessions Spotlight Powerful Weapons Against Diabetes

Several hopeful trends emerged from this year's ADA Scientific Sessions in Philadelphia, held June 8 through 12.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2012

Clinical Study Begins on Insulin Delivery Device for Type 2s

A clinical study has begun of a wearable device that continuously delivers basal insulin to people with type 2 diabetes. The device, PaQ®, is manufactured by CeQur SA, a Swiss company that has operations in Denmark and Massachusetts. Designed to provide three days of basal insulin delivery along with on-demand bolus insulin, the device incorporates a disposable insulin infuser reservoir attached to a reusable insulin monitor.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2012

Intensive Wellness Approach Helps Type 2s Lower Drug Doses and Costs

A Florida-based endocrinologist and his team have reported that an intensive 16-week wellness program aimed at type 2 patients yielded some dramatic results: Patients were able to decrease their insulin by 46 percent and their oral medication by 12 percent.  They saw their 30-day prescription costs drop by an average of more than $140 per month, reduced their BMI by 3.07, and experienced a drop of 0.7% in their A1C.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 14, 2012

The Game Plan: Blood Sugar Basics

How would you like an online interactive resource for type 2 diabetes that teaches you blood sugar basics? The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have come together to develop "the Game Plan" diabetes management program. By going to the website at bloodsugarbasics.com/the-game-plan, you can get everyday tips, watch a video, take a quiz that tests your understanding of high and low blood sugar, and find advice on how to approach your healthcare team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2012

Take the Pledge--Take Your Meds

Not taking medicine as directed causes more than one-third of medicine-related hospitalizations in the US each year, as well as almost 125,000 deaths. The following three cautionary tales illustrate the consequences of nonadherence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2012

May 2012

Study Says Best Drug Combo for Type 2 Kids Is Metformin and Rosiglitazone

A university study has concluded that a combination of metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) is the best drug therapy for controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 children and adolescents. Metformin alone is the drug most often prescribed for young or recently diagnosed type 2 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2012

Taiwanese Study Identifies Top Three Drugs for Type 2 Glycemic Control

Researchers in Taipei, Taiwan, report that they have identified the top three drugs for reducing A1C levels in type 2 diabetes: biphasic insulin, GLP-1 analogs, and basal insulin. They hedged a little on their endorsement of GLP-1 analogs, however, by saying that although they are not decisively better at controlling A1Cs than other oral diabetes drugs, they have the advantage of helping to reduce weight without adding to the danger of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2012

Molecular Switch Could Be Key for Type 2s

With tens of millions of American facing life with type 2 diabetes and many millions more at risk of the disease, scientists are scrambling to unravel novel treatments. The latest breakthrough could come from California's Salk Institute.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2012

Making a Healthy Choice for Breakfast

For people with diabetes, breakfast is more than just a morning meal. According to recent research, it may hold the key to good blood glucose numbers for the rest of the day.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2012

Obesity Could Follow Sleepless Nights

Feeling tired? Your lack of rest may be putting you at increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. That's the conclusion of a new paper, published in The American Journal of Human Biology, that looked at evidence collected from numerous experimental and observational studies. The link was clear: People who got less than six hours of sleep a night were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI) and be obese. The connection found in the study seems stronger for children and teenagers, which is especially worrisome given the skyrocketing rates of type 2 diabetes in young people.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2012

Insulin degludec

Novo Nordisk's new variety of long-lasting insulin, insulin degludec, reduces low blood sugars while improving overall control, according to a pair of studies published in the prestigious journal The Lancet on April 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2012

New Blood Sugar Guidelines Give Older Type 2s More Latitude

It may be better for older people with type 2 diabetes to have less stringent A1C goals than younger type 2s, according to new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 3, 2012

Changing Habits in Midstream

About 16 years ago, after some routine blood work, I was told by my doctor that he wanted me to see an endocrinologist because he suspected diabetes. I went to see the endo, and, sure enough, his suspicions were confirmed. I had type 2 diabetes, and I had some serious changes to make.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 2, 2012

American Idol Judge Promotes Healthy Decisions for Type 2s

American Idol judge Randy Jackson has embarked upon a mission of education and advocacy, urging those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to take a stand for their health and well-being.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2012

April 2012

Vitamin Deficiencies in People With Diabetes: the Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, "I can't have surgery because I won't heal." That is certainly not the case, however.  Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2012

Weight-Loss Surgery Produces Dramatic Results in Type 2s

Bariatric surgery, not medications, may be the key to producing dramatic drops in weight and even the remission of diabetes symptoms among type 2 patients, says a study from the University of Rome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2012

The ADA Chicago Expo Dishes Up Southern Hospitality and Much More

I was a mixture of nerves and excitement as I met one of my favorite celebrity chefs at the American Diabetes Association's Expo in Chicago on April 14th.  Jamie Deen, Paula Deen's adorable, blue-eyed, dimpled son, was there doing a food demonstration, meeting with fans, and extending a healthy dose of warm smiles and pure southern hospitality.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2012

Even 1% Weight Loss Improves Mobility in Older Type 2s

Just a 1 percent weight loss in older people with type 2 diabetes can improve their physical mobility by up to 7 percent, according to a new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

Kettlebells Offer a Unique Strength Training Workout

If you look around your health club and discover what appear to be cannonballs with handles placed in a corner, there is no need to walk away in fear: They're just kettlebells, a venerable resistance exercise tool that has been used for years by Russian athletes and has recently been taken up by actors as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2012

Eating White Rice May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

An examination of several studies that included a total of 350,000 people has linked high consumption of white rice with an increase in type 2 diabetes. A comparison of the studies that were conducted in China and Japan, where white rice is a staple, indicated that people there were 55 percent more likely to develop the disease than Asian people who ate the least rice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2012

Potassium May Help Prevent Diabetes

To discover the relationship between potassium levels and type 2 diabetes, a Johns Hopkins University study looked at more than 12,000 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), performed in 1987 and 1996. The study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes among study participants went down. The more than 2,000 African Americans in the study had lower average potassium levels than the 9,000 Caucasians and were twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2012

FDA Says Levemir OK for Pregnant Women

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that Levemir is safe for use by pregnant women and does not increase the risk of harm to children in the womb.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 4, 2012

Yogurt Drink Tamps Down Type 2 Inflammation

Iranian scientists report that a traditional Middle Eastern yogurt drink, doogh, when fortified with vitamin D, decreases the markers that indicate inflammation in persons with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2012

Surgery Works Better Than Drugs at Blood Sugar Control in Obese Patients

An Ohio-based study of overweight and obese type 2 patients shows that weight loss surgery works much better at controlling blood sugar levels than any known drug treatment.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2012

March 2012

Type 1 Diabetes Researchers Reach Important Milestone

Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international network of researchers exploring ways to prevent and delay the progression of type 1 diabetes, has reached an important milestone: screening 100,000 people to detect who among is at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This is a major achievement because it has helped researchers better predict who will develop diabetes and when it will require treatment. Earlier diagnosis helps patients avoid a severe, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2012

Metformin Shines Again: Long-Term Use Helps Prevent Type 2

Long-term use of metformin as a weight loss aid is both safe and effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, says the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2012

3 Factors Combine to Dramatically Increase Risk of Type 2

Three risk factors-insulin resistance, fatty liver, and overweight/obesity-that are commonly associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes can each, by itself, substantially increase the risk of developing the disease. But in individuals that have all three factors working in combination, the risk of developing type 2 in a five-year period increases 14-fold.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Self-Monitoring Benefits New Type 2s in the First Year

If you are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and don't take insulin, a new study says that you are likely to have better A1Cs if you have access to blood glucose testing supplies and use them. The finding comes from a large Cochrane review of previous studies that took place in many countries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2012

Diabetes Camp: What You Should Know

There are more than 200 diabetes camps in North America, offering more than 400 programs to more than 30,000 youths and young adults with diabetes and their families. One in 400 children has type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in children, once rare, is increasingly common due to obesity. Education and motivation are vital to healthy management of the disease. Diabetes camps empower children and their families to meet the rigorous demands of diabetes, allowing them to be healthy, active, and motivated to reach their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2012

Newly Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes? Be Sure Your Doctor Prescribes a Generic First

According to a study of patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 35 percent of the time their physicians did not follow the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guideline that calls for prescribing a generic drug first. The study, conducted by researchers from CVS Caremark, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, reviewed the pharmacy claims of 254,000 patients who were started on a diabetes medication in January 2006 and December 2008. One-third of the treatment regimens did not adhere to the ADA guideline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2012

Two Studies Confirm the Role of Exercise in Blood Glucose Control

Two recent studies confirm the powerful role that exercise plays in controlling blood glucose levels. The first study, conducted by University of Missouri researchers and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, found that blood glucose levels tend to spike during periods of inactivity. The second study, conducted by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia and published in Diabetes Care, shows that office employees who take short light-exercise breaks every 20 minutes enjoy a 30 percent reduction in blood glucose levels.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2012

ACP Guidelines Say Metformin Is the Best Starter Drug for Type 2s

The latest clinical guidelines for treating type 2 diabetes from the American College of Physicians (ACP) indicate that when diet, exercise, and weight loss fail to control blood sugar levels in early type 2 patients, physicians should prescribe metformin as the first drug therapy.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2012

February 2012

Neurologists Issue New Guideline for Treating Neuropathy

A team of neurologists has issued a new set of recommendations for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, including drugs and other treatments that have been found to be the most effective therapies for the condition.

comments 19 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2012

Metformin Could Protect Women Against Endometrial Cancer

British researchers say that metformin, the drug most often used to treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, could provide potential protection against endometrial cancer in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2012

Hypoglycemia Affects Productivity at Work

A survey of type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany indicates that more than one in every five have arrived late at work or not shown up at all because of a hypoglycemic episode the night before.

comments 18 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2012

Routine Tests Can Identify Risk of Gestational Diabetes Years Before Pregnancy

Up to seven years before she becomes pregnant, a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy can be identified based on routinely assessed measures of blood sugar and body weight, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the online issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2012

An Update on Bydureon

You've heard of the blockbuster drug Byetta, a daily injection for type 2 diabetes? Byetta's sister product, Bydureon, which is injected just once a week, has just been approved by the FDA and is available in pharmacies.

comments 18 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

“You Have Diabetes.” Momentary Panic, Then Dedication and Determination

My best friend from high school, Katherine, married a wonderful man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a little over two years ago. John Schaaf, now 60, lives with Katherine in Berkeley, Calif., and works for Chevron Corporation in nearby Richmond.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2012

Spotlight on Supplements

Cinnamon, chromium, and alpha-lipoic acid are dietary supplements that have been studied for diabetes management, but are not commonly found in daily multivitamins. Chromium* and cinnamon have the least supportive evidence of efficacy, while some studies have found alpha-lipoic acid to be promising, at least subjectively, in reducing the discomforts of peripheral neuropathy.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 12, 2012

FDA OKs Sale of Combo Drug JANUMET® XR

The FDA has approved US sales of JANUMET® XR, a daily oral treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin and extended-release metformin. The drug is the fourth oral type 2 diabetes treatment introduced by Merck, which also sells JANUVIA, JANUMET, and JUVISYNC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2012

Community-based Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Programs for Children

Due to the rising rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases related to obesity, children are expected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents for the first time in modern history. One in every three children aged two to 19 years is overweight or obese, and one-third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes during their lifetime.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2012

FDA Gives Long-Awaited Nod to Amylin’s Bydureon

After several years of delays and setbacks, Amylin Pharmaceuticals has received FDA approval to begin US marketing of BydureonTM. The first once-a-week type 2 therapy to be offered in the US market, Bydureon is expected to be available by February. Amylin says that its wholesale price will be about $4,200 a year.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2012

January 2012

Too Tired for Sex

Dear DH, I'm a 47-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008. For two years, I haven't been interested in sex. I have a demanding retail job and two teenage children. I can still perform, but I am usually so tired that I fall asleep after dinner. I don't miss sex much, but my wife does, and I don't want to lose her. By the way, my A1C usually runs around 6.8%.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2012

MTV’s True Life: I Have Diabetes

With the recent news of Paula Deen's battle with type 2 diabetes, diabetes has been getting some negative coverage in the media. I've even heard comments like " No wonder Paula Deen has diabetes when she eats so much sugar and butter." This is frustrating because it perpetuates the false stereotype that all people with diabetes are the same.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2012

The Diabetes Epidemic in India

A young man in his early thirties struggles through traffic on his small Honda motorbike. As he enjoys a short break at a traffic signal, one foot on the road, his eyes are attracted to a billboard picturing a succulent burger. While he gazes, fantasizing about lunch, his vision starts to blur.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

Even if They Don’t Add Pounds, Sugary Drinks Up Heart, Diabetes Risks

Some women who drink two of more sugary beverages daily are lucky: their consumption of sweetened drinks doesn't put on extra weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2012

Just 30 Minutes Per Week of Intense Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar

Canadian researchers report that just 30 minutes of intense exercise per week can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after each exercise session and help prevent post-prandial spikes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2012

December 2011

Support on the Diabetes Journey

Diagnosed with diabetes at age 15, Brandy Barnes went on to a successful career as a pharmaceuticals salesperson, but she deeply missed having other diabetic women in her life to whom she could relate. Finally, after a difficult pregnancy, long thought, and prayer, she founded DiabetesSisters (www.diabetes.sisters.org), a North Carolina-based nonprofit organization that provides education and support to women of all ages with all types of diabetes. DS offers conferences, websites, blogs, and a "sister match" program, all designed to lessen feelings of isolation and deepen bonds of connection among women with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2011

As Diabetes Increases Among Hispanics, Prevention Program Shows Promise

An article in an Indiana newspaper documents an alarming rise in diabetes among Arizona's Hispanics, especially along the US border with Mexico. The Republic, published in Columbus, Indiana, reports that 13.5 percent of residents in Arizona's Yuma County had diabetes in 2010. Almost 60 percent of the border county's nearly 200,000 residents are Hispanic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2011

3 Drugs on the Horizon Could Help the Fight Against Obesity

Health experts are unanimous that obesity or being overweight are major factors in the onset of type 2 diabetes. So it's no surprise that researchers here and abroad are working to develop weight-loss drugs that can help people shed pounds and lessen their susceptibility to diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 23, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

Novo Says Early Use of Victoza Aids Type 2 Control

News from Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk reinforces the growing trend toward using a two-drug combination in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes. (See "A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy Type 2 Diabetes" for more discussion about the phenomenon.)

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2011

A Single Healthy Choice Slashes Type 2 Risk

Here's good news for people who love nuts and Greek yogurt! Replacing even one serving of red meat with these tasty foods can substantially lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 11, 2011

New Type 2 Drug Targets Blood Sugar and Cholesterol

Drug company Merck aims to give people with type 2 diabetes two treatments for the price of one. The new therapy, called Juvisync, was just approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. It's not a radical new treatment, but instead a helpful combination of two familiar standbys: Juvisync unites the active ingredients in blood sugar-lowering Januvia and cholesterol-lowering Zocor in a single tablet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2011

Big Differences in How Men and Women Cope with Type 2 Diabetes

Women are better at coping with problems than men, right?  Not when it comes to being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to a new survey, that diagnosis had a greater negative impact on women's emotional outlook and adherence to diet and exercise than the same diagnosis given to men. The survey was conducted in September 2011, and included 831 completed responses from 458 women and 373 men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2011

Is It Possible to Tame Type 2 Diabetes?

Jeff O'Connell is the author of "Sugar Nation: The Hidden Truth Behind America's Deadliest Habit and the Simple Way to Beat It."  I discovered his book while browsing the shelves of my local library, and I could hardly put it down. Though I have type I diabetes and O'Connell's book focuses on type 2, I found many of his thoughts applicable to my own health. His book is no doubt controversial, so I wanted to delve deeper into his daring claims and share his responses with the diabetic community. After reading my interview with Jeff, please leave a comment below to let Diabetes Health know what you think.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2011

November 2011

Helping African Americans F.A.C.E. Their Risk for Diabetes

Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie recently spoke with television and movie actor Anthony Anderson, who has taken a lead role with Eli Lilly & Company's F.A.C.E. campaign, a diabetes outreach to African Americans. A veteran of more than 20 films, Anthony, age 41, currently plays Detective Kevin Bernard on NBC's Emmy Award-winning drama, "Law & Order."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2011

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2011

Go4Life: Exercise for Better Health

Exercise helps us stay healthy. That's the underlying message of Go4Life, a campaign from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, developed to encourage older people to exercise more. The campaign focuses on four exercise categories: aerobic, strength, balance, and flexibility. "We strongly encourage people to incorporate exercises from each of these four categories into developing their own personal routine," said Dr. Chanda Dutta, chief of the NIA's Clinical Gerontology Branch.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

An Unexpected Grief Down Under

Anyone who has lost a close family member to type 2 diabetes understands the grief and paralysis it creates, especially when the one who died was only 53.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2011

Three Questions That Can Predict a Type 2 Diagnosis

Want a simple way to find out if you or someone you know is likely to develop type 2 diabetes? Just answer these three simple questions!

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2011

Four Tips for a Happier Life With Diabetes

When doctors hand out a diagnosis of diabetes, I wish they'd give you a list of tips that can make life happier living with the illness.  After my diagnosis, I felt ashamed of my diabetes, ashamed of my inability to control it with diet and exercise even though I literally worked out every single day for nine months straight.  I skipped nearly all carbohydrates and didn't eat meat at the time, so all I ate was nuts, cheese, eggs, and vegetables.  The doctor didn't put me on insulin right away because I was eighteen, and she wasn't sure if I had type 1 or type 2. But nothing I did was working. It was soon apparent that I was type 1 and that insulin injections were unavoidable.  I had no idea that it wasn't my fault.  I felt hopeless, hungry, exhausted, and alone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

The New York City YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program

At 330 pounds, Kerry Watterson was tired of not being able to fit into his seat on an airplane. He had a family history of type 2 diabetes, and although doctors said his blood sugar was still at a normal level, he knew it was time to make a change. "I found out about the YDPP [YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program], called the director, and said, ‘I want to do this.' I'm so glad she took me," he says now, one year later.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2011

What Are Ketones, and Why Are They Important to Diabetes Self-Management?

All blood tests are tools. Some are to diagnose diabetes, some are to help you manage your diabetes on a daily or long term basis and some are to keep you safe.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 28, 2011

My Wife Has Diabetes—And I’ve Never Felt Better

Like many people, I have a soft spot for salty chips, butterscotch sundaes, cheesecake, meat loaf, mashed potatoes, fried chicken, and countless other comfort foods. A couple of martinis, accompanied by plump, red, pimento-filled olives, are another pleasant indulgence. And martinis were exactly what my wife Pat and I were drinking during the 2-for-1 Happy Hour at a chic Atlantic City bar during a vacation about five years ago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2011

GlucoLift: An All Natural Glucose Tab for People With Diabetes

Wrongly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 30 years old, Chris Angell spent several frustrating weeks trying to make sense of his condition and not understanding why he wasn't getting any better. His diagnosis was eventually changed to type 1 diabetes, but Chris never received the necessary education to get his blood sugars in control. "I didn't know what I was supposed to be eating or how to count carbs, and I really felt isolated," he says.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 25, 2011

Mark the Season With Inspiration

Winter might be on its way, but there's plenty of fall color to celebrate in the meantime. You can find fresh inspiration with the Divabetic Octoberfest, a series of events sponsored by the nonprofit wellness group for diabetic women.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2011

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Diabetes Education

Diabetes is a life-long, 24-hour-a-day disease that requires self-management, time, and lots of patience. Most people with diabetes know where their numbers should be, but many struggle to follow recommended behaviors. Despite the availability of new medications and treatment devices, as well as the emphasis placed on diabetes treatment adherence over the last decade, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data show that 45 percent of patients with diabetes have not achieved A1Cs lower than 7% (an average of approximately 150-170 mg/dL).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2011

Type 2: Bike Maintenance as Body Maintenance

When first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago, I was scared into a very rigid regime of diet and exercise. The first thing I did was register for the Tour de Cure - a bike ride sponsored by the American Diabetes Association. Establishing a goal served as an incentive to train and exercise daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2011

Scientists Use Rats’ Own Stem Cells to Cure Their Diabetes

Using stem cells that they extracted from the brains of diabetic lab rats, and turning them into insulin-producing pancreatic cells, Japanese scientists may be on the road to a virtual cure for diabetes that comes from people's own brains.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2011

Novo Nordisk Files for FDA Approval of New Insulin

A brand new insulin will soon be on pharmacy shelves in the United States if Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has its way. The company has filed for approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell insulin degludec, an original formulation that lasts an extra-long time. Insulin degludec is injected only once a day. Once under the skin, the dose of insulin is absorbed slowly and consistently, allowing for better nighttime control, according to Novo. Most importantly, test subjects had a low rate of hypoglycemia on the drug.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2011

Frequent Doctor Visits Improve Control

Need to take control of your diabetes and your health? Going to the doctor frequently might be just what the doctor ordered, according to a study from Brigham and Women's Hospital published last month. The researchers looked at how long it took type 2 patients to reach their goals in three areas: A1C levels, blood pressure, and LDL ("bad") cholesterol. Those who interacted with doctors frequently -- every week to two weeks -- achieved their goals far more quickly than those who interacted with doctors every three to six months.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2011

Have You Taken Your Walk Today?

