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Diabetes Complications & Care Article Archives

September 2014

Research Says It’s Okay To Go Nuts Since Tree Nuts Might Help Lower Cholesterol and Glucose Levels

According to a new study, those who regularly eat tree nuts including almonds, cashews, walnuts, pistachios and chestnuts have lower triglyceride levels (less fat in the blood), as well as lower blood glucose levels compared to those in the control group that did not eat nuts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2014

Diabetes Health: What You Need for Injections Crossword Puzzle Solution for #18

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2014

August 2014

Diabetes Health: What You Need for Injections Crossword Puzzle #18

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand what you need for injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 31, 2014

Latest Otelixizumab Study Showed No Beta Cell Benefits

Low doses of the GlaxoSmithKline drug otelixizumab did not preserve the function of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in those newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, according to recent research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2014

‘Smart’ Wound-Care Technology Reduces Costs By More Than 30%

Study finds self-adapting dressing significantly reduces cost of care while providing better clinical outcomes and simplifying wound-care procedures.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2014

Diabetes Health: Foot Care and Complications Crossword Puzzle Solution for #17

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2014

Diabetes Health: Foot Care and Complications Crossword Puzzle #17

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand Foot Care and Complications .

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2014

Women: Take Charge!

How many women sit in the CEO seat? The number is growing, but not nearly equal to that of men. There may be many reasons for this, and one of the possible explanations may be that some women believe that being “assertive” or “aggressive” are traits that are not “likeable” and inconsistent with how they want to be seen. As women, in both our personal and professional life, we need to worry less about what other people think of us and more about what we need. When it comes to our diabetes, we need to be our own Chief Executive Officer – and for some of us, we may need to step out of our comfort zones to get the care we need.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 23, 2014

Genteel: A Pain Free Lancing Instrument

All Dr. Christopher Jacobs’ friend wanted a lancing device that didn’t cause pain.  And after hearing the longtime type 1 diabetic lament the discomfort he felt from the many finger pricks required to test his blood glucose levels, Jacobs was intrigued by the challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2014

Insulin Pumps: Myths And Reality

I don't come to praise insulin pumps, and I don't come to bury them. Instead, I am here to tell the truth, from my experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2014

Dompé Earns Orphan Drug

An Italian-based pharmaceutical company with subsidiaries in New York has been granted orphan drug status for a new drug to treat neurotrophic keratitis, a rare degenerative corneal disease that impacts less than 1 in 5,000 people worldwide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2014

Researching the Cure Beyond The Mouse

For most of us with diabetes, diabetes cure research can feel like it's moving at a glacial pace. If you're a mouse, it's probably pretty exciting, considering researchers are discovering new ways to cure you almost every day. But what progress is being made in curing this disease? Is anyone moving beyond the lab rats and into people living with diabetes? The good news is yes, and there are a lot of people working on finding a cure, and many of them have started or will be starting clinical research in humans soon.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2014

Newly Discovered Virus Linked To Obesity

If you thought your obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnoses were genetic “gifts” from your family, it could be a virus instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #16

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Diabetes Health: Diabetes Symptoms Crossword Puzzle #16

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand Diabetes Symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2014

Carrying a Pancreas Outside My Body

One of the pluses of having a working pancreas is that you do not often lose it. The organ just comes along for the ride, as it were, safe inside your abdomen.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2014

New Device Spots Early Signs Of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, a common side effect of diabetes that is linked to a wide range of complications including digestive issues, erectile dysfunction, paralysis of the bladder and intestinal damage, is not only difficult to treat, it’s also difficult to diagnose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2014

For Diabetics And Their Devices, The Present Is Never Enough

Type 1 diabetics seem to always be living in a transitional phase. The technology we have currently is always about to be replaced with newer, better, fresher technology, It's exciting on one hand and exhausting on the other.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2014

Study Found Blood Sugar Levels Not Affected by Sucralose-sweetened Desserts

While there has been much debate recently about the impact of artificial sweeteners on diabetes, a new study finds that desserts sweetened with sucralose don’t impact blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #15

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2014

Diabetes Health: CGM Crossword Puzzle #15

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand CGM terms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2014

FDA Lifts Restrictions on Patient Access to Avandia

The type 2-diabetes drug Avandia will again be available through retail pharmacies after a May ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2014

Death Risk Higher in Polytrauma Cases for People With Diabetes

Having diabetes increases the risk of complications or death in cases where patients have suffered polytrauma compared with patients who don't have any history of medical comorbidities. (Comorbidities are defined as the simultaneous presence of two chronic diseases in a patient.) Polytrauma is defined as multiple injuries to the body or organs where at least one is life-threatening and exacerbated by the trauma of the other injuries. Such injuries usually occur in situations where the likelihood of substantial injury is high---falls, auto accidents, violent crimes, industrial accidents.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 5, 2014

Diabetes Health: Insulin Pump Crossword Puzzle #14

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand insulin pump terms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2014

Insulin pumps lead to lower A1C levels for insulin-dependent type 2s

Insulin pumps can be as beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes that require insulin as they have become for those with type 1, according to a new trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2014

Weekly Dulaglutide Performs Well in Comparison to Daily Liraglutide

A comparison of the effects on A1c between users of once-weekly dulaglutide (made by Eli Lilly and Company) and once-daily liraglutide (sold as Victoza from Novo Nordisk) shows that both drugs have very similar effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2014

July 2014

Those with diabetes are more likely to develop head and neck cancers, research shows

While experts have long noted that those with diabetes have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular issues, a new study shows the risk of head and neck cancers is also higher for diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2014

USDA Announces $78 Million Available for Local Food Enterprises

The local food movement was given a big boost earlier this month with the announcement that the USDA has plans to invest $78 million into local and regional food enterprises.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #13

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Diabetes Health: Terms Used to Describe People With Diabetes for Crossword Puzzle #13

Test your knowledge to see how well you know terms used to describe people with diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2014

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Insulin Device to U.S. Market

Novo Nordisk has introduced the Levemir® FlexTouch® prefilled insulin delivery device to the U.S. market. The device, filled with insulin detemir [rDNA origin], the first of its kind that does not use a pushbutton extension. In a conventional insulin delivery device, a pushbutton extends out from the device. If the called-for dose is large, an extension may cause problems for the user.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2014

How Do You Stay So Positive?

My class was discussing why we cannot just do pancreas transplants so we can cure diabetes,” said a dear friend that volunteers for me at work. It is a lot more complicated than that, sadly. I was touched that he and his college classmates were discussing ways to cure us. As we chatted about the challenges of diabetes and our wishes for a cure, a few other volunteers gathered. When they heard me mention that I have had Type 1 diabetes for twenty years and that I take 5 – 7 injections a day to stay alive and healthy, they all looked shocked and a silence fell over the group. My volunteer said “Wow, how do you stay so positive”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2014

A Primer on Gluten for Celiac Awareness Month

Many people first became aware of how dangerous a slice of bread could be for those with celiac disease when “The View” co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck shared her personal experiences with the genetic autoimmune disorder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2014

Type 2 Drug Slashes Dementia Risk

A new study has surprising implications for a generic diabetes drug. Pioglitazone, which is often prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes, also appears to reduce the risk of developing dementia. The drug was not studied specifically to see if cut the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Instead, researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases combed through a giant database of German health care records. They looked at information from 2004 to 2010, with a gigantic group of subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2014

Actress S. Epatha Merkerson Brings Order to Her Diabetes

Award winning S. Epatha Merkerson, Television, film and stage actress, brings a new order to her diabetes management: Get to Your Goals Program, which encourages people with type 2 diabetes to know their A1C, set a goal and take action.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2014

Mixed Martial Arts Reveals Hidden Strengths After Type 1 Diagnosis

Rob Cooper isn’t one to shy away from a challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2014

Diabetes Health: Oral Health and Dental Terms Crossword Puzzle #12

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand Oral Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2014

U.S. News & World Report Lists Best U.S. Hospitals for Diabetes

News magazine U.S. News & World Report has published a list of the top 10 American hospitals for treating diabetes and delivering endocrinological care.


comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2014

Key Steps in Diabetes Care

Living with diabetes means you need to take extra care to stay healthy. The good news is that even small changes in your lifestyle and habits can make a big difference in managing your blood sugar, staying healthy, and preventing complications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 18, 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

The Invisible Elephant in the Room

Diabetes is the invisible elephant in my room on a regular basis. As a type 1 diabetic, I think about it frequently even if my friends, family, doctors, and the people I encounter daily don’t see it. While diabetes truly is an invisible illness, my blood sugars affect everything I do or even think about doing. My diabetes elephant is there all the time. That elephant does not take days off or breaks. So when such an important medical issue goes unnoticed by a doctor after a lengthy visit, I see a red flag.

comments 18 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2014

Innovative Program: Offers People with Diabetes the Power to Improve Their Own Health

For most people with type 2 diabetes, successful outcomes of the disease usually rely more on living a healthy lifestyle, rather than a medicine chest of prescription drugs. Because it is such a self-managed disease, several high-profile groups are collaborating to create a new kind of the support group to help people stay on track and better manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2014

A Message From Dr. Polonsky

After reading new comments on an article we posted many years ago- http://diabeteshealth.com/read/2014/05/30/212/suicide-rate-in-men-with-type-1/?isComment=1#comments.  I felt compelled to write something-http://diabeteshealth.com/read/2014/06/06/8271/taken-hostage-by-your-thoughts/?isComment=1 - comments and reach out to an inspiring behavioral Doctor who has spent decades helping patients cope with the emotional aspect of diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2014

Diabetes Health: Endocrine Crossword Puzzle Solution for #10

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2014

Diabetes Health: Endocrine Theme for Crossword Puzzle #10

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand the Endocrine Glands.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2014

After 50 years, type 1 Suzi Vietti Has Mastered Her Disease

One thing most people who know 63-year-old Suzi Vietti should realize by now is that saying, “never” to her is like issuing a double-dog dare, and it might be one of her most detested words, given the number of times she has heard it.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2014

Fewer Hypoglycemic Episodes With One Insulin in Head-to-Head Comparison

A recently completed study that compared two types of insulin for treating inadequately controlled type 2 patients showed that insulin degludec/insulin aspart produced fewer instances of hypoglycemia than biphasic insulin aspart 30.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2014

Teen Energy Sports Drink Consumption: linked to Other Bad habits

Most studies targeting teen beverage consumption focus on sugar-laced sodas, but researchers say adolescents are also drinking many sports drinks and energy drinks, both of which had been linked to other unhealthy habits. According to the results of a new study from Minnesota, teen consumption of sports and energy drinks can lead to more physical activity. It also has been linked to increased consumption of other sugared beverages, cigarette smoking, more time spent playing video games and social media sites.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2014

June 2014

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins: Has A Slam Dunk Formula for Diabetes

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins, affectionately known as “The Human Highlight Film” has a few coaching tips for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #9

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2014

Diabetes Health: Optical Theme for Crossword Puzzle #9

Test your knowledge to see how well you understand the different eye conditions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2014

Embryonic Cloning Takes Step Toward Treating Diabetes

For more than 100 years, scientists have been exploring the possibilities of cloning, which led to the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996 along with a wealth of other developments in the treatment of disease, including the recent embryonic cloning of a woman with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2014

Belly Fat Linked to Metabolic Diseases in Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2014

High Birth Weights Could Put Babies at Risk Later On

Weight matters. Through all the research and studies, diseases and treatments, those two words possess a simple truth. The heavier people are, the more challenges they face in remaining healthy. The thinner we are, the more options we have to stay active and engaged in the world around us.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2014

Low-carb, Vegan Diet Offers Benefits

The public perception of low-carbohydrate diets often involves mounds of bacon, piles of steaks and rivers of cheese. After all, when the Atkins Diet swept the country more than a decade ago, that was one of the ways people described it to their friends -- and one of the ways that critics tried to define it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 23, 2014

Recession May Have Worsened Obesity

According to a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Great Recession that began in 2008 may have worsened obesity rates in developed nations, including some groups in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2014

Cheers to 20 Years

I recently noticed these faint little crinkle lines at the outer corners of my eyes when I smile. They aren't deep yet, but they're ever so slightly starting to emerge. The funny thing is that I don't hate them. In fact, I'm kind of proud of them. They are proof that I laugh a lot. I realize that a lot of women are trying to get rid of these little signs of aging, though I think there are a lot of good things that come with age. I believe some of the best things about a person, is the life experiences they've had and the lessons that come along with them. I'm turning 38 this month. My diabetes is turning 20. Here are some things about my diabetes that have really gotten better with age.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2014

Health Awareness vs Weight Conscious

There's a lot of focus on weight loss as of late; not only in the diabetic community, but in the world in general. New ads for gyms and products claiming fast weight loss come out daily, women feel pressured to lose pregnancy weight within minutes from birthing their children, thin models are being airbrushed until they are nearly unrecognizable and diets are being undertaken without people understanding how/why/if it's really going to be effective. Some of my own friends are chronically doing near-starvation diets to shed weight. People seem to be focused on getting the fat off, but unless long term habits are improved, it's not going to stay off. It's great to fight the obesity epidemic, but we can't allow ourselves to go to the other extreme. Carrying excess weight isn't a good thing, but I think we're losing focus on the importance of health versus aesthetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2014

A New Definition for Obesity?

Two groups are proposing a new definition of obesity that considers factors beyond body mass index.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2014

Handful of Foods Contribute to High Levels of Fat and Sodium in Kids' Diets

Most kids are eating too much fat and too much sodium, which can set the stage for a lifetime of unhealthy eating, experts say.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 14, 2014

Life With Type 2: When You Know More Than Your Doctor

I got the bad news about having type 2 one summer day in 2003 from my doctor, a very popular general practitioner with a large practice. He didn't mince words: "You have diabetes."

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2014

Why A Diabetes Camp?

After every show, Bret Michaels auctions his shirt and hat to the highest bidders.  A recent show in Maryland, raised more than $3,000. The money goes to his foundation that sends children to diabetes camps for a week at no cost to the family.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 11, 2014

Diabetes Complications Worsen Outcomes in Foot, Ankle Surgery

Complications from diabetes increase the risk of infection after foot or ankle surgery, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2014

Half of Those With Disabilities Are Inactive

Half of those who are disabled aren't getting the recommended amount of heart-healthy aerobic activity, and it's putting their health at risk, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2014

Taken Hostage by Your Thoughts

Many people go through times when hopelessness takes them hostage. Drudgery and hardship engulf them on a daily basis. Suicidal thoughts start creeping in. The only relief they can imagine is ending their life, quickly. They feel they can no longer bear their imprisonment. Then their mind drifts to family and friends, and to the pain their suicide may cause. The question becomes, should they continue to live in pain and hopelessness? Or do they commit suicide and create unbearable pain for their loved ones?

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2014

Diabetes and Family Bonds

Diabetes is a disease that has affected my family and me even before I was born. This chronic ailment has put my family through some scary times. Times that no one should have to face. Diseases like these affect far too many people of all ages. Seeing a loved one suffer and feeling completely helpless by not being able to take their pain away is the most disheartening experience anyone can go through. Sadly, this is a feeling I know all too well.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2014

Saving $20,000 With A Simple Foot Checkup

People with diabetes should know that taking care of their feet is crucial. The problems caused by losing sensation or circulation in the feet and legs -- both well-known complications of the disease -- can be severe. But it's not just a matter of avoiding ulcers or amputations, medical experts say. It's also a matter of dollars and cents.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2014

The Invisible Elephant In The Room

Diabetes is the invisible elephant in my room on a regular basis. As a type 1 diabetic, I think about it frequently even if my friends, family, doctors, and the people I encounter daily don’t see it. While diabetes truly is an invisible illness, my blood sugars affect everything I do or even think about doing. My diabetes elephant is there all the time. That elephant doesn’t take days off or breaks. So when such an important medical issue goes unnoticed by a doctor after a lengthy visit, I see a red flag.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2014

May 2014

Media May Influence Decisions Doctors Make

Few of us are immune to media influence, and doctors are no exception.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2014

Suicide Rate in Men with Type 1

The National Institute for Health (NIH) reports that people with diabetes who suffer from depression, are at a higher risk, in experiencing extreme symptoms from their diabetes.

comments 26 comments - Posted May 30, 2014

Ousting Tobacco: After CVS Announcement, Push Intensifies to Ban Pharmacy Cigarettes Sales

When pharmacy giant CVS Caremark recently announced that it would cease selling tobacco products in its 7,600 stores as of October 1, it was talking about a significant piece of change: Estimates of CVS's current tobacco sales range from $1.5 billion to $2 billion, constituting about 1.6 to 3 percent of its earnings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2014

Solution to Crossword Puzzle #4

Solution to diabeteshealth.com-crossword puzzle #4
If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write"create my special puzzle.". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzles.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2014

FDA Delays Decision on Inhaled Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has delayed until July 15th making a decision on whether to allow the inhaled insulin Afrezza entry into the American market.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 24, 2014

8 Heath Tests That Are a Must

As diabetics, it's easy for all of us to get caught up in the day-to-day management of our disease. After all, the regular monitoring of blood sugar, the injection or pumping of insulin, and the management of diet takes serious time and effort. So no wonder why you may feel overwhelmed when it comes to taking regular tests.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2014

Diabetes Health: crossword puzzle #3

Here is something new at Diabetes Health -a crossword puzzle. This 3rd crossword puzzle should be easy for the veterans with diabetes (Everyone will be challenged at one point or another.)

comments 2 comments - Posted May 18, 2014

Belly Fat Linked To Metabolic Diseases In Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2014

No Such Thing as ‘Healthy' Obesity, Study Says

While the last few years have sparked debate over whether those who are overweight or obese can still be classified as healthy, a new study seems to put the issue to rest.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2014

Obesity Risk Tied to Certain Demographics Who Drink Sugary Beverages

Although many of us are learning more about the dangers of sugary beverages - which have been linked to rising cases of obesity and increased rates of type 2 diabetes - there are some groups who seem to have not "gotten the memo."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 15, 2014

Life With Type 2: Science Catches Up to Our Experiences

Scientists will tell you that they don't consider anecdotes-personal stories about something-to be evidence that establishes a fact. Say you have 10 people swear they've been abducted by aliens, and all of their descriptions of the kidnapers match. That still wouldn't be enough for scientists to declare that aliens are real.
It would take other types of evidence, not just word of mouth, for the actual existence of aliens to be accepted as a plausible explanation for people's reported disappearances.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 14, 2014

Solution to Crossword Puzzle #2

Solution to diabeteshealth.com-crossword puzzle #2

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2014

Warning: Be Careful When Mixing Prescriptions

Two years ago a Wisconsin man hospitalized for pneumonia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and prescribed 100 mg of Januvia, one of the common oral medications used for treatment. A month later, he was back in the hospital complaining about stomach pain and worried something else was wrong.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 12, 2014

CDC Reports Decline of Diabetes-Related Complications

While new cases of type 2 diabetes are rising rapidly, recent research shows that complications from the disease are on the decline.
Research compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that over a 20-year period, rates of the five major complications associated with diabetes - heart attack, stroke, end-stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation and deaths from hyperglycemia - all saw drastic declines.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 9, 2014

Who Are You Modeling Your Health Habits After?

