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Blood Glucose Article Archives

May 2014

Diabetes Health: crossword puzzle #3

Here is something new at Diabetes Health -a crossword puzzle. This 3rd crossword puzzle should be easy for the veterans with diabetes (Everyone will be challenged at one point or another.)

comments 2 comments - Posted May 18, 2014

March 2013

February 2013

Guard Your Kidney Health!

If you are a diabetic, you’ve likely been cautioned by your physician about the consequences of allowing your blood sugar to run high. You may have shrugged off the horror stories about how unchecked high blood sugar can damage your eyes, your heart, and circulation to your extremities. You probably have thought, “I’m young (or relatively so), and it’s not going to be as bad as all that."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2013

My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I heart carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2013

Tandem Announces Two Partnerships

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. has teamed with Dexcom to expand an existing partnership to include development of Dexcom’s latest continuous glucose monitoring system, the G4 Platinum. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new CGM in October.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2013

Exenatide Bests Insulin Detemir in Head-to-Head Test

Sooner or later most type 2s face the choice of whether they should begin using insulin. As the effectiveness of metformin or sulfonylureas fades, physicians often look to insulin as the safest, most effective means of asserting control over blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2013

January 2013

Reminding Myself How Serious Those Low Blood Sugars Really Are

I was having my second low of the day at work recently when I got "the headache." If you have type 1 diabetes you probably know the one. It doesn't ever go away quickly and never without having to pop a couple pain relievers. I was popping more than a couple peppermint-flavored chocolates and glucose tabs and waiting for the low to go away before I could even reach for the Advil to help ease the pounding in my head.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

December 2012

New ADA Guidelines Revise Blood Pressure Goals, Testing Frequencies

The American Diabetes Association’s newly released 2013 edition of its annual “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” recommends two notable changes:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2012

Study Shows DAFNE Helps Type 1s Manage Their Diabetes

Education as part of routine care is the key to successful treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2012

Taking Linagliptin May Protect Kidney Function

Taking linagliptin seems to help protect the kidneys in people with type 2 diabetes. The drug, usually used along with diet, exercise, and sometimes other medications, lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2012

November 2012

Israeli Study Says Whey Protein Helpful Against Type 2

Scientists at Tel Aviv University in Israel report that taking whey protein isolates or concentrates may help treat type 2 diabetes and prevent obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2012

Don’t be a Turkey on Thanksgiving, Plan Ahead!

I really look forward to Thanksgiving. For me, it’s a great time to spend with family and friends, watch some ballgames on TV and eat. All those wonderful traditional dishes that taste so good are ready for my undivided attention. But for a diabetic, Thanksgiving dinner can be a bit tricky when it comes to controlling your blood glucose levels.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2012

FDA Approves Dexcom’s G4

The FDA has approved U.S. sales of Dexcom's G4TM PLATINUM continuous glucose monitor. The San Diego-based manufacturer said it is taking orders and plans to begin shipping the device to patients within the next few weeks.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

Stan Bush: Managing Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs

Stan Bush wasn't really surprised to find out he had type 2 diabetes. An unhealthy diet that regularly featured containers of ice cream before bed had left him primed for the disease. But how he handled the news was a surprise, at least to his doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2012

High Blood Sugar Associated With Brain Shrinkage

Do people on the high end of the normal range of blood sugar levels develop the same brain shrinkage and tendency toward dementia that has been found in those with type 2 diabetes? According to an Australian study, the answer appears to be yes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2012

October 2012

Type 2: Finnish Study Says Statins Users Run Higher Diabetes Risk

Recently, a Finnish study evaluated nearly 2,800 nondiabetic individuals, close to 500 of whom were using statins, after they had participated in a year of lifestyle interventions intended to improve their glucose metabolism. (Statins are lipid-lowering drugs that inhibit an enzyme crucial to the production of serum cholesterol; high cholesterol is associated with hardening of the arteries and cardiovascular problems.) The study was conducted by Dr. Nina Rautio and colleagues at Pirkanmaa Hospital in Tampere, Finland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2012

Cinnamon May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Like the taste of cinnamon? If you do and you have type 2 diabetes, a daily cinnamon supplement may help control your condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2012

ACCU-CHEK Combo Insulin Pump Now Available in U.S.

Roche Diagnostics says that its ACCU-CHEK Combo insulin pump system is now available in the US market. The system uses Bluetooth wireless technology to allow a glucose meter/insulin pump combination exchange data.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

September 2012

Bayer’s New Blood Glucose Meter Now Available

Bayer ‘s new blood glucose meter, the Contour® Next Link, which works with Medtronic's diabetes management system, is now available in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2012

July 2012

Fire In My Veins: A Story of Ketoacidosis

I've had type 1 diabetes for 14 long years. During that time, I have had five episodes of ketoacidosis, two of which were brought on by emotional stress.  The one that happened eight years ago, shortly after the meltdown of a serious relationship, lives vividly in my memory.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2012

Adding Liraglutide to Insulin May Help Obese Type 1s

New York researchers have reported that obese patients with type 1 diabetes who do not respond well to insulin may be able to improve their blood sugar control by adding liraglutide to their therapy. Liraglutide (brand name Victoza) is an injectible GLP-1 analog* that was introduced to the US market in 2010 to treat people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2012

June 2012

9 Tips To Make Testing Pain Free

Did you know there are 9 simple steps that you can take to make testing your blood glucose a lot less painful?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds

SAN DIEGO - June 15, 2012 - Dexcom, the leader in continuous glucose monitoring, is proudly sponsoring the efforts of the Diabetes Formation Flight USA(DFFUSA.org) - three pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes using Dexcom's Seven Plus as part of their effort to set new transcontinental world speed records while raising funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2012

New Adapter Allows ACCU-CHEK® Users to Access Glooko Logbook

People who use one of three ACCU-CHEK blood glucose monitoring systems and either the Apple iPhone or iPod touch can now access Glooko Inc.'s Logbook app, thanks to the introduction of the Glooko IR Adapter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 13, 2012

Breaking Bad Habits

When dealing with a chronic illness, especially one like diabetes that requires 24/7 attention, it's easy to take shortcuts and fall into bad habits.  Ask yourself the following questions to find out if you might be drifting into a few diabetes bad habits:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 4, 2012

May 2012

Drinking and Driving on Memorial Day

During Memorial Day Weekend celebrations, friends often gather where alcohol is served and then take to the road. Drinking and driving is hazardous, as we all know, because alcohol affects many skills needed to drive safely and competently, including reaction time, coordination, information processing, and the ability to track moving objects.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2012

April 2012

FDA Gives Go-ahead to Bayer’s CONTOUR® Next EZ

The US Food and Drug Administration has okayed US sales of Bayer HealthCare's CONTOUR® Next EZ blood glucose monitoring system. The new BGM, currently available in other countries as the CONTOUR XT, will be available in the US market this summer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 25, 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

February 2012

Men With Diabetes More Likely to Need Invasive ED Treatments

A study of medical claims data from more than 136,000 men shows that men with diabetes are much more likely to require invasive therapies for erectile dysfunction than men without diabetes. The therapies, which are the next steps beyond oral treatments, are second-line suppositories or injections and third-line surgeries to implant prostheses.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 23, 2012

December 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

November 2011

Study Suggests Hearing Loss Is More Common Among People With Diabetes

People with diabetes may want to have their hearing checked, based on a study that found hearing problems twice as common among them as among people without diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2011

Heather Shields Raises Diabetes Awareness in the Miss California Pageant

Heather Shields was thrilled when she got the opportunity to dance with the famous Joffrey Ballet School in New York City. At 11 years old, she dreamed of one day becoming a professional ballerina, and this trip would bring her dream a little closer. A long way from home for this California girl, Heather traveled with her family to the "Big Apple" for the month of July. During that month she remembers dancing six to seven hours a day in the heat of the summer. She began losing weight, but shrugged it off, assuming she'd caught her mom's stomach bug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2011

The Final Weeks of Pregnancy- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Final weeks of pregnancy! The third trimester brings about many more ultrasound scans and measurements taken to judge the growth and health of your child. You'll likely be visiting your OB/GYN or maternal fetal medicine office twice per week for non-stress tests to ensure that your baby is healthy and active.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2011

October 2011

Novo Says Early Use of Victoza Aids Type 2 Control

News from Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk reinforces the growing trend toward using a two-drug combination in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes. (See "A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes" for more discussion about this phenomenon.) In a study it released in Lisbon, Portugal, at the recent meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Novo said that combining its recently released drug Victoza® (liraglutide) with another drug early in therapy helps recently diagnosed type 2s achieve greater blood glucose control than they can with a single drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2011

September 2011

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock in the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Diabetes

A couple of factors lead to increased risk of insulin shock comas during the first trimester.  For many, insulin sensitivity increases and the pancreas isn't yet producing the hormones associated with insulin resistance.  In addition, many type 1s will be taken off of their current basal insulin if it is not yet approved for use during pregnancy.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2011

Pritikin and Preventive Health

Imagine if you could keep diabetes at bay for another three or four years with lifestyle changes. Would you change what you ate? Would you commit to an exercise program, maintain a food journal, and join a support group? Imagine if you could take these simple steps and save money. How quickly would you say "Sign me up"?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2011

Swimmers with Diabetes Cross English Channel

Claire Duncan is one of many people with type 1 diabetes who wears a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump, in this case, an Animas® VibeTM. In an age of almost routine medical marvels, Duncan doesn't really seem to be an exception.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2011

9 Safe Driving Tips

An estimated 34 million Americans will be on the road during Labor Day weekend, many of them with type 2 diabetes. Road travel can interfere with blood sugar management and lead to low blood sugar, which can cause serious complications, such as loss of consciousness, if not treated quickly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2011

A Nutty Way to Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrates can increase blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, as well as contribute to weight gain.  A recent study shows that eating two ounces of raw, dry, or roasted nuts daily as a replacement for two ounces of other carbohydrates may control blood sugar levels and cholesterol in type 2 diabetes without packing on the pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2011

When It Comes to Diabetes, Knowledge Truly Is Power

When people are diagnosed with diabetes, things can seem pretty overwhelming. In a short time, they have to absorb a daunting amount of information and start making significant decisions about the way they live their lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2011

August 2011

Bayer HealthCare Recalls 10- and 25-Count Contour Test Strip Vials in U.S. Market

US Action Follows Stop-Ship That Began in June

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2011

Diabetes and Mammograms

Many women with diabetes feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of family, work, and personal health. Balancing the minutiae of everyday life with the nonstop demands of blood glucose monitoring, exercise, and thoughtful meal planning takes time and effort. So it comes as no surprise that many women with diabetes put off talking to their doctors about breast cancer screening.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 20, 2011

Insulin Injections for Type 2s Could Drop to Three per Week

A study in the British medical journal The Lancet shows that type 2s who received once-daily or thrice-weekly injections of degludec, a very long-acting insulin, maintained blood glucose levels similar to patients receiving daily doses of insulin glargine. The results point the way to a possible reduction in the number of injections that type 2s who take insulin would need over any seven-day period. In both the United States and the United Kingdom currently, about one in every three type 2 patients injects insulin at least once daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2011

July 2011

“Attention: This Is Your Car Speaking.”

How many times has this happened to you? You're driving somewhere and something feels off. You suspect that your blood sugar level may be dropping, but you plow ahead. Now, imagine your car sounding the alarm: "Attention: This is your car speaking. Your blood sugar is low. Pull over and eat a snack."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2011

Tradjenta, a Drug for Type 2s, Now on U.S. Market

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly have begun sales of Tradjenta, a drug for type 2 diabetes, in U.S. pharmacies. The drug (generic name linagliptin) comes in tablet form and is intended to compete with Amylin Pharmaceuticals' Byetta, which is injected, and Merck's Januvia, which also competes with Byetta. Both are well-established in the U.S. market.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2011

A Rebellious Teenager Finds Team Type 1

I am excited to have this opportunity to write a diabetes-focused blog for Diabetes Health about living and thriving with type 1 diabetes. First of all, I am extremely passionate about racing road and mountain bicycles, running 5K runs and sprint triathlons, and doing other activities that I find to compete in for Team Type 1. But before I start blogging, I would like to tell a little about myself.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2011

Adjusting Type 1 Diabetes to a Racing Tour of America's Dairyland (Wednesday, June 22)

Anne Findlay has been racing road bikes for three years and just joined Team Type 1 this year. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1988, at age 14. For more information about Anne and Team Type 1, go to www.teamtype1.org.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 25, 2011

Before Disaster Strikes

With severe weather predicted for Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Meredith Cummings thought carefully about where to park her car-eyeing the large trees in her historic neighborhood-when she arrived home on the afternoon of April 27. As she walked to her door, she reassured herself: Those trees had been there for more than 100 years. What were the odds of them coming down today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2011

NeuroMetrix and Nipro Team Up to Market Neuropathy Test

Nipro Diagnostics, Inc., and NeuroMetrix, Inc., have announced that they will seek opportunities to sell their soon-to-be-introduced NC-stat® DPNCheckTM neuropathy test in retail medical clinics nationwide. The test, conducted onsite, evaluates neuropathies, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN).