The answer to the looming threat of obesity and cardiovascular disease could be as simple as putting one foot in front of the other. Indeed, according to a new campaign from managed-care giant Kaiser Permanente, walking has benefits in the short and long term.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2011

Celebrating Caregivers

My mother died unexpectedly this summer. While her loss was sad and sudden, I have many reasons to celebrate her life and the guidance she offered me. When I was diagnosed with diabetes as a child, she took it upon herself to learn the ins and outs of diabetes care. For most of the next decade, she oversaw my treatment.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2011

Resolving Erectile Dysfunction

Dear David and Aisha, I am a 39-year-old married man who has had type 1 diabetes for 22 years. My A1C levels run around 7.5%. About six years ago, I started having trouble with erections. Now they are very rare, even with ED pills. I know you say that there is more to sex than intercourse, and my wife and I still enjoy ourselves however we can. But we both miss the erections.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2011

Novo Says Early Use of Victoza Aids Type 2 Control

News from Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk reinforces the growing trend toward using a two-drug combination in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes. (See "A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes" for more discussion about this phenomenon.) In a study it released in Lisbon, Portugal, at the recent meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Novo said that combining its recently released drug Victoza® (liraglutide) with another drug early in therapy helps recently diagnosed type 2s achieve greater blood glucose control than they can with a single drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2011

September 2011

Nordstrom Will Donate Money for Type 2 Diabetes Tests for Hispanics

The Seattle-based Nordstrom department store chain will donate $5, up to $75,000 total, for each Diabetes Risk Test taken as part of the American Diabetes Association's Hispanic Heritage Month through October 15, 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2011

Pritikin and Preventive Health

Imagine if you could keep diabetes at bay for another three or four years with lifestyle changes. Would you change what you ate? Would you commit to an exercise program, maintain a food journal, and join a support group? Imagine if you could take these simple steps and save money. How quickly would you say "Sign me up"?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2011

The State of Insulin Injection

What's Being Researched Now

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2011

Ketones, Shmeetones.

When you live with diabetes, there's a lot to do.  Checking blood sugars.  Counting carbs.  Exercising.  Not to mention all those fun-filled doctors' appointments.  So the last time your physician or diabetes educator suggested ketone testing, it's completely understandable that your head was nodding but your mind was thinking "No way, Jack."  But before abandoning the idea completely, there are a few things you should know.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2011

A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

Combination therapy, in which doctors prescribe more than one drug to treat type 2 diabetes, is a fairly common practice. However, most newly diagnosed type 2 patients start off with metformin or a sulfonylurea and don't go on a two-drug therapy until their first drug begins to lose its effectiveness.

But combination therapy could soon become an earlier option for people with type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2011

9 Safe Driving Tips

An estimated 34 million Americans will be on the road during Labor Day weekend, many of them with type 2 diabetes. Road travel can interfere with blood sugar management and lead to low blood sugar, which can cause serious complications, such as loss of consciousness, if not treated quickly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2011

A Nutty Way to Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrates can increase blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, as well as contribute to weight gain.  A recent study shows that eating two ounces of raw, dry, or roasted nuts daily as a replacement for two ounces of other carbohydrates may control blood sugar levels and cholesterol in type 2 diabetes without packing on the pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2011

Allie and Me

When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I was eighteen years old, scared, and confused.  Although bone thin, I was older than the usual juvenile diabetic, so the doctor didn't know if I had type 1 or type 2 diabetes.  At first, the doctor gave me pills to lower my blood sugar.  I avoided carbohydrates and threw myself into exercise, then watched helplessly as the numbers on my blood sugar meter continued to rise.

comments 10 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2011

August 2011

Utah Firm Develops Emergency Supplies Case for People With Diabetes

Utah-based Essential Preparedness Products (EPP) offers an emergency storage case for people with diabetes, called Diabetic med-EcaseTM. The yellow cases, made of high-impact material, are waterproof, airtight, and can float. Buyers of the $69.99 product receive foam inserts for both type 1 and type 2 needs and can outfit the case accordingly.

comments 5 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2011

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2011

High Carb, Low Glycemic Diets, With Riva Greenberg

Carbohydrates have become the ugly stepsister in the family photo album of healthy eating. Standing in the grocery aisle, consumers study ingredients and food labels, counting and analyzing the carb content of their foods. In the last decade, the popularity of low carb diets rose to dramatic heights as Americans gravitated toward the South Beach, Atkins, and Zone diets. Fruits were forsaken for plates piled high with steak and eggs.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2011

Diabetes and Mammograms

Many women with diabetes feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of family, work, and personal health. Balancing the minutiae of everyday life with the nonstop demands of blood glucose monitoring, exercise, and thoughtful meal planning takes time and effort. So it comes as no surprise that many women with diabetes put off talking to their doctors about breast cancer screening.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 20, 2011

Parenting Style Impacts Control of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

As a dad, do you tend to be authoritative and have high expectations of your child's self control? Do you set clear limits and command respect, without bulldozing him or her? If so, you may be helping your child with type 1 diabetes stick to his or her treatment regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2011

Staying Motivated With Diabetes Part 2

You've successfully resisted the urge to eat that slice of cake. You've remembered to check your blood sugar that extra time. Maybe you've resisted and remembered for days, or weeks. Perhaps you now think that you've figured out how to keep yourself motivated in dealing with your diabetes. Actually, you're just getting started.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 14, 2011

Staying Motivated With Diabetes Part 1

The piece of cake sits there on the plate, daring you to eat it. The blood sugar meter rests on your nightstand, an obstacle formed of lancets and test strips. Life with diabetes is a parade of challenges, from diet temptations to healthcare hassles. You know--we all know --that the only way to say "no" to the cake and "yes" to the blood sugar check is through consistent self-motivation.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2011

Drug Combo Slows Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

Low doses of metformin and rosiglitazone seem to delay the onset of type 2 in prediabetic people who have impaired glucose tolerance, according to a Canadian study. However, although the drug combination was effective over the first year of the study in helping to control glucose levels and insulin resistance, it was not effective subsequently in delaying the onset of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell deterioration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2011

Vitamin D May Reduce Risk for Type 2

A Boston-based study has found that vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes by improving their beta cell functioning.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2011

Insulin Injections for Type 2s Could Drop to Three per Week

A study in the British medical journal The Lancet shows that type 2s who received once-daily or thrice-weekly injections of degludec, a very long-acting insulin, maintained blood glucose levels similar to patients receiving daily doses of insulin glargine. The results point the way to a possible reduction in the number of injections that type 2s who take insulin would need over any seven-day period. In both the United States and the United Kingdom currently, about one in every three type 2 patients injects insulin at least once daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2011

July 2011

New Website Facilitates Communication Between Type 2 Patients and Their Physicians

People with type 2 diabetes often find visits with their physicians frustrating.  Dr. Jeffrey Mechanick, MD, FACE, FACP, Secretary of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), observes, "Many times when patients come to the doctor, the first thing that they say is really what's on their mind--that's their top priority. But oftentimes physicians don't address that at all. Instead, they move on to what's on their own agenda."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2011

Tradjenta, a Drug for Type 2s, Now on U.S. Market

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly have begun sales of Tradjenta, a drug for type 2 diabetes, in U.S. pharmacies. The drug (generic name linagliptin) comes in tablet form and is intended to compete with Amylin Pharmaceuticals' Byetta, which is injected, and Merck's Januvia, which also competes with Byetta. Both are well-established in the U.S. market.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2011

Too Much TV Could Be Deadly

Spending too many hours watching TV can also substantially increase your odds of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or dying early. That's the conclusion of a Harvard School of Public Health study that looked at the effects of heavy TV watching.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2011

Before Disaster Strikes

With severe weather predicted for Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Meredith Cummings thought carefully about where to park her car-eyeing the large trees in her historic neighborhood-when she arrived home on the afternoon of April 27. As she walked to her door, she reassured herself: Those trees had been there for more than 100 years. What were the odds of them coming down today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2011

Omega-3 Could Help Block Diabetes Onset

Italian researchers have found that increased consumption of omega-3 fatty acids leads to a decrease in insulin resistance, a common precursor to the development of type 2 diabetes. It also improves lipid profiles and adiponectin levels. (Adiponectin is a protein that is involved in metabolizing glucose and fatty acids. Low levels are associated with insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2011

NYT Article Says Older Diabetes Drugs Are Often the Best

A recent article in the New York Times says that such old prescription diabetes drugs as metformin and generics such as glimepiride are often as effective as or even more effective than newer, more expensive drugs.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2011

Study Says Prostate Cancer Therapy Doubles Diabetes Risk

Scientists from the Philippine General Hospital in Manila say that in a study of 74 men being treated for prostate cancer, 42 percent of those receiving androgen deprivation therapy developed type 2 diabetes, compared to 19 percent of men not receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2011

Type 2 Drug Victoza Helps Type 1s, Too

Victoza, a drug aimed at type 2 diabetes, may turn out to be a boon for type 1 diabetes patients as well. A small clinical study shows that patients with well-controlled type 1 who took Victoza daily for just one week experienced a 15 percent drop in their blood sugar levels. Patients who took the drug over a full 24-week test period needed less and less insulin, decreasing their average mealtime dose by seven units and their all-day insulin requirement by eight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 49 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

Diabetes and Depression Offers Big Challenges

If you have diabetes, you're more likely to be depressed than people without the disease.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2011

June 2011

Looking at Cannabis Based Type 2 Treatment

One of the classic effects of cannabis on people is raging hunger-the "marijuana munchies." The drug has been used to good effect on people with diseases that diminish appetite, helping them to regain a healthy interest in food. So it is a bit ironic that British drug maker GW Pharmaceuticals has created a cross-bred cannabis plant whose appetite-suppressing qualities could be used to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities - Part 2

In the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to be aware of the new realities. In this article,  I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 71 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2011

No Difference in Effect When Combining Type 2 Drugs

You can add any third drug you want to the standard metformin-sulfonylurea combination used to treat type 2 diabetes, including insulin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, thiazolidinediones, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. None of them provides a decisive superiority in blood glucose control. That's the conclusion of a Brazilian meta-study of 18 drug trials published in the May 17, 2011, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities

Over the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to become aware of the new realities.  In this article, I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2011

Type 2s on Sulfonylureas Less Likely to Take Anti-Depressants

Type 2 patients who use only a sulfonylurea are less likely to take anti-depressant drugs than diabetes patients on other medications. That's the conclusion of a report delivered recently in Honolulu at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2011

May 2011

Gene Linked to Type 2, Cholesterol and Obesity

Here's news that has been receiving big play in U.S. and European media: British scientists have found that a gene called KLF14 acts as a "master switch" that controls other genes found in body fat-genes that are major factors in such conditions as type 2 diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol levels, and levels of glucose and insulin. The finding, by researchers at King's College London and Oxford University, could lead to treatments for diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders by targeting the gene.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2011

Cheaper Generic Medication for Lipitor, Actos and Plavix

A recent article in the Chicago Tribune reports that patients using Lipitor, Actos, or Plavix may start enjoying savings of up to 90 percent as patents on those drugs expire. The three drugs comprise a significant percentage of the $300 billion brand-name U.S. pharmaceutical market, according to the Tribune.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2011

Monitor Linked to Mobile Device Helps Lower Blood Pressure in Type 2s

A monitor attached to a mobile device helps people with type 2 diabetes lower their blood pressure more than simply having a blood pressure monitor available in the home. That's the conclusion of a year-long study conducted by the University Health Network in Toronto, Canada. The study showed that type 2 patients whose blood pressure was actively reported to their doctors via a Bluetooth-enabled device enjoyed lower blood pressure than patients whose readings were not passed on to doctors.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 26, 2011

Insulin Tumors

Swimsuit season lasts for at least five months in the South. The good news is that we live close to the beach, but the bad news is that after 25 years of living with diabetes (and three Caesareans), my body is starting to read like a map of my medical journey.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 25, 2011

Sanofi Says Late-Stage Trial of Type 2 Drug a Success

French drug maker Sanofi-aventis says that results from a Phase III trial of its experimental type 2 diabetes drug lixisenatide show that the drug successfully lowered patients' blood glucose levels and body weight, but did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 23, 2011

Is Sex Good for Your Heart Health?

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 3 comments - Posted May 21, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

Sexual Minority: The Invisible Diabetes Disparity

What does sexuality have to do with diabetes? A lot, according to research findings that have revealed a group of people with diabetes as large as the type 1 or gestational diabetes community. Estimates suggest that 1.3 million lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals have diabetes-at least 5 percent of the 23.6 million people with the disease in the United States.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 19, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Dr. Jonathan Beach

Dr. Jonathan Beach is a 35-year-old emergency medicine physician who has had type 1 diabetes for 31 years. He owns and operates Urgicare, a wellness center that includes The Northeast Center for Diabetes Care and Education in Plattsburgh, New York, an isolated rural community that has few other resources for diabetes. This is his story of his life with diabetes and his professional experience with the insulin pump.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 12, 2011

Prediabetes Sweet Tooth Doesn’t Always Lead to Weight Gain

A new study says that people who consume a "moderate" amount of candy per day have a slightly lower body mass index than people who don't eat candy.  They also run a 15 percent lower risk than the general population of developing metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2011

Albertson’s Supermarket Chain Joins Diabetes Alliance

Albertson's LLC, a nationwide supermarket chain with more than 200 stores, has announced that it will participate in the Diabetes Control Program (DCP) of the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance. The DCP works through trained pharmacists to provide education and support to people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2011

FDA Approves Indian Drug Maker’s Diabetes Drug Trial

The drug discussed below is for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 6, 2011

An Early Warning for Type 2? It’s Possible

Imagine knowing that you're likely to develop type 2 diabetes a decade from now. What would you do?

comments 3 comments - Posted May 3, 2011

Testosterone Replacement May Lower Death Rate Among Type 2 Men

British researchers say that testosterone replacement therapy for type 2 men with low testosterone levels could reduce their death rate significantly. Over the course of a six-year study by the University of Sheffield, only 8.6 percent of low-testosterone subjects who were given replacement therapy died, compared to 20 percent of low-testosterone subjects who did not receive the therapy.  

comments 2 comments - Posted May 2, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

Highlights From the Barbara Davis Center's July Keystone Conference

Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Barbara Davis Center's "Management of Diabetes in Youth" conference, held every other year in beautiful Keystone, Colorado. The focus is on all of the latest and greatest in type 1, and it's a real treat to have so many of the best names in this field gathered in one place. The Barbara Davis Center (BDC) is one of the premier programs in the world focusing on type I diabetes management, and the one (Dr. Peter Chase, to be precise) who brought us the famed" Pink Panther" book, Understanding Diabetes - the reliable handbook of type 1 diabetes that many parents of newly diagnosed kids rely on.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2011

Store Your Teeth in a Stem Cell Bank

Every year four million baby teeth fall out, and 1.4 million wisdom teeth are pulled out of our collective mouth. Until recently, the only entity really interested in all those teeth was the tooth fairy. But all that changed in the year 2000, with the discovery that dental pulp contains adult stem cells. In the not-too-distant future, those stem cells might be used for growing new islet cells to cure diabetes. The problem is, how to keep the teeth nice and fresh until that hoped-for day. That's where Provia Laboratories comes in, with their Store-A-Tooth service.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2011

Researcher Looks Into Protein That May Prevent Type 2 in Obese People

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $1.15 million grant to a researcher at Eastern Virginia Medical School to investigate a protein that may prevent obese people from developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2011

New Study Suggests the Effectiveness of Diabetes Education Paired With Meters With Advanced Features

A new study has proven that use of a blood glucose meter with advanced features, when paired with diabetes education, more effectively manages blood glucose than using a basic feature meter. This information was presented at the recent 46th European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2011

Diabetes Linked to Higher Risk for Parkinson’s

Researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health have found that people with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Despite that finding, they say that there are too few data to support a causative link between diabetes and Parkinson's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

3M Introduces Cavilon

3M Health Care has introduced CavilonTM Antifungal Cream for use by caregivers and patients in incontinence settings. The cream is the latest offering in the company's Cavilon line of skincare products designed for professional healthcare providers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2011

It’s Fun to Fend Off Pre-Diabetes at the (New York) YMCA!

If you have pre-diabetes and live in any of the five boroughs of New York City, get ready to learn a new acronym: YDPP. The initials stand for YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership under which New Yorkers can get enroll in a comprehensive low-cost diabetes prevention program at one of  the city's 27 YMCA branches and affiliates.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

Taiwanese Study Shows New Technology Nearly Three Times Better at Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Taiwanese researchers say that a technology that uses sound waves to stimulate healing in diabetic foot ulcers is almost three times more effective than conventional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The technology, called dermaPACE®, is manufactured by SANUWAVE Health Inc., a medical device company located in Alpharetta, Ga.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2011

Oklahoma Billionaires Pledge $20 Million for Diabetes Center

An Enid, Oklahoma, billionaire and his wife have pledged another $20 million on top of the $10.5 million they had previously contributed to his namesake diabetes center at the University of Oklahoma.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose sugar, glucose, has been partially changed into another type of sugar, fructose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Can Beta Blockers Encourage Weight Gain? Aussie Study Says Yes

Beta blockers, which many people with diabetes take to control high blood pressure, may be one of the reasons why type 2s often tend to gain and keep weight. That's the conclusion of a study from St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2011

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Blog, App, and Social Media Sites

France-based pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis has announced the availability of several new media designed to help the company communicate with people who have diabetes.
• A blog, "Discuss Diabetes," offers health, nutrition, and lifestyle information, as well as a way to offer suggestions to the company. The blog is available at www.discussdiabetes.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2011

Decades-Long Study Shows Second-Hand Smoke Ups Diabetes Risk

While smoking is commonly associated with a higher risk of developing a serious disease, it's not often that second-hand smoke or being an ex-smoker is considered even riskier. If the disease is type 2 diabetes, however, it is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2011

March 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Francisco Zepeda

Francisco Zepeda is a 54-year-old native of El Salvador who owns an insurance agency in San Francisco.  Type 2 diabetes runs in his family. He says, "My grandmother lived with diabetes for about 30 years, and my father has it as well. I heard about diabetes all that time, but I never thought that it was going to happen to me. And I still hope that I'm not really diabetic. They say that once your blood sugar goes up, then you are diabetic, but I don't want to believe that I'm diabetic, you know what I mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2011

Eighty Percent of Diabetes Concentrated in 20 Percent of Zip Codes

The recently launched U.S. Diabetes Index (USDI) has revealed that 80 percent of all diabetes cases are located in just 20 percent of zip codes. Dr. Gary Puckrein, USDI developer and CEO of the National Minority Quality Forum, hopes that the USDI will help   the United States direct its resources to the most affected areas.  