My mother was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 53. Unfortunately, she passed away from diabetes complications at 65. Of course this was because she did not take care of her blood sugars. Her A1C hovered around 10. It was so frustrating trying to help her. I remember traveling the full emotional scale as her caretaker, desperately trying to show her how to experience normal blood sugars.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 7, 2014

Solution to Crossword Puzzle #1

Solution to diabeteshealth.com-crossword puzzle #1

comments 0 comments - Posted May 5, 2014

April 2014

Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: How Serious Is It?

While three decades ago it was rare for a child or teen to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, today, the American Medical Association (AMA) estimates that there are about 3,700 new cases a year among youth in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2014

Adults with Diabetes and the Risk of Seasonal Influenza

If you have diabetes, the flu can be particularly risky.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2014

You Can’t Bring Your Supplies to Prison

If you’ve been reading my articles for a while, you may remember that my oldest son has drug addiction issues-http://diabeteshealth.com/read/2011/07/10/7206/a-brand-new-bottle-of-my-insulin-went-missing/.  We have tried everything to keep him on the right path.  Sadly, his path ended him in prison.  While I’m devastated on one hand, I’m grateful on the other.  He is safer there than on the street because he is not on drugs.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2014

Why We Need Endrocinologists

As diabetics, we have a funny attitude toward Endocrinologists. We're so familiar with our diseases that we feel we don't really need them to manage things on a daily basis, and yet we do need them since we can't write our own prescriptions for medications. 

Once we know as much as doctors -- or sometimes even more -- we become frustrated with the tedious process of seeing them every three months for an obligatory progress report. Though it pains me to say this, as much as we feel we don't need to see doctors, they are essential to our overall well being.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2014

420: Cannabis Observance Day and Diabetes

If you are unfamiliar with the code language 420, it's a sub-culture of people who observe and describe themselves as cannabis users. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2014

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Reducing Alzheimer's Disease

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that as many as half of all Americans who are alive today will end their lives in nursing homes, although it won’t be because their bodies cease to function, but because of their brains.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 16, 2014

Risk of Kidney Failure in Diabetics Nearly Doubles with Major Depression

If you have type 2 diabetes and also suffer from depression, you may want to keep an even closer eye on your kidney health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2014

Airfeet Insoles Can Ease the Pain of Diabetic Neuropathy

When the founder of AirFeet insoles was forced to switch jobs after years of brutalizing his body doing construction work, he needed a new path, and his aching back and feet led the way.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2014

Wound Covering Requires Less Tissue to Produce Effective Results

MUNDELEIN, Ill. (BUSINESS WIRE)-Diabetic foot complications are the largest non-traumatic cause of lower extremity amputations, accounting for nearly 90,000 amputations a year, at a cost of nearly $40,000 per procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2014

Diabetes and Arthritis: a Challenging Combination

For older adults dealing with type 2 diabetes, co-occurring physical problems can make disease management and healthy living a challenge. One of those most challenging-and common- diagnoses is arthritis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2014

Life With Type 2: The Power of Naming

This is not a religious essay, so please don't take the example below wrong.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2014

Obesity & Insulin Resistance

A University of Sao Paulo study of 135 individuals, half with normal weight and the other half obese, suggests there is a link between obesity and the body's inability to use insulin-insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2014

Dollars & Feet

A study published by the American Diabetes Association says Medicare pays an average of $11,170 for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers while private insurance doles out $16,883 for the same procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2014

Why We Need Them

Endocrinologists are in a funny position when it comes to people with diabetes. We spend so much time with our diseases that we don't really need them to manage things on a daily basis, but we can't write our prescriptions on our own. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2014

Sizing Up Gen X

Australia's Generation X population is twice as likely to have developed type 2 diabetes by a certain as baby boomers had at the same age. A national health survey looked at the Gen X population born between 1966 and 1980 and compared its weight and diet to baby boomers born between 1946-1965. The survey found the rate of obesity was 50 percent higher in Gen X.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2014

Statin Stats

A British study of 46,262 people concludes that statin side-effects are minimal. Of all the statins reviewed, rosuvastatin (Crestor) was found to be the most efficient at raising HDL (good cholesterol) levels while fluvastatin was the least likely to cause muscle pain, a common symptom of statin use. Only one in five of the side effects in the test group was caused by statins.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2014

March 2014

Text Messages Can Stop Type 2 Diabetes

Regular, health-focused text messages can prevent type 2 diabetes, according to new research out of India.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2014

Research Examines Damage to Hand Function in Type 2s

Damage to hands is not commonly associated with type 2 diabetes. We tend to think of the harm the disease does to feet and legs. But new research from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance found impairments in dexterity and sensory function in the hands of type 2 diabetes patients. The study marks the first time such results have been documented in that population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2014

Do We Really Need Statins?

Ten years ago, I was asked by my endocrinologist to begin using statins to lower my cholesterol. I was barely over 20 years of age and was afraid of possible side or long-term effects. I was nervous about adding yet another drug to my list of daily medications, so I told him I would consider it and went home feeling like a medical disaster. Hello, diabetes complications: We meet again.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 22, 2014

Another Blow to the "Saturated Fat Is Bad" School of Thought

Research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and reported on by The New York Times, says that sugary foods and excess carbohydrates, not saturated fat, are the main culprits in the build-up of artery-clogging particles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2014

Both High and Low A1c's Implicated in Longer Hospital Stays

An interesting study out of Brigham and Women's hospital in Boston ties poor glycemic control--defined as an A1c of 8% or more--to longer hospital stays for non-cardiac surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2014

Moving Target

So, what is it that affects my glucose levels and why is it so hard to manage diabetes? In this case, we're talking type 1 diabetes; mine seems to be extremely stubborn and "brittle" by nature. Honestly, sometimes balancing this chronic condition is downright exhausting. Some days it's a scientific equation, weighed and measured, a standard protocol. Other days, it's a roller coaster, a compounding tidal wave, a boxing match.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2014

Marijuana May Help Blood Sugar Control, Study Says

For residents of Colorado and Washington state, 2014 brought a profound legal and societal change. Marijuana is now available, legally, in both of those states. While the drug is cleared for medical use elsewhere, and other jurisdictions have decriminalized it, these two states have taken the profound, extra step of full legalization.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2014

Celebrating 30 years of the DCCT: Part 2

Three decades ago, the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Study was just beginning. To mark the anniversary of the most important advancement in diabetes care in most of our lifetimes, I've been recalling how the study came about and what it revealed. In short, the DCCT proved the tight control of type 1 diabetes not only was an achievable goal, but that it prevented or delayed complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2014

Celebrating 30 Years of the DCCT: Part 1

What do three decades mean to you? In absolute terms, 30 years is a serious amount of time. If you're under the age of 40, for example, it's the vast majority of your life. But in the world of medical research, where studies can take many years to complete--and even longer to affect everyday practice--three decades can go by surprisingly quickly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2014

57% of Type 1s Expect a Cure by 2024

New York, NY (PRWEB)--More than half of people who have type 1 diabetes or have a family member or close friend with the disease expect a cure to be found in the next 10 years, according to a semi-annual survey conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2014

McKesson’s Build a Buddy Program Helps Kids With Diabetes Feel Less Alone

For children newly diagnosed with diabetes, the world can suddenly seem a rather solitary place.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2014

Mouth Spray Could Aid Weight Loss

Few things are better for us or more difficult to sustain than losing weight. Whatever the cause--genetics, environment, our own bad choices--human bodies can be easily turned into sugar-craving machines. Turning our bodies from that course is easy enough for a week or three, but sustaining weight loss over many months and years is notoriously difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2014

The Trouble with Sight

I'm both eager and nervous as I walk through the office doors to my optometrist. I'm kiddishly excited because I'm getting a new pair of frames, which will replace last year's already well used and scuffed glasses. But, I'm also anxious because I will have to face the results of a difficult year in diabetes management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2014

FDA Backtracks Over GLP-1s' Effects on Pancreas

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that its review of various animal and human studies does not show a link between GLP-1 drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes and pancreatic maladies, including acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2014

Who Are You? The Importance of Medical Alert IDs

All of us who live with diabetes carry around a quiet dread, one that most of us keep way in the back of our minds: Suffering a hypoglycemic episode or being involved in an accident where we cannot communicate our diabetic status to rescuers or passerby.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2014

February 2014

Travel: Getting Comfortable Outside Your Comfort Zone

If there's a common word people with diabetes use when their blood sugar drops or goes high, it's "routine"--as in, "Whenever I get away from my routine, that's when I get into trouble." For most of us, traveling isn't part of our routine, so here are some suggestions to find that sought-after balance between "getting away" and "staying OK."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2014

Insulin Injection Port Reaches U.S. Market

Medtronic, Inc. has introduced the i-port Advance®, an FDA-cleared injection port device for people with diabetes, to the U.S. market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2014

Bariatric Surgery Shows Significant Effect on Obese Type 1s

Here's a development to keep your eye on: Bariatric surgery performed on a small group of morbidly obese type 1s led to considerable weight loss, improved glycemic control, and improved metabolic profiles up to three years later.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 25, 2014

Weekly Potpourri

Blame The Media

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2014

12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes

Are you ready for a challenge? Then let's take a trip together--just me, you, and diabetes. Another travel season is upon us, with all of the challenges and frustrations that it entails for those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It might not simple or easy to manage, but it should be rewarding if we handle it right.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2014

Having Kids Could Cut Risk of Death for Type 1s

Parenthood might have surprisingly beneficial effects for people with type 1 diabetes, according to a new Finnish study. Its analysis of data over four decades shows that people both with and without diabetes who had children died at half the rate of those who didn't have kids over that span of time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2014

Successful Clinical Trial of Type 2 Drug That Works on Intestinal Organisms

BROOMFIELD, Colo.--MicroBiome TherapeuticsTM has announced positive results from its clinical trial of a microbiome modulator, NM504, in development for type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2014

Getting Through TSA

(Editor's Note: Sections in italics are citations taken directly from the TSA and American Diabetes Association websites.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2014

Weekly Potpourri

Sock It To You

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2014

Blood Sugars Linked to Memory Problems

People with diabetes of any type have experienced a very simple but meaningful truth about the disease: Blood sugar levels affect everything. It's not just about lows and possible complications, either--those numbers can affect your mood and overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2014

US Hospitals Lacking When It Comes to Infection Protocols

Most of us don't expect to face a life-threatening infection when we're being treated at a hospital.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2014

How Much Does an Olympian Cross Country Skier Train and What Does He Eat?

On Friday, the official opening day of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, we featured an interview with Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman, a type 1 who is participating in his fourth Olympiad. We thought it would be interesting to delve a little more into Kris's training regimen, including the foods he eats to fuel the high energy demands of his races.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2014

Keeping Your Feet Fit for Travel

You're at your destination and ready to see what there is to see. The real question is this: Are you ready to walk?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2014

Bypass Surgery Cuts Heart Risk, Stroke Odds for Type 2s

Not only does gastric bypass help patients drop excess weight, it can also lower the risk of a variety of health problems, especially in those with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2014

Stress-Induced Hormone Imbalances Go Far Beyond Insulin in Diabetes

Virtually anything from the stress of a long checkout line to the first signs of menopause can trigger hormone imbalances, which reveal themselves through mood swings, fatigue, migraines, memory problems, and a lackluster sex drive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2014

Skin Cream Could Treat Peripheral Neuropathy

One of the most debilitating risks of diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, which can impact millions of people each year and often leads to amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2014

Exercise Can Temporarily Counteract Overeating

With the first few weeks of 2014 done, those with New Year's resolutions to exercise are probably beginning to drop out. After all, how many sub-zero jogs or shaky-legged visits to the gym can one person stand? Not many, that's for sure. But before you abandon that promise altogether, how about another reminder on the usefulness of exercise?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2014

January 2014

Digging into the New Blood Pressure Guidelines

For people with diabetes of all types, blood pressure is one of the most important health markers. It can be taken quickly and easily, and offers a quick glimpse at cardiovascular health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2014

Assessing a New Class of Type 2 Drugs

The name alone is a mouthful. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors are one of the newest class of drugs meant to treat type 2 diabetes, but you can be forgiven if the name doesn't trip lightly off your tongue. The conspicuously vowel-free abbreviation--SGLT2--isn't much better.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2014

Global Obesity Rates on the Rise

Obesity rates are rising steadily across the globe, allowing obesity to surpass hunger as a world health crisis, experts say.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2014

Even Small Weight Loss Can Reduce Women's Heart Disease Risk

Losing just 10 percent of body weight can be enough for middle-aged women who are overweight or obese to reduce the risk factors associated with heart disease and diabetes--provided that weight loss is sustained--according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2014

Depleted Food Budget May Be Linked to Hypoglycemia

As Congress considers cuts to the Food Stamp program, new research suggests that running out of food at the end of the month is a real health risk for those with diabetes, and is linked to an increased risk of being hospitalized for hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2014

Study Strengthens Type 2-Inflammation Link

According to the results of a recent study, the onset of type 2 diabetes may be more closely related to inflammation than previous research has suggested.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2014

"You Are Not Alone"

A small hand slowly rises at the back of the room. "Yes, in the black shirt," I call out. I can't see the woman; she seems somehow shrunken into herself, a sweater pulled around her so tightly as if she's trying to escape into the fabric. Silence seems to pervade until a small sniffle echoes through the conference room, then suddenly, sobbing-the kind that breaks your heart just hearing it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2014

Universal Screening Urged at 24 Weeks for Gestational Diabetes

A panel of medical experts has recommended that all women be tested for gestational diabetes at 24 weeks into a pregnancy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2014

Google Tests "Smart" Contact Lens for People With Diabetes

Internet search engine giant Google has announced that it developing a "smart contact lens" that uses an embedded chip and antenna to monitor blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2014

Type 1 Drug Wins Orphan Status

DV-100, a drug designed to halt the body's autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that leads to type 1 disease, has won orphan drug status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2014

Afraid of the Dark

One of the scariest moments of my diabetes life, so far, happened recently. Just a few months ago, after an intense cardio workout, I experienced something terrifying. It was so scary, it left me shaking, sobbing, and curled up like a baby in my husband's arms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2014

When Doctors Don't Listen: Tell Your Story

I recently interviewed Dr. Leana Wen, a Rhodes Scholar who is an attending physician and Director of Patient-Centered Care Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine at George Washington University in Washington, DC. She is the co-author of "When Doctors Don't Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests," a text she wrote with Joshua Kosowsky, MD. The book arose from their frustration at the number of tests modern medicine seems to require, often with no useful results or help in arriving at a diagnosis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2014

Many Type 2s Never Warned About Threats to Vision

More than half of adults with type 2 diabetes who are at risk of vision loss from their condition have not been advised by their doctors of the danger.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2014

Stresses of Type 1 Often Lead to Diabulimia

Living with type 1 diabetes means that you have a different relationship with food than other people. You live your life in between the demanding rituals that happen multiple times a day; before and after a meal or any type of snack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2014

Asian Companies to Collaborate on Type 1 Antibody Treatment

Two Asian companies--BioLineRx of Israel and JHL Biotech of Taiwan--have agreed to collaborate on the development and marketing of BL-9020, a monoclonal antibody that could become a significant means of treatment for early-stage type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2014