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2011

Diabetes and Depression Offers Big Challenges

If you have diabetes, you're more likely to be depressed than people without the disease.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2011

Roger Hurdsman Making Diabetes A Family Affair

Roger Hurdsman lives in Roy, Utah, surrounded by women. His wife of four years, Hilary, is there, along with his two young daughters, Bonnie and Tess.  He seems to be handling the estrogen well though, perhaps because he devotes his days  to designing software for the Department of Defense. He is able to spend time with computers and gadgets before being inundated with tea parties and dress-up when he gets home.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2011

Continuous Glucose Monitoring:  The Joys and Pains

"Good news," my diabetes nurse educator says to me. "Your new insurance covers continuous glucose monitoring supplies!" I give her a half-smile as my brain screams at me, "CGM?  Really?  Something else to deal with on top of this damn disease, an insulin pump, exercise, and nutrition?"  But I comply, and a CGM is added to the rest of my paraphernalia.

comments 28 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2011

June 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities - Part 2

In the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to be aware of the new realities. In this article,  I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 71 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2011

My Lovely Little Insulin Pump

"My pump, my pump, my lovely little pump!"  My sister invented her own version of the Black Eyed Peas' song, "My Humps" to poke friendly fun at my insulin pump.   

comments 20 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2011

Monitor Your Blood Sugars While You Drive?

Medtronic and Ford Motor Company have teamed up to develop a prototype device that will allow people with diabetes to monitor their blood glucose levels as they drive. Using Bluetooth technology, the system will connect readings from Medtronic's continuous glucose monitor to Ford's onboard communications system, called "Sync."

comments 8 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities

Over the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to become aware of the new realities.  In this article, I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2011

Your Glucose Meter Number?

A few months ago, I had the privilege of traveling to Australia to present at a conference of athletes with diabetes.  During the meeting, prizes were awarded to everyone who scored exactly 5.5 mmol/L (99 mg/dL) on their glucose meter. You should have seen it! Anyone who measured close to 5.5 was testing again and again, hoping for that magic number to pop up. Fingers were suffering, but the test strip manufacturers were making out like bandits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 5, 2011

Amylin, JDRF Team to Test Symlin/Insulin Combo for Type 1

Amylin Pharmaceuticals has announced that it will collaborate with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to test a combination of Symlin and insulin in injectible form as a type 1 therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2011

May 2011

Sanofi Says Late-Stage Trial of Type 2 Drug a Success

French drug maker Sanofi-aventis says that results from a Phase III trial of its experimental type 2 diabetes drug lixisenatide show that the drug successfully lowered patients' blood glucose levels and body weight, but did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 23, 2011

Albertson’s Supermarket Chain Joins Diabetes Alliance

Albertson's LLC, a nationwide supermarket chain with more than 200 stores, has announced that it will participate in the Diabetes Control Program (DCP) of the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance. The DCP works through trained pharmacists to provide education and support to people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2011

April 2011

Medtronic Announces Mac-Compatible Diabetes Management Software

Medtronic, Inc., says that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the marketing of the company's CareLink® Personal 5.4 Therapy Management Software for the Mac OS platform.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2011

New Study Suggests the Effectiveness of Diabetes Education Paired With Meters With Advanced Features

A new study has proven that use of a blood glucose meter with advanced features, when paired with diabetes education, more effectively manages blood glucose than using a basic feature meter. This information was presented at the recent 46th European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 117 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Jeff and Natalie Kolok: The Definition of Parenting

Jeff and Natalie Kolok live in northwestern Vermont with their three children: Naomi, 16, and Johanna and Nicholas, each ten years old. Both Johanna and Nicholas have type 1 diabetes, Johanna since age four and Nick since age six.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

March 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

Alcohol and Sex

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

The Great Lancing Debate

My almost 20 years as a diabetes educator have been memorable in many ways, but certain moments stand out more than others.  Because blood glucose testing is an important part of diabetes management for everyone I see, I try to assess each person’s skills and habits in this key area.  I’ll never forget the time I asked a client how often he changed his lancet.  He had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about four years earlier and was checking regularly, so it seemed like a reasonable question.  He proceeded to look at me with a puzzled expression and say, “You mean you’re supposed to change those things?”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

February 2011

Roche and Animas Recall

A couple of diabetes recalls are in the works, one for a group of insulin cartridges manufactured by Animas and another for the entire line of ACCU-CHEK® FlexLink Plus infusion sets, manufactured by Roche.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

Regulatory Protein Lowers Blood Sugar

Researchers at the Children's Hospital in Boston, led by Umut Ozcan, MD, have found a regulatory protein that lowers blood sugar when it is high due to either lack of insulin or a decreased sensitivity to insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2011

Tyler's Ten Objectives for Staying Healthy

Everywhere you look, there seems to be a great tasting high carb meal, dessert, or snack staring back at you. While away at college last fall, I found a t-shirt picturing a cupcake above a skull and crossbones. For me, that image really sums up how we need to deal with being diabetic while being constantly tempted by sugary treats.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Need Medicine and Have No Insurance for Your Diabetes?

Nearly one in six people in the United States has no health insurance. If you have diabetes, that's a very tough position to be in. There are, however, resources that can cut the costs that you have been paying out of pocket for medicines and supplies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Peeling a Grape Ups Your BG Test Results

According to a new study published in Diabetes Care, your finger-prick blood glucose test may be "abnormally and significantly high" if you test after handling fruit without first scrubbing your hands thoroughly and vigorously. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

“Artificial Pancreas” Helps Pregnant Mothers With Diabetes

It's hard enough to be pregnant, but pregnancy with diabetes is especially challenging because it's so difficult to keep blood sugar within a normal range at a time when hormones are surging. All women try their best with the tools that they have, but even so, about half of all babies born to mothers with type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese at birth because of too much sugar in their mothers' blood. Mothers with high blood glucose levels also increase their child's risk of congenital malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm delivery, and neonatal admission.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2011

January 2011

The Lowdown on Downloading

It doesn't matter if you're a computer geek or complete technophobe: If you've ever made the effort to download your blood glucose meter, you probably don't have a clue about what to do with the data once you've gotten it.  That needs to change. Those of us who live with diabetes need to become more adept at analyzing our own data, to see what's working and what isn't both for our own sake and that of our time-strapped healthcare providers. .

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

What do I do now, Coach?

Self-management is the key to healthy living with diabetes, but there are always challenges to maintaining optimum blood glucose levels.  Lagging motivation and focus can be obstacles, and adjusting diet and medications to meet changing conditions is challenging. If you have ever wished for a person to help you improve your skills, someone who could offer informed guidance between appointments with your doctor - you may have been wishing for a diabetes coach. Diabetes coaches are personal trainers for individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes. This unique branch of diabetes education delivers ongoing, one-on-one consulting from a trained certified diabetes educator.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2011

Flushing Away High Blood Sugar

Most type 2 meds work by increasing insulin production in one way or another. The extra insulin lowers blood sugar by ushering it out of your bloodstream and into your cells, where it may, unfortunately, make you fat. Wouldn't it be nice if instead, you could lower your high blood sugar by just flushing it right down the toilet?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2011

Infopia USA's Thermal Weight Scale

Infopia USA's Eocene System is a diabetes management system with a data collection device that gathers data from a meter, blood pressure cuff, and a thermal scale. Readings are stored on Infopia's network and available to you and your health team. See the video on Diabetes Health TV here.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2011

Walgreens in South Florida and Diabetes Research Institute Foundation Announce Unique Partnership

The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation (DRIF) announced a new, first-of-its-kind partnership aimed at helping the more than 200,000* Broward County, Florida, residents affected by diabetes. Diabetes Research Institute Live Well Broward County is a joint effort of the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, Walgreens in South Florida, LifeScan and a cadre of local physicians that will help residents "Manage Well, Stay Well and Live Well" with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2011

Diabetes Management in Flu Season

The crowd in the small Boston theater laughed and clapped. The comedy show was a good one, and I was enjoying it from a cramped seat in the balcony. It was October 29, a Friday, and while it was brisk outside, winter hadn't yet clamped down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

The A1C: A Better Way to Diagnose Pre-Diabetes?

A full third of adult Americans are pre-diabetic, and a third of those will develop type 2 diabetes before they're ten years older. Unfortunately, only about seven percent of them have been tested for pre-diabetes and warned of their condition; the rest are ignorant of the road they're on. By losing just 10 to 15 pounds, the whole group could cut their chances of getting type 2 by half. The problem is, how to alert them in time for them to stop their progression to type 2?

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Herbs, Sex, and Diabetes

Talk about a win-win situation! It seems that many aphrodisiacs--herbs that boost sexual energy and function--can also bring down blood sugar, cholesterol, and/or blood pressure.  At least four herbs have shown these double benefits in scientific studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2011

December 2010

Einstein College of Medicine Receives $600,000 Grant to Study Resveratrol's Impact on Pre-Diabetes

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City has received a $600,000 grant from the American Diabetes Association to study the effects of resveratrol on lowering impaired glucose tolerance in older adults.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2010

Lorcaserin Shows Statistically Significant Weight Loss in Patients With Diabetes

Arena Pharmaceuticals and Eisai Inc. recently released results of a phase 3 clinical trial for lorcaserin, a weight-loss drug they are developing in partnership. The trial, called BLOOM-DM (Behavioral modification and Lorcaserin for Overweight and Obesity Management- Diabetes Management), targeted patients with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2010

Abbott Diabetes Care Announces Recall of Certain Lots of Blood Glucose Test Strips in the United States and Puerto Rico

Abbott Diabetes Care today announced that it has initiated a recall of 359 lots (approximately 359 million strips) of Precision Xtra®, Precision Xceed Pro®, MediSense® Optium, Optium, OptiumEZ and ReliOn® Ultima Blood Glucose Test Strips in the United States and Puerto Rico.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 22, 2010

Alarming Study Regarding Oral Health Care of Those With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes means a lot of change in your daily life. From blood glucose monitoring to watching what you eat to losing weight, it's hard to keep track of the changes you need to make to keep diabetes under control. One aspect of diabetes care that sometimes falls through the cracks is oral health care, which, if ignored, can lead to serious health complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2010

Pepex Trio One-Click Blood Glucose Meter

Research firm Frost & Sullivan, a leading international healthcare consulting company, released a market study analyzing and estimating the demand for Pepex Biomedical Inc.'s new biosensor technology for blood glucose monitoring for diabetes sufferers worldwide.  The researchers interviewed diagnosed diabetics, diabetes educators, endocrinologists, and manufacturers of biosensors, blood glucose meters, or other clinical diagnostic or patient monitoring equipment suppliers for the study.  The Frost & Sullivan report concluded that the Pepex Trio technology has the "potential as a new standard for measuring blood glucose levels."

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2010

Life and Long-term Care Insurance Becoming Increasingly Available for Those With Type 1 Diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, you know that the process of obtaining life insurance or long-term care insurance has been a long, tough road, most often leading to the dead end of declined coverage. In fact, most insurance companies have classified anyone with type 1 as an automatic decline, without any consideration of each case individually.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2010

November 2010

Echo Therapeutics' Needle-Free Symphony Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

The competition for a continuous glucose monitoring system that can replace the classic finger prick blood tests for diabetes is heating up. Several new products have come to the market this year that use various techniques to test blood glucose levels continuously without the need for a blood test, but several have faltered with complaints of inaccurate readings and skin irritation.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 29, 2010

Christopher Gorham Grabs Silver and Bronze Medals At International Karate/Kickboxing Championships

Insulet Corp., the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, recognizes the outstanding achievements of Christopher Gorham, age 12, of Waterford, Michigan for bringing home both silver and bronze medals in the Sparring and Forms competitions at the 2010 World Karate/Kickboxing Council World Championships held in Albufeira, Portugal. Chris is a 2nd degree black belt in training for a 3rd degree black belt; he has been in martial arts since he was four years old, competing all over the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2010

A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes

A new drug for type 2 diabetes started showing up in drugstores this week, according to manufacturer Santarus. The FDA-approved drug, called Cycloset, takes an distinctive -- and not well understood -- approach to reducing blood sugar levels. The pill apparently works by increasing dopamine activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain. Dopamine is a brain chemical that plays a big role in people's behavior, mood, and ability to sleep. Scientists theorize that glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may in part result from abnormal activity of this chemical, and that upping dopamine activity may iron out these problems.That's the theory, at least: the drug's exact workings aren't known.  But it seems to do the trick.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2010

Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicines Cut From 2011 Flexible Spending Accounts

Get ready for a major change to the way you can use your Flexible Spending Account (FSA). Staring in 2011, you won't be able to use your FSA to purchase over-the-counter (OTC) medications unless you have a prescription from your doctor.  By the year 2013, FSAs will also  be capped at $2,500, down from the $5,000 currently allowed under the program. These changes, which are the result of the Affordable Care Act, could have a significant impact on both the revenues of the federal government and your wallet.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 23, 2010

This World Diabetes Day, Measure Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Imagine a pandemic. A disease comes into a community and then spreads across borders, causing disability and death in its path.  Scientists fight to contain its spread, and doctors try to mitigate its effects.  Most people associate this kind of scenario with a pathogen: a virus or bacteria, like HIV or avian flu, that has found a way to exploit the human body.  In fact, however, the overwhelming majority of pandemics are the result of noncommunicable diseases that are not spread by pathogens: conditions like cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 12, 2010

Could the iPad Save Your Life?