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

UltiMed Launches 50-Count Pen Needle

UltiMed, which offers the only pen needles assembled in the United States, has announced that it is now offering a 50-count universal-fit pen needle.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Michael Hamman

Michael Hamman is a 63-year-old contractor.  He recalls, "I first was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes five or six years ago.  I probably had elevated blood sugar well in advance of that, but I was unaware of it. I don't remember how high my blood sugar was at the time, but I think my A1C was 7.5%.  My blood sugar's never really been awful. Since I started monitoring myself, my sugar readings are normally between 150 and 165.  I think it was pushing 200 before I was medicated, but the medications brought it down. They started me on glyburide and I took that for a long time, and then the A1C was moving up again, so they added the metformin. The A1C now is down in the mid-sixes. They consider it controlled, not well controlled or as good as it could be, but certainly for someone my size, it's probably as good as you can get."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 25, 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

FDA Accepts Application to Review Dapagliflozin, a Type 2 Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted an application to review dapagliflozin, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2011

Did We Evolve to Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Evolution works in strange ways. What serves as an advantage at one point in time can sometimes prove a problem later, when the world has changed. It looks like that might be the case with type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from San Diego, California.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2011

Alcohol and Sex

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2011

“Diabetes Belt” Stretches Across the South

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a swath of the southern U.S. as the country's "diabetes belt." In this region, made up of parts of 15 states, some 12 percent of the population has type 2 diabetes, compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2011

A Lightweight, Colorful Medical ID Alternative

Silicon wristbands were first popularized by the yellow LiveStrong band and then became widespread as a way to raise awareness for charities. Light, colorful, easy to wear, and inexpensive, they have now become an option for personal identification and medical alert information as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 17, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

Diabetes Education Under-used by Medicare Recipients

A paid Medicare benefit for diabetes education is rarely used by those who qualify for it, despite the fact that diabetes education provides clear health benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

The Great Lancing Debate

My almost 20 years as a diabetes educator have been memorable in many ways, but certain moments stand out more than others.  Because blood glucose testing is an important part of diabetes management for everyone I see, I try to assess each person’s skills and habits in this key area.  I’ll never forget the time I asked a client how often he changed his lancet.  He had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about four years earlier and was checking regularly, so it seemed like a reasonable question.  He proceeded to look at me with a puzzled expression and say, “You mean you’re supposed to change those things?”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

Dr. Jane Delgado, Author of The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life

Hispanics are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have type 2 diabetes, and more than a third of working adult Hispanics do not have health insurance. For this audience, Jane Delgado, PhD, has written The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life. Available in both Spanish and English, it's a culturally sensitive and reassuring book that dispels myths and presents detailed science while gently guiding readers toward the right path in caring for their diabetes. The tone is conversational, as Dr. Delgado speaks to her readers like a family member who knows them well and has their best interests at heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2011

February 2011

Keeping the Weight Off: An Interview with Ellen Granberg, PhD

Ellen Granberg is an obesity sociologist who studies the processes that people go through when they lose weight and keep it off. As she says, "If the problem were that we don't know what people should eat to lose weight, that would be one thing, but we don't have that problem. There are a hundred weight loss plans out there that are perfectly good. We understand all about the physiology of weight loss maintenance and the metabolic impacts, but nothing about the social and emotional impacts. People who sustain weight loss over time move through a lot of different challenges."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

Diabetes Leads to Kidney Disease? That's News to Many Type 2s

It apparently comes as a surprise to many people with type 2 that diabetes can cause kidney disease. In fact, many diabetic patients don't realize that that their condition can cause kidney problems until after they've already developed kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2011

Regulatory Protein Lowers Blood Sugar

Researchers at the Children's Hospital in Boston, led by Umut Ozcan, MD, have found a regulatory protein that lowers blood sugar when it is high due to either lack of insulin or a decreased sensitivity to insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2011

Statins May Prevent Diabetic-Related Blindness

New University of Georgia research has found that a statin drug that is often known by the brand-name Lipitor may help prevent blindness in people with diabetes. In a study using diabetic rats, lead author Azza El-Remessy, assistant professor in the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, and her colleagues found that statins prevent free radicals in the retina from killing nerves important to maintaining vision. The results of the study are published in the March edition of the journal Diabetologia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

New Clinical Trial Needs Type 2 Patients for Gastric Bypass Surgery

In order to undergo gastric bypass surgery, you must have a BMI of at least 35. If you have type 2 diabetes and would like to undergo the surgery to alleviate your diabetes symptoms, you are out of luck unless you are also morbidly obese. A few less weighty type 2 patients have taken matters into their own hands by deliberately gaining enough weight to qualify, but now there is a less drastic way to qualify for the operation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Tyler Stevenson on Going Away to College with Diabetes

When a young person with type 1 diabetes leaves home for the first time, it's often a difficult adjustment for the parents as well as their child. Tyler Stevenson is 20 years old, in his second year at Florida State. This is what he told us about his life in college with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2011

A New Kind of Pharmacist

Ross Valley Pharmacy, tucked away inside a larger building of clinics, is not a big place, but it's very very busy. Its owner, Paul Lofholm, PharmD, has a vision of the pharmacist's role that goes far beyond simply putting pills in bottles. He sees pharmacists as integral members of the healthcare team who can fill the gaps in patients' education about their conditions and their medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2011

Does Coffee Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

Folks who need that morning cup of coffee to get going may be protecting themselves from type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. UCLA researchers wrote in the journal Diabetes last month that drinking four cups of coffee a day reduced women's chance of developing type 2 by a bit less than half. What's more, the scientists point to a specific reason why all that java has a beneficial effect: a protein known as sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Scientists have suspected for some time that SHBG was connected to diabetes development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2011

Medical Food Treats Neuropathy

Of all diabetic complications, neuropathy is one of the scariest and most difficult to treat. Nerve damage in the feet, leading to numbness or pain and, in severe cases, to foot ulcers or amputations, affects up to 60 percent of diabetics, according to recent research.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 17, 2011

A Lightweight, Colorful Medic-Alert Alternative

Silicon wristbands were first popularized by Lance Armstrong's yellow LiveStrong band and then became popular as a way to raise awareness for charities. Light, colorful, easy to wear, and inexpensive, they have now become an option for personal identification and medical alert information as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2011

Dribble to Stop Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The National Basketball Association (NBA), the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) and the NBA Development League, in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and sanofi-aventis U.S., today announced the launch of Dribble to Stop Diabetes, a national multimedia campaign designed to encourage fans to live an active, healthy lifestyle and raise awareness about diabetes prevention, management and the potentially serious health complications that can be associated with the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Need Medicine and Have No Insurance for Your Diabetes?

Nearly one in six people in the United States has no health insurance. If you have diabetes, that's a very tough position to be in. There are, however, resources that can cut the costs that you have been paying out of pocket for medicines and supplies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Peeling a Grape Ups Your BG Test Results

According to a new study published in Diabetes Care, your finger-prick blood glucose test may be "abnormally and significantly high" if you test after handling fruit without first scrubbing your hands thoroughly and vigorously. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

Vascular Complications of Diabetes: Due to One Missing Enzyme?

Many tragic complications of diabetes, including amputations, heart attack, stroke, and blindness, are due to blood vessel damage. According to Xiaochao Wei, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, all that vascular damage may be caused by a shortage of one enzyme: fatty acid synthase, or FAS.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

New Toolkit Available for Community Health Workers To Educate People About Diabetic Eye Disease

The National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) of the National Eye Institute now has a Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit to help community health workers educate people with diabetes about diabetic eye disease. The Toolkit is available in both English and Spanish and its contents ensure that community health workers are equipped with science-based, user-friendly materials about diabetes and eye health to enable them to provide sight-saving information to groups of people with diabetes, their family, and their friends.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2011

Diabetes Superfoods

Ever see the top 10 lists for foods everyone should eat to superpower your diet? Ever wonder which will mesh with your diabetes meal plan? Wonder no more. Your list of the top 10 diabetes superfoods has arrived.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Walmart Plans to Sell Healthier Food

Walmart, the nation's largest grocer, averages 20 million customers every single day, so their food policies can affect a lot of people. For one thing, researchers have linked part of the rise in obesity to the prevalence of cheaper food, and Walmart is famous for cheaper food.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Diabetes Health Feb/March Issue Out Now

As the new year begins, we return to an old friend in the diabetes community: rock star Bret Michaels.  You can find our current interview in this issue, but Diabetes Health first interviewed Bret in 2006. Before I talked to Bret back then, I read everything I could find about him.  From what I learned, it was clear that he did not appeal to everyone. In fact, after we printed our interview, some people canceled their subscriptions because they felt that we were promoting sex and drugs by talking candidly with Bret about a rock star's life.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2011

Diva TalkRadio Features Black History Month Diabetes Spotlight on Healthy Soulful Cuisine

Diva TalkRadio is an interactive, live internet talk-radio destination that focuses on issues and concerns of those living with, at risk of and affected by diabetes. Divabetic's founder and executive director, Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek serves as the resident host of DivaTalkRadio programs.  This month, Mr. Divabetic shines the spotlight on Constance Brown-Riggs MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN. Constance is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and a National Spokesperson American Dietetic Association. Constance has been honored with the Diabetes Care and Education Practice Group (DCE) 2007 Diabetes Educator of the Year Award. Over the course of her career, Constance Brown-Riggs has established herself as an expert on the subject of nutrition, diabetes and the cultural issues that impact the health and health care of people of color. She is not only versed in the science of medical nutrition, but also has an active nutrition counseling practice through which she sees hundreds of patients. Her ability to translate her academic and clinical knowledge into clear, understandable terms have made her a nationally renowned, sought-after speaker, educator and author. She is passionate about creating opportunities to spread the word about health and nutrition, and developing educational tools which shorten the cultural distance between patients and caregivers. Every aspect of her work supports that mission

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2011

January 2011

New Spanish-Language Soap Opera Focuses on Obesity, Healthy Living

DENVER -- New episodes of a critically acclaimed, locally-produced Spanish language soap opera will focus on the obesity crisis in hopes of helping viewers better understand what causes obesity and how they can live healthier lives. The soap opera is called "Encrucijada: Sin Salud, no hay Nada" ("Crossroads: Without Health, there is Nothing").

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Front Labels on Food Packages Are Misleading

After the American Heart Association introduced its heart healthy logo in 1995, manufacturers apparently decided that such "healthy" logos were a pretty good marketing idea. Similar logos, called front-of-the-package labels, or FoP labels, have become popular with several food manufacturers, each of which has developed its own labels using its own criteria. Now, not surprisingly, a study by the Prevention Institute has found that these labels are misleading to customers. According to the Prevention Institute's executive director, Larry Cohen, they "emphasize one healthy aspect to trick [customers] into buying something fundamentally unhealthy." Dora the Explorer Fruit Shapes, for example, prominently labels itself as "gluten free," but does not mention the fact that 58 percent of its calories come from sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Insulin's Partner: Amylin

Insulin has a companion, and it's called amylin. Amylin is a small hormone that is released along with insulin by the beta cells of the pancreas in response to a meal. When people are insulin-deficient, they are amylin-deficient as well. Amylin wasn't even discovered until 1970, and it was not until the 1990s that scientists began to figure out what amylin does. But they now know that it partners with insulin to help control blood sugar levels, each in its own way:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 28, 2011

New Primary Care Physicians Haven't Learned Enough About Diabetes

Your young primary care doctor may not know a lot about diabetes, according to a study led by Stephen Sisson, MD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  "When I graduated from residency here, I knew much more about how to ventilate a patient on a machine than how to control somebody's blood sugar, and that's a problem," said Sisson in a press release.  "The average resident doesn't know what the goal for normal fasting blood sugar should be. If you don't know what it has to be, how are you going to guide your diabetes management with patients?"

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

Kombiglyze Komes to a Pharmacy Near You

The kuriously named Kombiglyze XR, a combination of Onglyza (saxagliptin) and the old reliable metformin, has arrived at pharmacies and is available by prescription to people with type 2 diabetes. It's similar to Janumet, an older medication that's a combination of Januvia (sitagliptin) and metformin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

Why We Underestimate Our Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

You'd think the world would be running through the streets in a movie-style panic. An epidemic of unprecedented proportions is inexorably advancing.  In our lifetimes, half of us may develop a devastating disease that could cause us to go blind, lose a leg, or die far too soon. But we aren't in a panic. The authorities are talking it up, of course, but most of us aren't doing much at all to prevent type 2 diabetes. We're getting fatter by the year, and we're moving less and less.  Many of us who already have type 2 diabetes are not making the changes that could keep its consequences at bay. Why not?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 24, 2011

Mannkind's Inhalable Insulin, Afrezza, Put Back on Hold by the FDA

MannKind Corporation has finally received a complete response letter from the FDA regarding its inhalable insulin, Afrezza. (The FDA issues a complete response letter when it completes its review of a New Drug Application, but cannot yet approve the application as is.) What the FDA wants now is a couple more clinical trials with the new form of the inhaler (one in patients with type 1 diabetes and one in patients with type 2 diabetes), with at least one trial including a treatment group using the older form of the inhaler, in order to obtain a head-to-head comparison of the two devices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2011

Interview With Nick Jonas, a Pop Star With a Conscience

"Got the news today, doctor said I had to stay, a little bit longer and I'll be fine....Waitin' on a cure, but none of them are sure,  a little bit longer and I'll be fine....So I wait ‘til kingdom come, all the highs and lows are gone, a little bit longer and I'll be fine."

comments 12 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2011

One More Time: Walking A Lot Is Good For You

Taking 10,000 steps a day, or walking about five miles, is very, very good for you. It's even better than walking 3,000 steps a day, which is also extremely beneficial if you walk briskly enough to do it in 30 minutes. The 10,000 steps philosophy is not new--there's even a weight-loss book or two on the topic. But now the 10,000 step regimen has also been linked to an increase in insulin sensitivity in middle-aged adults.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 20, 2011

"The Hormone of Darkness" Won't Come Out in the Light

Keeping the lights on all night might keep away the monsters under the bed, but it also keeps away the "hormone of darkness," melatonin, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Melatonin, which is secreted into the blood by the brain's pineal gland at night, is involved in the circadian rhythm. Scientists believe that disrupting circadian rhythms can contribute to metabolic disease. Specifically, melatonin receptor genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant that may help prevent cancer.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2011

AADE Game Day Tips for People with Diabetes

Despite what many think, diabetes does not have to deter people who have the disease from enjoying Super Bowl Sunday parties along with everyone else, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). In fact, managing your diabetes is often an exercise in moderation, more than anything else. With more than 24 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, this is a very real issue, but there is no reason diabetics can't enjoy the festivities -- and the food -- at Super Bowl parties. The AADE put together the following tips for people with diabetes who want to enjoy the food - but need a little guidance about how to eat smart given all of the Super Bowl food temptations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 19, 2011

Flushing Away High Blood Sugar

Most type 2 meds work by increasing insulin production in one way or another. The extra insulin lowers blood sugar by ushering it out of your bloodstream and into your cells, where it may, unfortunately, make you fat. Wouldn't it be nice if instead, you could lower your high blood sugar by just flushing it right down the toilet?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2011

Scientists Cook Up a Little Brown Fat

Brown fat is an entirely different animal than the white fat that we pack onto our hips to store excess calories.  Instead of storing energy, brown fat actually burns glucose to produce heat (thermogenesis). It's brown because it contains special mitochondria that produce heat from the glucose when activated by cold. Adults don't have much of it, unfortunately, just a few grams if we're lucky. If we had about 50 grams and were cold enough to activate it, it would actually burn about 500 calories a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

Fatty Liver: It's Serious

"Fatty liver" doesn't sound very threatening. In fact, it sounds almost cute, like Fatty Arbuckle. Unfortunately, like Fatty Arbuckle, it's not what it seems. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common liver disease in the United States, comprising a quarter of all liver disease and responsible for a rising number of liver transplants. Approximately 20 percent of Americans may be lugging around a fatty liver.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 13, 2011

Walgreens in South Florida and Diabetes Research Institute Foundation Announce Unique Partnership

The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation (DRIF) announced a new, first-of-its-kind partnership aimed at helping the more than 200,000* Broward County, Florida, residents affected by diabetes. Diabetes Research Institute Live Well Broward County is a joint effort of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, Walgreens in South Florida, LifeScan and a cadre of local physicians that will help residents "Manage Well, Stay Well and Live Well" with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2011

New Wound Treatment for Non-healing Foot Ulcers

Results are expected by the end of the month in an efficacy study on a new drug that promises to improve diabetic wound care. Derma Sciences is wrapping up work on a phase 2 trial of DSC127, a drug already shown to speed up healing in animal tests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

Diabetes Management in Flu Season

The crowd in the small Boston theater laughed and clapped. The comedy show was a good one, and I was enjoying it from a cramped seat in the balcony. It was October 29, a Friday, and while it was brisk outside, winter hadn't yet clamped down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

The A1C: A Better Way to Diagnose Pre-Diabetes?

A full third of adult Americans are pre-diabetic, and a third of those will develop type 2 diabetes before they're ten years older. Unfortunately, only about seven percent of them have been tested for pre-diabetes and warned of their condition; the rest are ignorant of the road they're on. By losing just 10 to 15 pounds, the whole group could cut their chances of getting type 2 by half. The problem is, how to alert them in time for them to stop their progression to type 2?

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2011

Type-1 University Now Open for Enrollment

Introducing "Type-1 University" (T1U) - the online school for people with diabetes who use insulin, including parents and caregivers.  The school can be found only in cyberspace - at www.type1university.com

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Herbs, Sex, and Diabetes

Talk about a win-win situation! It seems that many aphrodisiacs--herbs that boost sexual energy and function--can also bring down blood sugar, cholesterol, and/or blood pressure.  At least four herbs have shown these double benefits in scientific studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2011

DiabetesSisters' National Conference Addresses Unique Challenges of Women with Diabetes

RALEIGH, NC- DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce that registration for the 2011 Weekend for Women Conference in Raleigh, NC will open on January 1, 2011 at 8am.  The Conference, a revolutionary national weekend conference designed specifically for women with diabetes, will take place April 29 - May 1, 2011 at the Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2011

UnitedHealthcare to Introduce a Diabetes-Prevention Program in Rhode Island in 2011

UnitedHealthcare of New England has announced that it plans to introduce a statewide program to prevent type 2 diabetes in Rhode Island sometime in 2011. Of the state's 2010 population of 1,053,000, an estimated 62,000 adults have diabetes-almost 6 percent of the population-according to the Rhode Island Department of Health. The department estimates that another 31,000 adults have the disease but have not yet been diagnosed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2011

December 2010

Divabetic's New Year Attitude: Be Healthy & Happy Too!

New York, NY - December 31, 2010 - Divabetic, one of the country's leading health and wellness nonprofits begins the New Year with an outreach jackpot of resources and tools for those affected by diabetes. With online and special events, Divabetic's mission is to provide an empowering and supportive environment so that no one living with diabetes has to cope alone or in silence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2010

February Launch of Childhood Obesity Program at R.I. YMCAs Could Set National Standard

Starting in February, Rhode Island's eight YMCAs will participate in JOIN, a 24-week research study on ways to help obese children and teenagers achieve healthier weight. If it meets its goals, it could become the prototype for a nationwide program that would have a direct effect on the treatment of pre-diabetes in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2010

Lorcaserin Shows Statistically Significant Weight Loss in Patients With Diabetes

Arena Pharmaceuticals and Eisai Inc. recently released results of a phase 3 clinical trial for lorcaserin, a weight-loss drug they are developing in partnership. The trial, called BLOOM-DM (Behavioral modification and Lorcaserin for Overweight and Obesity Management- Diabetes Management), targeted patients with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2010

Combining exenatide with insulin may be ‘best result ever' for diabetes patients

A new study finds that combining the newer diabetes drug exenatide with insulin provides better blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes than insulin alone and helps promote weight loss.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

Alarming Study Regarding Oral Health Care of Those With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes means a lot of change in your daily life. From blood glucose monitoring to watching what you eat to losing weight, it's hard to keep track of the changes you need to make to keep diabetes under control. One aspect of diabetes care that sometimes falls through the cracks is oral health care, which, if ignored, can lead to serious health complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2010

Diabetes and YouTube

University of Alaska Anchorage nursing student Ben McCormack was excited when a professor showed a YouTube video in his pathophysiology class.  "She tries to bring in a lot of multimedia stuff to each unit," he reports.  "And ‘Diabetes Rap' actually has all the information about [type 1] diabetes right in the video." "The Diabetes Rap," starring diabetic Luke Widbin, was the 2008 winner of the World Diabetes Day Young Voices video contest, thanks in part to Luke's willingness to make rhymes like "Sugar overdoses give me ketoacidosis."  With well over 100,000 views, this video does an educational and entertaining job of relating the facts about diabetes. See it here. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2010

One-Third of UAE Residents Could Have Diabetes or Pre-diabetes by 2020

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates-- One in three United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents could have diabetes or prediabetes by the end of the decade, according to a new analysis from international health and well-being company UnitedHealth Group, released at the World Health Care Congress Middle East meeting in Abu Dhabi.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Diabetes-Depression Connection

A 10-year study by Harvard University scientists found that diabetes puts people at risk for depression and that depression puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes. The two-way connection between the diseases was discovered in 55,000 nurses surveyed over the decade.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Abuse in Childhood and Teens May Set Many Women on the Path to Type 2

Women who experienced sexual or physical abuse in childhood and adolescence-whether moderate or severe-run a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who were not abused, according to results from a study recently reported online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 16, 2010

Almonds May Help Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

With nearly 16 million Americans living today with pre-diabetes, a condition that is the precursor to type 2 diabetes, and half of all Americans expected to have some form of diabetes by the year 2020, healthy eating is more important than ever (1,2).  But here is some good news: a recent scientific study shows that incorporating almonds into your diet can help treat and possibly prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2010

JDRF Applauds Congress for Passage of $300 Million for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Thanks Supporters for Advocacy Efforts for Special Diabetes Program Renewal

"Congress passed a multi-year renewal of the Special Diabetes Program (SDP), ensuring that studies on promising diabetes treatments and avenues toward a cure continue uninterrupted. As the father of a son living with type 1 diabetes, and as CEO of JDRF, one of the leading advocates for the renewal of this program, I applaud the U.S. government for its continued commitment to end this disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

Holiday Travel Tips for People With Diabetes

"Don't leave home without it" has a whole new meaning this holiday season. With holiday travel up from last year and increased security- and consequent delays- at airports, it's more important than ever for those with diabetes to properly prepare for their holiday travel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2010

Twenty Community-Based Organizations Across the United States Receive Awards to Encourage Seniors to Get Screened for Diabetes

Leaders of the Medicare Diabetes Screening Project (MDSP) announced that twenty community-based organizations from 17 states were given awards of $2,500 each to be used to encourage seniors ages 65 and older who are covered under Medicare to get screened for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2010

Valeritas Receives FDA Clearance for the V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device

Valeritas, Inc., a medical technology company committed to the development and commercialization of innovative drug delivery solutions, announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has cleared the company's V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device for the continuous subcutaneous delivery of insulin in preset basal rates and with on-demand bolus dosing for adult patients requiring insulin.  V-Go devices will be available in a preset basal rate to deliver 20, 30 or 40 Units of insulin in one 24-hour period (0.83 U/hr, 1.25U/hr or 1.67U/hr respectively) and on-demand bolus dosing in 2 Unit increments (up to 36 Units per one 24-hour time period).