Clinical Trials to Start for Blood Sugar Breathalyzer

Researchers at Western New England University have developed a breathalyzer-like device that can monitor blood glucose levels. Polymers in the breathalyzer react with acetone, a ketone that is produced in people with diabetes when there is a lack of insulin and fat is used as fuel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2014

The Crazy Things Love and Diabetes Can Make You Do

I stepped on a piece of glass at home recently. Suddenly I was home alone, hopping around barefoot and worrying (okay, freaking out) about diabetes and my foot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2014

People with Type 2 Also Suffer Dawn Phenomenon

Researchers have found that the dawn phenomenon, a rise in blood glucose in the early morning hours, affects both people with type 1 and people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2014

New Type 2 Drugs Change Treatment Decisions

Metformin, the cornerstone in treating type 2 diabetes, saw an increase in usage among type 2s from 23 percent of that population in 1997 to 53 percent in 2012. But that increase has since plateaued due to the introduction of additional drugs that target insulin secretion and glucose regulation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2014

FDA Opens Way for Diabetic Macular Edema Device

The Food and Drug Adminsitration, reversing itself on a decision it made in October, has opened the way for a new treatment for diabetic macular edema to reach the U.S. market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2014

December 2013

Danish Drug Improves Blood Sugar Control in Type 2s

Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk's drug Ryzodeg, which includes two different insulin products, has been shown to significantly lower rates of hypoglycemia and has led to improved blood sugar levels for those with type 2 diabetes compared to those taking a single insulin, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 27, 2013

Internet's a Hot Spot for Boomer Health Info Seekers

According to several recent polls, the Internet is considered a serious tool for baby boomers when it comes to researching healthcare.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2013

One Meal Daily May Be Better Option for People With Diabetes

While most nutritional experts say that eating three meals a day is important to maintaining a steady metabolism, a new study suggests that one meal a day may be a better option for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2013

ADA: Many at Risk for Diabetes Are Unaware

Despite evening newscasts that rarely skip talk about the increasing number of type 2 diabetes cases, and hard looks at the reasons why, many of those who run a high risk of developing diabetes are oblivious to it, according to the results of a new survey.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2013

Topical Diabetic Neuropathy Gel Enters Phase 3

Clonidine, a topical gel designed for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, will begin phase three studies early in 2014 after its maker, North Carolina-based BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc., garnered fast-track approval from the Food and Drug Administration for the trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

What role does tumor necrosis factor play in insulin resistance? Have you noticed improved insulin sensitivity when you use an anti-TNF agent such as Etanercept ? Do you recommend Etanercept for all your type 2 patients?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 19, 2013

Researchers Find a Key to Healing Chronic Wounds

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Chronic wounds affect an estimated 6.5 million Americans at an annual cost of about $25 billion. Further, foot blisters and other diabetic ulcers or sores account for the vast majority of foot and leg amputations in the United States today.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2013

Mail-Order Pharmacy Users Less Likely to Visit Emergency Rooms

Getting your drugs by mail rather than meeting face-to-face with a pharmacist may not have a negative impact on your health, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2013

Metformin May Offer Defense Against Dementia in Type 2s

Not only can the diabetes drug metformin help control blood sugar levels, it may also reduce the risk of dementia, a health risk that's elevated for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2013

Gastric Banding Now Suggested for Non-Obese Type 2s

We've suggested over the past few years that Diabetes Health readers keep an eye on the move to make gastric banding a therapy for non-obese type 2 patients. The procedure works by placing a band around the upper part of the study to restrict food intake and produce a feeling of satiety with less food.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 12, 2013

NeuroMetrix Launches www.SENSUSRx.com

Waltham, Mass.-based NeuroMetrix, Inc., a medical device company focused on the diagnosis and treatment of the neurological complications of diabetes, has announced the launch of a consumer website, www.SENSUSRx.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2013

Finding Joy and Having Fun Every Day: the Diabetic Parent Journals, Part 3

Most of the time, I'm the teacher and my two-and-a-half year old son is the student. But not always. Right now, my son is teaching me about acceptance. He looks at the day--or whatever situation he's in--and embraces it for what it is. If rain falls, he delights in it, telling me with a huge grin that, "Rain fall! From sky!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2013

Skin Disease Drug Holds Promise for Type 1s

File this news under "potential breakthrough you didn't see coming." Researchers have tried--and seem to have succeeded--in slowing the destruction of beta cells by treating recently diagnosed people with type 1 diabetes with alefacept, a drug usually prescribed to treat psoriasis, a disorder that leaves skin red and itchy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2013

"Artificial Pancreas" Could Benefit From Inhaled Insulin Therapy

For people with type 1 diabetes who follow medical research, development of a closed-loop, "artificial pancreas" has always been the Holy Grail. Such a system would combine an insulin pump with a continuous glucose monitor to provide constant control of blood glucose levels. But what if such a system was only a start? What if it might work better when combined with another therapy altogether?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2013

Organ Trafficking or Life Saver?

I recently saw a program on HBO featuring a Turkish and an Israeli physician who discussed their role in selling kidneys on the organ trafficking market. The Turk, a surgeon, saw himself as a skilled physician who is able to extend patients' lives. The Israeli, a nephrologist, saw himself as a hero. Both work in an shady industry where some people's demands and pocketbooks operate at levels far beyond our society's comfort zone: Many people consider organ trafficking to be a nefarious thing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Do thyroid levels affect how people are able to control their diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2013

Antibiotics May Be as Effective as Surgery in Treating Foot Osteomyelitis

A recent study found that surgery may not always be the best course of action to treat people with diabetes who have foot osteomyelitis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2013

November 2013

If You Have Diabetes, Set Your Sight on Healthy Vision

If you have diabetes, your doctors most likely have told you to keep your blood sugar under control through diet, exercise, and proper medication. But did you know that you also need a dilated eye exam at least once a year?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2013

Less Invasive Gastric Sleeve May Benefit Type 2s

Research has already shown that gastric bypass can ease symptoms of diabetes, but according to a new study, a less-invasive sleeve may also result in benefits for those with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 29, 2013

NMES Boosts Type 2s' Insulin Sensitivity

People with type 2 diabetes who have trouble with mobility and are unable to exercise may see benefits similar to exercise from neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

How do you work with patients who are happy to achieve an A1c of 6%, even though you know that is too high to reverse diabetes complications?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2013

Whole Fruits Lower Type 2 Risk

Eating whole fruits can reduce people's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health---but juicing them can send their risk factors soaring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2013

Vigorous Activity May Be Better for Women Than Moderate Workouts

While any exercise at all is certainly better than living a couch-potato lifestyle, women might see lower blood pressure and less depression with hard-core exercise compared to moderate physical activity, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 23, 2013

New Scoring System May Predict Post-Surgery Diabetes Remission

A new score chart may help obese patients with type 2 diabetes determine beforehand if gastric bypass surgery will - or will not - be an effective way to send their diabetes into remission, better determining if such a drastic surgery is the right choice to make in treating the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

What is the best way to overcome insulin resistance?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2013

The Bionic Type 1 Woman

I've been gone a few months. On September 9, 2013, my life took a tragic turn. I found out my brother died. He was my hero and my best friend. He lost a lifelong battle with alcohol and drug addiction. Although my family and I hurt and will never understand his pain, we smile knowing he no longer has to struggle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2013

Napping May Increase Likelihood of Type 2

If you like taking an afternoon power nap as a way to recharge, make sure it's a short one.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2013

Let's Be Honest

There are many rules to keeping diabetes "well managed." When I was diagnosed many years ago, I was told of the food allotments, the glucose checks, the exercise requirements, carbohydrate limitations, etc. There were many restrictions, and yet, the doctors told me I could live a "normal" life. As normal a life as anyone else in the world, so long as I followed the accompanying list. I shake my head and smile as I wonder, "What does that even mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2013

Study Finds No link Between Insulin and Breast Cancer

While recent research suggests that having diabetes increases the risk of developing breast cancer, another new study shows that the use of insulin to control blood glucose levels may not be a factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2013

October 2013

New Technology Could Help Type 2s Predict Hypoglycemia

Maryland-based health technology company WellDoc says it has developed a mathematical model that eventually will allow people with type 2 diabetes to predict the onset of a hypoglycemic episode.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2013

A New Approach to Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Ulcers are caused due to a breach in the skin which fails to heal. Initiated by injuries, skin infections, poor blood circulation, or sensory loss, foot ulcers may become a serious complication in up to 15 percent of all diabetic patients. Chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) need prolonged treatment and may even lead to amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2013

Life With Type 2: "Nano, Nano," as Mork Almost Said

Comedian Robin Williams got his start on TV in 1978 in the comedy "Mork and Mindy," about a wacky alien, Mork (Williams), who comes to live in a boarding house run by a cute young woman (Pam Dawber). In that popular sitcom, Mork would always greet people by saying, "Nanu, Nanu," which was "Hello" on his home planet of Ork.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2013

Sanofi Meter Tracks A1c's at Shorter Intervals

Sanofi has introduced a blood glucose meter that allows users to track their A1c levels over shorter intervals, giving them the information they need to accurately gauge their insulin intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2013

Sanofi Meter Tracks A1c's at Shorter Intervals

Sanofi has introduced a blood glucose meter that allows users to track their A1c levels over shorter intervals, giving them the information they need to accurately gauge their insulin intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2013

Study Advises Screening Type 1 Teens for Depression

A study of teens who have type 1 diabetes concludes that their rate of depression is linked to poor blood glucose control and that doctors should screen young type 1s to detect the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

For type 2's, at what level of ketones should you avoid exercising?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2013

NIH Lists Brittle Type 1 as a Rare, Distinct Diabetes

The National Institutes of Health recently listed brittle type 1 diabetes as a rare disease, a distinct and separate form of type 1. An estimated 3,700 to 8,700 persons in the United States have the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2013

Unplugged

At some point in all of our diabetic lives, we've felt the sinking in our gut at the mere thought of a doctor's appointment and we've made plans to leave the glucose journals at home. I'm at that point now. In less than two weeks, I will be seeing my endocrinologist. I have to be honest: I'm not looking forward to the visit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2013

Researchers Discover Biological Link Between Diabetes and Heart Disease

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- UC Davis Health System researchers have identified for the first time a biological pathway that is activated when blood sugar levels are abnormally high and causes irregular heartbeats, a condition known as cardiac arrhythmia that is linked with heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2013

A New Dawn for Inhalable Insulin?

Few treatments for type 1 diabetes have been as elusive and long-promised as inhalable insulin. The concept has always sounded remarkable: Instead of jabbing themselves with needles, type 1s (and insulin-using type 2s) could take a quick puff on an inhaler to get a dose of insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2013

Algorithm Could Identify Hidden Type 2 Cases

A simple algorithm used to scan electronic health records could be a breakthrough in identifying cases of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making. And that could lead to timely treatment and prevention of diabetes complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2013

Life With Type 2 The Desire for Control Has to Make Sense

For several years now I've been following the controversy surrounding a lawsuit by California parents to force public school districts to allow people who aren't nurses or doctors to be able to give insulin shots to diabetic children. (The California Supreme Court recently ruled that non-nurses can now give such injections. You can find background information here and here.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2013

Type 2 Beta Cells Decline Faster Than Previously Thought

People with type 2 diabetes and those heading toward that diagnosis may face a quicker decline in their beta cell function than previously understood, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. That means the progress and challenges for such patients may progress more quickly than doctors expects and need more aggressive treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2013

Experimental Drug Holds Promise for New Type 1s

One of the most intriguing areas of type 1 diabetes research focuses on newly diagnosed patients. Given that the disease occurs after an autoimmune response damages the body's insulin-producing beta cells, scientists have looked to new type 1s as fertile ground for experimentation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Is there anything you can do to treat hypoglycemia unawareness?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2013

Automatic Bolus Calculator Pays off With A1c Drops

For people with type 1 diabetes (and some with type 2), the question is simple-and crucial: How much insulin should you give yourself with a meal?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2013

Becoming Mom

Ever since I was a girl, I wanted to be a mother. I understood that I wasn't ready emotionally or physically, but at a young age I simply had the feeling that being a mother was what I was meant to do with my life. I was smart, attractive, motivated, driven, and could be anything that I wanted to be. And I wanted to be a mom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2013

Byetta for Type 1s? It Could Be Possible

Many people with type 2 diabetes are familiar with Byetta, a drug that helps raise their insulin levels. But a new study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests that the drug, known generically as exenatide, might have a role to play for people with type 1 diabetes as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2013

September 2013

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Artificial Pancreas

The FDA has approved a new, automated artificial pancreas system from Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2013

Dapagliflozin Teams Well With Metformin, Sulfonylurea

According to researchers, dapagliflozin, a diabetes drug developed jointly by two pharmaceutical companies has shown significant benefits when teamed with metformin and sulfonylurea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2013

The Diabetic Parent Journals Part. 2: Something Out of Nothing

We all start from nothing. When we're born, we're blank slates, minds looking outward, ready to absorb the love of our parents and the lessons of a rapidly shifting world. And we all grow. We learn those lessons. We grow up. Our minds expand and develop in a multitude of unexpected directions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2013

$Millions Going to Big Diabetes Non-Profits, But With Little Accountability

When it comes to research, you would expect that the wants of those living with type 1 diabetes would be totally in line with the goals of scientists seeking a cure for the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2013

Money and Medication

Money. No one wants to talk about it, but it affects all of us. In the United States of America, having a health condition can put you in the poorhouse. In a recent survey, the U.S. Census determined that medical bills were the biggest cause of bankruptcy filings in 2012. Many people will even hesitate to take their necessary medications in order to slow the financial bleed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2013

Eye Drug's Success With Diabetic Macular Degeneration

A drug traditionally used to treat age-related macular degeneration has been successful in also treating diabetic macular edema in recent trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2013

Discovery Points Way to Relieving Diabetic Nerve Pain  Discovery Points Way to Relieving Diabetic Nerve Pain

For people with diabetes who suffer from peripheral neuropathy, a gentle touch can be agony. A warm shower can be torture. New research at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, however, has shed light on the causes of this common diabetes complication - and may ultimately offer a way to reverse it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2013

New Monitoring Technique in Foot Ulcer Treatments

Monitoring skin temperature can help not only predict, but also prevent foot ulcers that form as a result of diabetic neuropathy, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2013

Fighting My Lifelong Enemy, Diabetes

"For the joy of the Lord is your strength." Nehemiah 8:10

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2013

Early Diabetes Interventions May Also Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Lifestyle change, medication both linked to cholesterol improvements

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2013

Study Concludes Cinnamon Has Some Beneficial Effects

Discussion has gone back and forth for several years now on whether cinnamon might be a powerful, previously unappreciated arrow in the quiver of diabetes medicines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2013

Statins May Lower Amputation Risk in Diabetes

Some cholesterol-lowering drugs may help reduce the risk of amputation for those with diabetes, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2013

Protein Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Insulin Resistance

People with type 2 diabetes who use insulin to help control elevated blood sugar might be able to end their dependence on it if new research progresses.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2013

Fruits, Proteins Can Help Thwart Kidney Disease

For those living with type 2 diabetes, kidney disease is unfortunately one of the associated risks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2013

Commuting on Foot Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk

If your commute to work is short enough to be tackled on foot, you might want to consider setting your alarm a little earlier. Not only could you save big bucks on gas, according to a new study, you might also reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2013

Glucagon Study Shows Promise for Type 1s

In the healthcare field today, perhaps no area holds as much promise and as many perils as weight control. Researchers see the same statistics that the rest of us do. They see the upcoming wave of obesity and diabetes diagnoses. They see the myriad complications that spring up from these conditions. And they want to address the problem in a simple way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2013

People More Knowledgeable, But Less Concerned, About Type 2

Even as we learn more about type 2 diabetes, that increase in information is not being taken as seriously as it should be, according to data presented at a recent meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 6, 2013

Five More Common Diabetes Fears

Fear is a funny thing. In a controlled situation, say a movie theater or roller coaster, it can be exciting. It gets our blood pumping, gets our adrenaline racing. But in the real world, where anything can happen and safety isn't assured, fears can get out of hand.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2013

Metformin Better Than Insulin for Gestational Diabetes?