New technology is popping up all over in the medical community, from new diagnostic machines, to new ways of administering drugs, to an almost endless supply of self-monitoring devices such as blood glucose meters. But a technology often overlooked is one that could have the most impact-electronic medical records.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2010

October 2010

Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose in Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2010

Diabetes and the Flu

As flu season approaches, many people are debating whether they should get a flu shot. As everyone knows, getting the flu is not fun. In fact, it can be downright miserable. But for those with diabetes, the flu can mean more than a cough, running nose, and body aches--it could mean more severe complications, and sometimes even death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2010

Diabetes Self-Management Tips, Free Health Screenings at Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid Clinics

Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid stores nationwide will host Diabetes Solutions Days on Nov. 2, 3 or 4 offering free health screenings and self-management solutions to patients living with diabetes, care-givers and those concerned about diabetes. Visitors also can get vaccinated against flu and/or pneumonia for $24.99 or $50 respectively, although many insurance plans including Medicare cover the cost. Vaccinations are especially important for diabetes patients because flu and pneumonia combine for the deaths of 10,000 to 30,000 diabetes patients annually, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Look AHEAD Study Examines Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss

An intensive lifestyle intervention program designed with weight loss in mind improves diabetes control and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. These are the findings of the four-year Look AHEAD study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) is a multi-center, randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity on the incidence of major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2010

Diabetes Risk May Fall as Magnesium Intake Increases

Getting enough magnesium in your diet could help prevent type 2 diabetes. Dr. Ka He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have found that people who consumed the most magnesium from foods and vitamin supplements were about half as likely to develop diabetes over the next 20 years as people who took in the least magnesium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2010

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Consensus Statement Released by AACE

JACKSONVILLE, FL - October 13, 2010 - The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) today published a consensus statement for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) online, and will be published in the next issue of the association's official medical journal Endocrine Practice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Have a Holiday Heart-to-Heart

The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even the occasional family conflict.  Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health is influenced by your family-for better or for worse.  This year, why not start a conversation that benefits everyone?  Gather your family health history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2010

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Coming Release of BGStar and iBGStar Blood Glucose Meters

Last week, sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose meters BGStar® and iBGStarTM (developed by sanofi and its partner AgaMatrix), which should be available in early 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 4, 2010

September 2010

Meetings, Medications, and Meters

I’m back. I started working with Diabetes Health 10 years ago.  At that time, Diabetes Health was the one publication open enough to talk about a subject that was controversial at that time… Lower Carb Options.  That was my column, and I got a lot of slack from it. I didn’t understand why. People with diabetes want and need lower carb options. What was the problem with giving people options? That’s what Diabetes Health is all about – teaching people there are healthy options. Now it’s common to see lower carb options for people who have diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2010

Glucose Meter Plug-in for iPhone

Sanofi-aventis announced the upcoming launch of the blood glucose monitoring (BGM) devices BGStar® and iBGStarTM, developed by sanofi-aventis and its partner AgaMatrix. Due to their convenience, accuracy and ease-of-use, BGStar® and iBGStarTM will help the decision-making process for people with diabetes and their healthcare professionals, with the aim of improving patient self-management. iBGStarTM connects to the iPhone® or iPod touch®. This is an important step towards sanofi-aventis' vision of becoming the leader in global diabetes care by integrating innovative monitoring technology, therapeutic innovations, personalized services and support solutions. BGStar® and iBGStarTM are planned to be made commercially available in the first markets in early 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

Kids and Diabetes Risk: Do Chromosomes Hold New Clues?

Children who have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes might be identified earlier by way of tell-tale genetic indicators known as biomarkers. Some of those new biomarkers might be pinpointed in research led by Nancy F. Butte and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition

New research findings reveal that one of America's favorite colorful fruits, blueberries, have properties that help to improve factors related to pre-diabetes and decrease inflammation in obese men and women. Chronic low-grade inflammation related to obesity contributes to insulin resistance, a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. "This is an excellent example of the importance of clinical trials to building our knowledge-base in helping to improve public health," said Steven Heymsfield, PBRC Executive Director

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Diabetes and Alcohol: What You Need to Know

If you are meeting a friend for a drink after work or attending a holiday party where alcohol is being offered, is it a health risk or a benefit?  The medical and nutrition literature reports that moderate consumption of alcohol can offer some health benefits, particularly for your heart. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 defines drinking in moderation as no more than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men. One drink, by definition, is a 12-ounce beer, eight-ounce glass of malt liquor, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor.  Moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke, lower the risk of developing gallstones, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes. Studies show  that those benefiting from moderate consumption are middle-aged and older adults.  It is not recommended, however, that anyone begin drinking or drink more frequently on the basis of health considerations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2010

Joslin 50-Year Medalists Give Clues to Cures

In type 1 diabetes, the body relentlessly attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. But a study by Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now has firmly established that some of these cells endure for many decades in a small group of people with the disease-offering clues to potential treatments for preserving and even restoring the crucial cell population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Living His Dream of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez

On July 2, 2010, when Lt. Jose Lopez took the podium at the recent Children With Diabetes Friends for Life Annual International Conference in Orlando to speak to the parents of children with diabetes, his goal was to use his own story to reassure them about their children's future. "What I most wanted to convey to them was that people with diabetes, especially children, can do normal stuff and live their dreams. I am not a super hero - and I did it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

No BG Deal: Today's Meter Innovations Leave Many Yawning for More

In my office, there is a box.  Nothing fancy, just a plain brown box filled with a collection of "old school" diabetes stuff:  "boil and re-use" syringes, urine test tape, screw-driven insulin pumps, medieval injection aids and lancing devices, and so on.  Of course, no such collection would be complete without an array of classic blood glucose meters.  The oldest one I have is a plug-in-the-wall model called a "Dextrometer" that featured test strip rinsing solution and a red LED display that could burn the retina of anyone within six feet.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2010

Type 2 Diabetes Raises Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are two distressing, but increasingly common, diseases seen in our aging population. At some point in the future, they may well overwhelm the healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2010

Bone Breakdown Helps Regulate Blood Sugar

The routine breakdown of old bone during skeletal growth has an important role to play in regulating blood sugar, according to Columbia University Medical Center researchers. The process, known as resorption, goes on throughout life. It stimulates insulin release and sugar absorption, helping healthy people maintain normal blood glucose levels. The new study, published in Cell, suggests that skeletal changes could causes diabetes for some and that possible treatments for type 2 diabetes could come from the bone-insulin connection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2010

As the Quest for an Artificial Pancreas Continues, Europeans Look at a Novel Approach

The Holy Grail pursued by all diabetes researchers is a complete cure for both the type 1 and type 2 forms of the disease. But until then, the "artificial pancreas," a combination of glucose monitoring and insulin dosing technology, may be as close as they get to a final breakthrough in treating diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2010

Brain Surgery Results Could Portend New Approach to Treating Type 2

Results of brain surgery on a small group of type 2 diabetes patients point the way to a possible new approach for treating the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2010

August 2010

MannKind Corporation Providing AFREZZA to JDRF for Artificial Pancreas Project

MannKind Corporation announced that the company will supply its novel, ultra rapid acting insulin AFREZZATM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) for use in a study being conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) as part of its Artificial Pancreas Project. The planned two-year study in patients with type 1 diabetes will leverage the unique rapid action of AFREZZA for use in a closed-loop blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery system, termed the "artificial pancreas" by the JDRF. The study will be managed in conjunction with the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2010

iGlucose

Working toward the goal of unifying patients' diabetic treatment information in a single place, the PositiveID Corporation hopes to patent a new device that monitors insulin pens. The Insulin Tracker would attach to a user's insulin pen and record the times and amounts of injections. That information would then be sent to a database that allows for comprehensive monitoring. Insulin pens come in disposable and cartridge-replaceable flavors; the tracker can be moved easily from one pen to another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2010

The Fruit Factor

In the early days after my type 1 diabetes diagnosis, I sentenced a lot of foods to what I came to think of as my personal DO-NOT-EAT list, often with only slight provocation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Novo Nordisk Creates "App" to Help Doctors Dose Insulin

Novo Nordisk announced today the availability of NovoDoseTM - the first-ever mobile insulin dosing guide for physicians to look up dosing guidelines and blood glucose goals for their patients with diabetes, a disease that affects nearly 24 million Americans. The guide is available as an application on iTunes and is specific to Novo Nordisk's modern insulin analog portfolio: Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection), NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection), and NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2010

Pilot Study Supports Adolescent Diabetes Patients through Personalized Text Messages

Jennifer Dyer, MD, MPH, an endocrinologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital, has developed and completed a pilot study that uses weekly, customized text messages to remind adolescent diabetes patients about their personal treatment activities. At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Dyer found an increase in overall treatment adherence and improved blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2010

The Sanford Project Launches Research Study to Find a Cure

"The objective of this clinical trial (research study) is to determine if the medications can rescue the few beta cells that remain soon after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; and whether new beta cells can even be regenerated," commented Alex Rabinovitch, MD, Principal Investigator of the trial and Associate Director of The Sanford Project. "The investigational combinations of these medications could possibly allow patients to decrease or no longer need to inject insulin to keep their blood levels under proper control."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2010

Red Wine Ingredient Increases Insulin Sensitivity, Works Against Retinal Disease

Two recent research studies on humans indicate that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine and peanuts, increases insulin sensitivity in older and obese people. A third study, done on mice, shows that resveratrol may someday become a powerful tool in therapies directed at macular degeneration and other retinal maladies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

July 2010

Diabetes Health Digital Edition for August/September Available Now!

We are always investigating new ideas, research findings, treatment options, and educational materials to share with you. This issue is very exciting because we were able to talk with experts and those with diabetes, and write about everything from traveling with type 1 in Italy to investigating why hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are so dangerous.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works for More than One Year

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and GlySens Incorporated have developed an implantable glucose sensor and wireless telemetry system that continuously monitors tissue glucose and transmits the information to an external receiver. The paper, published in the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, describes the use of this glucose-sensing device as an implant in animals for over one year. After human clinical trials and FDA approval, the device may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Dental Care Deserves More Than a Brush-Off

Unfortunately, dental treatment and vision care are rarely included in basic health insurance plans. I don't know how insurance companies concluded that the eyes and the teeth are not parts of the body, but they managed it somehow. If you have diabetes, however, it's especially important to realize that contrary to the rationalizations of insurance executives, both your eyes and your teeth require attention and care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2010

Type 2 Risk Information to Share with Your Friends and Loved Ones

Learn Your Risk for Diabetes and Take Steps to Protect Your Health. If you are diagnosed in the early stages of diabetes, you can take better care of yourself and get treatment. If you have pre-diabetes, you can take steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

Video Games for Kids with Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes often strikes children. Children love to play video games. Putting two and two together, diabetes educators have created a string of diabetes-themed video games over the years. The latest evolution of that simple equation--the Bayer Didget meter-game combination--arrived in U.S. drugstores this year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2010

Nutraceuticals and Natural Supplements for Treating Type 2 Diabetes: An Overview

From environmentally friendly hybrid cars and heating with solar power to organic or natural foods, our culture is increasingly embracing green strategies. "Using natural dietary supplements to support healthy blood sugar levels and minimize the impact of glycation is a rational continuation of this green philosophy," says Steven Joyal, MD, vice president of Scientific Affairs and Medical Development for the Life Extension Foundation in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (www.lef.org). He is also author of the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2010

The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute Meets the Challenge of Training Diabetes Educators Across the Globe

Looking for novel ways to help improve patient outcomes, the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is using innovative adult education techniques to train diabetes educators around the world.  While the cultural and epidemiological differences in each region can be challenging, David L. Horwitz, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, Chief Medical Officer of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute, feels confident this program can make a positive impact to help improve patient outcomes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2010

Pre-Diabetes: Using Diabetes Self-Management Education/Training to Prevent Diabetes Onset

Overview: 57 million Americans are estimated to have pre-diabetes, a condition in which a person's blood sugar (glucose) level is above normal but below a level that indicates diabetes. Pre-diabetes may have no outward symptoms, and is diagnosed with a blood glucose test.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Pump and Sensor Combo Beats MDI Decisively in Medtronic’s STAR 3 Study

A massive study involving 485 people with type 1 diabetes at 30 locations across North America shows that the combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor helps patients achieve significantly lower A1c levels than multiple daily insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