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 9, 2010

Nick Jonas' Holiday Dog Tag Challenge

This holiday season, Nick and Bayer have issued a dog tag challenge!  You can help them reach the goal of 50,000 tags by purchasing one for yourself or giving one as a gift this holiday season.  Proceeds from each tag sold will go to the Jonas Brothers Change for the Children Foundation to help others.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2010

Celebrity Life Coach

New York, NY (Grassroots Newswire) December 6, 2010 - Kathy Dolgin a.k.a High Voltage, beloved mentor to an A-list of supermodels, singers and television personalities and named a top lifestyle and fitness coach by Vogue Magazine, will appear on Divabetic's Diva TalkRadio Diabetes Spotlight with host Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek on Tuesday, December 7, 2010, at 6 p.m., Eastern. The exclusive interview will highlight Dolgin's war on Type 2 diabetes and childhood obesity, her amazing personal journey and her nonprofit organization, Energy Up Voltage Approved (www.energyup.org).

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 6, 2010

New Facebook Game Aims to Stem Type 2 Diabetes Among Latinos

An estimated two million Latinos in the United States have type 2 diabetes, a full 10 percent of the Latino population. Facebook, the fourth most popular Internet site among Latinos, reaches nearly 45 percent of the Latino population that goes online.  Put those two facts together, and you have the audience for a new online game, HealthSeekerTM Explorando tu Salud, Paso a Paso ("Exploring Your Health, Step by Step").

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2010

November 2010

When Diabetes Steals Your Livelihood

Too often our preconceptions of work-limiting disabilities are confined to suddenly devastating conditions, such as spinal cord injury or stroke. We rarely consider how diseases such as diabetes can be just as debilitating and just as costly to a family. With November being recognized as National Diabetes Awareness Month, we should remember the people who are unable to work due to the complications of diabetes and who need the benefits to which they are entitled under Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2010

The United States of Diabetes

More than 50 percent of Americans could have diabetes or pre-diabetes by 2020 at a cost of $3.35 trillion over the next decade if current trends continue, according to new analysis by UnitedHealth Group's Center for Health Reform & Modernization, but there are also practical solutions for slowing the trend.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2010

A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes

A new drug for type 2 diabetes started showing up in drugstores this week, according to manufacturer Santarus. The FDA-approved drug, called Cycloset, takes an distinctive -- and not well understood -- approach to reducing blood sugar levels. The pill apparently works by increasing dopamine activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain. Dopamine is a brain chemical that plays a big role in people's behavior, mood, and ability to sleep. Scientists theorize that glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may in part result from abnormal activity of this chemical, and that upping dopamine activity may iron out these problems.That's the theory, at least: the drug's exact workings aren't known.  But it seems to do the trick.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2010

At a Loss?

A friend of mine recently remarked that she wants her family to eat healthier, but she just doesn't know that much about nutrition. Though I can sympathize with her in some ways (nutritional education is a daunting and never-ending process), I do feel that the overall American attitude toward food is that ignorance is bliss. It reminds me of the preteen character in the movie Son-In-Law, who puts his sister's bra cups over his ears and tells his parents in a taunting voice, "I can't hear you!"  Unfortunately, what you don't know CAN hurt you, and not just you, but also your family. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2010

Flu Meeting Highlights the Latest in Flu Research

Scientists gathered in October to discuss a very timely topic- the flu. While influenza may not be the headline news that it was last year with the H1N1 epidemic, the flu is very much on the minds of many scientists and doctors nation- and world-wide.  The October gathering presented the newest research on the flu virus and attempts to vaccinate against it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2010

Diabetes Association of Atlanta Caps Off Successful Diabetes University

Atlanta, Ga. -With more than 30 state and nationally-renowned speakers, 400 attendees and dozens of workshops and panels, the 17th Annual Diabetes University concluded Saturday as one of the largest in the Diabetes Association of Atlanta's history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2010

Screening Practices and Management of Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

Both celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune diseases. In CD the immune response is triggered by the ingestion of gluten, resulting in chronic inflammation and villous atrophy in the small intestine. Treatment requires permanent elimination of gluten from the diet. In T1D, pancreatic islet beta cells are damaged resulting in loss of endogenous insulin production. Treatment includes daily insulin injections combined with meal planning and exercise. Nutrition management of the individual with both T1D and CD can be challenging for both the patient and the dietitian.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2010

Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Launches $100 Million Initiative Targeting America's Type 2 Diabetes Crisis

The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation announced Together on Diabetes®: Communities Uniting to Meet America's Diabetes Challenge, a 5-year, $100 million initiative to help patients living with type 2 diabetes better manage their disease beyond the doors of their doctor's office - in their homes and communities - and for the course of their disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 15, 2010

This World Diabetes Day, Measure Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Imagine a pandemic. A disease comes into a community and then spreads across borders, causing disability and death in its path.  Scientists fight to contain its spread, and doctors try to mitigate its effects.  Most people associate this kind of scenario with a pathogen: a virus or bacteria, like HIV or avian flu, that has found a way to exploit the human body.  In fact, however, the overwhelming majority of pandemics are the result of noncommunicable diseases that are not spread by pathogens: conditions like cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 12, 2010

Solianis Working on Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Patients With Diabetes

Solianis Monitoring AG is developing a groundbreaking device for the diabetes community- a noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring system that delivers reliable and consistent data. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2010

"Be Part of the Cure" Campaign Kicks Off National Diabetes Awareness Month

HOLLYWOOD, FL- Beginning today, thousands of people who want to help put an end to diabetes can be part of the cure by participating in the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation's online campaign at BePartoftheCure.org.  Kicking off National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Be Part of the CURE campaign is a fun and meaningful way for people living with diabetes, their family and friends, and anyone concerned about curing this devastating disease to literally participate in the "CURE."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2010

October 2010

Number of Americans With Diabetes Could Triple by 2050

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a startling new projection last week regarding diabetes:  As many as one in three U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050. The announcement on Friday represents a dramatic threefold increase in the number of Americans expected to have diabetes within the next 40 years if current trends continue.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2010

Diabetes and the Flu

As flu season approaches, many people are debating whether they should get a flu shot. As everyone knows, getting the flu is not fun. In fact, it can be downright miserable. But for those with diabetes, the flu can mean more than a cough, running nose, and body aches--it could mean more severe complications, and sometimes even death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2010

Dermagraft

It sounds like science fiction: a substitute for human skin, derived from human cells and used to treat difficult-to-treat diabetic foot ulcers. But it's a real product, called Dermagraft, manufactured and sold by a real company, Advanced BioHealing. The Connecticut-headquartered company is expanding its operations in Tennessee, part of an aggressive growth strategy to spread the word about its existing product and develop new ones.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Diabetes Self-Management Tips, Free Health Screenings at Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid Clinics

Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid stores nationwide will host Diabetes Solutions Days on Nov. 2, 3 or 4 offering free health screenings and self-management solutions to patients living with diabetes, care-givers and those concerned about diabetes. Visitors also can get vaccinated against flu and/or pneumonia for $24.99 or $50 respectively, although many insurance plans including Medicare cover the cost. Vaccinations are especially important for diabetes patients because flu and pneumonia combine for the deaths of 10,000 to 30,000 diabetes patients annually, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Look AHEAD Study Examines Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss

An intensive lifestyle intervention program designed with weight loss in mind improves diabetes control and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. These are the findings of the four-year Look AHEAD study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) is a multi-center, randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity on the incidence of major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2010

Trapped Underground for 70 Days with Diabetes

Imagine that you're a miner. Imagine you have diabetes (that, at least, shouldn't be too hard). Now, imagine that you have to spend two months trapped underground with other miners. How would you do?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2010

Diabetes Risk May Fall as Magnesium Intake Increases

Getting enough magnesium in your diet could help prevent type 2 diabetes. Dr. Ka He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have found that people who consumed the most magnesium from foods and vitamin supplements were about half as likely to develop diabetes over the next 20 years as people who took in the least magnesium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2010

Weight Watchers and Merck Collaborate to Help Physicians Fight Obesity Through Lifestyle Management Approach

Weight Watchers International, Inc., the world's leading provider of weight management services, and Merck, a global healthcare leader, announced today an innovative collaboration focused on fighting obesity.  The two companies will launch an initiative in which Merck will provide physicians and other health care providers with educational information about the Weight Watchers® program and its underlying clinical evidence to assist doctors in addressing the ongoing weight management needs of their patients. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2010

Reducing Health Costs Through Lower Food Prices

Reducing the cost of low-carbohydrate foods for people with diabetes could significantly reduce medical costs associated with the disease that affects more than 23 million Americans, according to a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2010

Transplanted Feces from Thin People Improve Insulin Sensitivity in People with Pre-Diabetes

European researchers have reported that when they transplanted fecal matter from healthy thin people into obese people with pre-diabetes, the latter group's insulin sensitivity notably increased. (Insulin sensitivity is the body's ability to properly use the insulin hormone to regulate the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Pre-diabetes exists when increasing resistance to insulin creates higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, a precondition to the onset of full-blown type 2 diabetes.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 19, 2010

New Studies Reveal Hidden Benefits of Exercise for Local Seniors

As the weather turns and leaves begin to fall this year, new research shows that local aging seniors are well served to get up and grab a rake themselves - for more reasons than one. A group of four recent studies published in 2010 Harvard University health and medicine journals shows a surprising and strong connection between seniors, exercise, and mental and physical health, especially among aging women. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2010

2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care

The 2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care are here! What are the new changes? Watch the YouTube video and learn more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2010

Pre-Diabetes Doubles Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A meta-analysis* of 87 studies  involving  951,083 patients, performed by a Canadian research team, shows that the pre-diabetic condition known as metabolic syndrome increases the risk of heart disease or stroke in patients by a factor of more than two.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2010

Early Research Reveals New Clues to Origin of Diabetes

University of Michigan scientists have identified events inside insulin-producing pancreatic cells that set the stage for a neonatal form of non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and may play a role in type 2 diabetes as well. The results point to a potential target for drugs to protect normally functioning proteins essential for producing insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2010

Seven Habits of Highly Effective People with Diabetes

What do you get when international best-selling author Dr. Steven Covey joins forces with Bayer Diabetes Care and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE)? You get an inspirational booklet that is a simple, practical resource guide to help people get started in managing their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2010

The Cost of Diabetes

In July, I went to order a refill of my pump and was refused. My account was overdue, and my pump company wouldn't issue a refill until I could pay at least $400 of the $1200 I owed. I didn't have $400. I am a freelance writer and stay-at-home mom with a knack for stretching my husband's paycheck. I'd been making small monthly payments of about $50 because that was all we could afford, but now they wouldn't send me any more. So I went to the pharmacy and bought a box of syringes for $25. I didn't want to go back to multiple daily injections, but I didn't see that I had a choice.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 9, 2010

AlertPaws Launches

Have you ever worried that in case of emergency, first responders will not know that you or a loved one has diabetes? Or concerned that a low blood sugar may be interpreted by law enforcement officials as intoxication--especially behind the wheel of a vehicle? What if you wear a Medical ID, but they cannot get to you right away in the case of an accident?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

Dancing for the Health of It

Dance Out Diabetes is a non-profit organization that addresses a critical component missing in most diabetes programs: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY! Our mission is to help individuals prevent or manage diabetes through dance and education.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2010

Paul and Mira Sorvino Partner with sanofi-aventis to Launch Diabetes Co-Stars

We all know of Paul and Mira Sorvino, the legendary father and daughter actors who have graced the small and big screens for decades. Paul has played such classic characters as Paulie Cicero in the film Goodfellas and Sgt. Phil Cerreta on the TV series Law & Order and is a well-known chef and singer, while Mira has starred in over 30 movies and won an Academy Award in 1995 for her role as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2010

Have a Holiday Heart-to-Heart

The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even the occasional family conflict.  Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health is influenced by your family-for better or for worse.  This year, why not start a conversation that benefits everyone?  Gather your family health history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2010

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Coming Release of BGStar and iBGStar Blood Glucose Meters

Last week, sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose meters BGStar® and iBGStarTM (developed by sanofi and its partner AgaMatrix), which should be available in early 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 4, 2010

Diabetes Awareness: Just for a Month, or All Year Long?

Twenty years ago, when I opened Sugar Happy Diabetes Supplies in San Francisco, people would open the front door, lean in, and ask, “I’m curious. Are there enough people with diabetes for you to stay in business?”  My reply was always, “You would be surprised by how many people have diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

September 2010

Instant Recess

(HealthDay News) -- Think recess, and you'll probably smile. What wasn't to like about a break in the school day set aside for running and playing, for friends and fun? Now fast-forward to your adult life. What if your workplace started offering recess on the job?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2010

Glucose Meter Plug-in for iPhone

Sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose monitoring (BGM) devices BGStar® and iBGStarTM, developed by sanofi-aventis and its partner AgaMatrix. Due to their convenience, accuracy and ease-of-use, BGStar® and iBGStarTM will help the decision-making process for people with diabetes and their healthcare professionals, with the aim of improving patient self-management. iBGStarTM connects to the iPhone® or iPod touch®. This is an important step towards sanofi-aventis' vision of becoming the leader in global diabetes care by integrating innovative monitoring technology, therapeutic innovations, personalized services and support solutions. BGStar® and iBGStarTM are planned to be made commercially available in the first markets in early 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

UCSF Diabetes Symposium Marks Decade of Research Advances

Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient's ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

FDA Significantly Restricts Access to the Diabetes Drug Avandia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it will significantly restrict the use of the diabetes drug Avandia (rosiglitazone) to patients with Type 2 diabetes who cannot control their diabetes on other medications. These new restrictions are in response to data that suggest an elevated risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients treated with Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2010

New Blood Markers for Type 2 Diabetes May Help to Identify Patients at Risk

For the first time, scientists have found that blood levels of some ribonucleic acids (microRNAs) are different among people with type 2 diabetes and those who subsequently develop the disease compared to healthy controls, according to research reported in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

"What's For Dinner?"

"What's for dinner?" is a commonly asked question in many households.  As children, spouses, friends, and others stream into your home after work, school, or a day of errands, they are eager to sit down, enjoy a meal, and unwind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Kids and Diabetes Risk: Do Chromosomes Hold New Clues?

Children who have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes might be identified earlier by way of tell-tale genetic indicators known as biomarkers. Some of those new biomarkers might be pinpointed in research led by Nancy F. Butte and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition

New research findings reveal that one of America's favorite colorful fruits, blueberries, have properties that help to improve factors related to pre-diabetes and decrease inflammation in obese men and women. Chronic low-grade inflammation related to obesity contributes to insulin resistance, a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. "This is an excellent example of the importance of clinical trials to building our knowledge-base in helping to improve public health," said Steven Heymsfield, PBRC Executive Director

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

From Helpless to Heroic: A Parent's Guide to Changing the Statistics One Child at a Time

I was reading the latest issue of one of my parenting magazines when I came across an article on children and food.  The author suggested offering dessert only two to three times a week instead of every day.  I laughed aloud.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2010

Rogue Protein May Trigger Diabetes

The presence of amyloid protein may produce a chain reaction which destroys vital insulin-producing cells. Researchers based in Dublin, writing in the journal Nature Immunology, say future drugs could target this process. Amyloid is implicated in many other diseases - most notably Alzheimer's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Insulindependence

In late July, five teenagers and five adults hiked to the summit of Mount Shavano, one of Colorado's famed 14,000-foot peaks.  For this particular group, the journey to the top of Shavano was designed to be an intensive educational experience on the topic of diabetes management.  Each teenager had type 1 diabetes, and the adults were mentors dedicated to helping the teens feel more in control of the disease. The team made it to the summit by performing countless blood sugar tests, counting carbs, and experimenting with insulin pump basal rates. The outfit behind the expedition was Testing Limits, an outdoor adventure club just for people with diabetes, operated by the non-profit Insulindependence. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Diabetes and Alcohol: What You Need to Know

If you are meeting a friend for a drink after work or attending a holiday party where alcohol is being offered, is it a health risk or a benefit?  The medical and nutrition literature reports that moderate consumption of alcohol can offer some health benefits, particularly for your heart. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 defines drinking in moderation as no more than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men. One drink, by definition, is a 12-ounce beer, eight-ounce glass of malt liquor, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor.  Moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke, lower the risk of developing gallstones, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes. Studies show  that those benefiting from moderate consumption are middle-aged and older adults.  It is not recommended, however, that anyone begin drinking or drink more frequently on the basis of health considerations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2010

Living His Dream of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez

On July 2, 2010, when Lt. Jose Lopez took the podium at the recent Children With Diabetes Friends for Life Annual International Conference in Orlando to speak to the parents of children with diabetes, his goal was to use his own story to reassure them about their children's future. "What I most wanted to convey to them was that people with diabetes, especially children, can do normal stuff and live their dreams. I am not a super hero - and I did it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Vietnam Vets, Agent Orange, and Type 2 Diabetes

Despite the lack of a strong link between type 2 diabetes and Agent Orange, the government is paying Vietnam veterans hundreds of millions of dollars for the disease on the basis of Agent Orange exposure.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 12, 2010

No BG Deal: Today's Meter Innovations Leave Many Yawning for More

In my office, there is a box.  Nothing fancy, just a plain brown box filled with a collection of "old school" diabetes stuff:  "boil and re-use" syringes, urine test tape, screw-driven insulin pumps, medieval injection aids and lancing devices, and so on.  Of course, no such collection would be complete without an array of classic blood glucose meters.  The oldest one I have is a plug-in-the-wall model called a "Dextrometer" that featured test strip rinsing solution and a red LED display that could burn the retina of anyone within six feet.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2010

Long-term Weight Loss may be Harmful to Health

Long-term weight loss may release into the blood industrial pollutants linked to illnesses like diabetes, hypertension and rheumatoid arthritis, researchers said on Tuesday. These compounds are normally stored in fatty tissues, but when fat breaks down during weight loss, they get into the blood stream, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee at the Kyungpook National University in Daegu in South Korea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2010

Your Meds and Your Love Life

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 62 years old. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1997, and I am doing OK on metformin. My last A1c was 7.2 %. About a year ago, they put me on medicine for my blood pressure (which was 142/90) and for cholesterol.  I started having less interest in sex, which I had really liked before.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2010

Type 2 Diabetes Raises Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are two distressing, but increasingly common, diseases seen in our aging population. At some point in the future, they may well overwhelm the healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2010

Bone Breakdown Helps Regulate Blood Sugar

The routine breakdown of old bone during skeletal growth has an important role to play in regulating blood sugar, according to Columbia University Medical Center researchers. The process, known as resorption, goes on throughout life. It stimulates insulin release and sugar absorption, helping healthy people maintain normal blood glucose levels. The new study, published in Cell, suggests that skeletal changes could causes diabetes for some and that possible treatments for type 2 diabetes could come from the bone-insulin connection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2010

As the Quest for an Artificial Pancreas Continues, Europeans Look at a Novel Approach