Insulin may not be the best first line of defense for women who develop gestational diabetes, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2013

Chronic Fatigue Common in Type 1s, Says New Study

Are you a person with type 1 diabetes? Do you often feel tired? A new study suggests that you're not alone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2013

August 2013

The Green Light, Red Light Way

Growing up in Los Angeles, I used to watch an afternoon kids' show called "Engineer Bill." It was obvious from watching Bill that he didn't really like kids, but he wrapped his patter around some pretty good cartoons and, besides, they paid him well. It didn't kill him to pretend.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 31, 2013

Modest Weight Loss Helps Overweight Teens Avoid Diabetes

According to an article in the Journal of Pediatrics, even a small increase in activity and better eating patterns can help decrease an obese teen's risk of developing diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2013

Inflammation, Not Weight, May Explain Diabetes in Obese People

It's commonly believed that obese people run an especially high risk of developing type 2 diabetes because their extra weight leads to insulin resistance, or because some of their weight is the result of unhealthy diets.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Can exercise for a short period of time increase liver and cortisol involvement and cause a negative impact on BG levels?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2013

Type 2 Costs Average $85,000 Over a Lifetime

A study recently published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine concludes that the average lifetime cost of treating type 2 diabetes and its related complications is almost $85,000.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2013

Court Rules CA Schools Can Give Insulin Without Licensed Nurses

The California Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that trained school employees, as well as licensed nurses, can administer insulin injections to students in the state's public schools.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Is it important to determine the exact type of diabetes you have if you're already on insulin and maintaining very good blood sugar control, and if so, why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2013

Eye Health Program Offers Free Online Training

Community health workers who provide diabetes education often lack information on how this disease affects the eyes. In response, the National Eye Health Education Program of the National Eye Institute has developed a new interactive online training course to help CHWs better understand the eye complications that diabetes can bring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2013

Promising Topical Nail Fungus Treatment Performs Well in Phase 3

Hard-to-treat toenail fungus is one side effect of diabetes, a condition brought by decreased circulation and increased susceptibility to infection. The condition, called onychomycosis, afflicts some 35 million people in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2013

To the Extreme

British snowboard champion Christopher Southwell has always lived for the adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2013

Sometimes the Good News Gets You Through the Rough Stuff

Thrilled, elated, ecstatic, joyful-these are all accurate descriptions of my feelings after my doctor appointment today, but somehow they don't seem to be enough. Words can't quite express the feeling that you get when you get a good report from the doctor after having what seems like bad report after bad report.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2013

Book Review: Raising Teens with Diabetes

Raising Teens with Diabetes: A Survival Guide for Parents by Moira McCarthy, Spry Publishing, 272 pages, $15.95. ISBN: 978-1-9381720-20-1

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2013

Diabetes awareness mission takes flight

Jason Harmon had dreams of taking to the skies as a commercial pilot, but a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes crashed his plans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

What do you believe are normal blood sugars? Do you believe an A1c of 5%, or even 5.5%, is normal?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2013

The Agony of Type 1 Hope

I can only speak as a type 2. I don't for a second think that the problems I encounter managing my diabetes compare to what people with type 1 go through.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2013

Type A Type 1s May Run Lower Mortality Risk

New research suggests that type 1s' personality types could affect their mortality risk. While that might sound peculiar at first, the research results-culled from 22 years of study-make some important connections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2013

Dietary Changes Could Preserve Beta Cells

Type 1 diabetes doesn't happen all at once. Scientists have shown that it's usually a gradual process, in which the insulin-producing beta cells eventually fade out. So wouldn't it be marvelous if the function of those beta cells could be preserved, allowing people newly diagnosed with diabetes to produce some of their own insulin for a longer time?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2013

Enzyme Discovery Could Predict Diabetic Neuropathy

Physicians may be able to predict if diabetic patients will develop peripheral neuropathy, thanks to results of new research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2013

July 2013

Timing of First Solid Food Intake Linked to Type 1

New parents like British royals Will and Kate might not want to rush the introduction of solid food into their baby's diet. That's not to say they want to put it off, either.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2013

NFL Player Reaches Out to Inspire, Empower Young Type 1

Despite living with type 1 diabetes, fourth grader Joey Balistrieri wanted nothing more than to play football. But it would require advice from a professional player, Houston Texan tight end Jake Byrne, to convince Joey's mom to let her son take the field.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 29, 2013

Lower Limb Amputation Rates Have Dropped

Despite an increase in diabetes cases nationwide, fewer people with diabetes are facing lower leg and foot amputations than a decade ago, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2013

Five Big Diabetes Fears—and What to Do About Them

It's human to be afraid. As cave people, we scurried for safety at the slightest provocation- scared of wolves, and tigers, and thunderstorms. Even today, we jump when someone comes up behind us unexpectedly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 24, 2013

Vitamin D May Lessen Heart Risks, Ease Type 2 Symptoms

A low level of vitamin D in teenagers and young adults who have type 2 diabetes may put them at risk for arterial stiffness. Stiff arteries, that force the heart to beat harder to pump blood, are a known cardiovascular risk factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2013

Scientists Clarify Benefits and Use of Glycemic Index, Load, and Response

BOSTON---An international committee of leading nutrition scientists from 10 countries on three continents has released a consensus statement that concludes that carbohydrate quality (measured by the glycemic index or GI) matters and that the carbohydrates present in different foods affect post-meal blood sugar differently, with important health implications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 21, 2013

Cannabis-Derived Drug for Type 2 Enters Phase 2

A British drug company is looking to medical marijuana- or at least a derivative of it-to help treat a variety of different diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 20, 2013

Diabetes Remission After Gastric Bypass Not Always Permanent

Over the years, gastric bypass surgery has led to remission of type 2 diabetes in a substantial number of patients, with some studies showing the absence of any diabetes symptoms even five years after the procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2013

Study Shows Promise for Artificial Pancreas

Insulin pump maker Animas has taken another step toward perfecting (and hopefully putting on sale) the first artificial pancreas. The company doesn't call it anything that clear-cut, instead referring to the device as "a closed-loop insulin delivery system."

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2013

Obesity Declared a Disease—Now What?

The statements from august medical authorities were grand and sweeping. This was important news, they said. This would change everything. Pay attention, patients, they said. The experts have spoken, and their word should be taken as final.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2013

Precedent-Setting Ski Champ Remembers the Kids

As if being the first Olympic endurance athlete with type 1 diabetes wasn't enough, there's even more reason to look up to cross-country skiing champ Kris Freeman.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2013

Experts Target Hypoglycemia at ADA Conference

Hypoglycemia remains a complex issue for diabetes patients and their healthcare providers, according to the focus of a recent symposium.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 14, 2013

The Growing Number of Diabetes Therapies

While there is still no cure for diabetes, there is a growing number of therapies available to those battling the disease-and even more are in the works, according to experts who spoke at a recent symposium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2013

My Pal Paul and the Type 2 Jitters

My down-the-street neighbor, Paul (not his real name), has type 2. We often stop to talk about our numbers, our latest visits to the endocrinologist, and our concerns.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2013

It's Going to Be Okay

A friend of my sister's toddler was recently diagnosed with type 1. My heart ached at the thought. I immediately wanted to reach out to this mom whom I've never met, but knew she would not be in the state of mind to talk about this traumatic event just yet.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2013

Obesity Drug Beloranib Shows Promise

Massachusetts-based Zafgen, a biopharmaceutical company devoted to treating obesity, may have taken a big step toward making the growing health concern obsolete.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2013

Have Boston Researchers Found Type 1's Root Cause?

Will people with type 1 diabetes ever see an end to their need for insulin?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2013

Diabetes Patients on Insulin Sensitizers Run Lower PAD Risk

Insulin sensitizers--drugs that increase sensitivity to insulin such as Avandia and Actos--could help lessen the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) for those with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 5, 2013

Amina's Pas de Deux With Type 1

Amina Kolenc knew as soon as she could walk that she wanted to be a ballerina. And she wasn't going to allow a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at age 5 and a half - several years after she started studying dance - to derail her dreams.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2013

Managing Diabetes and My Day Job

There are no vacations or even lunch breaks from diabetes. In addition to my day job, it can be overwhelming and frustrating. Diabetes often seems like a full-time job on top of my actual full-time employment. The other day I had to knock back a Watermelon Quick Sticks glucose packet while riding to a work function with my assistant. I didn't want to admit I was in danger of going low. I wanted to pretend I no longer worked at my diabetes job. Sadly though, diabetes isn't a job you can quit.  My lunch was delayed and there were no snacks in sight, only a couple of glucose packets in the bottom of my purse.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 2013

June 2013

Link Between Second-Hand Smoke and Type 2 Diabetes Seen

In addition to the other negative effects attributed to secondhand smoke, a new report says it is also linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2013

Lifestyle Change Can Lessen Sexual Dysfunction in Type 2 Women

While erectile dysfunction gets much of the attention, sexual problems as a side effect of type 2 diabetes are not limited to men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2013

FDA Approves Invokana, a New Type 2 Drug

A new, first-in-its-class drug for type 2 diabetes has just been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Invokana works by blocking re-absorption of glucose by the kidneys and stimulating urination, which removes glucose from the bloodstream.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2013

Global Survey Finds One in Five Feel Discriminated Against Because of Their Diabetes

CHICAGO, June 24, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Key results from the global Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 study (DAWN2TM) show that one in five people with diabetes feel discriminated against because of their condition, and support from the broader community is scarce. Results from the DAWN2 study were presented at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). DAWN2 represents opinions from more than 15,000 people living, or caring for people, with diabetes in 17 countries across four continents.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2013

How to Help Overweight Kids

(Editor's Note: This article was orginally published in the April 2008 edition of Diabetes Health and later online as article 5658. We are reproducing the article in light of the American Medical Association's recent decision to treat obesity as a disease. That decision will spur much debate, and we think this article will help add some perspective to the discussion.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2013

The Other Kids

I grew up with a large family. I have a brother and sister from my parents, a brother from my mother, and two sisters plus a brother from my step-mother. There were a lot of children in both of our houses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2013

My Lucky Day: An Offer to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

My eyes went directly to the advertisement, featuring a free gourmet meal and a promise to attendees to "discover the hidden secrets about how to potentially reverse your Type 2 diabetes."  This was the most exciting thing I'd come across in some time and it was happening at a location near me.  Was this the answer?  I mean, who wants to pass up a free gourmet meal and an opportunity to reverse this chronic disease?  Reading the advertisement more closely, it was being promoted by a diabetes company and it was being held at a convenient evening hour.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 16, 2013

How High Is Your Eye Q?

The eyes are the windows to the soul, and also one of the primary places where health problems associated with diabetes turn up.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 13, 2013

12th Q&A With Dr. Bernstein

Can Januvia Trigger Cancer Symptoms?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2013

Despite the Fear

On some days living with a chronic disease and all its complexities for 15 years has the ability to force me into hiding.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2013

My Life as a Guinea Pig

About five years ago during a visit to a local endocrinologist, he asked if I might be interested in participating in a Phase 3 study of a new type 2 drug. It didn't take long for me to say yes, especially once he explained how being a study subject worked.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2013

FDA Panelists Vote to Ease Up on Avandia

A significant majority-20 of 26 members attending a combined meeting of FDA advisory committees-has voted to modify or remove the current restrictive label and distribution regulations affecting the type 2 drug Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Diabetes Is Certainly a Journey.

Diabetes is certainly a journey. The more I learn about it, the more I want to step off this path and onto a new one. So, how do you change the course of such an expensive and frustrating chronic illness?

comments 2 comments - Posted May 31, 2013

Juggling More Than Three Pins

I've been type 1 diabetic for 15 years. It hasn't been easy and I'm still grasping to keep my feet on the ground medically. Every time I think I've got this disease figured out, something new gets thrown at me and I stumble over and over again.  From insulin resistance to pump failures to carbohydrate/insulin sensitivity changes to exercise regimens to health insurance issues to medical bill payments to a seemingly innocent cut on the sole of my foot, etc., I'm getting worn out.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 29, 2013

How Dottie Kept Her Prediabetes in Check

You may be in jeopardy. You may be in danger with blood sugar levels higher than normal. You may have prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2013

Americans Slightly Better at Managing Diabetes

Americans are getting better at managing their type 2 diabetes, according to a new study appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine. But that's not to say we still don't have a long way to go.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 21, 2013

Sleep Apnea Is No laughing Matter

Snoring is one of the great clichés. In cartoons, you just know that a blissfully snoring dog, cat, or human is about to be startled by an explosion or some scaringly loud noise.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 17, 2013

What are your thoughts on insulin pumps?

I spent a month in a major insulin pump center and saw several things. Many of the female patients seemed to have wings on their sides where the pump tubing was inserted and they got lipohypertrophy from localized injections, but that was the least of it. None of them actually had remotely normal blood sugars. 

comments 21 comments - Posted May 15, 2013

Reduced Insulin May Prevent Exercise-Related Hypoglycemia

People with type 1 diabetes who exercise may need to reduce their insulin to counteract the effects of their workouts, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2013

Diabetes and Your Eyes: Commit to Routine Vision Care 

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect many parts of the body-the heart, kidneys, blood circulation, and eyes. In fact, according to the National Eye Institute, diabetic eye disease increased in prevalence by 89 percent between 2000 and 2010, and is a leading cause of blindness among American adults. Despite this, people with diabetes often overlook vision care as they work to manage the many other health problems the disease can cause.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 3, 2013

If someone needs to restrict their protein intake because of kidney damage, is it safe to do a low carb diet?

The restriction of protein intake is an outdated thought. It was born of a study by Barry Brenner, at Harvard, back in the 1980s. He did a survey of the diabetologists in Boston asking, "At what blood sugars do you like to keep your diabetics?"  The collective answer ultimately was 250 mg/dl.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2013

April 2013

Smaller, Lighter OmniPod Earns FDA Approval

The FDA recently approved the next-generation OmniPod from Insulet, giving people with insulin-dependent diabetes an even less invasive way to manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2013

Is it dangerous to continually have low-grade ketone levels in your blood?

Low-grade ketones are not a problem; it's part of the survival system that humans have for getting through famines. We don't have many famines nowadays, but if they're not eating overnight, a large percent of the population is going to have ketones in their blood in the morning.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2013

Hank’s Healthy Habits: 13 Steps to a Joyful, Happy Life

He is 89 years old and the picture of health. Yet looking at the robust, healthy, laughing gentleman sitting across the desk from me on this Saturday morning, one would never guess his age. Hank has been married 50 years, is active in his church, and hosts a prayer breakfast most Saturday mornings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2013

Pot Smoking Has Little Lasting Metabolic Effect

While marijuana use may spark an increased appetite for everything from chips to dubious leftover takeout, it has little effect on overall metabolism, according to a new study that appeared recently in the American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2013

What meds do you recommend to control elevated cholesterol?

In my experience the most common cause of elevated cholesterol is low thyroid. High blood sugars also have an effect on LDL that can be very dramatic. If someone has elevated cholesterol, diabetic or not, the very first thing you do is check their free and total T3, and free and total T4. When you give them adequate thyroid replacement, the LDL usually normalizes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2013

Metanx Medicinal Food for Neuropathy Shows Promise

A new study on the treatment of symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy has shown promising results, according to one of the lead doctors on the study.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 5, 2013

March 2013

New Study Links Diabetes to Lower Prostate Cancer Risk

A new study shows that men with heart disease who have diabetes may have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2013

Diabetes Is No Slam Dunk

Monica Joyce had an idea. It wasn't original, but a good idea inspired by another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2013

Idol’s Randy Jackson: “It Always Happens to Somebody Else, Right?”

Twelve years after it began as a summer placeholder designed to keep Fox TV viewers hanging around until the fall season, "American Idol" has become one of this young century's most renowned cultural phenomena. From the show's modest beginning, record producer and musician Randy Jackson has been at its heart, the memorable judge who has popularized such greetings as "Dawg!" and such praises as "I believe she's in it to win it!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2013

Lack of Sleep Affects Portion Size and Food Choices in Young Men

Don't get enough sleep? According to a small, new study, this may make you eat larger portions of high-calorie foods and, accordingly, increase your risk of gaining weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2013

TIR-199: Potential New Heavy Weapon Against Kidney Cancer

Researchers in California may have taken a big step in the fight to end renal cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2013

February 2013

Guard Your Kidney Health!

If you are a diabetic, you’ve likely been cautioned by your physician about the consequences of allowing your blood sugar to run high. You may have shrugged off the horror stories about how unchecked high blood sugar can damage your eyes, your heart, and circulation to your extremities. You probably have thought, “I’m young (or relatively so), and it’s not going to be as bad as all that."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2013

My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I heart carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2013

Tandem Announces Two Partnerships

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. has teamed with Dexcom to expand an existing partnership to include development of Dexcom’s latest continuous glucose monitoring system, the G4 Platinum. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new CGM in October.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2013

Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself as a Newly Diagnosed Teen

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault." You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2013

Hormone Could Become Basis for “Exercise Pill”

Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston report that they have discovered a naturally occurring hormone that can direct the body to burn more calories and increase its insulin sensitivity. Their results, based on lab experiments with mice, could potentially lead to therapies for diabetes, obesity, and even muscular dystrophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2013

Exenatide Bests Insulin Detemir in Head-to-Head Test

Sooner or later most type 2s face the choice of whether they should begin using insulin. As the effectiveness of metformin or sulfonylureas fades, physicians often look to insulin as the safest, most effective means of asserting control over blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2013

Mike Fisher, Competitive Snowboarder

Mike Fisher is a 23-year-old from Ontario, Canada, who's been snowboarding since he was 13 years old. At the age of 18, he was involved in a motorcycle crash that necessitated the amputation of one leg below the knee. He says, "At first, I felt that my life was coming to a crashing halt. But I just pushed myself to recover as fast as possible and get my life back on track, go to school, get back into snowboarding and motorcycles-just anything so that my life wasn't affected at all. I had a lot of support, and I would say that I was pretty optimistic about it and took it almost as a challenge. By the time that I was 19, I was happy. I was walking again, I was back in college in London, Ontario, and everything was good. The accident was a minor setback to me, and I rose above it. I was just continuing with my life."