AFREZZA Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy with Type 2s

AFREZZA TM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder, a well-tolerated, investigational ultra rapid acting mealtime insulin, as part of a diabetes treatment regimen, provides long-term glucose control comparable to usual insulin therapy but with a significantly reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a two-year study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

June 2010

Do You Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

It raises fasting blood sugars. It increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. Millions of people suffer from it. And many don't even know they have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 30, 2010

Dieting to Reduce Diabetes Risk May Not Work in People With Low Muscle Mass

One of the factors that increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes is excess body fat. So it makes sense that losing weight has always been one of the first lines of defense against the disease. Yet people who are slender -skinny, even- sometimes develop type 2. Why is that? Does the fact that a slender person can acquire type 2 negate the need for weight control?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Metformin-Avandia Combo Slows Progression to Type 2 in Two-Thirds of At-Risk Patients

A Canadian study that tracked 207 patients suggests that a low-dose combination of metformin and Avandia can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes by 66 percent in people at high risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

May 2010

Abbott Receives FDA Clearance for New, Easier-to-Use FreeStyle Lite® Test Strips

Abbott announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new FreeStyle Lite blood glucose test strips. The new FreeStyle Lite test strips minimize interference during blood glucose testing and are designed to offer a better testing experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

Glucose Monitoring Medical Tattoo

Tattoos aren't just an art form or a way of making a personal statement anymore: They are beginning to save lives.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2010

Ethnic Disparities Found in A1c Test

A new study released by the Children's Hospital of New Orleans has found that black children with type 1 diabetes scored higher on A1c tests than white children who had similar blood glucose levels. Such ethnic disparity has already been shown in previous studies with adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

CVS Loyalty Program for People with Diabetes

Rhode Island-based CVS/pharmacy, which operates more than 7,000 pharmacies and drug stores in the United States, has announced three diabetes-related initiatives:

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 13 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

Recruiting Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Dr. Richard Hays announced today that he is now recruiting children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes for Protégé Encore, a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III clinical trial. This is the second of two Phase III studies testing the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug called teplizumab. The first study, known as Protégé, has completed enrollment of more than 530 subjects with type 1 diabetes. There is currently no approved therapy to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2010

New Agents That Keep Insulin Working Longer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have developed a molecule that can block the breakdown of insulin. Their discovery could lead to development of a new class of drugs to help treat diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2010

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Tyler’s Top Ten Sports Tips

My last ten tips were meant to give you an idea of what to think about before you plan your day (Tyler's Top Ten Tips). Now I'm going to give you my top ten tips for how to manage your blood glucose levels while playing sports. These should help you keep everything in control and allow you to relax and have fun while playing.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 5, 2010

April 2010

Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Specially Bred Pigs

NEW YORK, April 27, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation announced today that it is partnering with Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand-based biotechnology company focused on developing cell based therapeutics, in a Phase II clinical trial to study the safety and effectiveness of transplanting encapsulated insulin-producing cells from pigs as a treatment for type 1 diabetes with significant hypoglycemia unawareness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2010

Sex and Diabetes: Diabetes for Couples

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 60 year old married woman who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago.  In the last two years, I have lost interest in sex. I just don't feel like it, although I still like hugs.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Generic Drug Salsalate Continues to Show Promise

We continue to monitor the progress of studies to determine the effectiveness of salsalate, a generic aspirin-like drug, to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.  As previously reported here in October 2008 and January 2009, researchers from the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard University are conducting clinical trials to determine if this well known and proven drug for joint pain can be added to the list of diabetes drugs.  Recently, results from a three-month trial were announced online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, showing that those who took salsalate demonstrated significantly improved blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2010

March 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

Consensus Moving to A1c as a Better Predictor of Diabetes Than Fasting Glucose

Over the past few months, there has been a discernible shift of opinion among healthcare providers about which test best reveals a high risk of acquiring diabetes. The old standby, fasting glucose, seems to be giving way to the hemoglobin A1c test as the preferred method.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 26, 2010

Tyler's Top Ten Tips for Teens

Experience is a great teacher, but sometimes it's not the best way to learn, especially when it comes to your medical needs. Smart people learn from their mistakes, but wise people learn from other people's mistakes. In my ten years with diabetes, I have found that to eliminate problems, you need to anticipate your needs. A few moments of preparation can ensure a great afternoon of fun with your friends, a better grade on a test, or participation in a sporting competition without any complications.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2010

Revised Criteria Could Triple Reported Cases of Gestational Diabetes

Suggested revisions in the benchmarks used to assess dangerously high blood sugar levels in pregnant women could lead to a doubling or tripling of the number of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes*. That's the conclusion of an international study led by the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2010

Our Journey to Hope and Beyond

I grew up around the corner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In high school, long ago, I thought that NIH scientists were "bad guys" who mistreated animals in the name of medical research. I later moved to the West Coast and became a registered obstetrical nurse. Over the years, along with sharing the joys of new moms and new babies, I cared for patients with devastating conditions like cancer and quadriplegia, people whose lives could potentially be saved or improved by medical research., Yet it wasn't until many years later, after moving back to the DC area, that I really began to see the NIH in a new light.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Mutation That Affects Response to Smell and Taste Could Lead to Type 2 Diabetes

According to Duke University researchers, a mutation that causes the lack of an insulin-controlling molecule may be a factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The molecule, ankyrin B, is activated in response to the smell and taste of food and leads to the production of insulin in preparation for food intake.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2010

A Diagnosis of Pre-Diabetes Isn’t Enough to Motivate Many Patients

In a study that tracked 1,402 people with pre-diabetes, researchers found that only about half of them responded to the diagnosis by trying to shed weight or increase their level of exercise.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2010

FDA eyes improvements for diabetics' glucose devices

At a two-day meeting (March 16 and 17, 2010) to review blood glucose meters, Food and Drug Administration officials and staff pointed to a number of issues that can prevent people from getting proper treatment and sought input from medical experts and industry on ways to improve test results with the widely used devices.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Although Statins Increase Diabetes Risk, Study Says They're Still Worth Taking

An article by Scottish researchers, published in the British medical journal Lancet, says that although people taking statins are nine percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, that risk is outweighed by the drug's ability to lower cholesterol and protect against heart disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 14, 2010

Mom Says 'Just a Phone Call Away', Just Not Good Enough

Allen, Texas - When Pam Henry's daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, she never even thought she would be part of something that could revolutionize health care. "When Sarah was diagnosed, my only goal was to do all I could to keep her as healthy as possible.  What I created was something just to help keep her that way." 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery Could Be Key to Reversing Diabetes in Non-Obese Patients

A controversial New York doctor is poised to begin surgical trials on non-obese diabetes patients in an attempt to reverse their disease with gastric bypass surgery. Dr. Francesco Rubino, the chief of gastrointestinal surgery at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, believes that because gastric surgery has been shown to be highly effective in remitting diabetes symptoms, the procedure should now be allowed among non-overweight type 2s.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2010

February 2010

FDA Gives Novo the Go-Ahead to Market Victoza® in the U.S.

Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has received Food and Drug Administration permission to begin marketing its type 2 drug Victoza® in the United States.
Victoza, the brand name for liraglutide, is a GLP-1* analog that is taken one a day by injection to help control blood sugar-and in some cases, help with weight loss-in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2010

Bayer's A1CNow® SELFCHECK At-Home A1C System Now Available In Local Pharmacies

Bayer's A1CNow SELFCHECK, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration last year, is the first and only system of its kind with at-home results in five minutes. It enables patients to more closely watch their A1C level in between doctor visits so they may have a more informed discussion with their healthcare provider to ensure their diabetes plan is working.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

Artificial Pancreas Project Update

Feb. 11, 2010 - At the 3rd International Conference on Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD) in Basel, Switzerland, Roche Diabetes Care, the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute announced their expanded collaboration in the Artificial Pancreas Project sponsored by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

California Parents of Children with Diabetes and Care Advocates Hail Isadore Hall, III Legislation to Fight Diabetes

Sacramento- February 10, 2010 -- Assistant Speaker pro Tempore Isadore Hall, III (D- Compton) today introduced AB 1802, which would clarify existing law by allowing, but not requiring, a parent/guardian-designated teacher, administrator or school employee to administer insulin to a diabetic student while on a school campus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

"America's Silent Killer" on The Oprah Winfrey Show

CHICAGO, IL - On Thursday, February 4, Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and more reveal the staggering human cost of the growing diabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic on a special episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show. Before a studio audience comprised of all diabetics and their families, Oprah and Dr. Oz reveal the latest facts and figures, share stories of those affected, and hold a no-holds-barred, revealing conversation about risk factors, diet and lifestyle.

comments 17 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Scared of Lows

Dear Diabetes Health, I'm 26 years old and engaged to a woman I've known since college.  We live together, love each other, and have good sex, but now I'm having doubts. A year ago, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She started taking insulin, and it has been rough. Four times now she has started sweating and shaking and saying strange things. Twice this happened during sex. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2010

January 2010

Multidisciplinary Researchers Convene For First International Congress On Abdominal Obesity

Clinical and basic science researchers from around the world will convene in Hong Kong from January 28 to 30 for the First International Congress on Abdominal Obesity: "Bridging the Gap between Cardiology and Diabetology." The congress, sponsored by the International Chair on Cardiometabolic Risk (ICCR) (http://www.cardiometabolic-risk.org), is the first-ever specialized forum for sharing new insights and evidence about abdominal obesity and its clinical and public health implications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Changes in the Position of Conventional Insulin Pumps Shown to Significantly Impact Accuracy of Insulin Delivery

Researchers at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and University of California, Santa Barbara have concluded that changing the height of a conventional insulin pump in relation to its tubing and infusion set can significantly impact expected insulin delivery rates. Such changes can occur during routine daily activities like dressing, sleeping or showering. The study, "Siphon Effects of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pump Delivery Performance," evaluated the siphon or hydrostatic pressure action effects on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and was published in the January issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2010

Newly identified genes influence insulin and glucose regulation

An international research consortium has found 13 new genetic variants that influence blood glucose regulation, insulin resistance, and the function of insulin-secreting beta cells in populations of European descent. Five of the newly discovered variants increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2010

JDRF and BD Collaborate to Improve Insulin Pump Delivery

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) announced today an innovative program aimed at improving the treatment of type 1 diabetes by developing novel insulin delivery products to enhance the use of insulin pumps. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2010

Meditation Medication

Living with a chronic condition like diabetes can be a challenging and stressful experience. Unfortunately, all the worry about blood glucose and the constant effort to balance insulin against food intake and exercise can itself raise blood glucose levels. But stress management can help control the stress hormones that affect blood glucose levels. Yoga practice, for example, can have a calming effect and play a major role in stress management.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 21, 2010

Study Finds Tight Blood Sugar Control not so Important if Other Medical Problems are Present

A five-year study of 2,613 people treated for diabetes at Italian clinics shows that tight blood sugar control may not be the number-one priority for patients who have other medical problems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed Due to Flaws in Screening

MADISON, Wis. - Using one of the two major national diabetes screening guidelines misses about one-third of those with diabetes, consequently putting them at risk for serious health complications, according to surprising research findings at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Quitting Smoking and Diabetes Risk

"People who give up smoking are prone to developing diabetes because they gain weight," TheTimes reported. It said a study has found that quitters are twice as likely as smokers, and 70% more likely than non-smokers, to have type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2010

Insulet and Ypsomed Sign International Distribution Agreement for the OmniPod Insulin Management System

BEDFORD, Mass. and BURGDORF, Switzerland, Jan. 5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Insulet Corporation (Nasdaq: PODD), the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, and Ypsomed AG (SIX Swiss Exchange: YPSN), a leading independent diabetes specialist and technology provider of innovative injection systems for self-medication in Europe, today announced an exclusive agreement for the distribution of the OmniPod Insulin Management System in nine countries across Europe, as well as China and Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2010

Diabetes Technology and Intimacy

The first time that my fiancé Richard and I got, um, "intimate," I had some explaining to do. "Er, that's for my diabetes. So's that. And this thing. Oh, and this too." Richard was a bit overwhelmed. I think his exact words were, "Are you bionic or something?"

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2010

Pedometer Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk By Half

Using a pedometer as part of a structured education programme could reduce the chances of Type 2 diabetes by more than 50 per cent in those at risk of developing the condition, reveals a new Diabetes UK-funded study1 out today.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 5, 2010

The Doctor says,

"You have diabetes."  Have you just heard these words?  Or maybe you recently heard it about your son or daughter.  The oxygen rushes out of your body.  A knot forms in your stomach.  "What now?"