The Holy Grail pursued by all diabetes researchers is a complete cure for both the type 1 and type 2 forms of the disease. But until then, the "artificial pancreas," a combination of glucose monitoring and insulin dosing technology, may be as close as they get to a final breakthrough in treating diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2010

Brain Surgery Results Could Portend New Approach to Treating Type 2

Results of brain surgery on a small group of type 2 diabetes patients point the way to a possible new approach for treating the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2010

August 2010

THE Diabetes Dude Ramps Up an Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The Flamingo Flock diabetes awareness campaign is the brainchild of 9-year-old Noah Brokmeier, "The Diabetes Dude."  Noah's blue flamingos are landing on lawns nationwide and appearing at big events like the Boston Marathon. Wherever they go, the birds pose for pictures, which are then posted on Noah's website, www.thediabetesdude.com. The location of the birds is also flagged on his "official flamingo tracking map," to show the progress and growth of the campaign.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2010

MannKind Corporation Providing AFREZZA to JDRF for Artificial Pancreas Project

MannKind Corporation announced that the company will supply its novel, ultra rapid acting insulin AFREZZATM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) for use in a study being conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) as part of its Artificial Pancreas Project. The planned two-year study in patients with type 1 diabetes will leverage the unique rapid action of AFREZZA for use in a closed-loop blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery system, termed the "artificial pancreas" by the JDRF. The study will be managed in conjunction with the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2010

'Sugar Crush' (Diabetes Dietary Supplement) Clinical Research Presented at the 37th Annual AADE Meeting

NaturEra, (http://www.NaturEra.com) a dietary supplements emerging leader, this month announced the launch of its new Sugar Crush dietary supplements would take place at the American Association of Diabetes Educators meeting in San Antonio, Texas.  Sugar Crush research has been accepted for Poster presentation at the AADE meeting.  The full clinical research study (http://www.naturera.com/Manuscript.pdf) shows that NaturEra's 'Sugar Crush' and 'Sugar Crush Daily' dietary supplement formulas used in combination lower and maintain healthy blood sugar levels for people with diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 26, 2010

NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

Doctors have long known that different populations have different risks for chronic illness. Certain ethnic groups, for instance, are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others. But why? The National Institutes of Health aims to find out. It's Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health will take a broad look at factors that influence disease and aim to make positive changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Type 2-Induced Brain Changes May Hinder Learning in Obese Kids

Results of a recently published study show that type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents can affect their ability to learn by altering the amount of sugar that reaches their brains to fuel thinking.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2010

Controlling a Fat-Regulating Protein Dramatically Increases Insulin Sensitivity

PPARy is a protein that regulates the body's production of fat cells. However, obesity can modify how PPARy works, leading to decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of metabolic syndrome. (Metabolic syndrome is the cluster of factors, including insulin resistance, overweight, high blood pressure, and abnormal blood sugar levels, that is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2010

Evolution May Have Pushed Humans Toward Greater Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Gene variants associated with an increased risk for type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis may confer previously unknown benefits to their human carriers, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. As a result, the human race may have been evolving in the recent past to be more susceptible, rather than less, to some complex diseases, they conclude.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2010

FDA Approves Mobile App for Managing Diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared Baltimore-based health software company WellDoc to begin marketing the DiabetesManager® System, a mobile phone application designed for patients and healthcare providers who are dealing with type 2 diabetes. The company, founded in 2005, plans to start selling the product early next year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2010

Gene testing could have saved weight-loss drug

(Reuters) - Genetic testing might have helped identify people who would become depressed or suicidal while taking Sanofi-Aventis' weight loss drug Acomplia, which might have helped keep the drug on the market, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2010

Can I Have Laser Eye Surgery If I Have Diabetes?

Laser eye surgery is becoming increasingly popular as more and more people look to free themselves from their glasses or contact lenses. There are two main types of laser eye surgery, Lasik and Lasek. The vast majority of people choose to have Lasik because it has a far quicker and more comfortable recovery period. Most people can return to work and normal activities within 48 hours of having Lasik, whereas it can take up to a week to recover from Lasek surgery. In some instances your surgeon may insist that you have Lasik--if, for example, you are involved in contact sports.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2010

The Sanford Project Launches Research Study to Find a Cure

"The objective of this clinical trial (research study) is to determine if the medications can rescue the few beta cells that remain soon after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; and whether new beta cells can even be regenerated," commented Alex Rabinovitch, MD, Principal Investigator of the trial and Associate Director of The Sanford Project. "The investigational combinations of these medications could possibly allow patients to decrease or no longer need to inject insulin to keep their blood levels under proper control."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2010

Gestational Diabetes

Women who deal with gestational diabetes in their first or second pregnancy are far more likely to develop the condition again in their third pregnancy, according to a new study from Kaiser Permanente that examined the electronic medical records of 65,132 women. The study was published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology last month.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2010

Kids' Fructose Consumption Can Lead to Big Adult Bellies

Children who consume a lot of high-fructose corn syrup in soft drinks and processed foods as they're growing up may run the risk of turning many of their fat cells into belly fat when they reach adulthood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2010

Lower-Carb Diet Better Than Low-Fat for Obese Insulin-Resistant Women

Insulin-resistant obese women lost more weight after 12 weeks on a low-carbohydrate diet than they did on a low-fat diet, according to a study conducted by the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno. (The study was funded by Jenny Craig, a company that sells diet foods.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2010

Red Wine Ingredient Increases Insulin Sensitivity, Works Against Retinal Disease

Two recent research studies on humans indicate that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine and peanuts, increases insulin sensitivity in older and obese people. A third study, done on mice, shows that resveratrol may someday become a powerful tool in therapies directed at macular degeneration and other retinal maladies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

Victoza® Achieved Improved Blood Sugar Control in African-Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk presented results demonstrating that once-daily Victoza® (liraglutide [rDNA] injection) achieved significantly greater improvements in blood sugar control compared to placebo among African-American patients with type 2 diabetes. The meta-analysis of phase 3 data from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) trials were presented at the 2010 National Medical Association Annual Convention & Scientific Assembly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2010

Early Predictors of Metabolic Syndrome in Healthy Kids

Children as young as seven years old can show markers for metabolic syndrome, a condition that raises their risk for type 2 diabetes and a host of other health problems, according to university researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2010

July 2010

Diabetes Health Digital Edition for August/September Available Now!

We are always investigating new ideas, research findings, treatment options, and educational materials to share with you. This issue is very exciting because we were able to talk with experts and those with diabetes, and write about everything from traveling with type 1 in Italy to investigating why hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are so dangerous.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works for More than One Year

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and GlySens Incorporated have developed an implantable glucose sensor and wireless telemetry system that continuously monitors tissue glucose and transmits the information to an external receiver. The paper, published in the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, describes the use of this glucose-sensing device as an implant in animals for over one year. After human clinical trials and FDA approval, the device may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Dental Care Deserves More Than a Brush-Off

Unfortunately, dental treatment and vision care are rarely included in basic health insurance plans. I don't know how insurance companies concluded that the eyes and the teeth are not parts of the body, but they managed it somehow. If you have diabetes, however, it's especially important to realize that contrary to the rationalizations of insurance executives, both your eyes and your teeth require attention and care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2010

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2010

New Hope for Men Troubled with Sleep Apnea and Snoring

Widely recognized evidence supports the fact that Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a very serious health risk primarily afflicting men over the age of forty, yet 80 to 90 percent of cases go undiagnosed except for the telltale symptoms of chronic fatigue and snoring. Precision diagnosis and recent developments in FDA-approved mouthpiece technology can now provide an unprecedented 78 percent reduction of the condition without surgery, and offer for the first time an effective and convenient alternative for those intolerant to using the frequently prescribed but highly rejected Continuous Positive Airway Pressure therapy.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 28, 2010

New York Historical Society Brings to Life the Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin

NEW YORK, NY, July 26, 2010 - Recalling the desperate fight for life that used to be waged by juvenile diabetes patients, and commemorating the events of 1921 that inaugurated a new era of hope for them and their families, the New York Historical Society will present the exhibition Breakthrough: The Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin from October 5, 2010 through January 31, 2011. Exploring the roles of science, government, higher education and industry in developing and distributing a life-saving drug, the exhibition will bring to life the personalities who discovered insulin and raced to bring it to the world and will tell the story of one extraordinary New York girl-Elizabeth Evans Hughes, daughter of the leading statesman and jurist Charles Evans Hughes-who was among the very first patients to be saved.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2010

The Power of Being Positive

I was in the parking lot of the mall, walking past wheelchair parking, when I noticed a man using the lift gate of his specially equipped van. There he was, lowering himself and his motorized wheelchair down to the ground all by himself. As I walked through the mall that day, I couldn't get the man in the wheelchair off my mind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2010

Please Help! What To Do When You're Deemed a Diabetes Expert

Hardly a day goes by that I am not asked a question related to diabetes. I'm a "heart on my sleeve" diabetic. Because one of my jobs, writing articles and guest blog posts, centers on the subject of diabetes, I'm known, in part, by my disease.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2010

Type 2 Risk Information to Share with Your Friends and Loved Ones

Learn Your Risk for Diabetes and Take Steps to Protect Your Health. If you are diagnosed in the early stages of diabetes, you can take better care of yourself and get treatment. If you have pre-diabetes, you can take steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

FDA Freezes Long-Term Study on Diabetes Drug Avandia

A long-term study on the safety of a popular diabetes drug was put on hold Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, while the FDA considers whether it's too dangerous to continue.  Several large studies have linked the drug, Avandia, to a higher risk of heart attacks and other heart problems. While other studies have not found the same risk, last week an FDA advisory panel recommended that the drug not be sold without a stronger warning label or possibly limits on who could receive it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

Video Games for Kids with Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes often strikes children. Children love to play video games. Putting two and two together, diabetes educators have created a string of diabetes-themed video games over the years. The latest evolution of that simple equation--the Bayer Didget meter-game combination--arrived in U.S. drugstores this year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2010

Hepatitis C and Insulin Resistance

We have known for several years that Hepatitis C, a common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, also makes people three to four times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. In studying the insulin resistance of 29 people with Hepatitis C, Australian researchers have confirmed that they have high insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. However, almost all insulin resistance occurs in muscle, with little or none in the liver, a very surprising finding given that Hepatitis C is a liver disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2010

Nutraceuticals and Natural Supplements for Treating Type 2 Diabetes: An Overview

From environmentally friendly hybrid cars and heating with solar power to organic or natural foods, our culture is increasingly embracing green strategies. "Using natural dietary supplements to support healthy blood sugar levels and minimize the impact of glycation is a rational continuation of this green philosophy," says Steven Joyal, MD, vice president of Scientific Affairs and Medical Development for the Life Extension Foundation in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (www.lef.org). He is also author of the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 20, 2010

U.S. Advisers Reject Vivus' Fat Pill

(Reuters) - The first new prescription weight-loss pill in more than a decade failed to win backing from U.S.health advisers, who said safety concerns about the drug outweighed its ability to help obese patients shed pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2010

The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute Meets the Challenge of Training Diabetes Educators Across the Globe

Looking for novel ways to help improve patient outcomes, the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is using innovative adult education techniques to train diabetes educators around the world.  While the cultural and epidemiological differences in each region can be challenging, David L. Horwitz, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, Chief Medical Officer of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute, feels confident this program can make a positive impact to help improve patient outcomes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2010

Pre-Diabetes: Using Diabetes Self-Management Education/Training to Prevent Diabetes Onset

Overview: 57 million Americans are estimated to have pre-diabetes, a condition in which a person's blood sugar (glucose) level is above normal but below a level that indicates diabetes. Pre-diabetes may have no outward symptoms, and is diagnosed with a blood glucose test.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Moderate Alcohol Intake Lessens Chance of Developing Type 2, Says Dutch Study

While teetotaling is the surest way to avoid abusing alcohol, it turns out that moderate alcohol intake may be one way to stave off the development of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Johns Hopkins Team Discovers Sweet Way to Detect Pre-Diabetes

Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple, routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Medtronic Launches First Free Safe-Driving Program for Teens with Diabetes in Los Angeles July 19

Medtronic, Inc. announced today that Test B4U Drive, the first-ever, free program for teens with diabetes combining advanced driver skills training with diabetes management education, will be held July 19-21 at The Forum in Los Angeles. In partnership with the Juvenile Diabetes No Limits Foundation, Medtronic will continue the program throughout the summer across the country to teach teens with diabetes that good diabetes management is a key to staying safe behind the wheel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2010

HHS Secretary Sebelius Announces New Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced the establishment of a new Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) that will offer coverage to uninsured Americans who have been unable to obtain health coverage because of a pre-existing health condition. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2010

Ignorance Is Bliss or Knowledge Is Power?

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the disease became my entire life. I was drowning in paperwork telling me who to pay, what to eat, how to medicate, and what to do if I got sick. But as months and years passed, diabetes management became just a part of my goal to live healthfully. I realized that I couldn't compartmentalize my health. I cannot pinpoint when my obsession with all things healthy started, but once it did--well, I've never looked back. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

Study Says Byetta and Januvia Do Not Pose Extra Risk for Pancreatitis

A study released in late June has brought some welcome news to the makers of Byetta and Januvia: Users of the two diabetes drugs run no greater risk of developing pancreatitis than people with diabetes who take other drugs. In fact, both drugs seem to put users at slightly less risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2010

Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2010

AFREZZA Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy with Type 2s

AFREZZA TM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder, a well-tolerated, investigational ultra rapid acting mealtime insulin, as part of a diabetes treatment regimen, provides long-term glucose control comparable to usual insulin therapy but with a significantly reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a two-year study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Vitamin D Deficiency Common in People With Poor Diabetes Control

In a recent study of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and glucose intolerance in people with type 2 diabetes, more than 90 percent of the type 2 diabetes patients were found to be deficient in vitamin D, with their control over the disease worsening as their deficiency increased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 4, 2010

Traveling Wisely With Diabetes

Summer has arrived, and for many, that means it's time to take that long-awaited vacation. Visions of sunny beaches, gourmet meals, mountain resorts, adventurous excursions, and campgrounds dance in our minds. The word "vacation" is typically a synonym for "letting it all go."  No worries. No cares. Just pure indulgence. But for people with diabetes, an upcoming vacation can bring on anxiety and stress. For many of us, our disease thrives on routine and predictability, and vacations do not adhere to our everyday lives.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

A diet including coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA), helps combat insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of cells to respond to insulin and take in glucose for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate for insulin resistance by producing even more insulin, but eventually glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Over time, insulin resistance and obesity can lead to pre-diabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

GLUMETZA: Extended Release Metformin

Depomed, Inc. and Santarus, Inc. announced new data suggesting that patients previously intolerant of metformin may be able to tolerate higher doses of metformin when treated with GLUMETZA® (metformin HCl extended release tablets).  The finding will be presented at the 70th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in Orlando. GLUMETZA is a once-daily, extended release formulation of metformin, and is approved for use in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is promoted in the U.S. by Santarus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

June 2010

Do You Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

It raises fasting blood sugars. It increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. Millions of people suffer from it. And many don't even know they have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 30, 2010

Diabetes Health is the First Diabetes Magazine to Launch iPhone and iPod Touch Applications, DH Mobile

It is official! Today at the World's largest Diabetes Congress, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 70th Scientific Sessions (Booth 305) in Orlando, Florida, Diabetes Health Magazine (www.diabeteshealth.com) launched the first diabetes magazine Mobile Application, Diabetes Health Mobile (DH Mobile.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Lonely Nights

Dear Diabetes Health, I have been married for 14 years.  I am 36 and my husband is 39, and we have a seven-year-old daughter. About six months, ago my husband found out that he has type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Malfunctioning Pancreatic

A malfunction in the pancreas's "circadian clock*," the built-in timer found in all living things that regulates major biological processes, may be one of the reasons that people develop diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Harvard Study Says Brown Rice Twice Weekly Can Reduce Diabetes Risk by 10 Percent

White rice and brown rice are reminiscent of those old dramas about identical twins, wherein one turns out to be angelic and the other turns out to be bad news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2010

Getting Back to Basics When Life Gets In the Way

One day as I was multi-tasking (making dinner, washing dishes, supervising my daughter, returning phone calls), I suddenly grew very annoyed at the music we were listening to. I had recently purchased a children's CD for my daughter, and it hit me that all the songs sounded the same.  What a waste of twelve dollars, I thought, as I headed toward the CD player to shut it off.   As I reached down to hit the "off" button, I noticed a small, unfamiliar icon on the display screen. I crouched down to further examine and then laughed aloud.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2010

Diabetes and Cancer: A Consensus Report

The American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society have issued a joint consensus statement that acknowledges some links between diabetes and cancer but also notes there are numerous questions that have yet to be answered.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2010

Girls Who Lose Weight Before Adulthood Lessen Risk for Diabetes

A study that tracked more than 109,000 women nurses over a 16-year period has found that overweight girls who lose weight before reaching adulthood lessen their risk of type 2 diabetes. The research, conducted by Harvard University and the National Institutes of Health, asked the women to recall their body weight at the ages of five, 10, and 20 years. The women were aided by the use of diagrams that depicted various body types, ranging from extreme thinness (Category 1) to obese (Category 9).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2010

California Chronic Care Coalition is Seeking Stories

The definition for a chronic illness is one lasting 3 months or more (U.S. National Center for Health Statistics). Seventy-five per cent of our health care spending is on people with chronic conditions. These persistent conditions - the nation's leading causes of death and disability - leave in their wake deaths that could have been prevented, lifelong disability, compromised quality of life, and burgeoning health care costs. The facts are arresting:

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2010

Depomed recalls 52 lots of diabetes drug

(Reuters) - Drug developer Depomed Inc (DEPO.O) said it will recall 52 lots of its diabetes drug Glumetza due to the presence of traces of a certain chemical in the tablet's 500 mg bottle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2010

Wholly Healthy

Diabetes is often perceived as a physical disease, an issue with one's body.  But those of us with diabetes know that it affects every area of our lives, including our emotional, spiritual, and mental health. People with diabetes are more likely to experience depression than the average person, and it doesn't take a doctor to explain why. Diabetes is daunting, complicated, and confusing.  There's no one-size-fits-all explanation or treatment plan, and even when we arrive at something that works, diabetes throws us a curveball and we are forced to reinvent our treatment regimen---time, and time, and time again. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Dieting to Reduce Diabetes Risk May Not Work in People With Low Muscle Mass

One of the factors that increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes is excess body fat. So it makes sense that losing weight has always been one of the first lines of defense against the disease. Yet people who are slender -skinny, even- sometimes develop type 2. Why is that? Does the fact that a slender person can acquire type 2 negate the need for weight control?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Italian Scientists Find a Viral Link to Type 1 Diabetes

Italian researchers have found a link between a common virus and type 1 diabetes that may open the door to answers about what triggers the disease in children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2010

Tyler's Guide for a Successful Vacation

As a type 1 diabetic, I have found that it's a good idea to plan for the unexpected when traveling. Life is full of surprises, and so are vacations. The flight is late. The flight has been cancelled.  We had a flat tire or ran out of gas. There is an accident on the highway, and the traffic isn't moving. Who would have ever thought that airline flights would be grounded for five days in most of Eastern Europe because of volcanic ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland? If a diabetic had planned on going for a week-long vacation in England or France and had taken limited insulin, syringes, or infusion sets, he might have been in big trouble. Trying to replenish medical supplies in a foreign country could prove to be very difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Diabetes Linked to High-Grade Prostate Cancer in Obese Men

A Duke University Medical Center study has concluded that obese men who have type 2 diabetes are almost four times as likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer during a prostate biopsy as men who do not have diabetes. When ethnicity is taken into account, obese white men run a five-times greater chance of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Metformin-Avandia Combo Slows Progression to Type 2 in Two-Thirds of At-Risk Patients

A Canadian study that tracked 207 patients suggests that a low-dose combination of metformin and Avandia can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes by 66 percent in people at high risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Olympic XC Skier Kris Freeman Brings Story of Spirit and Tenacity to Campers with Diabetes

One of the most inspiring personalities of the 2010 Vancouver Games, Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman sheds his skis and poles this week to kick off his 6th annual diabetes summer camp tour with Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly Diabetes). Freeman, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 10 years ago at age 19, will share his amazing comeback story from coast to coast and encourage children with diabetes to continue pursuing their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2010

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Benefit Younger Diabetes Patients

New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and two other major medical associations advise not prescribing low-dose aspirin therapy for women under 60 or men under 50 who have diabetes but no other risks for heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

I Can't Look at Chips as Just Chips

I am that mom.  The one who buys organic foods, bakes her own bread, bans high fructose corn syrup and trans fats, and always totes around healthy snacks.  I don't drink soda, my toddler has never consumed fish sticks, and not once since her birth have we visited McDonalds for a "value" or Happy Meal.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2010