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2013

January 2013

Reminding Myself How Serious Those Low Blood Sugars Really Are

I was having my second low of the day at work recently when I got "the headache." If you have type 1 diabetes you probably know the one. It doesn't ever go away quickly and never without having to pop a couple pain relievers. I was popping more than a couple peppermint-flavored chocolates and glucose tabs and waiting for the low to go away before I could even reach for the Advil to help ease the pounding in my head.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2013

#Six and Diabetes: Jay Cutler On Numbers

As an NFL quarterback, Jay Cutler makes his living putting a football into the hands of an open receiver before getting slammed to the ground by a huge defensive lineman.  It's a stressful occupation, all about timing, a little luck, and seeing the big picture in a split second.  

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2013

Diabetes and Cancer Together: Which Disease to Address First?

You're a person with diabetes who has just learned that you've been diagnosed with cancer. Which disease should take precedence in your life?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2013

The Hidden Gift of a Diabetes Diagnosis

Michelle Gaylord has lived more than 30 years with type 2 diabetes, but the diagnosis is one that she now sees a bit like a gift.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 22, 2013

Just Don’t Do Nothing!

On September 26, 1992, my daughter Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Since that time, we have immersed ourselves in the world of diabetes with two goals: First, to ensure that Kaitlyn has the very best tools, both medical and emotional, to manage her diabetes, and second, to dedicate our unyielding efforts in pursuit of a cure. For us, it's not either/or: It's both.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2013

Each One of Us Inspires the Other

Every spring since 1999, the Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) has distributed our publication to their young campers. In honor of their youthful enthusiasm, our springtime issue always focuses on people who inspire us, from the young to the old. In this issue, we bring you the stories of people who refuse to let their diabetes limit them, people whose example re-ignites our determination to live our very best and healthiest lives. As a publisher, I am always seeking inspiration, and each of these individuals is a fresh reminder of what we can do if we put our minds to it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 19, 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

Prefab or Custom, Insoles Good at Reducing Pressure on Feet

Good news for people with diabetes who worry about protecting themselves against the plantar pressure and risks of ulcerous foot injuries that come with diabetic neuropathy: A recent British study shows that ready-made insoles you can buy at the store perform almost as well as more expensive custom-made insoles at achieving those foot protection goals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

Calcium Score Predicts Cardiovascular Death Risk in Type 2

It's well known that diabetes, an inflammatory disease, increases the risk of developing heart disease and related complications-also the result of inflammation. Now there's a way of predicting which type 2s may be at the highest risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2013

Islet Transplants May Decrease Type 1 Atherosclerosis Risk

Narrowed and hardened arteries-atherosclerosis-are a common risk associated with type 1 diabetes. Fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up to create plaque, which narrows the arteries and makes blood flow more difficult. The increased risk of blood clots often leads to heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2013

December 2012

New ADA Guidelines Revise Blood Pressure Goals, Testing Frequencies

The American Diabetes Association’s newly released 2013 edition of its annual “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” recommends two notable changes:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2012

Study Says Some Type 2 Remissions Possible With Exercise, Diet

One out of nine type 2s who followed an intensive diet and exercise program for one year were able to record normal or prediabetes-level blood sugar levels, according to a study recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2012

Brown, White and Beige: Not in Fashion But in Fat

To help stem the obesity epidemic, researchers are looking at how certain hormones act on fat cells. Scientists know that "white" fat cells store fat while "brown" fat cells not only store fat but also turn it into energy, a process that goes awry in obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2012

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2012

No Flu for You This Year!

According to the Centers for Disease Control, an early flu season is underway in 2012. If youwant to spend the upcoming holidays enjoying family, friends, and seasonal activities rather than being sick, here are several simple steps to protect yourself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2012

Study Says Bypass Surgery Is Not a Cure for Diabetes

A 14-year study that tracked 4,434 obese type 2 patients shows that despite much talk about gastric bypass surgery as a "cure" for diabetes, a majority of the patients who underwent the procedure had no long-lasting remission of their symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2012

Study Shows DAFNE Helps Type 1s Manage Their Diabetes

Education as part of routine care is the key to successful treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2012

Taking Linagliptin May Protect Kidney Function

Taking linagliptin seems to help protect the kidneys in people with type 2 diabetes. The drug, usually used along with diet, exercise, and sometimes other medications, lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2012

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2012

Behind the Wheel, But Still in Control

Last May, 24-year-old Charlie Kimball was in Car #35, taking Turn 3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the Firestone Freedom 100. He was in radio contact with his pit crew, who informed him that he had a headwind coming out of the turn and onto the 5/8 mile "straight." Charlie kept an eye on the car next to him, moving closer and beginning to crowd it on the inside. Having raced professionally for six years, he knew that he had to make a move, and soon. He shifted into sixth gear and accelerated.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 4, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

New research reveals that those suffering from depression might be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

November 2012

Stem Cell Research Points Way to Possible Type 1 Cure

Australian researchers have released a study on stem cells that potentially could lead to type 1s being able to make their own insulin, erasing the need for regular injections.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2012

Israeli Study Says Whey Protein Helpful Against Type 2

Scientists at Tel Aviv University in Israel report that taking whey protein isolates or concentrates may help treat type 2 diabetes and prevent obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2012

Child and Teen Deaths from Diabetes Plummet Over 41-Year Period

Gratifying news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: The overall death rate from diabetes among children 19 years and younger plummeted 61 percent over the years 1968 through 2009.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 23, 2012

Don’t be a Turkey on Thanksgiving, Plan Ahead!

I really look forward to Thanksgiving. For me, it’s a great time to spend with family and friends, watch some ballgames on TV and eat. All those wonderful traditional dishes that taste so good are ready for my undivided attention. But for a diabetic, Thanksgiving dinner can be a bit tricky when it comes to controlling your blood glucose levels.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms Three Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2012

Fighting For Test Strips

Recently while I was out shopping with my sister, I tested my blood sugar and found that I had a high reading of 217. Because I had just downed a non-fat pumpkin spice latte and still had active insulin in my bloodstream, I skipped correcting it with an insulin shot and went on trying on clothing and chatting with my sister. When I got to my car afterward, I realized that I felt a little like I was drunk, so I figured that I'd better test my blood sugar again. It was 58.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In this new column, "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" readers send in observations and questions, and, in response, other readers share similar and not-so-similar experiences by posting in the "Comments" section.

comments 13 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2012

FDA Approves Dexcom’s G4

The FDA has approved U.S. sales of Dexcom's G4TM PLATINUM continuous glucose monitor. The San Diego-based manufacturer said it is taking orders and plans to begin shipping the device to patients within the next few weeks.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2012

Deborah Grona: Dancing Back to Life

Deborah Grona hadn't danced with her husband in more than four years. "We fell in love on the dance floor," says Grona, who had been unable to dance, or even stand for short periods of time, since developing the chronic pain that comes with diabetic neuropathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2012

Super-Tight Control of Blood Sugar After Kidney Transplant May Be Counterproductive

To see if tightly controlling blood sugar provides improved results in patients who received a kidney transplant, a group of diabetic post-transplant patients were followed for three days. A subset of the randomly assigned group had their blood glucose kept in tight range with IV insulin, while a control group received insulin as they ordinarily would, via injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

Gum Treatments Can Lower Diabetes-Related Medical Costs

People with diabetes who receive treatment for gum disease can enjoy substantial reductions in hospitalizations, doctor visits, and annual medical expenses according to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and dental insurer United Concordia Dental.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2012

Type 1 For a Day

I recently learned of a JDRF campaign to increase type 1 diabetes awareness, in which people without diabetes can sign up to experience “virtual diabetes” for a day. During that day, they receive up to 24 texts prompting actions that simulate the frequent blood sugar testing, insulin injections, and dietary choices that people with type 1 diabetes must endure. JDRF thoughtfully notes on its website that “while no virtual campaign can re-create the many needles required or the physical and financial tolls of this serious disease, T1D for a Day seeks to deepen understanding of the many heroic steps our friends and loved ones with T1D take each day.”

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2012

Study Reports That “Fat but Fit” Is Not an Oxymoron

While there is an almost constant media drumbeat about the dangers of obesity and overweight, it's a pleasure to learn that not everyone who is overweight is in bad health or runs the risk of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2012

Penny Hildreth: Finally Facing Diabetes

It was more than two decades ago, and Penny Hildreth was already feeling overwhelmed by life when she learned that she had type 1 diabetes. She was pregnant with her second child and worried about the baby’s safety after a car accident that had left Hildreth with a broken collarbone, a broken rib, and a punctured spleen. It was the spleen injury that ultimately led to her diagnosis of diabetes, but she was more concerned about the baby, a little girl who was born healthy despite the automobile accident. “I always say that she’s my miracle,” says the 46-year-old Portland resident.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

Small A1c Reduction Considerably Lessens Type 2 Death Risk

A Swedish study has found that even less than a 1% reduction in A1c's lowered the mortality rate among type 2 patients by 50 percent compared to patients whose A1c's remained stable or increased. (Mortality was defined as the likelihood of dying from any cause within the next five years.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2012

Stan Bush: Managing Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs

Stan Bush wasn't really surprised to find out he had type 2 diabetes. An unhealthy diet that regularly featured containers of ice cream before bed had left him primed for the disease. But how he handled the news was a surprise, at least to his doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2012

High Blood Sugar Associated With Brain Shrinkage

Do people on the high end of the normal range of blood sugar levels develop the same brain shrinkage and tendency toward dementia that has been found in those with type 2 diabetes? According to an Australian study, the answer appears to be yes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2012

October 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In response to a post that I wrote on October 19, 2012, asking readers to contribute their opinions, John M wrote to me asking for more information. After exchanging a few emails, we came up with an idea that we think you will like: a new column by readers who write in about experiences they have had with diabetes and who are curious to know if anybody else has experienced the same thing. The new column will be called "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" The idea is for you to send in your question, in response to which other readers will share similar and not-so-similar experiences through our "Comments" section. (Take note that comments take one to two days to post because they all need to be read and approved.)

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2012

Many Supplements Are Illegally Labeled

According to a report by the inspector general of the US Department of Health and Human Services, dozens of purported weight-loss and immune-system supplements are illegally labeled and do not have appropriate scientific evidence to support their claims.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2012

What is Affordable Health Care?

Dear Editor,

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2012

Special Diabetes Coupon Savings from Diabetes Health and CVS Pharmacy

I’m very happy to announce Diabetes Health’s partnership with CVS/pharmacy and welcome you to ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes® from CVS/pharmacy®. If you have diabetes and already have a CVS/pharmacy ExtraCare® card, ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes offers even more benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2012

Under Physical Stress, Insulin-Producing Cells Regress

Scientists generally think that decreased insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is due to the death of the organ's beta cells. However, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center report that the beta cells do not die, but instead revert to a more basic cell type.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2012

Join in a Virtual Dance-a-thon, November 10, 2012!

You don't have to live in San Francisco to participate in the annual Dance Out Diabetes dance-a-thon event.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 15, 2012

Thinking Positively About Diabetes

When people with diabetes are successful and happy, their situation is often viewed as having been achieved despite the obstacle of diabetes. I am advocating for a shift in that perception. What if instead of seeing all the good in our lives as existing despite our disease, we begin to see everything that we are—the challenges and the achievements—as a direct product of all that we are made up of, diabetes included?

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2012

Type 2: Finnish Study Says Statins Users Run Higher Diabetes Risk

Recently, a Finnish study evaluated nearly 2,800 nondiabetic individuals, close to 500 of whom were using statins, after they had participated in a year of lifestyle interventions intended to improve their glucose metabolism. (Statins are lipid-lowering drugs that inhibit an enzyme crucial to the production of serum cholesterol; high cholesterol is associated with hardening of the arteries and cardiovascular problems.) The study was conducted by Dr. Nina Rautio and colleagues at Pirkanmaa Hospital in Tampere, Finland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2012

Cinnamon May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Like the taste of cinnamon? If you do and you have type 2 diabetes, a daily cinnamon supplement may help control your condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2012

ACCU-CHEK Combo Insulin Pump Now Available in U.S.

Roche Diagnostics says that its ACCU-CHEK Combo insulin pump system is now available in the US market. The system uses Bluetooth wireless technology to allow a glucose meter/insulin pump combination exchange data.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

The Scoop on Fiber

Does consuming fiber really lower blood sugar? How many grams of fiber do you need each day? What’s the difference between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

September 2012

New Wound Healing Process Speeds Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

A new technique using amniotic tissue harvested from a discarded placenta can heal wounds, burns and scars twice as fast as previous treatments. The tissue is extracted from the placenta, with the woman's consent, during Caesarian sections and then sent to Georgia-based MiMedX, the company that processes the material so it can then be applied to the injured area to jump-start healing. The process, known as EpiFix, demonstrated significant success in a clinical trial involving patients with diabetic foot ulcers. 92% of patients who received the treatment were completely healed in six weeks compared with only 8 percent who healed in the same time frame without the addition of the processed amniotic membrane material. The trial was so successful it was terminated earlier than anticipated. Study findings are expected to be submitted for peer reviewed journal publication shortly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2012

Paula Deen and Type 2: The Real Story

Celebrity chef Paula Deen was subjected to some withering criticism recently when the public learned that she has type 2 diabetes. How could she push butter and sugar-loaded recipes at TV viewers when she has diabetes, her critics demanded.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 29, 2012

After Twenty-one Years With Type 2 Diabetes, Bonny Damocles Feels Better Than Ever

Bonny Damocles, a longtime fan of TV shows like “Wild Kingdom,” looked at his type 2 diabetes diagnosis as his opportunity to take a walk on the wild side. When the Michigan resident learned that he had diabetes more than two decades ago, he immediately began thinking about how lions survive in the wild as inspiration for his own diet plan.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2012

Lilly Launches Glucagon Mobile App

Lilly Diabetes recently launched the free Lilly Glucagon Mobile App to educate those who support people living with type 1 diabetes. The interactive app, available on the iTunes store for iPhone and iPad devices, provides caregivers, diabetes educators, and school nurses with visual and audio emergency instructions, as well as tools to track locations of glucagon kits and alerts for expiration dates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2012

Boehringer and Lilly Introduce Online Program for Adult Type 2s

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Eli Lilly and Company have introduced My Well Planner, a new online program offering customized educational content to help adults with type 2 diabetes make simple lifestyle changes to improve their health. Sample topics include general information about type 2 diabetes, better eating habits, building physical activity into daily life, taking medication, and communication strategies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2012

Reminding Myself That My Life Is More Than Diabetes

Time after time, people without diabetes ask me how my diabetes is going. I always get a little tongue-tied because "Wow, great!" isn't really accurate, and the alternatives are complicated. Usually, something like "Uh, good, fine, hard sometimes, but um, thanks for asking" awkwardly tumbles out of my mouth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2012

Gestational Diabetes, Low Income May Increase Child’s Risk of ADHD

German scientists report that gestational diabetes and/or low income may increase a child’s risk of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the study indicates, breastfed children born under those conditions may gain some protection against ADHD.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2012

UK Study Casts Doubt on Testosterone Therapy for Depressed Type 2s

A British study of type 2 men reports that although testosterone therapy had a beneficial effect on blood glucose levels and other metabolic indicators for non-depressed men, those suffering from depression experienced no benefit. In fact, reports Geoffrey Hackett, MD, at Good Hope Hospital in Sutton Coldfield, depressed men actually experienced a worsening of symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2012

Bayer’s New Blood Glucose Meter Now Available

Bayer ‘s new blood glucose meter, the Contour® Next Link, which works with Medtronic's diabetes management system, is now available in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2012

When They Mean Well

Sometimes it isn’t a stranger or acquaintance giving you a hard time about your diabetes.  Sometimes it’s a family member or close friend that says something hurtful about your diabetes management. And that is far more difficult to hear than the guy at the table next to you in a restaurant or some lady sharing an office with you at work.

comments 14 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2012

FDA Approves New Neuropathy Pain Drug

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved US sales of NUCYNTA® ER (tapentadol), a twice-daily extended-release oral analgesic for the treatment of pain from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The drug, produced by New Jersey-based Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., provides around-the-clock management for moderate to severe chronic neuropathic pain. Janssen says that it is currently the only opioid on the US market that has been approved for treating the condition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2012

Could Skewed Biorhythms Cause Obesity?

According to a Scottish study recently published in Bioessays, the confusing signals created by modern technology's ability to turn night into day may be contributing to the global epidemic of obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  In this second part of our interview, I asked him about his motivations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2012

Mayo Clinic Says Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Forestall Type 2

The Mayo Clinic Health Letter for August 2012 has published three lifestyle changes that could stave off the progression of prediabetes to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The list isn't new, but its periodic reiteration indicates that healthcare researchers and providers have settled on a simple prescription for staying diabetes-free.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 4, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  When I caught up with Steve on a rare day when he happened to be at sea level, I asked him about his mission.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

Type 2: Intense Control May Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Older type 2s who exercise tight control over their blood sugar may run an increased risk of hip fracture, says a study from Changi General Hospital in Singapore. The researchers studied 558 elderly people with diabetes who had been treated for hip fracture between 2005 and 2010. They found that those patients had a significantly lower median A1C, 6.8%, than the control group median of 7.4%. In 59.2 percent of the hip fracture cases, the patient's A1C was less than 7%, and slightly more than three-quarters of the patients were taking sulfonylureas.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2012

Getting Sufficient Shut-eye Counts!