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

December 2009

American Diabetes Association Revises Diabetes Guidelines

December 29, 2009 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) revised clinical practice recommendations for diabetes diagnosis promote hemoglobin A1c (A1c) as a faster, easier diagnostic test that could help reduce the number of undiagnosed patients and better identify patients with prediabetes. The new recommendations are published December 29 in the January supplement of Diabetes Care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Relieving Stress on Insulin-Producing Cells May Prevent Diabetes

BOSTON, Mass. - Dec. 23, 2009 - Cells in your body are constantly churning out poisonous forms of oxygen (oxidants) and mopping them up with a countervailing force of proteins and chemicals (anti-oxidants). This balancing act of oxidative stress is particularly likely to go haywire in beta cells, the insulin-producing cells that malfunction and then start to die off in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

Artificial Sweeteners May Help Control Blood Sugar

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Combining artificial sweeteners with the real thing boosts the stomach's secretion of a hormone that makes people feel full and helps control blood sugar, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2009

Evidence Deepens That Breastfeeding Helps Moms Avoid Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2

A 20-year study that tracked 704 women from before their first pregnancy onward suggests that the first year mothers breastfeed, they reduce their risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes within the next 15 years by 15 percent. Each subsequent year of breastfeeding further reduces the risk by 15 percent. For example, a mother who has two children and breastfeeds each for a year could enjoy a 30 percent reduction in her risk of type 2 over a 15-year period.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2009

Sugar Plum Dreams

The dictionary defines a sugar plum as a small round or oval piece of sugary candy. But for most of us, visions of sugar plums dancing in our heads conjures up a far vaster array of sweet holiday treats. From cakes, cookies, and pies, to sugar-laced seasonal beverages, and yes, plenty of sweet confections, the holiday season is arguably the sweetest time of the year - and the most difficult when one is trying to keep carbohydrates and calories in check.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2009

Etiquette for People Without Diabetes

Dr. Bill Polonsky, PhD, CDE, knows diabetes. Among other things, he has served as Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, as a Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is the founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute (BDI) in San Diego, California, and a member of Diabetes Health's Advisory Board.

comments 18 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2009

November 2009

Food Insulin Index Predicts Insulin Demand of Mixed Meals

Dr. Jennie C. Brand-Miller, from the University of Sydney stated that, "The food insulin index (FII) may provide a better way to adjust insulin dose in Type 1 diabetes.... In time, it may also enable us to design diets to prevent diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years, diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. A Greek by the name of Aretaeus described its destructive nature in the first century AD, naming the affliction "diabetes," the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold, in his text "Aretaeus the Cappodacian," described Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain, and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body, while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2009

Q & A: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have  type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

Primary Care Doctors, Endocrinologists Feel Ill-Equipped to Provide Ideal, Multi-Disciplinary Team Care

PRINCETON, N.J., Nov. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly one-third of doctors surveyed said they did not have enough time and did not receive sufficient reimbursement to provide comprehensive care to their patients with diabetes, according to the results of a study of endocrinologists and primary care doctors published in American Health & Drug Benefits.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

FDA Gives the Nod to New BGM System From ARKRAY

The Food and Drug Administration has given ARKRAY, Inc., a 510(k)* clearance to begin marketing its new GLUCOCARD® VitalTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2009

AACE Releases New Algorithm for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the College of Endocrinology (ACE) released online a one-page resource for physicians and healthcare providers for the management of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

Reeling from Your Recent Diabetes Diagnosis? Read This Book!

I recently ran into Theresa Garnero at the California AADE annual meeting and discovered that Diabetes Health had not yet reviewed her book, Your First Year with Diabetes: What To Do, Month By Month. We regret the oversight because it's a great resource for anyone dealing with the shock of a diabetes diagnosis. And Garnero is the perfect author for a book like this. She's an award-winning certified diabetes educator (CDE) and advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) with board certification in advanced diabetes management (BC-ADM), and she earned an Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). She is also a former national educator of the year, a cartoonist, and the 2008 global recipient of Inspired by Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2009

Next Generation Blood Glucose Meters

Fingertip blood-oxygen monitors, called pulse oximeters, measure oxygen in the blood using light and color. The noninvasive device, which clips onto a fingertip or earlobe, typically has a pair of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) facing a sensor. Light of a certain wavelength (a certain color) travels through a translucent part of the body like the fingertip or an earlobe, and is picked up by the sensor. The amount of oxygen in the blood (actually, oxygenated hemoglobin) affects how much light from each diode finally makes it through the finger and reaches the sensor. The result is an effective measurement of the amount of oxygen in the blood.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2009

Notes from the California AADE Meeting

The California Association of American Diabetes Educators held its second annual meeting October 22 through 24, 2009, in Monterey, California, and Diabetes Health was there. The clinical and educational program, put together by Debra Norman and Kim Higgins, was called "Tidal Wave of Diabetes."  The invited speakers shared innovation, research, and new techniques with the attendees.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2009

October 2009

Sex and Diabetes: Lubes and Libido

Dear Diabetes Health, Hello!  I am 60 years old and have had type one for about 24 years. It has been quite some time since I had a relationship, and now I have one coming at me.  The problem is, I am very dry. The commercially sold products don't seem to help,  and Intercourse isn't comfortable. What do you recommend that I try?  And what about a libido enhancer?  I need this relationship to work because living alone is tough, and my partner likes his intimacy.  Please!!!

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2009

Diabetes? No Problema!

The statistics are chilling. Children born today have a one-in-three chance of developing type 2 diabetes. For Latinos, however, that risk is one-in-two.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2009

Grapefruit and Metformin May Have Ill Effects on the Body's pH Levels

A South African university pharmacologist has found that simultaneous consumption of metformin and grapefruit juice raises lactic acid to dangerous levels in rats (and conceivably in people) with type 2 diabetes. Too much acid in the blood can cause low pH levels that interfere with the body's metabolic functions. Conceivably, says Dr. Peter Owira, a pharmacologist at the University of KawZulu-Natal, such low levels could be fatal.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2009

A Big Bone of Contention: Should Bariatric Surgery Become a Standard Type 2 Diabetes Therapy?

A recent and contentious meeting of diabetes experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Vienna, Austria, has continued the intense international debate over whether bariatric surgery should become a treatment for type 2 diabetes or continue to be reserved only for the extremely obese.

comments 13 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2009

Should You Get a Seasonal Flu Shot and an H1N1 Flu Shot? Yes!

The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health (CDC) recommends that everyone, especially people with diabetes and other diseases, get both a seasonal flu vaccination and an H1N1 flu ("swine flu") vaccination this year.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2009

Never a

"Self-monitoring blood glucose" (SMBG), a staple in the lives of most people with diabetes who take insulin, involves consistently monitoring and recording blood glucose levels before and after specific activities, such as eating, exercising, sleeping, and taking insulin. By observing the effects of certain foods and activities on their blood glucose levels, patients can learn exactly what works to raise or lower them. Thus, SMBG affords a kind of "fine tuning" approach to diabetes that empowers patients to adjust their medicine, modify their behavior, and manage their disease without always needing expert intervention. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 13, 2009

Parents Cheer, But Teachers and Nurses Oppose New Jersey Law That Allows Non-Professionals to Give Glucagon Shots

A law signed by New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine that allows teachers to give emergency glucagon shots to students with diabetes has parents elated but has drawn strong opposition from teachers and nurses. The law also allows students with diabetes to test their own blood glucose levels and use insulin pumps while they are in the classroom, two activities that were not previously allowed.

comments 15 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2009

Magneto-encephalography

Hyperglycemia is known to cause microvascular damage, which then creates complications such as proliferative retinopathy. However, this microvascular damage may also affect cognitive functioning even before it is reflected by more easily observed complications such as retinopathy. A study carried out by Eelco van Duinkerken and colleagues in the Netherlands found that "functional connectivity", which is "an indicator of functional interactions and information exchange between brain regions," was different in type 1's as compared to controls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2009

Making Health Ends Meet

In these challenging economic times, when unemployment is so high and insurance coverage is being lost, many people find themselves having to miss doctor's visits, skip preventive care, and do without their prescriptions. Change is in the air, but in the meantime, there are programs that can help.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2009

The Importance of Treating Even Mild Gestational Diabetes

Nature is wonderfully complex. During the second trimester of pregnancy, when the fetus is growing rapidly, hormones from the placenta begin to reduce the ability of the mother's insulin to bind with insulin receptors. Because the mother's insulin is consequently less able to shuttle glucose out of her bloodstream, the growing fetus is guaranteed a good supply of blood glucose. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2009

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Aisha and David - I am a 22-year-old woman with type 1, on a pump.  I've only had one real boyfriend, and we broke up two months ago.  He said that my diabetes didn't have anything to do with it, but I'm not sure. I think that the lows scared him. Sex with him was good, but I don't have much to compare it with.  

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2009

Pearls From the 2009 AADE Annual Meeting and Exhibition

In August, I had the pleasure of traveling to Atlanta, Georgia to attend the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting.  I sat in on several seminars, the most interesting of which are summarized here.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

September 2009

Using the Medicine Wheel to Control Type 2 Diabetes

The way information is presented to us makes a big difference in whether we are able to integrate that information into our daily lives. Although graphs and numbers may sway some people, putting educational materials into a culturally relevant context can be more effective. A recent study, for example, has found that a dietary program based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition can change eating patterns among Native Americans, who have the highest rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease of all ethnic groups. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2009

Exercise, Even Without Weight Loss, Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Teens

Even if they don't lose weight, a moderate aerobic exercise program can improve insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents who are sedentary.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2009

Continuous Glucose Monitors: Even More of a Good Thing

For a while now, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) has been conducting clinical trials on the effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with type 1 diabetes. Last year, they issued their first two reports on their findings, showing that CGMs can improve control even for people who already have A1c's below 7%.  That information has already had a powerful impact: It's convinced a number of large health insurers (including Aetna, Cigna, Kaiser Permanente, United Healthcare, and Wellpoint) to cover CGMs for type 1s, and it's led to the inclusion of CGMs in national standards of care for type 1 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2009

Forming a Partnership with Your Healthcare Team: Tips From a Type 1 Pharmacist

I remember it like it was yesterday. It was the night before Thanksgiving, and my family and I were driving to my parents' house for the holiday weekend. I am usually the one who drives, but this time my wife insisted on taking the wheel because I was so dizzy and light-headed that I could hardly stand upright. Over the course of the previous week, I had not been feeling well. I had been getting up frequently at night to use the bathroom, was insatiably thirsty, and had been so dizzy that I had actually fallen down several times.

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2009

Biotransformed Blueberry Juice Fights Fat and Diabetes

Juice extracted from North American lowbush blueberries, biotransformed with bacteria from the skin of the fruit, holds great promise as an anti-obesity and anti-diabetic agent. The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, was conducted by researchers from the Université de Montréal, the Institut Armand-Frappier and the Université de Moncton who tested the effects of biotransformed juices compared to regular blueberry drinks on mice.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2009

The DCCT Lives On! Intensive Glucose Control Halves Complications

The famous Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, known to its friends as the DCCT, was the first to prove the power of "intensive control" of  blood glucose to reduce the complications of diabetes. Although the ten-year study ended in 1993, researchers have continued to follow about 90 percent of the nearly 1,500 original DCCT volunteers. And the follow-up study, called the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), is measuring up to its illustrious parent in terms of demonstrating the value of tight control.  According to results published in the July 27, 2009 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, microvascular and cardiovascular complications of type 1 diabetes are cut in half for patients with near-normal glucose. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

August 2009

Gut Hormone That Controls Glucose Production Could Become Diabetes Therapy

Canadian scientists have reported that a hormone found in the gut has the power to lower glucose production by signaling the brain and liver to do so. When the researchers activated its receptors in lab rats, they found that the hormone, called cholecystokinin (CCK) peptide, rapidly lowered the animals' blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2009

FDA Issues Warning About Test Strips That Can Give False Readings, Lead to Insulin Overdoses

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against the use of GDH-PQQ blood glucose test strips by people with diabetes who are taking medications that contain non-glucose sugars. [Note: GDH-PQQ is the abbreviation of "glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone," a chemical that reacts with the non-glucose sugars maltose, galactose, and xylose, which are contained in some therapeutic products.]

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2009

Insulin and Innovative Approaches

In June, I attended the ADA's 69th Scientific Sessions Conference that was held in New Orleans this year. Among other presentations, I listened to Mary Sullivan's very interesting talk offering practical advice on better inpatient diabetes care. We've written numerous times online about how hospital glycemic control needs to be improved. For example, you can read our article on DiabetesHealth.com called, "U.S. Academic Medical Centers Are Not Cutting the Mustard."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2009

Women's Monthly Cycle Affects Blood Glucose Control, But Not Consistently

Only a handful of studies have examined the relationship of a woman's menstrual cycle to her blood glucose control, but they have one finding in common: menstruation's effect on blood glucose is as varied as each individual's disease. As a result, blood glucose testing remains the only way to know how a woman's monthly cycle affects her diabetes control.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

FDA Approves Onglyza for Type 2 Diabetes

Onglyza (saxagliptin), a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor produced by AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

Exciting Things Seen at the Recent AADE Conference

This year the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) went deep south for its annual conference, hosting the event in Atlanta, Georgia, from August 3rd through August 9thDiabetes Health was there, hobnobbing with thousands of attendees and hundreds of companies, and it was an amazing experience. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

WaveSense Diabetes App for iPhone and iPod Touch: Now Available on iTunes

Now there's an iPhone and iPod Touch app for diabetes. AgaMatrix, Inc., the makers of the WaveSense line of blood glucose monitoring products, has announced the launch of the WaveSense Diabetes Manager, an electronic diabetes logbook software application that runs on the two Apple products.
The WaveSense Diabetes Manager, in development and testing for over a year, lays the foundation for a series of upcoming products that will take advantage of the iPhone and other mobile platforms to help people with diabetes manage  the disease. AgaMatrix reports that the WaveSense app provides users with the following features:

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2009

Surfing with Type 1

Initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Rob subsequently discovered that he had type 1. Knowing that he needed to exercise more, he returned to professional surfing. Today, he is a sponsored professional athlete who uses a CGM.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2009

Nine months on the Protégé teplizumab clinical trial: How it started, how we are doing...