The Other: How Spouses of Diabetics Deal

It's a cool Sunday evening, and I'm sitting in a lively Italian restaurant. My husband is across the table.  We've just placed our orders, and we're engaged in easy conversation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2010

MACUGEN® Improved Vision in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

Results from a Phase 3 study demonstrate MACUGEN® (pegaptanib sodium) significantly improved vision in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), a complication of diabetes that is a leading cause of blindness in people of working age.¹ In the study, 37 percent of patients treated with MACUGEN gained two lines, or 10 letters, of vision on the ETDRS eye chart at 54 weeks, compared to 20 percent of patients who received a sham (placebo-like) procedure which consists of anesthesia and a simulated injection in the eye (p=0.0047). The data were presented at the World Ophthalmology Congress in Berlin by Frank G. Holz, an investigator in the trial and director of the University Eye Hospital at the University of Bonn in Germany.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2010

Meat Preservatives, Not Meats Themselves, May Increase the Risk for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, some medical researchers have pointed the finger at meat consumption as a major factor in the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, a meta-analysis conducted by the Harvard School of Medical Health has concluded that it may be the salt and chemical preservatives used in processed meats that lead to health problems, not the meats themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

U.K. Study Links Metformin to B-12 Deficiency

If you take metformin to control your type 2 diabetes, ask your doctor to take a look at your vitamin B-12 levels when you get a chance. A recent British study shows that metformin may cause a deficiency in the vitamin, which is necessary for the regeneration of red blood cells and the maintenance of nervous system health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

FREE iPhone Diabetes Applications

With the rise of the iPhone and the creation of hundreds of thousands of iPhone applications, it's only natural that several wonderful apps have appeared to make life easier for diabetes patients. Here is a quick look at 10 FREE applications, in no particular order, to help you choose the right ones for you.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 2, 2010

BD Announces U.S. Launch of BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set with Pre-Attached Holder

BD Diagnostics, a segment of BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), announced today the U.S. launch of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set with Pre-Attached Holder. The ready-to-use product has been designed to help protect healthcare workers from accidental needlestick injuries (NSIs) during the blood collection process and to prevent reuse of the tube holder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

May 2010

Knowledge Is Power

Investigate. Inform. Inspire. This statement is not only our commitment to you, the readers of Diabetes Health, but also a call to action. In our June/July print issue (available online June 1 under the Digital Edition tab), we've done some investigating. We tracked down educational agencies, websites, software, and applications, and we've listed them for you in our 2nd Educational Resource Guide.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2010

National Plan to Improve Health Literacy

The United States Department of Health and Human Services released The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy aimed at making health information and services easier to understand and use. The plan calls for improving the jargon-filled language, dense writing, and complex explanations that often fill patient handouts, medical forms, health web sites, and recommendations to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2010

Environmental Factors In Diabetes

Both genetic components and environmental factors play a role in most chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. In the same way that researchers use a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) to evaluate the role of genetic factors in disease, scientists at Stanford University have used an Environmental-Wide Association Study (EWAS) to evaluate environmental factors on diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Bret Michaels - Type 1 Diabetes Patient and Celebrity Apprentice Winner

It was a great win for diabetes on Sunday night as Bret Michaels, lead singer for the rock band Poison and reality TV star, was crowned the latest Celebrity Apprentice winner after struggling with several medical scares in the past month. Just as impressive is that throughout the season, Michaels' various wins raised more than $390,000 for the American Diabetes Association, including the final challenge prize from Snapple, worth $250,000. The 47-year old Michaels has lived with type 1 diabetes since he was six years old.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2010

Nick Jonas and Bayer Diabetes Care Announce 'Give Back. Simply Win'

A new contest, "Give Back. Simply Win." sponsored by Bayer Diabetes Care will shine a spotlight on people with diabetes who are making a difference in their local communities. Three grand prize winners will meet international singing sensation Nick Jonas and Bayer will donate $5,000 to three not-for-profit charitable causes, one selected by each winner.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2010

Attending Weight Watchers® Meetings Helps Reduce the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

The 57 million Americans currently living with "pre-diabetes" could benefit from a group weight loss program, like Weight Watchers, according to a new study published in this month's American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. Researchers found that after a 6-month Weight Watchers group program, overweight or obese adults who attended at least two thirds of the weekly sessions, not only lost weight, but also significantly reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels - important indicators of diabetes risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Kids' Consumption of Chronic Medications on the Rise

In growing numbers, children across America are adding a dose of medicine to their daily routine. In 2009, drug trend for children - a measure of prescription spending growth - increased 10.8 percent, driven by a 5 percent increase in drug utilization and higher medication costs, according to the Medco 2010 Drug Trend Report. The growth in prescription drug use among children was nearly four times higher than the rise seen in the overall population.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2010

Health Literacy and Safety Risks

People with diabetes who have limited health literacy are at higher risk for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, CA.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2010

IDF Launches World Diabetes Day 2010 Campaign

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has kicked off its World Diabetes Day campaign under the slogan "Let's take control of diabetes. Now."  Led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations, World Diabetes Day is celebrated every year on November 14. Created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to growing concerns about the escalating threat of diabetes worldwide, it reaches a global audience of over 1 billion people. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

Why Drugstore Genetic Tests Upset the FDA

On Tuesday, Pathway Genomics announced that their personal genetic testing kit (InsightTM Saliva Collection Kit) would soon be available at the pharmacy chain Walgreens. The next day, the FDA released a letter it had sent to Pathway Genomics on Monday saying hold on, there was no approval on record for Pathway's Genetic Health Report. By Thursday, Wallgreens announced that it was delaying the sale of the genetic testing kits.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

CVS Loyalty Program for People with Diabetes

Rhode Island-based CVS/pharmacy, which operates more than 7,000 pharmacies and drug stores in the United States, has announced three diabetes-related initiatives:

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Pain Is Worst Late at Night for People With Diabetic Neuropathy

Most people who have diabetes quickly learn that one of the worst side effects of the disease is pain caused by damage to the hands and feet. High blood sugar inflames nerves, leading to tingling and numbness, and often, severe pain. Researchers at the Comprehensive Pain Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland have learned that onset of nerve pain may have a daily rhythm, with the worst occurring late at night around 11 p.m. Their study, which they characterized as "preliminary," tracked 647 people with diabetic neuropathy. The results showed that the typical pattern for people with the condition was to experience the greatest pain from it after sunset, peaking at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 14, 2010

FDA’s Bad Ad Program

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched a "Bad Ad Program," an outreach effort aimed at educating healthcare providers and urging them to report misleading drug advertisements. The Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications (DDMAC), in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, administers the program.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

New Agents That Keep Insulin Working Longer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have developed a molecule that can block the breakdown of insulin. Their discovery could lead to development of a new class of drugs to help treat diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2010

Physician Survey Reveals That Early Team Approach Is Best Medicine

Early management of type 2 diabetes with an integrated team of specialists, including a dietitian, diabetes educator, endocrinologist, cardiologist, and nephrologist, can significantly reduce the incidence of complications and lower healthcare costs, according to an online survey of more than 300 endocrinologists and family practice physicians. The survey was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., with the goal of determining the most common obstacles for physicians in treating type 2 diabetes patients and preventing complications.  Sermo, the largest physician only online community, conducted the survey.  A significant number of these physicians (44 percent) reveal that 50 percent of their patients develop at least one of the following serious complications:  cardiovascular disease, nerve pain, kidney disease, stroke, blindness, or limb amputation.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Decreased Sleep Means Increased Insulin Resistance

A new study to be published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) says that a single night of too little sleep can induce insulin resistance. 

comments 2 comments - Posted May 6, 2010

D-TREAT

Diabetes Education and Camping Association's (DECA's) young adult leadership team "DLEAD" takes on Boston at "D-TREAT" - a unique 3-day event at Northeastern University, May 28-30, 2010 - to encourage young adults with diabetes to network, share insights and meet peers during an awesome event.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 6, 2010

Surprise! Metformin Works Differently Than Thought

CINCINNATI - The popular diabetes medication metformin works in different fashion than the current widely accepted view. This new finding could lead to wider use of the drug-particularly in people with cancer.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 4, 2010

Bret Michaels: Rock Star, Celebrity Apprentice, and Type 1 Diabetic

Bret Michaels suffered a brain hemorrhage last week, and his official website states that he remains in critical condition in ICU under 24-hour supervision by doctors and medical staff.  His doctors are hopeful that he can make a full recovery, but that could take weeks or months.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2010

Combination Drug-Laser Therapy Shows Great Promise in Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Clinical studies at 52 different sites nationwide have shown that combining standard laser treatments with injections of the drug ranibizumab (Lucentis) offers substantially better results for treating macular edema than laser treatments alone. The research showed that almost 50 percent of patients treated with the combination therapy showed substantial improvement in their vision after one year, compared with 28 percent of patients who had been treated solely with laser.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2010

April 2010

SafeSittings Diabetes Babysitting Service

Are you the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes? Do you often wish that you could find a babysitter who understands the "ins-and-outs" of type 1 so that you could enjoy an evening out, assured that your child is in good hands? Or are you a teenager with type 1 who is looking for a way to help children manage their disease, while making a little extra money at the same time?  Then look no further than www.SafeSittings.com. Launched over six years ago in Manhattan by teenager Kimberly Ross, www.SafeSittings.com is a free online service that matches type 1 families with babysitters who also have the disease. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2010

National Physical Activity Plan Seeks to Reduce Chronic Illness and Obesity

Increasing physical activity for greater health among the American public will take center stage on May 3 with the launch of the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP or Plan).  The signature events of the launch will be a press conference at the National Press Club and briefings with members of Congress in Washington, D.C.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina are providing the organizational infrastructure for writing the plan.  The implementation of the plan will be coordinated by the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity (NCPPA).  The goal of NPAP is "to encourage everyone to be more physically active, reduce barriers to inactivity, and make sure our communities and institutions provide opportunities to move." 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 29, 2010

Sex and Diabetes: Diabetes for Couples

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 60 year old married woman who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago.  In the last two years, I have lost interest in sex. I just don't feel like it, although I still like hugs.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Smart Insulin

A team of researchers from Case Western University published an article revealing their invention of a "smart" insulin molecule that binds considerably less to cancer receptors and self-assembles under the skin. To provide a slow-release form of insulin, the compound self-assembles under the skin by "stapling" itself together with zinc ions. Zinc staples connect the pieces of the insulin puzzle together to create a functional protein.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

Emergency Checklist

In the early hours of Saturday, February 27th, an 8.8-magnitude earthquake hit Chile, eventually leaving 1.5 million displaced from their homes. At 6 a.m. that same morning, Hawaiians awoke to the news that a tsunami was barreling towards them and evacuation was necessary. Within minutes, many had left their homes for safe ground.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

Diabetes Drug Tied to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, adds to evidence that metformin, a generically available drug commonly used for type 2 diabetes, may have anti-cancer effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

No More Slow-to-Heal Wounds

Researchers at Loyola University have discovered a group of immune system cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells that slow the wound healing process. Their findings pave the way for potential new treatments to accelerate the healing process in slow-to-heal wounds that can occur in people with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2010

What People with Type 1 Diabetes can Learn from Type 2s

Admit it, Type 1s. In weaker moments, you look down your noses at the Type 2 diabetics. You know that their disease can result from poor lifestyle choices. You know that their treatment regimen, compared with yours, is simple.

comments 37 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

Gene Makes People Fat, Raises Alzheimer's Risk

(Reuters) - A variant of an obesity gene carried by more than a third of the U.S. population also reduces brain volume, raising carriers' risk of Alzheimer's disease, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

Artificial Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Works in Clinical Trials

The first human trials of the latest design of an artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes found the device worked without causing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2010

New Model for Chronic Disease Prevention

YMCA of the USA, the nation's leading non-profit service organization dedicated to healthy living, and UnitedHealth Group, a diversified health and well-being company, today announced a partnership to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes in the United States. In this first of its kind collaboration, UnitedHealth Group will reimburse YMCAs offering the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2010

Four

Four risk factors-all of them preventable-reduce life expectancy among U.S. men by 4.9 years and among U.S. women by 4.1 years, according to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. (According to U.N. figures, current U.S. life expectancy is 75.6 years for men and 80.8 years for women.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2010

A Promising New Drug for Treating Diabetic Macular Edema

Successful clinical trials of a topical drug called mecamylamine may lead to a potent new treatment for the diabetes-induced eye disease known as macular edema. Diabetic macular edema* involves the part of the retina called the macula. High blood sugar levels inflame its blood vessels, leading to leakiness and fluid accumulation. Left uncontrolled, those symptoms can lead to blurriness, impaired vision, and even blindness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 14, 2010

Sea Urchin Proteins Might Lead to Eventual Treatment for Rare Form of Diabetes

A gene that mutated half a billion years ago and now shows up in modern sea creatures could hold the key to understanding a rare form of diabetes. The disease, called diabetes insipidus (not to be confused with diabetes mellitus), causes sufferers to urinate more than three-fourths of a gallon every day. An estimated 41,000 U.S. patients suffer from diabetes insipidus.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2010

It’s All in the Genes: New Study Links Low Birth Weight and Type 2 Diabetes

The first concrete evidence of a genetic link between low birth weight and the potential for developing type 2 diabetes has been published in the April 6 issue of the journal Nature Genetics. Scientists previously believed that lower birth weight babies were more at risk, but the cause remained unclear.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2010

Generic Drug Salsalate Continues to Show Promise

We continue to monitor the progress of studies to determine the effectiveness of salsalate, a generic aspirin-like drug, to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.  As previously reported here in October 2008 and January 2009, researchers from the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard University are conducting clinical trials to determine if this well known and proven drug for joint pain can be added to the list of diabetes drugs.  Recently, results from a three-month trial were announced online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, showing that those who took salsalate demonstrated significantly improved blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2010

Tell Your Friends Who May Have Pre-Diabetes to Take This Simple Online Test

If you're a regular visitor to the Diabetes Health website, chances are you've been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for some time. Your experience with the disease has taught you a lot about its warning signs and the lifestyle habits that can make it worse.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2010

Synthetic Molecule That Stops Diabetic Inflammation Could Become a Type 2 Therapy

Tests of an experimental drug called CPSI-1306 at Ohio State University were so successful at lowering inflammation and blood sugar levels in lab mice with type 2 diabetes that scientists consider it a prime candidate to become a new therapy for the disease. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2010

Soy Supplements Show No Diabetes Benefit in Study

(Reuters Health) - Adding soy supplements to the diet may not improve blood sugar control in older women who are at high risk of or in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2010

Flowers and Cards and Faux Pas... Oh My!

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, someone said brightly to me, "Well, at least you don't have cancer!" Others told me with naïve confidence, "You can beat this thing!"  Another person remarked to my mother, "If anyone could do a good job with diabetes, it's Rachel!  I'm too scared of needles."  Not one of these comments, nor about ninety percent of the others I received, was helpful, encouraging, or beneficial. 

comments 18 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2010

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Industry Resource for Information on Diabetes and Chronic Disease

Novo Nordisk, a global healthcare company and leader in diabetes care, announced the launch of the Novo Nordisk BlueSheet, a resource for information on diabetes and chronic disease, highlighting key issues in diabetes prevention, detection, treatment and care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2010

Ask Nadia!

Diabetes Health is excited to welcome you to "Ask Nadia", a new column by founder and editor-in-chief, Nadia Al-Samarrie. Nadia's adeptness in diabetes health comes from more than 20 years experience as a caregiver, managing the myriad of Type 1, Type 2 and pre-diabetes related issues in her own family, as well as from the knowledge acquired through her devoted and passionate tenure as the publisher of the prominent Diabetes Health Magazine. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2010

Reluctance to Reach Out to Others Can Boost Mortality Rate 33 Percent Among People With Diabetes

People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who find it difficult to trust others or reach out for emotional support may be shortening their own lives. That's the conclusion of a five-year University of Washington study that showed a 33 percent higher mortality rate among diabetes patients who did not interact well with their healthcare providers or other people.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2010

Our Kids and Camps: April/May Digital Edition Is Now Available

While the words "diabetes" and "camp" may not sound like they belong in the same sentence for most people, they sure do for thousands of kids across the country. Diabetes camp is their time to share experiences, learn, and have fun with other kids who have diabetes. You'll find the usual camping activities like hiking, arts and crafts, boating, swimming, and sitting around the campfire, but also lessons on adjusting your insulin pump to compensate for sports and how to give yourself an injection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

Summer Fun for Kids!

The Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) mission is to "promote communication, provide education, share resources, and serve as a worldwide voice to advance diabetes education and camping programs that meet the diverse needs of individuals and families."  DECA provides an international databse of diabetes camping organizations, and "Best Practices" tools for diabetes camp management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

March 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

FDA Hedges Approval of Long-Acting Byetta, Asks Amylin for More Information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has withheld approval of Bydureon, the once-weekly version of the popular type 2 diabetes drug Byetta.  The agency has asked its manufacturer, Amylin, for more information regarding Bydureon's manufacture, labeling, and risk management plan. It did not, however, request further information on tests of the drug itself-an indication that the agency probably intends to grant marketing permission once it has dotted all the i's and crossed all the t's involved in the approval process.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2010

If You Can Taste the Fat, You Don't Eat So Much of It

Common knowledge says that humans have the ability to perceive five tastes:  sweet, salt, sour, bitter, and umami (protein-richness). But now, researchers have discovered that humans can detect a sixth taste as well: fat. And apparently, people with higher sensitivity to the taste of fat are less likely to eat fatty foods and become overweight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2010

Texas Researcher Poised to Test Leptin as a Replacement for Insulin Among Type 1s

A University of Texas researcher who genetically modified mice with type 1 diabetes to control their disease with leptin instead of insulin is now ready to extend his experiment to human test subjects. Dr. Roger Unger, a researcher at the UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, will begin the tests as soon as leptin manufacturers can assure him of a steady supply of the hormone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2010

Intestinal Bacteria May Contribute to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

According to researchers at the Emory University School of Medicine, obesity and metabolic syndrome may be partially brought on by intestinal bacteria that increase appetite and insulin resistance. The two can lead to overeating and high blood sugar levels - both important factors in the eventual onset of type 2 diabetes. Perhaps even more interesting, the scientists found that the bacteria can be transferred from one mouse to another, creating increased appetite and insulin resistance in an animal that had previously experienced neither.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2010

Tyler's Top Ten Tips for Teens

Experience is a great teacher, but sometimes it's not the best way to learn, especially when it comes to your medical needs. Smart people learn from their mistakes, but wise people learn from other people's mistakes. In my ten years with diabetes, I have found that to eliminate problems, you need to anticipate your needs. A few moments of preparation can ensure a great afternoon of fun with your friends, a better grade on a test, or participation in a sporting competition without any complications.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2010

Revised Criteria Could Triple Reported Cases of Gestational Diabetes

Suggested revisions in the benchmarks used to assess dangerously high blood sugar levels in pregnant women could lead to a doubling or tripling of the number of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes*. That's the conclusion of an international study led by the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2010

Medtronic Receives FDA Approval for Industry's Most Advanced Integrated System for Diabetes Management

MINNEAPOLIS - March 17, 2010 - Medtronic, Inc. today announced it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, the next generation of the industry's only integrated diabetes management system (insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and diabetes therapy management software). The system incorporates new innovative CGM features including predictive alerts that can give early warning to people with diabetes so they can take action to prevent dangerous high or low glucose events.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2010

Valsartan (Diovan) Delayed Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Cardiovascular Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Results from a landmark study involving more than 9,000 people showed that the high blood pressure medicine valsartan (Diovan) delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a common pre-diabetic condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Our Journey to Hope and Beyond

I grew up around the corner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In high school, long ago, I thought that NIH scientists were "bad guys" who mistreated animals in the name of medical research. I later moved to the West Coast and became a registered obstetrical nurse. Over the years, along with sharing the joys of new moms and new babies, I cared for patients with devastating conditions like cancer and quadriplegia, people whose lives could potentially be saved or improved by medical research., Yet it wasn't until many years later, after moving back to the DC area, that I really began to see the NIH in a new light.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Mutation That Affects Response to Smell and Taste Could Lead to Type 2 Diabetes

According to Duke University researchers, a mutation that causes the lack of an insulin-controlling molecule may be a factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The molecule, ankyrin B, is activated in response to the smell and taste of food and leads to the production of insulin in preparation for food intake.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2010

FDA eyes improvements for diabetics' glucose devices

At a two-day meeting (March 16 and 17, 2010) to review blood glucose meters, Food and Drug Administration officials and staff pointed to a number of issues that can prevent people from getting proper treatment and sought input from medical experts and industry on ways to improve test results with the widely used devices.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Depression or Sex?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 55-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago, and I think it made me depressed. The depression eventually got so bad that I didn't want to get out of bed in the morning. My doctor referred me to the psych clinic, where they put me on Paxil (paroxetine). The medication is helping my depression, but ruining my sex life.  Basically, I can't get an erection, but I don't really care because I'm not interested anyway. I have no desire. My wife is still interested, however, and she is really upset about my lack of desire for sex.  I don't like hurting her, and I don't want us to break up over this, but the depression was awful. I don't want to go back to that. What can I do? 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2010

Although Statins Increase Diabetes Risk, Study Says They're Still Worth Taking

An article by Scottish researchers, published in the British medical journal Lancet, says that although people taking statins are nine percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, that risk is outweighed by the drug's ability to lower cholesterol and protect against heart disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 14, 2010

Mom Says 'Just a Phone Call Away', Just Not Good Enough

Allen, Texas - When Pam Henry's daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, she never even thought she would be part of something that could revolutionize health care. "When Sarah was diagnosed, my only goal was to do all I could to keep her as healthy as possible.  What I created was something just to help keep her that way." 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Dolphins' Ability to Switch Diabetes On and Off Could Point to a Similar Knack in Humans

A scientist's discovery that dolphins have a genetic ability to turn diabetes on and off, depending on the availability of food, could lead to research into whether humans might have a similar-although dormant-gene.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Starting Treatment Early Doubles Chance of Success for People with Diabetes

The sooner people with diabetes start taking metformin, the longer the drug remains effective, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery Could Be Key to Reversing Diabetes in Non-Obese Patients

A controversial New York doctor is poised to begin surgical trials on non-obese diabetes patients in an attempt to reverse their disease with gastric bypass surgery. Dr. Francesco Rubino, the chief of gastrointestinal surgery at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, believes that because gastric surgery has been shown to be highly effective in remitting diabetes symptoms, the procedure should now be allowed among non-overweight type 2s.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2010

Naps Among Older People Linked to Higher Diabetes Rate

A university study of 20,000 Chinese adults aged 50 and older says that people who nap four to six days a week have a higher rate of type 2 diabetes than people who either never take a daily snooze or do so less often.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2010

Women Who Drink Moderately Appear to Gain Less Weight than Non-Drinkers

The study started out with nearly 20,000 trim middle-aged and older women. Over time, women who drank alcohol in moderation put on less weight and were less apt to become overweight compared to non-drinkers. This was true even after taking into account various lifestyle and dietary factors that might influence a woman's weight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2010

Northern California's Biggest County Sues Glaxo Over Avandia

Santa Clara County, the largest county in Northern California (nearly 1.9 million people), has filed a federal lawsuit against pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, alleging that Glaxo knowingly sold its type 2 diabetes drug Avandia for several years despite indications the drug causes heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2010

Is Impulse Control Impaired in Type 2s?