Can’t focus well after a poor night’s sleep? You are not alone. A small study at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital looked at 12 people during a one-month study in a sleep lab. Their sleep was cut dramatically, to a mere six hours instead of their customary ten to twelve hours.  Later, when searching for pictures on a computer, their performance was slower.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2012

US Sale of Generic Actos Gets FDA Nod

The Food and Drug Administration has approved US sale of generic pioglitazone (trade name Actos) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Actos, originally developed and trademarked by Takeda Pharmaceuticals, works by decreasing insulin resistance in type 2 patients. The prescription drug, which belongs to the class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has enjoyed great commercial success in the United States since its introduction in 1999, posting estimated sales last year of $2.7 billion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2012

Playing God

Recently, while scrolling through discussions posted on an online diabetes forum, I came across one from a man in his thirties who wrote about how paramedics had found his twin brother face down in a sauna, in an insulin shock coma.  How did he end up in such a state?  The appalling answer is, he didn't have enough glucose strips to test before he got into the hot tub.  A few weeks before the sauna incident, his insurance company had limited his glucose strips to just four per day.

comments 26 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2012

An Amazon Adventure with Bugs, Drugs, and Diabetes

Students in the healthcare field have probably attended a "bugs and drugs" lecture about bacteria and the various antibiotics used in response. Put that on a whole new level, where the "bugs and drugs" are hordes of mosquitoes and peculiar plants, and you would be envisioning my pharmacy rotation in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest. The purpose of the trip was to study medicinal plants and natural medicine, but our group definitely braved the elements as well. A few of the pleasures we got to experience included extreme heat, daily paddling of canoes down the Amazon River, tightly rationed drinking water, bathing with piranhas, stepping in quicksand, eating guinea pig, and almost sinking our canoe in a torrential downpour. Now mix in my diabetes, and you would seemingly have the recipe for the perfect storm.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2012

The New Accu-Chek Nano Blood Glucose Meter

The new Accu-Chek Nano was approved for diabetes patients in January 2012, and distribution of the product began in April. Jennifer Aspy, the director of product marketing and operations, sat down with me at the American Association of Diabetes Educators to talk about the merits of this new medical device.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 21, 2012

Social Media, Partnerships Are Top Topics at AADE12

As diabetes climbs to epidemic levels in the United States, and finding adequate resources to fund future U.S. healthcare remains in question, the need for an already existing "boots on the ground" group that can address the disease is greater than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2012

An Interview With Robert Cuddihy, MD, of Sanofi US

Endocrinologist Robert Cuddihy, MD, joined Sanofi US over a year ago to be the company’s Vice President and Medical Diabetes Head in the United States. He is responsible for developing and executing the US strategy for Sanofi’s Diabetes Division, including pharmaceuticals, devices, and other technologies. He previously served as the medical director for several organizations, including the International Diabetes Center-Park Nicollet in Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2012

Lovers of Cheddar and Gouda May Have Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

If you like cheese, there may be cause for celebration. According to a new study, eating cheese may lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2012

Biological Clock Molecule Could Become New Type 2 Treatment

UC San Diego scientists have discovered a molecule involved in regulating the biological clock that could open a new path for treating type 2 diabetes. The molecule, dubbed KL001, controls a key protein, cryptochrome, that regulates the biological clock (circadian rhythm) in plants, animals, and humans. In doing so, cryptochrome indirectly affects the liver's production of glucose. KL001 can be manipulated to induce cryptochrome to slow the liver's glucose production, thus creating a possible new therapeutic approach to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2012

Study Shows Turmeric Is Helpful to Adults With Prediabetes

A study has found that taking curcumin extract, the main ingredient of the popular Indian spice turmeric, may help ward off type 2 in those with prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2012

A Reckless Summer

As teenagers, most of us did some reckless and irresponsible things. It's part of growing up, right? But if you're a teenager with type 1 diabetes, acting reckless becomes a bit more tricky. I had a reckless summer of my own ten years ago, right after high school graduation, when I traveled down south to spend a month with my mom. I hadn't lived with her since the age of 16, so I wanted to get to know her and my younger brother again. Unfortunately, I also used that time to take a break from my diabetes regimen. It had been only four years since my diagnosis, and I wanted to feel that even though I had a disease, I was still a normal teenager who was capable of an adventure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2012

July 2012

My Pump Almost Killed Me... Twice

One of the greatest technological advancements in diabetes care has been the insulin pump.  For one, it gives you the illusion of being "normal" because you no longer have to inject insulin throughout the day. Instead, you "bolus" by pushing a button on the pump itself or using a remote control. It allows better glucose management because you can adjust your basal rate (the "background" insulin dose) by increments of one thousandth of a unit every hour.  Especially when you're moving from the peaks and valleys of NPH or the restraints and hazards of Lantus, the freedom of living with an insulin pump is incredible.  But pumps do not come without their kinks.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

Meet A New Breed Of Medical Professional: The Health Coach

This story is part of a reporting partnership that includes APRN,  and Kaiser Health News.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Improves Nighttime Control in Young Type 1s

In a small study of 10 type 1 children under the age of seven years, closed-loop insulin delivery improved their nighttime glycemic control. The therapy, delivered at Children's Hospital Boston, used an algorithm-controlled pump and continuous glucose monitor to deliver insulin on an as-needed basis as the children slept.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2012

Standing Together

If I were asked to talk about diabetes to a group of newly diagnosed people, I think I'd start by telling them that there is actually some good that comes from a life with diabetes.  While they were deciding whether I had lost my mind, I'd explain that I'm not crazy, but that there really is a saving grace when it comes to having diabetes.  It's called the diabetes online community, or DOC.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2012

Type 2: Early Therapy Helps Retain Beta Cell Function

Immediately starting intense therapy for newly diagnosed type 2s preserved their beta cell functioning for 3.5 years, according to a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2012

Fire In My Veins: A Story of Ketoacidosis

I've had type 1 diabetes for 14 long years. During that time, I have had five episodes of ketoacidosis, two of which were brought on by emotional stress.  The one that happened eight years ago, shortly after the meltdown of a serious relationship, lives vividly in my memory.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2012

Adding Liraglutide to Insulin May Help Obese Type 1s

New York researchers have reported that obese patients with type 1 diabetes who do not respond well to insulin may be able to improve their blood sugar control by adding liraglutide to their therapy. Liraglutide (brand name Victoza) is an injectible GLP-1 analog* that was introduced to the US market in 2010 to treat people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2012

A Food for Thought Issue

Over the years, Diabetes Health has covered a vast array of diabetes-related topics, from recipes and sex to celebrity interviews and scientific research. This issue is no exception-I think you'll find a lot to "chew on" here, especially in the three diet-related articles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2012

Kentucky Public Health Expert Says Diabetes Epidemic 'Really Requires Community Action And Support'

An epidemic more deadly than coal dust is sweeping through the dogwood-dappled hollows of eastern Kentucky. The new threat: diabetes.  In Kentucky and across the broad Appalachian region, a third of the population is estimated by health officials to have diabetes, double the rate for the country as a whole. Ads for diabetes counseling and testing clinics have replaced those for supermarkets as a major revenue source in local newspapers, and billboards urging middle-aged people to get tested appear almost everywhere there’s a straight stretch of highway.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2012

Type 2: Diabetes Recurrence After Bariatric Surgery May Depend on Diabetes Duration

Bariatric surgery, which alters or blocks portions of the digestive system, has produced long-term remission of diabetes symptoms in many type 2 patients. However, a small study of obese type 2 patients who underwent bariatric surgery shows that the longer they had diabetes, the greater the chances that their disease recurred after surgery. The retrospective study, conducted by Yessica Ramos, MD, at the Mayo Clinic Arizona, found that patients who had had diabetes for five years or longer were nearly four times as likely to experience a recurrence of the disease after the remission brought on by the surgery.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2012

Type 1: New Drug Class Could Lead to Neuropathy Relief

University of California researchers report that they have found a new class of drugs that could lead to a pain relief treatment for people who have diabetic neuropathy. The drugs, which were successfully tested on lab animals, are anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit the action of an enzyme called soluble epoxide hydrolase. The enzyme is key to the transmission of pain sensations. Previous research has shown that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase also lowers blood pressure and protects against kidney damage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2012

Brits Link Sleep Apnea to Diabetic Neuropathy

British scientists say that they have discovered a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. OSA is defined as having five or more events per hour of hypopnea (abnormally slow or shallow breathing). The researchers, from the University of Birmingham, UK, report that the association between the two conditions is strong despite other factors that could be used to explain the correlation. According to their findings, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the severity of the neuropathy correlates with the degree of OSA.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2012

Metformin Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

Metformin is the aspirin of the diabetes world, an almost-wonder drug that proves itself again and again the longer it's around. This time, a new study shows that postmenopausal women with diabetes who have taken metformin for several years are 25 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than nondiabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2012

June 2012

Foot Problems Pervasive In The U.S., Linked To Obesity, Sedentary Lives And Diabetes, Says New New IPFH/NPD Study Foot Health Affects Overall Health

Statesville, NC - June, 26, 2012 - A staggering 78% of U.S. adults age 21+ report they have had one or more problems with their feet at some time in their lives, according to The National Foot Health Assessment 2012, a survey conducted for the Institute for Preventive Foot Health (IPFH) by The NPD Group. The most common foot maladies, plaguing both men and women, were ankle sprains (reported by roughly one in three respondents), followed by blisters, calluses, foot fatigue, cracked skin and athlete's foot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2012

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

A small Chinese study has reported that 15 of 28 young type 1 patients, aged 14 to 30 years, who underwent an experimental adult stem cell procedure were able to stay off insulin injections for an average of 18 months. Though not conclusive, the study highlights an interesting avenue of research that could eventually dramatically reduce insulin dependence among type 1s.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2012

Things I Can't Stand About My Insulin Pump

As I said in my previous article on this subject, my insulin pump has changed my life. My A1C has improved, I've felt more energetic, and I've controlled my diabetes more effectively overall. It has been the biggest and best change in my diabetes treatment since I started on insulin a quarter-century ago.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2012

The Way I Am

My 16-year-old son and I spent the day together recently and decided to head out for burgers at lunchtime.  Sitting in a rather exposed booth at a restaurant, we chatted and began eating.  I wasn't really thinking about anything, just enjoying the rare moment of hanging out with my sweet son, when he remarked, "I'd feel so awkward if I had to do that." I asked him what he meant and actually looked around to see what he was talking about.  Then it hit me, as he mimed taking an injection and said, "Having to take shots in front of random people all the time." Moments before, I had taken a shot in my hip, capped my syringe, and popped it back into my handbag without even thinking about it.  After 18 years of shots, it's practically instinct for me.  

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2012

Things I Can't Stand About My Insulin Pump

My insulin pump has changed my life. My A1C has improved, I've felt more energetic, and I've controlled my diabetes more effectively overall. It has been the biggest and best change in my diabetes treatment since I started on insulin a quarter-century ago.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2012

Entrances and Exits

The Year
What a year I've had. From the spring of 2011 to the spring of 2012, my life changed utterly. There have been few years in my life more eventful, and few years that mixed joy and pain in such bracing amounts. With the year now done, I'm hesitant to draw any lessons--I just look back in amazement.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2012

ADA Sessions Spotlight Powerful Weapons Against Diabetes

Several hopeful trends emerged from this year's ADA Scientific Sessions in Philadelphia, held June 8 through 12.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

9 Tips To Make Testing Pain Free

Did you know there are 9 simple steps that you can take to make testing your blood glucose a lot less painful?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds

SAN DIEGO - June 15, 2012 - Dexcom, the leader in continuous glucose monitoring, is proudly sponsoring the efforts of the Diabetes Formation Flight USA(DFFUSA.org) - three pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes using Dexcom's Seven Plus as part of their effort to set new transcontinental world speed records while raising funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Israeli Biotech Company Takes Novel Approach to Diabetic Ulcer Treatment

An Israeli biotech company's cell therapy, designed to treat hard-to-heal diabetic ulcers, is now in phase 3 testing in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2012

Another Day, Another Battle

Last year, I gave birth to my daughter and shared my pregnancy and birthing experiences with you. The pregnancy was a very difficult but extremely rewarding experience. A few months after our daughter was born, my husband and I discussed whether we'd have another child. On one hand, I went through several insulin shock comas, severe insulin resistance, and pre-eclampsia, ending in an emergency cesarean section. Because my first pregnancy was so tough, we weren't sure if we wanted to risk another one. On the other hand, if we did have two children, we wanted them to be very close in age so that they could bond well. We figured that if the two children were around fifteen months apart, then my daughter would be too young to feel any tension about having another baby in the house. We hoped they'd be close enough in age that they would always have one another as a companion.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2012

Clinical Study Begins on Insulin Delivery Device for Type 2s

A clinical study has begun of a wearable device that continuously delivers basal insulin to people with type 2 diabetes. The device, PaQ®, is manufactured by CeQur SA, a Swiss company that has operations in Denmark and Massachusetts. Designed to provide three days of basal insulin delivery along with on-demand bolus insulin, the device incorporates a disposable insulin infuser reservoir attached to a reusable insulin monitor.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2012

Intensive Wellness Approach Helps Type 2s Lower Drug Doses and Costs

A Florida-based endocrinologist and his team have reported that an intensive 16-week wellness program aimed at type 2 patients yielded some dramatic results: Patients were able to decrease their insulin by 46 percent and their oral medication by 12 percent.  They saw their 30-day prescription costs drop by an average of more than $140 per month, reduced their BMI by 3.07, and experienced a drop of 0.7% in their A1C.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2012

New Adapter Allows ACCU-CHEK® Users to Access Glooko Logbook

People who use one of three ACCU-CHEK blood glucose monitoring systems and either the Apple iPhone or iPod touch can now access Glooko Inc.'s Logbook app, thanks to the introduction of the Glooko IR Adapter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 13, 2012

The Game Plan: Blood Sugar Basics

How would you like an online interactive resource for type 2 diabetes that teaches you blood sugar basics? The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have come together to develop "the Game Plan" diabetes management program. By going to the website at bloodsugarbasics.com/the-game-plan, you can get everyday tips, watch a video, take a quiz that tests your understanding of high and low blood sugar, and find advice on how to approach your healthcare team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 14 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Take the Pledge--Take Your Meds

Not taking medicine as directed causes more than one-third of medicine-related hospitalizations in the US each year, as well as almost 125,000 deaths. The following three cautionary tales illustrate the consequences of nonadherence.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2012

Cardiovascular Death Rate Among Americans With Diabetes Drops 40 Percent

Here is a statistic to warm the heart-literally: The death rate from heart disease and stroke among American adults with diabetes dropped 40 percent from 1997 to 2006, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The overall mortality rate among people with diabetes dropped 23 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 9, 2012

Eating Breakfast Lowers Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Now there's another good reason to chow down in the morning. According to a study of almost 2,000 men who did not have type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or cancer, those who didn't eat breakfast had a 21 percent higher risk of developing type 2.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 8, 2012

Type 1: FDA OKs Levemir for Two- to Five-Year-Olds

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Novo Nordisk's Levemir basal insulin for type 1 children aged two to five years. The FDA decision makes Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) the only basal insulin approved for use in this age group.
Levemir, introduced to the US market in 2006, was previously approved for older children and adults with type 1 diabetes, as well as insulin-using type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2012

A Spiritual Approach to Diabetes Care

The following article documents a very personal way of approaching diabetes.  Always check with a healthcare professional before changing your diet or your diabetes care regimen.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2012

Short Video Shows and Tells Diabetes Basics

A short animated video narrated in a woman's reassuring tone provides a basic look at diabetes. The presentation touches on the science behind the condition and explains important terms, including "pancreas," "glucose," and "insulin." It stresses the importance of regular A1C checks and taking medication if needed, while pointing out the dangers associated with not staying on top of blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2012

Breaking Bad Habits

When dealing with a chronic illness, especially one like diabetes that requires 24/7 attention, it's easy to take shortcuts and fall into bad habits.  Ask yourself the following questions to find out if you might be drifting into a few diabetes bad habits:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 4, 2012

ACE and Lilly Diabetes Offer Help Preparing for Diabetes Emergencies ACE and Lilly Diabetes Offer Help Preparing for Diabetes Emergencies

"How To" video also available to guide emergency kit creation

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

The Young and the Reckless

I'm about to tell you a secret that I've kept for 15 years.  I know that we all make mistakes with our diabetes, but the one I made back then was literally a wake-up call.  While I cringe at telling this unflattering story, I hope that it will help others realize how scary things can get quickly if you ignore your diabetes. Thankfully, the scenario that unfolded all those years ago helped bring me out of my reckless state and showed me the way to a better life with diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2012

May 2012

USDA Food Recalls Update

When it comes to diabetes management, food is probably the most important component. What we eat affects our blood sugar levels, nutrition, weight, and feelings of satisfaction and well being.