In April of 2008, our healthy nine-year-old son, Gaspar, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After his two days in the ICU and a week in the hospital, a new life began for all of us. Although we couldn't immediately grasp all its implications and were simultaneously dealing with our shaken world, we gave the situation a "think outside the box" approach. When the endocrinologist told us, "That's the way it is. Just focus on the controls and all will be fine," we asked whether the condition might be cured or attenuated if we acted quickly at the beginning. We were met with the usual answer:  "There's nothing you can do. Just focus on the controls."

comments 8 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2009

Knowledge Is Not Only Power: It’s Also Powerful Medicine

It's very likely that you, like most people, believe many myths about diabetes. If you do, you might actually be doing yourself harm. Learning the truth can empower you (as it did me) to make choices and take actions that increase the quality and length of your life.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

A Chat with Kelli Kuehne on Life, Golf, and Diabetes

In 1994, Kelli Kuehne was on a roll. That year, she won the United States Girls Junior Amateur Golf Championship and a year later, she won the U.S. Women's Amateur Golf Championship, repeating that win in 1996 while also taking the British Ladies Amateur Golf Championship. The roll continues. Today, Kelli Kuehne is still playing matches in the LPGA and, through it all, has never allowed type 1 diabetes to beat her on the golf course or in her life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Protein Build-Up in Baboons' Pancreases Could Hold a Key to the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

A protein that builds up in the pancreases of baboons and leads to the suppression of insulin-producing beta cells, may provide one of the most significant indicators yet for predicting the onset of type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 28, 2009

Naturopathic Physicians: Up and Coming Partners in Diabetes Care

After experiencing blurry vision and excessive thirst, Mr. R visits his primary care doctor, who tests him and diagnoses diabetes and high lipid levels.  Mr. R is placed on hypoglycemic and statin medications and sent to a dietitian for nutritional advice, but he is confused about to how to shop and cook according to the new recommendations.  In the next weeks, he experiences dangerous blood glucose swings and inadequate improvement in his LDL level.  His primary care doctor refers him to an endocrinologist, but the next available appointment is three months away.  What now?

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2009

Dealing With Your Newly Diagnosed Diabetes: First, Look for Patterns

A man who has been married for 15 years suddenly begins losing weight and buying new clothes. He starts staying late at work and taking weekend business trips, unusual behaviors for him. His wife thinks he is having an affair. Why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2009

Medtronic Recalls Its Quick-set Infusion Sets

Minneapolis-based Medtronic Inc. is recalling some lots of its Quick-set infusion sets over concerns that they may cause insulin pumps to deliver too much or too little insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 21, 2009

Path to Good Health Includes Breastfeeding Your Baby, Avoiding Pesticides, and Eating a Mediterranean Diet

The Organic Center (TOC), a leading research institute focused on the science of organic food and farming, announced that a balanced, organic diet-both before and during pregnancy-can significantly reduce a child's likelihood of becoming overweight or obese or developing diabetes.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 17, 2009

Medicare helps cover diabetes supplies and services

Medicare offers: Screenings for people at risk, Diabetes self-management training, Medical nutrition therapy services, Hemoglobin A1c tests, Glucose monitors, test strips, lancets, insulin, and some insulin pumps, Glaucoma tests, Foot exams, foot treatment, and therapeutic shoes, Flu and pneumonia shots, and Cholesterol and lipid checks.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 15, 2009

Discovery of Link Between Obesity and Type 2 Opens Path to Possible New Treatment

Obesity has always been one of the major precursors to type 2 diabetes because of its ill effects on the body's ability to properly use insulin. But until now, scientists haven't been able to say with certainty just what happens in obese people to increase their insulin resistance. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2009

Diabetes and the iPhone

People often ask me, "Why limit diabetes-related services to the iPhone when there are so many other cell phones out there?" I always answer them by asking, "How many applications have you downloaded onto your cell phone?" 

comments 15 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2009

Roche Works for Diabetes Behavior Change/Patient Engagement

Roche Diabetes Care Announces Unique Coaching Program for Diabetes Educators as Part of Long-Term Commitment to Fight the Disease

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 8, 2009

Dude! Marijuana Could Be the Basis for a Type 2 Drug

UK-based GW Pharmaceuticals has entered into a strategic alliance with Professor Mike Cawthorne and the Clore Laboratory, University of Buckingham, to research the use of cannabinoids-chemical compounds derived from marijuana-in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2009

BG Levels Nearly Normal When Liver Enzyme Suppressed in Research

By inhibiting the expression of a gene called sirtuin 1, Yale researchers have been able to reduce blood glucose levels, decrease the liver's production of glucose, and increase insulin sensitivity in rats conditioned to exhibit type 2 symptoms. A happy byproduct of their research is a simultaneous lowering of cholesterol levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2009

June 2009

News from the ADA Conference in New Orleans, June 2009

Every time I return from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions conference, my head is so full of information that I need a week or two to sort through it. But now I've had a chance to choose what I think are the top five things that you need to know.  Here they are...

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2009

Get the Facts on Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Until now, care for insulin-dependent diabetes has focused on the delivery of insulin combined with frequent blood glucose (BG) testing. Keeping your A1c down is, and always will be, the name of the game. But numerous studies have shown us in the last few years that having access to continuous glucose data has a huge impact. How you deliver the insulin doesn't necessarily matter-you can use a pump, a syringe, or an insulin pen, it's knowing your personal BG trends that makes all the difference.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2009

Heart Association Makes It Plain: Get Off Your Duff and Exercise!

The American Heart Association (AHA) has added weight training to the list of exercises it recommends for people with type 2 diabetes to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease. Heart and blood vessel diseases account for nearly 70 percent of deaths among type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2009

Researchers Take One Big Step Closer to

One of the fondest hopes of people with type 1 diabetes has long been for the creation of an artificial pancreas, a reliable combination of automated glucose monitoring and insulin delivery that could serve in place of a defunct pancreas.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2009

Non-compliance vs. diabetes self care: Are we still playing a blame game?

In 1993, I published an article entitled "Is non-compliance a dirty word?" in The Diabetes Educator in which I expressed my sadness that people with diabetes were actually getting blamed by their health care providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's failure might really be a failure in the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work together with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2009

Research Disputes FDA Claim that Exenatide Increase Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

In 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration published strong warnings that the type 2 diabetes drug exenatide (trade name Byetta) might increase risk of acute pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas. The FDA's action came in the wake of reports that 30 exenatide users had come down with pancreatitis and that six of them had died from the condition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2009

Just in Time for Father’s Day, a Grateful Nod to the Hardworking Parents of Kids with Diabetes

I hear voices in my surroundings as the cloud of confusion gradually begins to lift. "Curtis, can you hear me?" "Curtis, what was the score of the football game?" "Curtis, do you know where you are?"

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2009

AACE Conference Wrap-Up

I attended the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), held from May 14th to 18th, 2009.  Here's a re-cap of the buzz about ICU glycemic control, prediabetes, and vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2009

Joslin 50-Year Medal Winner Triumphs over Diabetes

Gale Fullerton is a 65-year-old Californian who has the distinction of being a Joslin 50-Year medal winner. Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., knew that good self-management was the key to minimizing long-term diabetes complications, and the medal program was designed as an incentive for those committed to good diabetes care. In 1970, Joslin Diabetes Center expanded the program and began awarding a 50-year bronze medal. They presented the first 75-year medal in 1996.

comments 24 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2009

Restored Leptin Sensitivity in Lab Mice Produces Normal BG, Increased Activity—Without Need for Weight Loss

Obese lab mice with severe type 2 diabetes had their blood glucose levels restored to normal and experienced a doubling in physical activity when sensitivity to the hormone leptin was restored to a portion of their hypothalamus.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2009

AADE Supports Bill to Improve Access to Diabetes Education Services for Medicare Recipients

As Congress and President Obama get set to tackle healthcare reform, the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) has begun a multi-front battle to seek Medicare designation for all certified diabetes educators (CDEs). 

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 5, 2009

Metformin Add-on Drops Fasting Glucose Levels by 12 Points in Phase 2 Trial

CRx-401, an insulin sensitizer intended to assist metformin in type 2 diabetes therapy, has successfully completed a Phase 2 clinical trial in which patients taking it saw their fasting plasma glucose drop by 12 mg/dl after 90 days.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 3, 2009

Great Meter for the Sight-Impaired

Here’s a handy meter to have if reading your meter is a challenge. The Prodigy Autocode meter speaks your test results in seconds, and it’ll do so in English or Spanish. The audible function also promotes team work by allowing you to hear your child’s or spouse’s test result from across the room and work together as a team to manage diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2009

May 2009

New Type 2 Drug, Welchol, Discussed at the AACE Conference Reduces A1c's and LDL Cholesterol

In a recent 16-week randomized, open-label pilot study, 169 patients were randomized to receive Welchol (n=57), Januvia (n=56), or Avandia (n=56).1  The results demonstrated that Welchol (colesevelam HCl) significantly improved glycemic control and reduced mean LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) when added to metformin monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the study, Januvia® (sitagliptin) and Avandia® (rosiglitazone) also significantly improved glycemic control, but LDL-C increased in patients on both of these treatment regimens.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2009

Test for Triglycerides Can Predict Who’s at Risk for Neuropathy

Researchers at Wayne State University and the University of Michigan have found that a common blood test for triglycerides may allow doctors to predict which patients with diabetes are more likely to develop neuropathy.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 29, 2009

Metformin Turns Out to Be a More Formidable Diabetes Drug Than Previously Thought

Wow. It's like discovering that the orchestra's second violinist, who does a good job but just isn't as glamorous as the first violinist, also has a fantastic operatic singing voice. In this case, the surprise comes from metformin, the solid performer that since the 1950s has been the first non-insulin drug that doctors prescribe to newly diagnosed type 2s.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 27, 2009

What Are the Effects of Smoking?

Smoking has severe effects on your diabetes and your health. Quitting smoking will give you more energy, better control of your diabetes, and less chance of a heart attack or stroke.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 21, 2009

Managing Type 2 Abroad: Tips for Taking Diabetes on the Road in a Foreign Country

My husband, Simon, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in October 2004. It was managed via oral medication at first, but his blood sugar levels were hard to control, and his doctor prescribed insulin to stabilize his condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2009

Is It Harder to Kick the Habit if You Have Diabetes?

Smoking increases the harmful effects of diabetes by increasing insulin resistance and worsening diabetes control. It raises the likelihood of microvascular and macrovascular complications associated with diabetes. The risk of death from heart disease and stroke is increased, as are the possibilities of neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy. 

comments 3 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

“Global Diabetes Handprint” Awareness Campaign Selects Five Words That Exemplify Life with the Disease

Brave.  Fight.  Grandpa.  Life.  Alive.

Those words are some of the answers to the question "What would people living with diabetes or with somebody who has it tell you is the one word that sums up their own experience with the disease?"

comments 3 comments - Posted May 7, 2009

Type 2 Drugs: EU Approves “Victoza,” FDA Extends Review of “Onglyza”

The European Union's drug regulation agency has recommended that the EU approve the marketing of "Victoza" (liraglutide), a type 2 drug developed by Novo Nordisk.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 6, 2009

Common Glucose-Control Drug May Delay or Even Prevent Onset of Type 2

Voglibose*, a generic drug often used in combination with sulfonylureas to control blood glucose levels, appears to delay or even prevent the onset of diabetes in people who are predisposed to the disease.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

April 2009

Joy Pape’s New Book: Living with Diabetes Day-to-Day

Long before Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN, served a stint as the clinical editor and contributing columnist for Diabetes Health Professional, she was a seasoned diabetes expert who knew her way around almost every aspect of the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2009

Scientists Ponder Why Exercise Helps Control High BG in Type 2s

Understanding which proteins help control blood glucose during and after exercise could lead to new drug therapies or more effective exercise to prevent type 2 diabetes and other health problems associated with high blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2009

Study Shows Link Between Gum Disease and Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant women who have gum disease run a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes than pregnant women who have healthy gums, says a study from the New York University College of Dentistry.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2009

OneTouch Teams up with Consumer Advocate to Offers Tips on Maintaining Your Health in Tough Economic Times

The majority of U.S. adults are worried about being able to afford medical care and prescription medications.1  In addition, a recent study reveals that one in seven children and working-age Americans went without needed prescription medications in 2007 due to cost concerns, up from one in 10 in 2003.  Experts predict these statistics are likely to get worse in 2009, and this could present even greater hardships for those Americans with chronic conditions such as diabetes.2

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

March 2009

Joint Statement Published from ADA and AACE on the NICE-SUGAR Study

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) released a statement last week in response to the study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine which suggested that intensive blood glucose control for critical care patients with hyperglycemia doesn't improve outcomes and is associated with an increase in deaths.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Living with Diabetes: A Tribute to Moms and Dads

I hear voices in my surroundings as the cloud of confusion gradually begins to lift. "Curtis, can you hear me?" "Curtis, what was the score of the football game?" "Curtis, do you know where you are?" 