Working with a small group of type 2 patients, Japanese scientists think that they may have found one reason why some people develop obesity that can eventually lead to diabetes: poor impulse control.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2010

Insulin Used to Treat Diabetes May Be Linked to Increased Cancer Risk, Review Suggests

The benefits of using insulin to treat diabetes far outweigh the risks, but a review just published online by IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, suggests that commonly used diabetes therapies may differ from each other when it comes to their influence on cancer risk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 5, 2010

Does Something Smell Fishy? It Could Be Your Metformin

If you regularly take metformin, one of the oldest and most respected tools in doctors' anti-diabetes kits, chances are that you don't detect the unpleasant odor that turns some type 2s against the drug.  Some think it has fishy smell, while others say that it reminds them of the inside of an inner tube.

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2010

Amylin Hopes to Begin U.S. Sales of Long-Acting Byetta Early This Year

Amylin Pharmaceuticals has announced that it expects to begin selling a once-weekly version of its diabetes drug, Byetta, by the end of the year. The company reports that the FDA is nearing final inspections of its manufacturing plant and could give the go-ahead for U.S. sales in early March.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2010

Money Money Money: Diabetes Research Funding

The demand for diabetes research funding clearly exceeds the funds available. In the United States, 23.6 million children and adults (7.8 percent of the population) have diabetes, and we spent $174 billion on diagnosed diabetes alone in 2007 (the most recent year for which data are available). It is imperative that we take action, but where is the research funding coming from? Can it possibly be sufficient, and how is it being spent? 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2010

February 2010

FDA Gives Novo the Go-Ahead to Market Victoza® in the U.S.

Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has received Food and Drug Administration permission to begin marketing its type 2 drug Victoza® in the United States.
Victoza, the brand name for liraglutide, is a GLP-1* analog that is taken one a day by injection to help control blood sugar-and in some cases, help with weight loss-in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2010

JDRF Launches Program to Support Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

As part of an extensive program to support the needs of adults with type 1 diabetes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International announced the introduction of a key support program, the JDRF Adult Type 1 Toolkit, to meet an immediate need for resources and community for adults more recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes - a chronic autoimmune disease often first diagnosed in children.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women Conference Filling up Fast

The North Carolina-based not-for-profit DiabetesSisters (DiabetesSisters.org) is pleased to announce that registration for the first annual Weekend for Women conference to be held May 22-23rd in Raleigh is two-thirds full, and will likely close by April 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2010

GSK rejects conclusions of Senate Committee on Finance Staff Report on Avandia

The Staff Report of the Senate Committee on Finance draws conclusions on the safety of Avandia (rosiglitazone) that are based on analyses that are not consistent with the rigorous scientific evidence supporting the safety of the drug. In addition, the report cherry-picks information from documents, which mischaracterizes GlaxoSmithKline's comprehensive efforts to research Avandia and communicate those findings to regulators, physicians and patients. In fact, the safety and effectiveness of Avandia is well characterized in the label approved by the FDA.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 23, 2010

U.S. Senate Report Says Glaxo Knew that Avandia Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

A U.S. Senate Finance Committee report released on February 20 says that Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline's drug for type 2 diabetes, may have caused as many as 83,000 heart attacks between 1999, when the drug was introduced, and 2007. The Senate report, culminating a two-year inquiry into the drug, also says that Glaxo knew about the drug's potential risks years before suspicions began to form regarding a connection between Avandia and heart problems.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

Embracing a New Diet: Vegetarianism

For as long as I can remember, I have disliked meat.  I believe it started with my sensitive gag reflex as a child.  I could hardly chew and swallow pork chops, pineapple, or anything else that didn't go down easily. In high school I became best friends with a girl who didn't eat meat.  It seemed like a really cool lifestyle, so I joined ranks with her.  Instead of eating meat, we consumed french fries, fruit punch, and snack cakes.  This became our definition of vegetarianism. Then, during my junior year of high school, my doctor informed me that my chronic low blood sugars might be improved by more protein consumption, so I forced myself back into the life of a carnivore, not knowing then that protein consumption didn't have to equal a slab of meat at every meal. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2010

Handing down the Genes. Part 3 (of 3)

This is the third - and final - installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part III: "Nutrition and Exercise Tips"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 19, 2010

Bayer's A1CNow® SELFCHECK At-Home A1C System Now Available In Local Pharmacies

Bayer's A1CNow SELFCHECK, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration last year, is the first and only system of its kind with at-home results in five minutes. It enables patients to more closely watch their A1C level in between doctor visits so they may have a more informed discussion with their healthcare provider to ensure their diabetes plan is working.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

Newly Found Protein and Enzyme Duo May Hold Key to a Cure for Retinopathy

Thwarting a protein that carries an otherwise benign enzyme into the nuclei of cells in the retina, where the enzyme kills the retinal cells, may hold the key to preventing blindness in patients with diabetes. That's the conclusion of a two-year study by researchers at Michigan State University seeking a way to treat retinopathy, the disease that often leads to blindness in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2010

CVS/pharmacy Begins Free Health Screenings in Communities Nationwide Through 'A Su Salud' Program

CVS/pharmacy, the nation's leading retail pharmacy, today announced its "A Su Salud" (To Your Health) health fairs for 2010. The community wellness program offers free comprehensive health risk assessments and screenings to help people in underserved areas with early detection and disease prevention. More than 800 events are scheduled for 2010 in cities including Miami, Los Angeles, Dallas/Fort-Worth, Houston, Corpus Christi, San Francisco, Sacramento and Fresno.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 2 (of 3)

This is the second installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part II: "Preventing Type 2 in Children"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 13, 2010

UK Study Finds That People With A1c's of 7.5% Run Less Risk of Death Than Those With Lower A1c's

Results of a 22-year study by researchers at Cardiff University School of Medicine in Wales indicate that older type 2s who try too hard to drive their A1c's down to "normal" (4.5% to 6%) may significantly increase their chances of early death. In fact, the study, just published in the British medical journal The Lancet*, found that type 2s with the lowest risk of death had A1c's of 7.5% -- a figure that few authorities on the disease have recommended as ideal.

comments 15 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2010

Study Suggests Extended Release Metformin May Reduce Body Mass Index in Teens

A California study that tracked 77 obese adolescents for almost two years indicates that metformin XR, an extended-release version of the popular anti-diabetic drug, may help lower body mass index in overweight teens who do not have diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2010

What’s the Deal with Steel-Cut Oats?

Steel-cut oats are whole grains, made when the groats (the inner portion of the oat kernel) are cut into pieces by steel. Also known as coarse-cut oats or Irish oats, they are golden and look a little like small pieces of rice. They gain part of their distinctive flavor from the roasting process after being harvested and cleaned. Although the oats are then hulled, this process does not strip away their bran and germ, allowing them to retain a concentrated source of their fiber and nutrients.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

Cutting Off the Blood Supply to Fat Cells Could Become a New Obesity Therapy

White fat is the "bad" gut fat associated with obesity and enlarged abdomens. When a pound of new white fat forms in the body, it requires a full mile of new blood vessels to nourish and sustain it. That's because white fat is much like a tumor in requiring a steady blood supply. To build the new blood vessels, it depends on a process called angiogenesis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2010

Dreamfields Pasta Wants to Know: Who's Your 'DFF'?

Many of us have a "BFF" (Best Friend Forever), but people with diabetes or pre-diabetes need a BFF who understands the importance of maintaining a healthy diabetic lifestyle -- a "DFF" (Diabetes Friend Forever). To honor these unsung heroes, Dreamfields Pasta is launching a first-of-its-kind contest to pay tribute to the special people who help make living with diabetes a manageable experience.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

"America's Silent Killer" on The Oprah Winfrey Show

CHICAGO, IL - On Thursday, February 4, Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and more reveal the staggering human cost of the growing diabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic on a special episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show. Before a studio audience comprised of all diabetics and their families, Oprah and Dr. Oz reveal the latest facts and figures, share stories of those affected, and hold a no-holds-barred, revealing conversation about risk factors, diet and lifestyle.

comments 17 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 1 (of 3)

This is the beginning of our three part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part I: "When to Worry-and When Not to-About Your Child's Increased Risk for Diabetes."

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Death by TV?

Australian researchers who tracked the TV viewing habits of 8,800 people over a six-year span have some sobering statistics for people who love the tube too well: (1) If you watch TV more than two and up to four hours a day, your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease increases by 19 percent. (2) If your viewing habit is more than four hours a day, your risk of death from cardiovascular disease skyrockets by 80 percent.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Cost the U.S. $218 Billion in 2007: En Route to $336 Billion by 2034

A study commissioned by healthcare company Novo Nordisk has reported that the cost of diabetes and pre-diabetes to the U.S. economy in 2007 was $218 billion. The study, conducted by The Lewin Group, projected that by 2034, the two conditions will cost the economy $336 billion per year.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 3, 2010

UK Study Says Bisphenol A (BPA) Is Connected to Increased Risks for Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease

A study by researchers at the universities of Exeter and Plymouth in the United Kingdom says that Bisphenol A-BPA-a chemical commonly used in plastic packaging and products, is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and coronary heart disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2010

Severe complications of diabetes higher in depressed patients

Depression raises risks of advanced and severe complications from diabetes, according to a prospective study of Group Health primary-care patients in western Washington. These complications include kidney failure or blindness, the result of small vessel damage, as well as major vessel problems leading to heart attack or stroke.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2010

Novo, Upping the Ante in the Race for an Oral GLP-1 Drug, Tests a Pill Version of Victoza

Denmark-based Novo Nordisk has begun a Phase 1 trial of a pill form of a GLP-1 drug very similar to its Victoza product. The trial will involve  155 British patients with type 2 diabetes. The test on human subjects, although very early-stage,  puts the company in the lead to develop an oral form of a GLP-1 drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2010

January 2010

DiabetesHealth Feb-March Print and Digital Edition Available Now!

On Monday, take a look at our new Feb\March digital edition. DiabetesHealth sat down to talk with Kris Freeman, the first Olympian with type 1 diabetes to compete in the endurance sport of cross country skiing. He has shared his story about what it is like to follow your dreams regardless of the obstacles in place. Working with Eli Lily, Kris spends time traveling around the country talking with kids about their aspirations and diabetes. He wants his story to inspire other people with type 1 diabetes to follow their own dreams. "Diabetes doesn't have to hold you back."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2010

Multidisciplinary Researchers Convene For First International Congress On Abdominal Obesity

Clinical and basic science researchers from around the world will convene in Hong Kong from January 28 to 30 for the First International Congress on Abdominal Obesity: "Bridging the Gap between Cardiology and Diabetology." The congress, sponsored by the International Chair on Cardiometabolic Risk (ICCR) (http://www.cardiometabolic-risk.org), is the first-ever specialized forum for sharing new insights and evidence about abdominal obesity and its clinical and public health implications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Newly identified genes influence insulin and glucose regulation

An international research consortium has found 13 new genetic variants that influence blood glucose regulation, insulin resistance, and the function of insulin-secreting beta cells in populations of European descent. Five of the newly discovered variants increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2010

A Tasty Look into Marlene’s Delicious Life

Bestselling cookbook author and nutritionist Marlene Koch (pronounced, serendipitously, "cook") has been dubbed a "magician in the kitchen" when it comes to creating great-tasting, healthy recipes that everyone can enjoy, including those with diabetes!  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 20, 2010

Moving Toward a Healthcare Bill: What People with Diabetes Need to Know

The effort underway in Washington, D.C., to draft a healthcare bill is often described as "trying to get a handle on so many moving parts." At issue is this: the House passed a 1,990 page bill in December followed by the Senate passing a 2,074 page bill on Christmas Eve. Now, those two versions are being merged into one with a conference committee that would be composed of House and Senate Members while, at the same time, the White House has been pushing for a deadline by the State of the Union Address, now scheduled for Wednesday, January 27.  So far, all sides believe there will be a health care bill in front of the president within the next few weeks. What it looks like is one of the "moving parts."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2010

Diabetes Ups Risk of Dementia for Mildly Impaired

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diabetes may hasten progression to dementia in older people with mild thinking impairment, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2010

Walgreens Expands Health and Wellness Offerings with Walgreens Optimal Wellness

DEERFIELD, Ill. January 13, 2010 - Walgreens (NYSE: WAG)(NASDAQ: WAG) today announced the launch of the Walgreens Optimal WellnessTM program, an innovative self-care educational program for people with chronic conditions that will initially focus on people with type 2 diabetes. Walgreens Optimal WellnessTM is a significant step for Walgreens and the health care industry that capitalizes on the power of face-to-face interaction.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 14, 2010

Study Finds Tight Blood Sugar Control not so Important if Other Medical Problems are Present

A five-year study of 2,613 people treated for diabetes at Italian clinics shows that tight blood sugar control may not be the number-one priority for patients who have other medical problems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed Due to Flaws in Screening

MADISON, Wis. - Using one of the two major national diabetes screening guidelines misses about one-third of those with diabetes, consequently putting them at risk for serious health complications, according to surprising research findings at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Out of Love

Dear Diabetes Health, I hope you can help me. I am 49 years old and was diagnosed with type 2 five years ago.  My husband still wants sex. I don't even want him to touch me.  He is very mean to me. He yells at me and calls me names.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2010

Simple Questionnaire Could Be One of the Best Diabetes Screening Tests Yet

A simple self-assessment questionnaire developed by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City may be the best means yet for screening people who are unaware that they have diabetes or who are at risk of developing it. The questionnaire asks about six factors that have proven to be the most reliable in predicting diabetes: age, gender, level of physical activity, hypertension, obesity, and family history of diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 11, 2010

Study Says Type 2s Don't Benefit as Much From Good Cholesterol

German and Swiss researchers have found that high-density lipoprotein, or HDL-so-called "good" cholesterol-does not protect blood vessels in people with type 2 diabetes as well as it does in people who don't have the disease. However, their follow-up experiment, which added doses of extended-release niacin, shows that HDL's efficacy in type 2s might be sharply increased simply by the addition of a daily niacin pill.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2010

Quitting Smoking and Diabetes Risk

"People who give up smoking are prone to developing diabetes because they gain weight," TheTimes reported. It said a study has found that quitters are twice as likely as smokers, and 70% more likely than non-smokers, to have type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2010

Pedometer Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk By Half

Using a pedometer as part of a structured education programme could reduce the chances of Type 2 diabetes by more than 50 per cent in those at risk of developing the condition, reveals a new Diabetes UK-funded study1 out today.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 5, 2010

Do sugary drinks really fuel weight gain?

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Studies reporting a link between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain have garnered a lot of attention, but actual research on the issue has yielded mixed results, researchers note in a new report.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2010

The Doctor says,

"You have diabetes."  Have you just heard these words?  Or maybe you recently heard it about your son or daughter.  The oxygen rushes out of your body.  A knot forms in your stomach.  "What now?"

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women: May 22-23

DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce OPEN REGISTRATION for the Weekend for Women Conference hosted by DiabetesSisters and TCOYD on May 22-23, 2010 at Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2010

Laser Deemed Best Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Steroid injections into the eye slowed diabetes-related eye disease, though lasers remain the treatment of choice because of side effects related to the steroids, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2010

December 2009

Tasty Tips and Tricks from Marlene

According to Marlene, finding the perfect mix of ingredients is key when creating healthier versions of your favorite foods. From composing a healthier sandwich to perfecting pasta dishes and creating delightful desserts, Marlene reveals some of her tastiest ingredient tips:

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2009

American Diabetes Association Revises Diabetes Guidelines

December 29, 2009 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) revised clinical practice recommendations for diabetes diagnosis promote hemoglobin A1c (A1c) as a faster, easier diagnostic test that could help reduce the number of undiagnosed patients and better identify patients with prediabetes. The new recommendations are published December 29 in the January supplement of Diabetes Care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Relieving Stress on Insulin-Producing Cells May Prevent Diabetes

BOSTON, Mass. - Dec. 23, 2009 - Cells in your body are constantly churning out poisonous forms of oxygen (oxidants) and mopping them up with a countervailing force of proteins and chemicals (anti-oxidants). This balancing act of oxidative stress is particularly likely to go haywire in beta cells, the insulin-producing cells that malfunction and then start to die off in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

An American in the UK: Healthcare for Type 1

As an American living abroad, I tried to follow the debate over healthcare reform in the US, but I had to drop it for my own sanity. How could so many of my fellow Americans say that people like me, with chronic diseases we never asked for, should pay more for healthcare because they don't want to participate in the risk pool? How could people like me, who live in fear of losing health insurance, be blind to how badly Americans with type 1 diabetes can get ripped off? I had to remind myself, "It's okay. I don't live there anymore."