But as careful as we are about our food choices, sometimes the people who supply that food are not as careful. Fortunately, government agencies like the US Department of Agriculture help protect us by issuing recalls and warnings about foods and food suppliers that fail to meet minimum sanitary and health standards.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 31, 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

Finding the Right Diabetes Doctor

I once had a doctor ask me what I'd do if someone offered me a drink or a cigarette. I was a teenager, recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and it was the first time that I had seen her. When I told her that I didn't drink or smoke, she kept hounding me with questions as if I were lying. I grew tired of telling her the same thing over and over. She just didn't seem to hear what I was saying. Maybe she was just trying to scare me from starting, but I left feeling annoyed and convinced that I needed to find a different doctor.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 25, 2012

Study Says Best Drug Combo for Type 2 Kids Is Metformin and Rosiglitazone

A university study has concluded that a combination of metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) is the best drug therapy for controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 children and adolescents. Metformin alone is the drug most often prescribed for young or recently diagnosed type 2 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 16 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

Drinking and Driving on Memorial Day

During Memorial Day Weekend celebrations, friends often gather where alcohol is served and then take to the road. Drinking and driving is hazardous, as we all know, because alcohol affects many skills needed to drive safely and competently, including reaction time, coordination, information processing, and the ability to track moving objects.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2012

Five Ways to Rev Up Your Walking Routine

Warmer temperatures bring the opportunity to put on our walking shoes and step outside for our workouts.  But if you, like me, have been walking for many years, you may find yourself bored with the same old routine. To avoid burnout, try these five ways to rev up your walk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2012

Transplanted Gut Organisms Could Prevent Diabetes Onset

Scientists meeting recently at the International Liver Congress in Barcelona, Spain, say that microbiota-tiny organisms specific to a part of the body-transplanted from healthy people to people at risk of diabetes or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may prevent the later onset of those conditions. The procedure involves implanting small quantities of fecal matter from healthy donors into the colons of pre-diseased recipients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2012

Five Ways to Get Back on Track When You’re Burned Out

Burnout is common among people with diabetes, especially those who have had the disease for years, even decades. Diabetes management can be exhausting, confusing, and frustrating, particularly when you think you are doing everything right but your blood sugars still fail to cooperate.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 17, 2012

Taiwanese Study Identifies Top Three Drugs for Type 2 Glycemic Control

Researchers in Taipei, Taiwan, report that they have identified the top three drugs for reducing A1C levels in type 2 diabetes: biphasic insulin, GLP-1 analogs, and basal insulin. They hedged a little on their endorsement of GLP-1 analogs, however, by saying that although they are not decisively better at controlling A1Cs than other oral diabetes drugs, they have the advantage of helping to reduce weight without adding to the danger of hypoglycemia.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 16, 2012

“Reprogrammed” Cells in Mice Reverse Late-stage Type 1 Diabetes

A successful experiment on mice with type 1 diabetes, which involved "reprogramming" their immune systems to stop attacks on pancreatic beta cells, may point the way to an eventual cure for the disease in humans.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 15, 2012

Molecular Switch Could Be Key for Type 2s

With tens of millions of American facing life with type 2 diabetes and many millions more at risk of the disease, scientists are scrambling to unravel novel treatments. The latest breakthrough could come from California's Salk Institute.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2012

Making a Healthy Choice for Breakfast

For people with diabetes, breakfast is more than just a morning meal. According to recent research, it may hold the key to good blood glucose numbers for the rest of the day.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 11, 2012

Obesity Could Follow Sleepless Nights

Feeling tired? Your lack of rest may be putting you at increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. That's the conclusion of a new paper, published in The American Journal of Human Biology, that looked at evidence collected from numerous experimental and observational studies. The link was clear: People who got less than six hours of sleep a night were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI) and be obese. The connection found in the study seems stronger for children and teenagers, which is especially worrisome given the skyrocketing rates of type 2 diabetes in young people.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2012

Insulin degludec

Novo Nordisk's new variety of long-lasting insulin, insulin degludec, reduces low blood sugars while improving overall control, according to a pair of studies published in the prestigious journal The Lancet on April 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2012

The State of the States: Adherence Report

Diabetes Health recently submitted some questions to CVS Caremark Corporation regarding its "The State of the States: Adherence Report." The report compiled data from more than 50 million patients to track their level of adherence to drug prescriptions for four chronic diseases: diabetes, depression, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 4, 2012

New Blood Sugar Guidelines Give Older Type 2s More Latitude

It may be better for older people with type 2 diabetes to have less stringent A1C goals than younger type 2s, according to new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 3, 2012

Changing Habits in Midstream

About 16 years ago, after some routine blood work, I was told by my doctor that he wanted me to see an endocrinologist because he suspected diabetes. I went to see the endo, and, sure enough, his suspicions were confirmed. I had type 2 diabetes, and I had some serious changes to make.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 2, 2012

American Idol Judge Promotes Healthy Decisions for Type 2s

American Idol judge Randy Jackson has embarked upon a mission of education and advocacy, urging those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to take a stand for their health and well-being.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2012

April 2012

The Best Ingredient to Diet Success: Diet Management!

Food plays an important role in our lives. For most of us, it is more than just a means of sustenance. For some, it is a source of great pleasure. For others, it is a source of painful consequences. And for many, it is both.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2012

Vitamin Deficiencies in People With Diabetes: the Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, "I can't have surgery because I won't heal." That is certainly not the case, however.  Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2012

All in the Family

My oldest nephew, James, has a double whammy to deal with.  His aunt, yours truly, has type 1 diabetes, and so does his father. I was in the room when my sister had an ultrasound during her pregnancy with James, and I clearly remember the doctor asking her if anyone in her family had diabetes.  We shared a look as she informed the doctor of my diabetes and her husband's diabetes.  I know we also shared a silent prayer as the reality hit us that diabetes might be passed on to her children.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2012

FDA Gives Go-ahead to Bayer’s CONTOUR® Next EZ

The US Food and Drug Administration has okayed US sales of Bayer HealthCare's CONTOUR® Next EZ blood glucose monitoring system. The new BGM, currently available in other countries as the CONTOUR XT, will be available in the US market this summer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 25, 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

Driving Safely With Type 1 Diabetes

Research has shown that a few people with Type 1 diabetes are at an increased risk for having traffic accidents due to low blood sugars.  
Possibly, we can help the diabetes community. 
Researchers at the University of Virginia are conducting a study evaluating internet tools designed to:
• • Anonymously assess risk for ALL drivers with Type 1 diabetes of being in an accident and 
• • Potentially help reduce the chance of high-risk drivers being in a future collision.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 21, 2012

Weight-Loss Surgery Produces Dramatic Results in Type 2s

Bariatric surgery, not medications, may be the key to producing dramatic drops in weight and even the remission of diabetes symptoms among type 2 patients, says a study from the University of Rome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2012

The ADA Chicago Expo Dishes Up Southern Hospitality and Much More

I was a mixture of nerves and excitement as I met one of my favorite celebrity chefs at the American Diabetes Association's Expo in Chicago on April 14th.  Jamie Deen, Paula Deen's adorable, blue-eyed, dimpled son, was there doing a food demonstration, meeting with fans, and extending a healthy dose of warm smiles and pure southern hospitality.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2012

Medicare To Tie Doctors' Pay To Quality, Cost Of Care

Twenty thousand physicians in four Midwest states received a glimpse into their financial future last month. Landing in their e-mail inboxes were links to reports from Medicare showing the amount their patients cost on average as well as the quality of the care they provided. The reports also showed how Medicare spending on each doctor's patients compared to their local peers in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2012

Even 1% Weight Loss Improves Mobility in Older Type 2s

Just a 1 percent weight loss in older people with type 2 diabetes can improve their physical mobility by up to 7 percent, according to a new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2012

Are You Comfortable Sharing Your A1C?

Some people are perfectly happy divulging their three-month blood sugar average, known as an A1C, but I'd rather walk barefoot across hot coals than share my A1C number.  It's funny, because I'm actually kind of proud of it these days.  It's by no means perfect and could definitely stand to be lower, but I've come a long way.  There was a time in my life when my diabetes was out of control and my A1C results were shameful.  I felt so embarrassed and disappointed in myself, and the worst part was, I felt hopeless.  Thankfully, I have maintained a substantial A1C drop for years now.

comments 11 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

To Love a Diabetic

To love a diabetic is to be a doctor. It means helping her to remember her medications. It means driving her for an hour to the only 24 hour pharmacy when she's gotten the flu and can't take the Nyquil in the refrigerator. Or driving her to the hospital when the simple flu turns into bronchitis and her blood turns acidic.

comments 32 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2012

Eating White Rice May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

An examination of several studies that included a total of 350,000 people has linked high consumption of white rice with an increase in type 2 diabetes. A comparison of the studies that were conducted in China and Japan, where white rice is a staple, indicated that people there were 55 percent more likely to develop the disease than Asian people who ate the least rice.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 9, 2012

Potassium May Help Prevent Diabetes

To discover the relationship between potassium levels and type 2 diabetes, a Johns Hopkins University study looked at more than 12,000 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), performed in 1987 and 1996. The study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes among study participants went down. The more than 2,000 African Americans in the study had lower average potassium levels than the 9,000 Caucasians and were twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2012

Yogurt Drink Tamps Down Type 2 Inflammation

Iranian scientists report that a traditional Middle Eastern yogurt drink, doogh, when fortified with vitamin D, decreases the markers that indicate inflammation in persons with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2012

Surgery Works Better Than Drugs at Blood Sugar Control in Obese Patients

An Ohio-based study of overweight and obese type 2 patients shows that weight loss surgery works much better at controlling blood sugar levels than any known drug treatment.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2012

Imagining the Unimaginable

As I listen to the news of the recent Mega Millions jackpot of over $600 million, my dreams aren't about fast cars, vast mansions, or plush vacations. My thoughts revolve around my diabetes. How awesome would it be to have the best care that money can buy?

comments 7 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2012

March 2012

Healthy Gums and Diabetes: Study Seems to Show a Beneficial Connection

Healthcare providers and most people with diabetes are aware that there is a connection between gum health and complications from diabetes. Unhealthy gums are thought to be both a result of the disease and a gateway to infections and complications to which diabetes opens the door.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2012

Am I Doing the Right Thing?

Readers occasionally ask us for advice about drugs they are taking. When they do, we refer their questions to a medical professional. In the question below, a Florida reader expresses concerns about the interaction of her diabetes drug with the medicines she takes for asthma.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2012

Type 1 Diabetes Researchers Reach Important Milestone

Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international network of researchers exploring ways to prevent and delay the progression of type 1 diabetes, has reached an important milestone: screening 100,000 people to detect who among is at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This is a major achievement because it has helped researchers better predict who will develop diabetes and when it will require treatment. Earlier diagnosis helps patients avoid a severe, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2012

Keep Your Fingers Crossed: FDA Approves Artificial Pancreas Outpatient Trial

The FDA has approved the start of outpatient trials of a smart phone-based monitoring device that functions as an artificial pancreas. If the device, which automatically measures blood glucose levels and adjusts them with insulin, is successful, several million type 1 patients could enjoy a whole new level of convenience.

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2012

Spring Break With Diabetes

It's spring break again, when thousands of people head to the beach. A lot of wonderful things come with being out and about on spring break, but if you have diabetes, there are also several things you should consider. There's going to be more traffic, fewer parking places, lots of people, an abundance of uncalculated carbohydrate sources, and longer waits for everything, to name just a few.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2012

Metformin Shines Again: Long-Term Use Helps Prevent Type 2

Long-term use of metformin as a weight loss aid is both safe and effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, says the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2012

3 Factors Combine to Dramatically Increase Risk of Type 2

Three risk factors-insulin resistance, fatty liver, and overweight/obesity-that are commonly associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes can each, by itself, substantially increase the risk of developing the disease. But in individuals that have all three factors working in combination, the risk of developing type 2 in a five-year period increases 14-fold.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2012

My Fight With Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

After my recent heart attack, it got harder to keep my diabetes under control. No matter how hard I try, I'm always struggling with my sugar levels these days. Checking them at every meal and at bedtime is a job, but it keeps me healthy and alive. So many people I know have died from diabetes, in part because they failed to do the daily maintenance that came with controlling their condition.

When I was told that I have coronary artery disease, I was baffled. After all, I am only 36, and CAD is a condition of the elderly, or so I thought. The heart specialist, however, let me know that anyone may be susceptible to the condition. Coronary artery disease is caused by a buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels increase the risk of heart attack because the sugar in the blood damages blood vessels throughout the body, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2012

Diabetes and Exercise

Do you struggle with controlling your sugar levels during exercise? When my doctor changed my exercise regimen after my heart attack, my biggest struggle was keeping my sugar levels stable. We all like to see low numbers, but no one likes the shaking associated with low blood sugar or that feeling we have for the rest of the day after our levels have fluctuated. So how low is too low before working out?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Type 1s May Produce Insulin for Decades After Diagnosis

Massachusetts researchers have found that even years after they are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, some people continue to possess functioning beta cells. This finding departs from the conventional thinking that in type 1 diabetes beat cell activity inevitably ceases--the result of attacks on the cells by the body's immune system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2012

Self-Monitoring Benefits New Type 2s in the First Year

If you are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and don't take insulin, a new study says that you are likely to have better A1Cs if you have access to blood glucose testing supplies and use them. The finding comes from a large Cochrane review of previous studies that took place in many countries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2012

Study Shows Vitamin D Wards Off Stroke

Everyone needs vitamin D to be healthy and maintain strong bones, but a new study has found that it may also protect against stroke. In the study, 21,000 people aged 45 and older answered a food questionnaire. According to the findings, presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference, there was an 11 percent reduction in stroke among those who consumed the most vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2012

Diabetes Camp: What You Should Know

There are more than 200 diabetes camps in North America, offering more than 400 programs to more than 30,000 youths and young adults with diabetes and their families. One in 400 children has type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in children, once rare, is increasingly common due to obesity. Education and motivation are vital to healthy management of the disease. Diabetes camps empower children and their families to meet the rigorous demands of diabetes, allowing them to be healthy, active, and motivated to reach their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2012

My Vision Scare

One night last week I was awakened by the sound of my dogs barking, and I jumped out of bed to check for intruders. As I ran down the hallway, I realized that something was wrong with my right eye: It had an image, like someone had flashed a bright light into it. I blinked wildly, trying to regain my normal vision, but the image remained. As I sat on the couch after checking the house, I was scared to death, not of intruders, but of the thought that diabetes had finally invaded my eyes. The image soon subsided, but I made an appointment with a retina specialist the next morning and braced myself for the worst.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 14, 2012

Newly Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes? Be Sure Your Doctor Prescribes a Generic First

According to a study of patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 35 percent of the time their physicians did not follow the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guideline that calls for prescribing a generic drug first. The study, conducted by researchers from CVS Caremark, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, reviewed the pharmacy claims of 254,000 patients who were started on a diabetes medication in January 2006 and December 2008. One-third of the treatment regimens did not adhere to the ADA guideline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2012

Unnecessary, Expensive Tests Performed for Diabetic Neuropathy

One quarter of patients with diabetic neuropathy undergo unnecessary, expensive tests, according to a study by Brian Callaghan, MD, of the University of Michigan Medical School. When Dr. Callaghan and his team looked at 1996-2007 Medicare claims of patients diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy, they found that the most common test performed was an MRI of the brain or spine. There were far fewer instances of glucose tolerance tests. Other tests that were done, but much less often, included fasting glucose levels, A1Cs, vitamin B12 levels, and serum protein electrophoresis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2012

Medtronic’s New CAD Stent Is a Boon for Diabetic Patients

(Editor's Note: Some information in this article is from a press release issued by Medtronic, Inc.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2012

Please Don’t Imply That I Caused My Diabetes.