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2009

Sleeping Less Than Six 6 Hours a Night? Your Risk of Developing a Type 2 Precursor Is Nearly 5x Higher

If you get less than six hours of sleep per night, your risk of developing impaired fasting glucose rises by a factor of 4.56, according to a report from the American Heart Association. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2009

FDA Poised to Review Two New Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes

The FDA has announced that starting in early April, its Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee will begin looking into two new drugs for type 2 diabetes: saxagliptin tablets from Bristol-Meyers Squibb and liraglutide, an injection drug from Novo Nordisk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 24, 2009

Help on YouTube for Type 2’s Considering Insulin

Sanofi-aventis U.S., a maker of insulin as well as many other pharmaceuticals, announced last month the launch of their new YouTube diabetes channel that's designed to challenge the barriers, myths, and misperceptions about insulin use and empower people living with type 2 diabetes to make better-informed decisions for managing their condition.  The channel is part of their broader GoInsulin campaign, a multi-media resource for people living with type 2 diabetes to help dispel the myths about insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2009

Color-Changing Tattoos Could Be the Next BG Level Detector

Scientists at a Cambridge, Massachusetts, laboratory who set out to develop a tattoo for tracking heart health may now be on track for developing a tattoo for people with diabetes that changes color as blood glucose levels rise and fall. If it becomes a workable approach, the tattoo technology could spare millions of people the tiresome, often painful routine of pricking themselves throughout the day to produce blood samples for their glucose monitors. 

comments 14 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2009

Volunteering at Diabetes Camp

It was in the spring of 2005 that I received a call from the director of the diabetes camp in the state where I lived and worked as a sales rep for a blood glucose meter company.  He was calling to ask if I would volunteer as a counselor at the week-long camp, which served around 200 campers, the vast majority with type 1 diabetes. I'd known for years that counselors were always in demand at the camp, but had never stepped forward to volunteer.  I'd heard the stories of how tough and exhausting it was keeping up with your group, performing 2:00 AM blood sugar checks, and ensuring that they all stayed safe and had fun.  Frankly, I'd always had serious doubts as to whether I was up to it.  This, however, was the first time that I had been directly asked to volunteer, and something inside me made me grudgingly agree.  As I drove to the campsite to begin that week in June, though, I'd be lying if I did not admit to being as nervous as any of the kids who were attending.

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2009

Hare Beats Tortoise! Scottish Study Finds Quick Bursts Beat Steady Exercise in BG Control

A few quick, intense bursts of energy, such as 7.5 minutes per week of sprints on a stationary bicycle, may be just as good as 30 minutes per day of moderate exercise in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. In fact, say researchers at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, such short bursts may be even more effective. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2009

Diabulimia: What It Is and How To Treat It

A few years ago a young man named Jeff came into my office seeking help to lose weight.  He was 5'10" tall and weighed 130 pounds. Jeff denied starving himself, denied making himself throw up, and denied over-exercising. I tried to convince him that he was actually 30 pounds underweight. As I looked for the most effective ways of motivating him to restore his health, he brought up the fact that he had type 1 diabetes.  Jeff said that he rarely gave himself insulin and that he had "diabulimia." I had never heard of diabulimia and had no idea what I was dealing with. I gave him a list of clinicians and asked him to call me back after he made appointments with an endocrinologist and a psychotherapist.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2009

February 2009

Young Adults and Health Insurance

Editor's note: We recently received the following heartbreaking letter. The article that follows was first published in May, 2006. Little has changed.

comments 13 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2009

Baxter Teams with MedicAlert to Add Glucose Monitoring Alert for Dialysis Patients

Baxter International, Inc., which produces the peritoneal dialysis solution Extraneal (icodextrin), has teamed with MedicAlert Foundation International to encourage peritoneal dialysis patients to add a warning to their MedicAlert bracelets regarding the fact that icodextrin may cause false readings on non-specific glucose monitors. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2009

Noncompliance Versus Diabetes Self Care: Are We Still Playing a Blame Game?

Back in 1993, I published an article titled "Is Noncompliance a Dirty Word?" in which I expressed sadness that people with diabetes were being blamed by their healthcare providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's "failure" might really be a failure of the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen long years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So, how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2009

January 2009

An Update on Salsalate, an Aspirin-Like Drug That Lowers Blood Glucose and Fights Inflammation

We first reported on salsalate, an aspirin-like drug discovered in the nineteenth century, last October. At that time, researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston discovered that it appears to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2009

Chicago Diabetes Project Collaborates Globally to Find the Cure

Nearly every time that I mention islet transplantation in a conversation about diabetes, the person I'm with responds with a sniff that it's never going to work because of the immune suppression problem.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2009

Supply and Demand

The treatment of diabetes has come a long way since Dr. Elliot Joslin wrote The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in 1916. But Dr. Joslin's idea that diet, exercise, and insulin (when it became available as therapy in 1922) are the keys to managing diabetes remains true today. This doesn't mean that diabetes is not a complex illness requiring ongoing education and individualized care. People with diabetes benefit greatly from the services of a team of health care professionals including a certified diabetes educator and an endocrinologist--a doctor who specializes in treating disorders of the endocrine system.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2009

What Is Diabetes?

You've been diagnosed with diabetes because there is too much glucose (a kind of sugar) in your blood. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2009

Experts Change Their Tune About Whether People With Longstanding Diabetes Should Pursue Low Blood Sugar

One of 2008's most interesting developments was the change in one long-standing recommendation for treating diabetes in people who have had the disease for a long time: Work intensely on getting blood sugar levels as low as possible. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Nursing Home Care for People With Diabetes a Mixed Bag

As the 76-million-member Baby Boomer generation ages-its oldest members are now 63-nursing homes are bracing for an unprecedented demand for their services. Along with increased pressure from the sheer number of patients, nursing homes will also have to deal with the skyrocketing number of seniors with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Controlling Blood Sugar May Lead to Fewer “Senior Moments”
Controlling Blood Sugar May Lead to Fewer “Senior Moments”

They start in your forties as periodic mental hiccups where you suddenly lose the thread of a thought. By your fifties, they happen often enough to make you jokingly introduce the phase "senior moment" to your vocabulary. And by the time you enter your sixties, there's not a lot of humor in them any more. Senior moments become an often exasperating stall in conversations and thought.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

December 2008

Resolve and Evolve!

Here at Diabetes Health, we've learned the hard way that specific resolutions are the way to go. General plans like "I'll watch my weight" or "I'll check my blood glucose more often" tend to be less successful than the more specific: "I'll eat x number of carbs each meal" and "I'll check my BG before and after every meal." 

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

A Low Blood Sugar Scenario Explained
A Low Blood Sugar Scenario Explained

Every type 1 fears having a hypoglycemic event.  Because people are usually more accustomed to dealing with highs, however, a sudden low often catches them unaware. Use this fictional yet typical story to find out what might happen medically during a low and what you need to know to keep hypoglycemia in check.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Low Carbohydrate Diets: Why You Don't Want the "Experts" to Tell You What to Eat
Low Carbohydrate Diets: Why You Don't Want the "Experts" to Tell You What to Eat

Diabetes may be described as a disease of glucose intolerance: high blood glucose is both the characteristic indicator and the cause of complications.

comments 121 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Woman Loses 134 Pounds in One Year

About a year ago, Cheryl Tooke found herself in the last place she ever wanted to be. She weighed 268 pounds, and her doctor had just diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes.

comments 85 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?
The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?

Obesity in the United States is increasing in epidemic proportions. This is true in children as well as adults. It's estimated that the healthcare costs associated with obesity and its related complications will exceed $130 billion this year.

comments 52 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

FDA Asks Diabetes Drug Makers To Study Their Medicines’ Potential Heart Risks
FDA Asks Diabetes Drug Makers To Study Their Medicines’ Potential Heart Risks

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended that companies manufacturing diabetes treatment drugs provide evidence that their products will not increase cardiovascular risks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Sleep Apnea Therapy Improves BG Levels in Type 2s

A common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreased the average glucose level during sleep of type 2s who were newly diagnosed with OSA. After seven weeks of the therapy, known as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the diabetic patients' average BG level fell 20 mg/dl.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 22, 2008

The History of Diabetes
The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. In the first century A.D. a Greek, Aretaeus, described the destructive nature of the affliction which he named "diabetes" from the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold in his text Aretaeus the Cappodacian describes Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 47 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Take This Test on Insulin: You May Be Smarter Than a Doctor!
Take This Test on Insulin: You May Be Smarter Than a Doctor!

Take this test on insulin and see if you can get a higher score than hospital doctors and nurses.

comments 19 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

American Idol's Elliott Yamin Brings Diabetes Message to Millions
American Idol's Elliott Yamin Brings Diabetes Message to Millions

It has been rags to riches for singer Elliott Yamin. With his naturally soulful singing voice, listeners feel his raw emotion and they like it. When you hear him, you know immediately that few guys in any musical genre sing with this kind of authenticity.

comments 29 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Top 10 Patient Gripes
Top 10 Patient Gripes

Most people with diabetes will tell you this: Everything about having it is a hassle, an annoyance and sometimes utterly overwhelming. Endless worrying over meal plans, carbohydrate counting, finger-stick checks, pills, injections, lab tests, prescriptions, supplies and doctors’ appointments are nobody’s idea of fun.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Brothers’ Diabetes Spans History of Insulin
Brothers’ Diabetes Spans History of Insulin

Bob Cleveland wondered if he’d live when he went to the hospital as a 5-year-old. In 1925, hospital visits were made for dire reasons.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Internal Body Clock May Increase Risk of Type 2

An international team of researchers reports that a mutation in a gene that controls a person's body clock can cause higher blood sugar levels, leading to a 20 percent increased risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2008

Hope for Healthy Hearts, Women Have the Power to Lessen Risk

Many people think of heart disease as something that mostly afflicts men. But heart disease actually kills more women in the United States than anything else, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. And diabetes plays a stronger role in risk for heart disease in women than it does in men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 15, 2008

Surviving the Holidays in Good Health
Surviving the Holidays in Good Health

The end of the year can be a difficult time because for many of us, it’s not just a day or two but whole weeks of merrymaking. We all know people who throw caution to the winds and give up all semblance of healthy behavior when holiday or vacation time comes around. It is not uncommon for these people to still be struggling to get back on track by March of the following year.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2008

Holiday Eating
Holiday Eating

Sometimes happy holiday dreams and dazzling parties turn into nightmares of stressful schedules, impulse eating and battered blood glucose. Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah or the winter solstice, bountiful food and holiday stress can affect your festive mood and your health.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2008

Holiday Gift Ideas for Insulin Pump Users
Holiday Gift Ideas for Insulin Pump Users

Need gift ideas? Holiday gift-giving can be a challenge. Some people like surprise gifts, some make “must have” or “wish” lists. I don’t always know what is on someone’s list, or if they would enjoy a surprise.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2008

Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanzaa
Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanzaa

Hanukkah treats? Christmas traditions? Kwanzaa celebrations?

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2008

The Joke’s on You: Laugh Yourself Healthier
The Joke’s on You: Laugh Yourself Healthier

A doctor is trying to get his patient, an overweight man with diabetes, to lose some weight. "I want you to eat what you always do for two days, then skip a day, then repeat this for two weeks. When you come back, you should have lost five pounds." A month later when the patient returns, he's lost 20 pounds. The doctor is amazed. "Was it hard to follow my instructions?" he asks. "Well, on the third day, I thought I'd die," the man replied. The doctor nodded. "From hunger? " "No," the man replied, "From the skipping."