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

Amylin Shares Drop after FDA Requests New Studies

BOSTON/NEW YORK, Dec 23 (Reuters) - The shares of Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc (AMLN.O) fell nearly 10 percent on Wednesday after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that the company conduct additional safety studies on its diabetes drug, Byetta.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 28, 2009

Artificial Sweeteners May Help Control Blood Sugar

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Combining artificial sweeteners with the real thing boosts the stomach's secretion of a hormone that makes people feel full and helps control blood sugar, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2009

Senate Passes Health Care Reform

"The passing of health reform in the Senate is a historic moment for our nation and for all people affected by diabetes," commented George J. Huntley, Chair of the Board, American Diabetes Association.

comments 13 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2009

Evidence Deepens That Breastfeeding Helps Moms Avoid Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2

A 20-year study that tracked 704 women from before their first pregnancy onward suggests that the first year mothers breastfeed, they reduce their risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes within the next 15 years by 15 percent. Each subsequent year of breastfeeding further reduces the risk by 15 percent. For example, a mother who has two children and breastfeeds each for a year could enjoy a 30 percent reduction in her risk of type 2 over a 15-year period.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2009

Novo Enters Phase 1 Test of an Insulin Pill

Denmark-based Novo Nordisk A/S has begun phase 1 testing of an insulin pill that, if successful, could replace injections as the primary means of blood sugar control for millions of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The company has enrolled 80 volunteer German test subjects in the study and expects to have preliminary results by the first half of 2011. The test group consists of both people with diabetes and people without it.

comments 12 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2009

A Prostate Cancer Therapy Increases Risk of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

Regardless of age, men undergoing prostate cancer treatment via androgen deprivation therapy have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A study published in early December by Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston noted that although androgen deprivation therapy has been associated with a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular problems in older men, this is the first time the connection has been noted among men of all ages.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 24, 2009

Good Fat, Bad Fat

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks tend to carry around less of a particularly unhealthy type of abdominal fat than whites, even though they suffer more from obesity-linked illness, researchers report.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2009

deCODE Discovers a Major Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Dependent on Parent of Origin

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, December 16/PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Scientists at deCODE genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq:DCGN) publish in the journal Nature the discovery of a version of a common single-letter variant in the sequence of the human genome (SNP) with a major impact on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). The impact of the T2D variant is not only large, but unusual: if an individual inherits it from their father, the variant increases risk of T2D by more than 30% compared to those who inherit the non T2D-linked version; if inherited maternally, the variant lowers risk by more than 10% compared to the non T2D-linked version. Nearly one quarter of those studied have the highest risk combination of the versions of this SNP, putting them at a roughly 50% greater lifetime risk of T2D than the quarter with the protective combination. This is the second largest effect of any genetic variant for T2D apart from SNPs in TCF7L2, discovered by deCODE in 2006.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2009

Lifestyle Changes Work as Well as Surgery for Type 2s Who Have Artery Disease

The combination of type 2 diabetes and mild heart disease is a double whammy that in many cases leads to such intrusive therapies as angioplasty* and can result in death from some sort of cardiovascular event. But a five-year university study of 2,368 type 2 patients with moderate heart disease shows that lifestyle changes and non-intrusive treatments can work just as well at lowering mortality rates as surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2009

Good Insulin Injection Practices

Good injection practices - such as proper injection technique, site rotation, and appropriate needle use - are as important to your glucose control as your type and dosage of insulin (1). But over time, you may have developed your own injection technique, which may not exactly accord with professional guidelines and standards.  For instance, you might reuse your needles. It's a very common practice, despite the fact that guidelines issued by regulatory agencies call for all insulin injection needles to be labeled single-use only. However, changes to injection technique can alter insulin absorption and may lead to problems down the road.  So maybe it's time for a refresher in the official line on appropriate insulin injection practices - injection technique, site rotation, and proper needle use (2).

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2009

Type 2 diabetes gene predisposes children to obesity

A gene named HHEX/IDE, which has already been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes (see research article), may also contribute to childhood obesity. While the gene does not appear to affect birth weight and does not necessarily predispose an adult to become obese, it may set the stage for obesity in some children. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2009

Eliminating Endocrinologist Consultations

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Dec. 7 -- A survey just conducted by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) indicates that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) decision to eliminate consultation codes will force four out of five endocrinologists to reduce the number of Medicare patients seen in their practices.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2009

Coffee, Tea, or Type 2 Diabetes?

CHICAGO - Individuals who drink more coffee (regular or decaffeinated) or tea appear to have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis of previous studies reported in the December 14/28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. A previously published meta-analysis suggested drinking more coffee may be linked with a reduced risk, but the amount of available information has more than doubled since.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2009

Mobile Phone Technology may Address Unmet Needs of Parents of Children with Diabetes, Sending Blood Sugar Readings Via Text, to Help Manage Child's Illness

BOSTON, DECEMBER 8, 2009 -- In a recent study conducted by the Center for Connected Health, a division of Partners HealthCare, new data revealed that parents of children with diabetes were receptive to using novel health technology - such as a mobile phone that could collect and transmit the child's blood sugar readings to a doctor - to help manage their child's diabetes. This study was published in the November issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2009).

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2009

Are You Prepared to Handle Diabetes During a Disaster?

If you have diabetes and are wondering whether you're prepared for a unexpected disaster, then head for the website of the American Association for Diabetes Educators. There you'll find a Diabetes Disaster Response Toolkit that contains an abundance of information on nearly every aspect of getting prepared and helping your local diabetes community do the same. The toolkit, which was put together by the Alamo Association of Diabetes Educators in Texas, will help any educator or member of the public get ready to handle diabetes during a flood, earthquake, or any other natural or human-made disaster.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

Is Testosterone the Wonder Drug?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 57 years old. About five years ago, I saw my doctor because I was feeling tired. My waist size was up, and I was not interested in sex. I almost never got an erection. The doctor diagnosed type 2 diabetes and put me on metformin. He also prescribed Viagra, which helped sometimes, but not all the time.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

Review of Clinical Trials of Oral Insulin: Oral-lyn

WORCESTER, Mass., Dec 3, 2009 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX News Network) -- Published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, an independent review of clinical trials of Generex Oral-lyn(TM) shows that the oral insulin spray has a faster onset of action and shorter duration of action than insulin delivered subcutaneously.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2009

Statins Might Slightly Raise Diabetes Risk, But Are Still Worthwhile

We'd all prefer it if there were no nasty side effects to our treatments, but that isn't always the case. Sometimes it is worth risking a side effect for the greater good of our health. On that note, researchers continue to emphasize that the benefits of cholesterol-lowering statins on heart disease far outweigh any risk that they might slightly increase the chance of developing diabetes. More studies needs to be done in this area, but in light of the fact that cardiovascular disease is responsible for nearly two-thirds of deaths in people with diabetes and is the number one killer of women in the United States, it seems better to stick with the statins.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2009

Etiquette for People Without Diabetes

Dr. Bill Polonsky, PhD, CDE, knows diabetes. Among other things, he has served as Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, as a Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is the founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute (BDI) in San Diego, California, and a member of Diabetes Health's Advisory Board.

comments 18 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2009

One in Five Type 2s Is Morbidly Obese - 100 or More Pounds Overweight

Researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago report that 20.7 percent of all American adults who have type 2 diabetes are "morbidly obese," a description that applies to people who are 100 or more pounds overweight. The researchers said that the figure for African Americans is even higher, with one out of three type 2s in that group falling under the definition of morbidly obese.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

Cardiovascular risk in youth with type 1 diabetes linked primarily to insulin resistance

Chevy Chase, MD- According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), youth with type 1 diabetes have now been found to have abnormal insulin resistance. Having abnormal insulin resistance appears to negatively affect heart, blood vessel and exercise function in this population.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

Diabetes Surgery Summit Issues Call to Use Bariatric Surgery as a Type 2 Treatment

Fifty science and medical diabetes experts, representing 22 international organizations*, have issued a consensus statement that calls for bariatric surgery to be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. The statement, published online November 23 in the Annals of Surgery, is seen by attendees at the recent Diabetes Surgery Summit in Rome as the precursor to the establishment of a new medical discipline, "diabetes surgery."

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

Pharmacists, Drug Wholesalers Offer Solutions to Avoid Disruption for Medicare Beneficiaries

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (Dec. 1, 2009) - Seniors may find that many common prescription drugs that Medicare Part D has covered for years may suddenly be denied due to a new policy being implemented by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2009

It's All in the Cooking: Omega-3 Fatty Acids are Good for Your Heart When Cooked Properly

It's been known for some time that omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of heart disease, but no one has really known if one dietary source is better than another. For that reason, Lixin Meng, MS, a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, designed a study to compare sources, types, amounts, and frequencies of omega-3 in diets, while taking into account gender and ethnic groups. The study was presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

Hey, I'm not Fat!

A study presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions said that eight percent of obese people misunderstand their body size and don't feel they need to lose weight.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2009

Diabetes Population to Double and Diabetes Costs to Nearly Triple in 25 Years, New Study Shows

PRINCETON, NJ (November 27, 2009) - The diabetes population in the United States will almost double over the next 25 years and annual medical spending on the disease is projected to hit $336 billion, up from $113 billion today, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.  The National Changing Diabetes® Program (NCDP), a program of Novo Nordisk, commissioned the analysis by a team from the University of Chicago.

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2009

Consensus Statement Recognizes the Legitimacy of Surgery as a Dedicated Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Carefully Selected Patients

NEW YORK (Nov. 23, 2009) - A first-of-its-kind consensus statement on diabetes surgery is published online today in the Annals of Surgery. The report illustrates the findings of the first international consensus conference - Diabetes Surgery Summit (DSS) - where an international group of more than 50 scientific and medical experts agreed on a set of evidence-based guidelines and definitions that are meant to guide the use and study of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes. The document is considered to be the foundation of diabetes surgery as a medical discipline of its own.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2009

Nutrisystem Steps Up to Help Stop Diabetes with $100,000 Pledge

HORSHAM, Pa.-- (BUSINESS WIRE)--Nutrisystem, Inc. (NASDQ: NTRI), a leading developer of weight loss products and services, today announced its company-wide support for the recently launched Stop DiabetesSM  movement from the American Diabetes Association. On the heels of the successful launch of Nutrisystem D, its program designed to help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight, Nutrisystem has implemented a $5.00 contribution for every person who shares their story on the American Diabetes Association's Stop Diabetes website, up to $100,000 through December 31, 2009.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

Food Insulin Index Predicts Insulin Demand of Mixed Meals

Dr. Jennie C. Brand-Miller, from the University of Sydney stated that, "The food insulin index (FII) may provide a better way to adjust insulin dose in Type 1 diabetes.... In time, it may also enable us to design diets to prevent diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

New Accu-Chek Diabetes Link Launched

The official site launch for Accu-Chek Diabetes Link Canada was Monday November 16, and is the first of many proposed sites being developed by Roche to link people with diabetes to various resources.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2009

Portion Distortion: Take Charge!

We hear it all the time, from the diet ads on television to the lectures from our doctors and dietitians.  What matters is not only what you eat, but also how much you eat.   But how can you control your portions?  Is it possible to have a healthy relationship with food?  How can you make sure you are full, but not stuffed? Can you keep your blood sugars under control?  The answer to all these questions is yes! 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2009

The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years, diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. A Greek by the name of Aretaeus described its destructive nature in the first century AD, naming the affliction "diabetes," the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold, in his text "Aretaeus the Cappodacian," described Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain, and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body, while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2009

Cranberry Sauce Alternatives: Ditch the Can (and the Sugar)!

CRANBERRY CHUTNEY       Every year during the holidays, I make cranberry chutney to serve with turkey. Chutneys combine vinegar with sugar for a balance of sweet and sour flavors, but this one also has a touch of heat from red pepper flakes, along with a lovely hint of orange.  Make another batch or use leftover chutney as a great spread for cold turkey sandwiches. This chutney also really dresses up pork tenderloin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 23, 2009

Q & A: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have  type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

New GoMeals

Bridgewater, NJ, November 19, 2009 - Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today that GoMealsTM, a new iPhone application (app) designed to help people living with diabetes make healthy food choices, is now available for download at the iTunes App store.  GoMealsTM is a food tracking tool which allows users to search thousands of foods and dishes from popular restaurants and grocery stores to easily see the nutritional content of meals and snacks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

In patients on statins, raising good cholesterol with niacin (Niaspan), but not reducing bad cholesterol with ezetimibe (Zetia), decreases plaque build-up

ORLANDO, Fla. Nov. 16, 2009 - In combination with statins, adding a medication that raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was more effective in reversing artery wall plaque buildup and in reducing heart disease risk than adding a drug that lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, researchers reported today at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 19, 2009

The Affordable Health Care for America Act Passed

Whew! We received a landslide of comments recently when we published an article called Demand Health Care Reform Now! Some people complained that politics should stay out of our publication. Unfortunately, healthcare is a political issue, and we at Diabetes Health are interested in healthcare. We believe that healthcare should not be tied to employment and should be available to all, regardless of how healthy or wealthy they are. As always, though, we encourage dialog and welcome all points of view. Please keep telling us what you think.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2009

Parade Magazine's Ad Linking Gastric Banding to Type 2 Control: Opening a Campaign for a New Means of Treating Diabetes?

An ad in the November 15, 2009, edition of Parade magazine may be the opening salvo in a campaign to push adjustable gastric bands as a weight loss aid to help overweight type 2s dramatically improve their symptoms or even go into remission.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2009

FDA Gives the Nod to New BGM System From ARKRAY

The Food and Drug Administration has given ARKRAY, Inc., a 510(k)* clearance to begin marketing its new GLUCOCARD® VitalTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2009

Genetic Information and Discrimination

The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was signed into law by former President George W. Bush on May 21, 2008, and is set to become effective Nov. 21, 2009. The law covers all employers with 15 or more employees. It prohibits employers from considering a person's genetic background in promotions, hiring, or firing. It also prohibits health insurers from using genetic information to deny coverage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2009

Endocrinologists Recommend Describing Dramatic Reversals of Diabetes Symptoms As

How careful should healthcare workers and patients be in describing a total remission of diabetes as a "cure?" That's a question that has taken on increasing urgency in the wake of reports about dramatic reversals of type 2 symptoms after gastric bypass surgery and the cessation of symptoms in people with type 1 diabetes after pancreatic islet replacement. To answer it, a group of endocrinologists met earlier this year to come up with descriptions and definitions that accurately describe what happens when people with diabetes experience a reversal of symptoms.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2009

Secretary Sebelius Releases New Report on Health Insurance Reform and Diabetes in America

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As the nation marks American Diabetes Month, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius released a new report today, Preventing and Treating Diabetes: Health Insurance Reform and Diabetes in America. The report comes one day after Sebelius toured the East Manatee Family Healthcare Center in Bradenton, Fla. At the center, Sebelius met with patients and Floridians who care for people with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2009

World Diabetes Day Is This Saturday, November 14, 2009

World Diabetes Day is a global awareness campaign that's celebrated every year on November 14. The goal is to encourage action to further the prevention, treatment, and care of diabetes, as well as to support the United Nations Resolution on Diabetes. Landmarks and monuments across the world are lit in blue to create a united voice for diabetes awareness, and diabetes events are held around the globe. As of Monday evening, November 9, the World Diabetes Day website reports that 366 registered diabetes events are scheduled for November 14th, in countries ranging from Saudi Arabia to Argentina to Morocco. In addition, 623 monuments are being lit in blue around the globe. More are sure to be added to the list as the day draws closer and closer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 12, 2009

To Heal Diabetic Foot Ulcers, A New Drug Harnesses Stem Cells Inside Us All

Princeton, NJ - November 10, 2009 -- Diabetic foot ulcers are the primary cause of hospital admissions for diabetics. Foot ulcers that heal improperly are at risk for infection, which can lead to amputation.  According to the American Diabetes Association, one in four patients with diabetic foot ulcers will eventually require lower-limb amputation.  Now science has found a way of mobilizing stem cells within the body to treat this health issue, which affects more than three million Americans annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2009

Dear Medical Health Professional,

When I was a child, my mother always said, "Think before you speak." Have you heard of this before? If not, please digest my words. If you have heard of this simple yet beneficial policy, please reconsider its merit and then implement it into your practice.

comments 34 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

AACE Releases New Algorithm for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the College of Endocrinology (ACE) released online a one-page resource for physicians and healthcare providers for the management of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

More Employers Turning to UnitedHealthcare's Diabetes Health Plan to Help Improve Health, Control Costs

MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Employers are signing up for a first-of-its-kind health plan by UnitedHealthcare designed to help control the escalating costs of insuring diabetic and pre-diabetic employees and their families while improving their health.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

Reeling from Your Recent Diabetes Diagnosis? Read This Book!

I recently ran into Theresa Garnero at the California AADE annual meeting and discovered that Diabetes Health had not yet reviewed her book, Your First Year with Diabetes: What To Do, Month By Month. We regret the oversight because it's a great resource for anyone dealing with the shock of a diabetes diagnosis. And Garnero is the perfect author for a book like this. She's an award-winning certified diabetes educator (CDE) and advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) with board certification in advanced diabetes management (BC-ADM), and she earned an Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). She is also a former national educator of the year, a cartoonist, and the 2008 global recipient of Inspired by Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2009

Next Generation Blood Glucose Meters

Fingertip blood-oxygen monitors, called pulse oximeters, measure oxygen in the blood using light and color. The noninvasive device, which clips onto a fingertip or earlobe, typically has a pair of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) facing a sensor. Light of a certain wavelength (a certain color) travels through a translucent part of the body like the fingertip or an earlobe, and is picked up by the sensor. The amount of oxygen in the blood (actually, oxygenated hemoglobin) affects how much light from each diode finally makes it through the finger and reaches the sensor. The result is an effective measurement of the amount of oxygen in the blood.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2009

If You've Taken Zetia or Vytorin, There Might Be $$ Headed Your Way

If you bought Vytorin® and/or Zetia® to lower your cholesterol between November 1, 2002, and September 17, 2009, you may be entitled to some money. A lawsuit against Merck & Co., Inc., Schering-Plough Corporation, Merck/Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals, and other defendants has reached a proposed settlement in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. The lawsuit, according to vytorinzetiasettlement.com (the authorized website for the settlement), claims that Vytorin and Zetia "were marketed as being more effective than other anti-cholesterol drugs and were sold at higher prices, when they were no more effective than less expensive anti-cholesterol drugs". The defendants, according to the website, "deny any wrongdoing and are settling this lawsuit to avoid the costs and expenses of further litigation."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2009

Demand Health Care Reform Now!

Congress is getting a little bit closer to making the changes to the health care system we've been dreaming about for a very long time. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says these changes could provide a real benefit to people with diabetes. Draft health care reform bills have now passed through the committee process in both the House and the Senate.

comments 27 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2009

Preventing Type 2 in Europe: An Interview with Dr. Peter Schwarz

Professor Peter Schwartz, MD, is a very busy man in the European diabetes community. He's a professor of medicine, a scientist, and a medical doctor in the Division of Prevention and Care of Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Dresden. It's a mystery how he finds enough hours in the day to do what he does. Diabetes Health recently interviewed him via email since he lives and works in Dresden, Germany.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2009

Notes from the California AADE Meeting

The California Association of American Diabetes Educators held its second annual meeting October 22 through 24, 2009, in Monterey, California, and Diabetes Health was there. The clinical and educational program, put together by Debra Norman and Kim Higgins, was called "Tidal Wave of Diabetes."  The invited speakers shared innovation, research, and new techniques with the attendees.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2009

October 2009

Sex and Diabetes: Lubes and Libido

Dear Diabetes Health, Hello!  I am 60 years old and have had type one for about 24 years. It has been quite some time since I had a relationship, and now I have one coming at me.  The problem is, I am very dry. The commercially sold products don't seem to help,  and Intercourse isn't comfortable. What do you recommend that I try?  And what about a libido enhancer?  I need this relationship to work because living alone is tough, and my partner likes his intimacy.  Please!!!

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2009

Qualitest Pharmaceuticals Issues a Voluntary Nationwide Recall of All Accusure® Insulin Syringes

October 27, 2009 - Huntsville AL-Qualitest Pharmaceuticals today issued a voluntary nationwide recall of all Accusure® Insulin Syringes. The distributed syringes are of the following descriptions and NDC numbers: 28G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-6995-21;28G 1cc, NDC 0603-6996-21; 29G 1/2cc NDC 0603-6997-21, 29G 1cc, NDC 0603-6998-21, 30G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-999-21, 30G 1cc, NDC 0603-7000-21, 31G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-7001-21; and 31G 1cc, NDC 0603-7002-21. All Accusure® Insulin Syringes regardless of lot number are subject to this recall. These syringes were distributed between January 2002 and October 2009 to wholesale and retail pharmacies nationwide (including Puerto Rico). The syringes in these lots may have needles which detach from the syringe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

Study Shows Resolution of Type 2 Diabetes in Morbidly Obese Patients; Data Published in Annals of Surgery

LEXINGTON, Mass., October 27, 2009 - GI Dynamics, a leader in non-surgical treatments for type 2 diabetes and obesity, today announced data which support the safety and efficacy of the EndoBarrierTM Gastrointestinal Liner for pre-surgical weight loss treatment, along with a positive effect on glucose homeostasis in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to the study, mean excess weight loss (EWL) achieved after 12 weeks post implantation was 19.0 % for EndoBarrier patients versus 6.9 % for control patients (p<0.002).  The results of this European weight loss study were published today in the advance online publication of Annals of Surgery.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

While the relationship between Alzheimer's and diabetes is far from clear, there does seem to be an interesting connection. And that connection just became a little more complicated according