When it comes to diabetes, people often blame the patient instead of the disease. I cannot think of another chronic illness for which this is the case. Much of the public seems to believe that we bring diabetes on ourselves. When people with diabetes are diagnosed with complications, uninformed observers often insist that it happened because they were "bad diabetics." Comments like "She didn't take care of herself" make me instantly defensive and angry. How can anyone know what that person went through on a day-to-day basis with her diabetes?

comments 11 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2012

New Wound Test Could Cut Diabetes Amputation Rate

For people with diabetes, elevated blood sugar adversely affects the ability to heal. Their slow-healing wounds invite hard-to-treat infections that can eventually lead to amputation. In fact, they are 15 times more likely to undergo limb amputations than people without diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2012

Veganism and Diabetes

As I was sitting in the hospital after a heart attack, my cardiologist walked in and said, "You have to stop eating meat." "Red meat?" I asked hopefully. "All meat," he replied firmly. It was disconcerting, to say the least, because meat has been in my life since I could feed myself. But my cardiologist explained, "If you don't want to end up back here again, you will start on an plant-based diet immediately." That day, I stopped eating meat. In fact, I asked the hospital food service to switch me to a vegetarian diet.

comments 9 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2012

Two Studies Confirm the Role of Exercise in Blood Glucose Control

Two recent studies confirm the powerful role that exercise plays in controlling blood glucose levels. The first study, conducted by University of Missouri researchers and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, found that blood glucose levels tend to spike during periods of inactivity. The second study, conducted by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia and published in Diabetes Care, shows that office employees who take short light-exercise breaks every 20 minutes enjoy a 30 percent reduction in blood glucose levels.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2012

ACP Guidelines Say Metformin Is the Best Starter Drug for Type 2s

The latest clinical guidelines for treating type 2 diabetes from the American College of Physicians (ACP) indicate that when diet, exercise, and weight loss fail to control blood sugar levels in early type 2 patients, physicians should prescribe metformin as the first drug therapy.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2012

February 2012

Diagnosed After Sixty: Medication Not Required

"I knew I didn't eat a totally healthy diet because bread is a big weakness of mine. Worse, exercise was something I kept planning to do but hadn't gotten around to," recalls 62-year-old Laura M., who lives in a New York City suburb. "I had been feeling more tired than usual and had a cut on my right leg that seemed to be healing slowly, but other than that I felt fine. When during the course of an annual check-up, my doctor said I had diabetes, I practically fell apart."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2012

Hear Me, Doctor

During my 14 years with type 1 diabetes and my time spent interacting with the diabetes online community, I constantly hear the same theme: Doctors aren't listening to their patients, and their bedside manners are deteriorating. Every day, it seems, I hear about people who have been treated as if they are simply a number or dismissed as uneducated in their own health conditions.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2012

Neurologists Issue New Guideline for Treating Neuropathy

A team of neurologists has issued a new set of recommendations for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, including drugs and other treatments that have been found to be the most effective therapies for the condition.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2012

Metformin Could Protect Women Against Endometrial Cancer

British researchers say that metformin, the drug most often used to treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, could provide potential protection against endometrial cancer in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2012

Men With Diabetes More Likely to Need Invasive ED Treatments

A study of medical claims data from more than 136,000 men shows that men with diabetes are much more likely to require invasive therapies for erectile dysfunction than men without diabetes. The therapies, which are the next steps beyond oral treatments, are second-line suppositories or injections and third-line surgeries to implant prostheses.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 23, 2012

Gluten-Free Diet Doesn’t Lower Diabetes Risk

A gluten-free diet in the first 12 months of life does not lower the risk of later developing type 1 diabetes in children who have a family history of the disease, says a German study. Previous studies had suggested that babies whose diets included gluten in their first months of life might be more likely to develop type 1 than youngsters whose diets did not.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 22, 2012

Hypoglycemia Affects Productivity at Work

A survey of type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany indicates that more than one in every five have arrived late at work or not shown up at all because of a hypoglycemic episode the night before.

comments 16 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

Routine Tests Can Identify Risk of Gestational Diabetes Years Before Pregnancy

Up to seven years before she becomes pregnant, a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy can be identified based on routinely assessed measures of blood sugar and body weight, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the online issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2012

An Update on Bydureon

You've heard of the blockbuster drug Byetta, a daily injection for type 2 diabetes? Byetta's sister product, Bydureon, which is injected just once a week, has just been approved by the FDA and is available in pharmacies.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2012

Diabetes and Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

The Blood Sugar Blame Game

Wiped out and dejected, that's my state of mind this morning. I had a really low blood sugar, and it's left me feeling like I've been in a fight. My arms and legs feel heavy, and my "low" headache lingers, but I remind myself that it could be worse. I'm fine, I treated it, and my day will go on.

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2012

“You Have Diabetes.” Momentary Panic, Then Dedication and Determination

My best friend from high school, Katherine, married a wonderful man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a little over two years ago. John Schaaf, now 60, lives with Katherine in Berkeley, Calif., and works for Chevron Corporation in nearby Richmond.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2012

Spotlight on Supplements

Cinnamon, chromium, and alpha-lipoic acid are dietary supplements that have been studied for diabetes management, but are not commonly found in daily multivitamins. Chromium* and cinnamon have the least supportive evidence of efficacy, while some studies have found alpha-lipoic acid to be promising, at least subjectively, in reducing the discomforts of peripheral neuropathy.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 12, 2012

Managing In-Home Sharps Disposal

Burbank, Calif.-February 2012 - Although it is illegal to throw used needles and syringes in the trash in California, more than 936 million home-generated sharps end up in the waste stream annually, according to CalRecycle. This is often due to the lack of convenient return options for users of these medical products.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2012

Keeping Up With Baby

My son learned to crawl last month. As a part-time stay-at-home dad, I found it both exciting and terrifying. Through crawling, my son has entered a new stage in life. He might have rolled or scooted a few feet before, but now he can see something in another room and make up his mind to go there.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2012

Diabetic Amputations Down Significantly Since 1996

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that foot and leg amputations decreased dramatically between 1996 and 2008. Over those 12 years, amputations dropped from 11 out of every 1,000 diabetic adults to only four-a decrease of almost 64 percent. Over the same period, however, the number of people officially diagnosed with diabetes tripled.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2012

The Seasons of Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't confine itself to a single week or month. It's a year-round condition, and each season offers its own challenges and opportunities for those of us with the disease. We should be prepared to change and evolve as the seasons shift--not only to stay healthy, but also to enjoy all the fun that our dynamic world offers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 7, 2012

FDA OKs Sale of Combo Drug JANUMET® XR

The FDA has approved US sales of JANUMET® XR, a daily oral treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin and extended-release metformin. The drug is the fourth oral type 2 diabetes treatment introduced by Merck, which also sells JANUVIA, JANUMET, and JUVISYNC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2012

An Inside View of Barley Beta Glucan

Barley has more beta glucan fiber than any other grain, and it has repeatedly established positive clinical results with regard to diabetes control. It not only boosts immune function by supporting macrophages and neutrophils, lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and helps control obesity, but also attenuates postprandial glucose levels, improves insulin sensitivity, and promotes a feeling of satiety.

comments 6 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2012

Community-based Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Programs for Children

Due to the rising rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases related to obesity, children are expected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents for the first time in modern history. One in every three children aged two to 19 years is overweight or obese, and one-third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes during their lifetime.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2012

FDA Gives Long-Awaited Nod to Amylin’s Bydureon

After several years of delays and setbacks, Amylin Pharmaceuticals has received FDA approval to begin US marketing of BydureonTM. The first once-a-week type 2 therapy to be offered in the US market, Bydureon is expected to be available by February. Amylin says that its wholesale price will be about $4,200 a year.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2012

Keeping My Feet Healthy

Winter in Chicago is catching up with my diabetic feet.  No matter how much I lotion up before bed, the cracks are beginning to show.  I recall a visit to my endocrinologist where she tested for sensitivity and scoped for cracks, wounds, or anything out of the ordinary.  She told me how lucky I was that the skin on my feet was smooth and well maintained.  She said to keep up with what I was doing.  Though truthfully, I wasn't doing anything, it was summer and my feet were in good condition because of the warm weather and pure luck. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2012

The Badge of Courage

Two years ago, I was a different woman. I was just beginning to come out of my diabetes shell, assessing my confidence with strangers by testing in public and telling friends about my disease. I can still feel the panic rising in my throat as I told people that I have diabetes and need to take injections multiple times per day. I was afraid of rejection, afraid that they would treat me like a sick person. But after eleven years of fighting for my life with type 1 diabetes, I was tired of being afraid. The more people I told, the easier it got.

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2012

January 2012

Too Tired for Sex

Dear DH, I'm a 47-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008. For two years, I haven't been interested in sex. I have a demanding retail job and two teenage children. I can still perform, but I am usually so tired that I fall asleep after dinner. I don't miss sex much, but my wife does, and I don't want to lose her. By the way, my A1C usually runs around 6.8%.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2012

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2012

Animas Receives Warning Letter From the FDA

Animas Corporation, a division of Johnson & Johnson that manufactures insulin pumps, has been reprimanded by the FDA for not reporting serious problems resulting from use of its equipment. The parent company was warned that it could face fines and more for selling faulty insulin pumps and failing to disclose serious injuries to diabetic patients who used the OneTouch Ping and 2020 insulin pumps. According to reports, J&J continued to sell the pumps even after the company knew that some had failed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 29, 2012

Diagnostic Tool Uses Light to Determine Diabetes Risk

Until now, drawing blood has been an unavoidable component of being tested for prediabetes and diabetes. Nobody enjoys the process, and it probably makes many people shy away from undergoing diagnosis at all.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 28, 2012

MTV’s True Life: I Have Diabetes

With the recent news of Paula Deen's battle with type 2 diabetes, diabetes has been getting some negative coverage in the media. I've even heard comments like " No wonder Paula Deen has diabetes when she eats so much sugar and butter." This is frustrating because it perpetuates the false stereotype that all people with diabetes are the same.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2012

The Diabetes Epidemic in India

A young man in his early thirties struggles through traffic on his small Honda motorbike. As he enjoys a short break at a traffic signal, one foot on the road, his eyes are attracted to a billboard picturing a succulent burger. While he gazes, fantasizing about lunch, his vision starts to blur.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2012

Lessons Learned About Diabetes and Self-Care

In my work as a prevention health technician in the Lakota community of South Dakota, I encourage people to ask questions and learn the facts about diabetes. Once they are aware of what diabetes is and how they can prevent or control it, they become empowered.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2012

A Heart Attack at Age 35

Like I did, you may take it for granted that you don't have to worry about having a heart attack. You may assume that heart attacks only happen to senior citizens. But I am living proof that there is no age limit to heart attack. At age 35, just three days after Christmas, it happened to me.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2012

After Shock

I wake in the morning with the taste of sour milk on my tongue. I'm sweating, extremely weak and disoriented. My muscles ache at the thought of moving. I have a sick feeling in my stomach, and it's threatening to come up my throat. I'm not sure what day it is. Nausea hits in a wave, sending chills down my spine.

comments 28 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2012

New LifeScan Meter Alerts Users About Blood Sugar Patterns

LifeScan has introduced the OneTouch® VerioTM IQ, a meter that not only tracks and displays blood sugar patterns, but also announces them with messages, such as "Looks like your blood sugar has been running LOW around this time."

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2012

Aussie Scientists Say a Complex Sugar Is Key to Beta Cell Protection

Australian scientists have discovered that when a complex sugar crucial to the survival of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells is degraded by the body's immune system, the beta cells die.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2012

There’s No Shame in Taking Insulin Injections in Public

Recently, there has been a great deal of discussion on the subject of testing your blood sugar and taking insulin shots in public. A shocking number of people on social networks have commented that their family members don't want them to test their blood sugar or take their shots in public. They report having to inject in restrooms or even through their clothing to avoid drawing attention or offending their families. One hypersensitive husband even objected when his recently diagnosed wife took a shot in the relative privacy of their car.

comments 40 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2012

Surgery Doesn’t Have to Be an Ordeal for People With Diabetes

North Carolina-based Marc S. Stevens, MD, FACS, is one of the top orthopedic surgeons in the country. Previously, while practicing in Little Rock, he was named Arkansas Physician of the Year.  In addition to his orthopedic expertise, Dr. Stevens has developed a reputation as an expert in nutrition, especially as it relates to wound healing, bone and joint health, and healthy weight. To learn more about Dr. Marc S. Stevens go to www.DRSHealthInc.com

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Remote Diabetes Monitor

Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc., has announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has given it the go-ahead to market its mySentry monitor, which allows caregivers to check the blood sugar of a diabetic person sleeping in another room. The bedside monitor, which costs around $3,000, works in tandem with Medtronic's MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, a combined insulin pump/continuous glucose monitor unit.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2012

Diabetes Resolutions for the New Year

A new year means new beginnings. Traditionally, it's a time to resolve to make changes for the better in our lives. This year, I decided to write a resolution list dedicated specifically to diabetes. I hope that some of you will want to try these ideas with me.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2012

Recovery

My baby girl had just been born. I was in the postoperation room after going through a cesarean section. My husband went to get my parents, who had been waiting for twelve hours in the waiting room. A nurse laid my little girl in an incubator next to my bed and checked her blood sugar, which was normal, in the mid-40 range. Fifteen minutes later the nurse checked her again, and it registered in the mid-30s. I watched as the nurse fed my baby her first ounces of food. I was still too numb to even know that I had legs, much less to be able to wiggle my toes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2012

Even if They Don’t Add Pounds, Sugary Drinks Up Heart, Diabetes Risks

Some women who drink two of more sugary beverages daily are lucky: their consumption of sweetened drinks doesn't put on extra weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2012

Instructional Video Available for Spring Universal Infusion Set

Spring Health Solutions, Inc., has released an instructional video describing its Spring Universal Infusion Set, recently approved by the FDA and Health Canada. The video, at www.SpringUniversal.com, is designed to help consumers properly use the product.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2012

Just 30 Minutes Per Week of Intense Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar

Canadian researchers report that just 30 minutes of intense exercise per week can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after each exercise session and help prevent post-prandial spikes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2012

Pain and Joy

As I explained in my previous articles, I was pre-eclamptic and was admitted to the hospital at 37 weeks. I had a migraine that lasted for ten hours after I entered the emergency room. I had experienced migraines before and knew that Tylenol wouldn't ease the pain, so I went untreated even in the hospital. About twelve hours after admission, I was brought to the women's floor, where I waited for my already injected Levemir supply to diminish in my bloodstream.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 2, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Finding Relief From Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is more common in people with diabetes than you may realize.  My own painful experience with frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, happened a few years ago.  I slipped and fell down the stairs at home, hitting the wall and nearly every stair from top to bottom.  I injured an ankle and lost my big toenail in the accident.  As I began healing, I also noticed that my left arm wouldn't go above my head.

comments 13 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2011

Birthing Options

Throughout pregnancy and all the way up until labor, I was adamant that I was not having a cesarean section. I was terrified of being cut open because I know that my healing time is longer due to my lowered immune system. In 2009, I had to go to the emergency room for an infection caused by cutting my leg while shaving, so how could I possibly heal after being opened up to birth a baby?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

Support on the Diabetes Journey

Diagnosed with diabetes at age 15, Brandy Barnes went on to a successful career as a pharmaceuticals salesperson, but she deeply missed having other diabetic women in her life to whom she could relate. Finally, after a difficult pregnancy, long thought, and prayer, she founded DiabetesSisters (www.diabetes.sisters.org), a North Carolina-based nonprofit organization that provides education and support to women of all ages with all types of diabetes. DS offers conferences, websites, blogs, and a "sister match" program, all designed to lessen feelings of isolation and deepen bonds of connection among women with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2011

Complications in the Third Trimester

Editor' Note: This article continues Katherine Marple's series on pregnancy with diabetes as a complicating factor. For previous articles, enter her name in the search feature at the top right-hand of this website. The next installment, "Birthing Options," will appear on December 30.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2011

Coming Soon: A New and Better Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage to blood vessels of the retina. Almost everyone who has had diabetes for thirty years or more has some sign of the condition. Now, retinopathy researchers have come up with a device that will be implanted behind a patient's eye to deliver medication on demand. "We wanted to come up with a safe and effective way to help diabetic patients safeguard their sight," said lead author Mu Chiao, a mechanical engineering associate professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, in Science Daily. "This new device offers improvements upon existing implantable devices for drug delivery."

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2011

3 Drugs on the Horizon Could Help the Fight Against Obesity

Health experts are unanimous that obesity or being overweight are major factors in the onset of type 2 diabetes. So it's no surprise that researchers here and abroad are working to develop weight-loss drugs that can help people shed pounds and lessen their susceptibility to diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 23, 2011

Standing Up For Sugar, the Hypoglycemia Alert Dog  

We are a tight-knit community.  I'm not talking about my neighbors in my hometown of Chicago.  I'm talking about my worldwide neighbors in the diabetic online community.  Anyone dealing with diabetes knows the bond that it brings.  When a person with diabetes is wronged, the rest of us feel the sting.  Most of us living with diabetes have stories about people badgering our diet choices, saying inappropriate or insensitive things, and, sadly, crossing the line even further.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2011

Medicare’s Competitive Bidding Program Fails to Offer Diabetes Supplies as Promised

In some US markets, people with diabetes who are covered by Medicare cannot get the mail order diabetes testing supplies that Medicare promised.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 19, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

Novo Says Early Use of Victoza Aids Type 2 Control

News from Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk reinforces the growing trend toward using a two-drug combination in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes. (See "A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy Type 2 Diabetes" for more discussion about the phenomenon.)

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2011

Optimizing Life With a Chronic Health Problem

A staggering 45 percent of Americans deal with chronic illness. This, of course, includes diabetes. Danea Horn, a certified life coach, speaker, author, and 30-year chronic disease patient, has just released a new report: "How to Develop a Positive Attitude When You Are Coping With Illness."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2011

Why Didn’t Someone Tell Me That?

I wish there were a fail-safe manual for diabetes. Just when I'm thinking about how great my blood sugars have been, bam! I see a 300 on my meter, or a 40. It's so hard to know why: The off numbers could be due to hormones, stress, sickness, an incorrect carb count, varying activity levels, or any combination thereof. With diabetes, you really do learn as you go. Here are a few things I have learned along the way.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2011

A Single Healthy Choice Slashes Type 2 Risk

Here's good news for people who love nuts and Greek yogurt! Replacing even one serving of red meat with these tasty foods can substantially lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 11, 2011