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 8, 2008

Rethinking the Treatment of Diabetes

The first time I presented medical research findings, I was not yet a physician. The year was about 1975. I was in my early forties and a mid-career engineer. The forum was a scientific symposium on diabetes. At the time, I felt that I had discovered the holy grail of diabetes care and was eager to share what I had learned.

comments 22 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

Good News for Older Men With Pre-Diabetes: Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance

Older men who are worried about insulin resistance can take heart from a Tufts University study which shows that higher than normal doses of vitamin K slow development of the condition. (Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body increasingly cannot use insulin properly and blood glucose levels rise. It is a major precursor to type 2 diabetes.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 8, 2008

Are You an Athlete with Diabetes? Then You Need This Book! (Part 2)

Last week we published an excerpt from Chapter 4 of Sheri Colberg's revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg has a PhD in exercise physiology, is a Diabetes Health board member, and is herself an athlete with diabetes. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!
Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!

Diabetes Health board member Sheri Colberg, PhD, has published a completely revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg, a diabetic athlete herself, has a PhD in exercise physiology. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Anti-Cancer Drugs in Lab Mice Trials Prevent or Reverse Type 1
Anti-Cancer Drugs in Lab Mice Trials Prevent or Reverse Type 1

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have found that two drugs used to treat cancer can prevent or cure type 1 diabetes in mice.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Diabetes and the Open Road—Are You Driving While Low?
Diabetes and the Open Road—Are You Driving While Low?

A study published in the August 25 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports that people with type 1 diabetes "may not judge correctly when their blood sugar levels are too low and may consider driving with a low BG." In the study, "low" was defined as less than 70 mg/dl.

comments 15 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2008

Research Centers Report “Encouraging Results” in Tests of Artificial Pancreases
Research Centers Report “Encouraging Results” in Tests of Artificial Pancreases

Even as diabetes researchers worldwide strive for total control over-or even an outright cure of-type 1 diabetes via gene therapy, altered cells, or surgical intervention, other researchers continue to press toward creation of a functional "artificial pancreas."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 3, 2008

October 2008

OneTouch Ping Recalled by Animas
OneTouch Ping Recalled by Animas

David Kliff of Diabetic Investor was the first to report last week that Animas, the Johnson and Johnson unit that makes the  OneTouch Ping blood glucose monitor, is recalling the Ping. The brand-new Ping received FDA clearance this past summer on July 1. According to reports, there is a small problem with the Ping that has nothing to do with the Animas 2020 insulin pump it works in concert with. The bolus calculator on the Ping does not work properly when it isn’t synched with the pump. When the two are synched, it works fine. Animas says the problem has been corrected and they are sending new units to customers to replace the defective ones.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Take More Than 200 Units of Insulin a Day? Consider Taking U-500
Take More Than 200 Units of Insulin a Day? Consider Taking U-500

If you use more than 200 units of insulin a day (or your child needs more than three units of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day), and you aren't reaching your blood glucose goals, you may want to consider U-500 insulin. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

LifeScan Launches Diabetes Handprint Project

LifeScan, the maker of OneTouch blood glucose meters, recently announced Global Diabetes Handprint, a new collaboration with the Diabetes Hands Foundation.  The project encourages people with diabetes to post an image of their hand, decorated with words and graphics depicting their personal expressions about living with diabetes (or decorate a virtual hand online). The project is designed to help people with diabetes use self-expression to connect with each other and feel less isolated.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 27, 2008

New Data From Phase 3 Trial Says Liraglutide Is More Effective Than Exenatide For Type 2s

Novo Nordisk recently announced results from its LEAD 6 study showing that once daily liraglutide was significantly more effective at improving blood glucose control (as measured by A1c) than exenatide, a GLP-1 mimetic administered twice daily.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Anti-Inflammatory Protein from the Liver Appears to Cure Type 1 in Mice
Anti-Inflammatory Protein from the Liver Appears to Cure Type 1 in Mice

Diabetes Health has always been ambivalent when it comes to reporting diabetes research that involves mice. For one thing, although the critters are mammals, it's a stretch to say that what happens in a mouse can be duplicated in a human.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

Need Gastric Bypass? Put a Sock in It! The EndoBarrier Gastrointestinal Liner

In gastric bypass surgery, the surgeon basically lops your small intestine in two and then hooks it back up again in such a way that it's much shorter than before. With the first section of your small intestine out of commission, food flows directly from your stomach to the middle of your small intestine. When less intestine is available to absorb food, less food is absorbed, not surprisingly. It works, but it's not pretty. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

Salsalate, an Aspirin-Like Drug, Shows Promise as a Type 2 Prevention

An aspirin-like drug discovered 132 years ago may prove to be a powerful weapon against type 2 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2008

You Can’t Push the River:  Self-Directed Education at Diabetes Camp in Mexico
You Can’t Push the River: Self-Directed Education at Diabetes Camp in Mexico

The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes peaks at 13 to 14 years of age, but at any age it immediately requires children and adolescents to learn many complex facets of glycemic self-management.  Dr. Elliot Joslin's belief of 85 years ago, that education is not just part of the treatment of diabetes, but rather the treatment itself, still holds true.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 6, 2008

Heritage Labs Debuts $19.95 Home A1c Test
Heritage Labs Debuts $19.95 Home A1c Test

Heritage Labs has introduced the Appraise® Home A1c Kit, a product that allows people with diabetes and pre-diabetes to measure their average blood glucose level over a three- or four-month period. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month
November is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November is National Diabetes Awareness month.  It's a good time to reflect on your blood glucose successes and have compassion for what you may view as failures.  What's in a glucose reading anyway?  It's just a number. It gives you feedback for a certain time period. Everyone struggles with maintaining good blood sugars.  The important thing to remember is that you are not alone. In this issue, you will find everyday heroes who are committed to reminding other people that we are all in this together. Since dialog is what it's all about when dealing with your diabetes, I am happy to tell you about a new section of our popular web site, Diabetes Health Forums. It's a place where you can participate in an existing discussion or start a new one of your own. Learn more at www.diabeteshealth.com/forums.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2008

September 2008

Bret Michaels, Diabetic Lead Singer of Poison

Bret Michaels was only six years old when he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Now 44 years old, he's a twenty-year veteran of the rock and roll scene as the lead singer of the eighties band "Poison."

comments 64 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Doctors Say Avandia Warning Label Should Tout Vegan Diet

A professional doctors' group has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to require that Avandia's warning label include a statement that a low-fat vegan diet is a safer, more effective approach to lowering blood sugar levels than the drug itself.

comments 20 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Making Time for Breakfast
Making Time for Breakfast

Many people know that it is beneficial to eat your morning meal, but it can be challenging for many reasons. Breakfast is not the meal to miss, especially when you feel stressed, since it can set the mood for the entire day. The truth is that what you eat for breakfast may be more important than if you eat breakfast at all.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

The Latest ‘Scoop’  on Ice Cream
The Latest ‘Scoop’ on Ice Cream

Originally ice cream consisted of milk, cream, sugar, flavoring and lots of air. But modern brands adhering to this original recipe are few and far between.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 22, 2008

When Diabetes Leads to a Lazy Stomach: The Goods on Gastroparesis
When Diabetes Leads to a Lazy Stomach: The Goods on Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn't sound good, and it isn't. Literally "stomach paralysis," it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature.

comments 27 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Shedding Habits and Pounds: No Brand-Name Diets, No Gym Memberships

I remember the call from the doctor's office two weeks after a long overdue annual physical. I sat in the examining room expecting to hear the usual "lose weight" diagnosis. I had been feeling tired and had been making more than a few daily trips to the bathroom. But in spite of the fact that my grandmother, father, cousin, and brother all suffered from type 2 diabetes, I was not prepared for my doctor's stern warning: My sugar had been totally out of control for several months. I needed to adjust my diet and lifestyle immediately. I was a 40-year-old chocoholic and totally calorie clueless. I also weighed 255 pounds. The doctor prescribed an oral medication and told me that monthly visits for testing would now be required. I thought, OK, I can do this.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 18, 2008

The Consumer Has Spoken: “Let Me Test in Purple.”
The Consumer Has Spoken: “Let Me Test in Purple.”

The OneTouch® UltraMini® Meter by LifeScan, Inc., is now available in Purple Twilight and Blue Comet.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

Long-Term Benefits of Blood Sugar Control

People who tightly control their blood sugar-even if only for the first decade after they are diagnosed-have lower risks of heart attack, death, and other complications ten or more years later, a large follow-up study has found.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

“I’m High…Why?”
“I’m High…Why?”

Diabetes educator Cindy Young used case studies to illustrate the many little things that can have a big effect on your blood glucose-or just on the readings you get with your meter.

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2008

Good News for Byetta (Exenatide): Canadian Study Reports Once-Weekly Dose Is Better at BG Control Than Twice Daily

A Canadian clinical study has delivered a double dose of good news for proponents of exenatide (sold commercially as Byetta), a drug used by more than 700,000 Americans to control blood glucose, ease food cravings, and, incidentally, lose weight.  

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2008

Study Shows CGMs Help Type 1s Achieve Better Blood Sugar Control-Especially Those Over 25
Study Shows CGMs Help Type 1s Achieve Better Blood Sugar Control-Especially Those Over 25

A study sponsored by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation confirms that many older type 1 patients achieve better control of their blood sugar levels by using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) than by conventional monitoring with a meter and finger pricks. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2008

Speak Out When Schools Eliminate Full-Time Nurses!
Speak Out When Schools Eliminate Full-Time Nurses!

This is a worst case scenario.
This is the untrained trying to do the unknown.
This is 20 minutes of hell.

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes
As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes

With 21 million U.S. residents now officially diagnosed as having diabetes, healthcare professionals are looking at another statistic that is causing them many a sleepless night: The Centers for Disease Control estimate that there are 57 million people with pre-diabetes in the United States. (Pre-diabetes is defined as impaired fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl, impaired glucose tolerance of 140 to 199 mg/dl, or both.)

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

Four Lucky Winners with Diabetes Will Meet Nick Jonas
Four Lucky Winners with Diabetes Will Meet Nick Jonas

Bayer Diabetes Care and teen pop sensation Nick Jonas of the Jonas Brothers are inviting people with diabetes to enter the "Walk In Nick's Shoes" (W.I.N.S.) sweepstakes, which runs through October 1, 2008.

comments 9 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

August 2008

Sleep Apnea and Diabetes

Imagine someone pressing a pillow over your face while you sleep. You wake up and struggle for air. After 10 seconds, you're allowed to breathe again. But pretty soon, the pillow goes back over your face.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

Family with Nine Kids, Three with Type 1, Finds There Are Some Silver Linings
Family with Nine Kids, Three with Type 1, Finds There Are Some Silver Linings

My husband and I have nine children. Elliott is our oldest and when he was diagnosed with type 1 at age 11 in 1996, we were blindsided. Neither my husband, nor I, nor anyone in our extended family had diabetes. Elliot had all of the classic symptoms: excessive thirst, frequent urination, uncontrollable hunger, occasional blurry vision, and (something I think a lot of parents don't recognize as a sign) bedwetting.  

comments 11 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

I Wish Someone Had Done That for Me

I was forty-five years old when I found out that I had type 2 diabetes. I don't know why I was shocked. Diabetes ran like a river through my family. My father had type 1. He died at the age of forty-one from a heart attack, but my mother always insisted that it was partly because he didn't "manage" his diabetes well.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Are You Paying for Test Strips When You Don’t Have To?
Are You Paying for Test Strips When You Don’t Have To?

Diabetes educator Mary M. Austin reported that many people are paying for blood glucose test strips even though their insurance plans would cover them. "There is a lot of misunderstanding," she said. For example, a client of Austin's got a free meter at a health fair. He then paid for strips on his own for six months, until he found out that his insurance plan would cover them if he got a prescription for the strips from his healthcare provider.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

So You Want to Get Into Research?
So You Want to Get Into Research?

Researchers Adeola Akindana and Laura Want explained that diabetes education may be an integral part of a clinical study, as it was in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). But most diabetes studies have an education component even when it isn't specified in the study's protocol. For example, in a drug study in which participants must check their blood glucose levels, they may need to be taught the correct technique.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

The Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup
The Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup

You know how important it is to control the sugar and carbohydrates in your diet. So you read food labels and listen to your body cues to make sure you’re getting what you need to stay healthy.

comments 52 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think
Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think

Do you want to lose weight and improve your blood glucose levels? Do you want to do it without having to weigh your portions and count your calories? Try a low-fat vegan diet. A vegan diet is one with no animal products: no fish, no eggs, no dairy, and, of course, no meat.

comments 22 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

A1c Testing Should Be Routine for Everyone, Not Just Those with Diabetes, Say Researchers
A1c Testing Should Be Routine for Everyone, Not Just Those with Diabetes, Say Researchers

The hemoglobin A1c test (HbA1c) is a staple among people with diabetes attempting to map out their long-term blood glucose levels. However, it is not a standard test for non-diabetics, even those whose doctors suspect they may have the disease.

comments 14 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

Dr. Denise Faustman Continues Working Toward the Cure
Dr. Denise Faustman Continues Working Toward the Cure

After it saved the lives of diabetic mice, a drug used to treat tuberculosis and cancer is now being tested in humans at Massachusetts General Hospital as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes.

comments 21 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

Prodigy® Voice Receives A+ Award from the National Federation of the Blind
Prodigy® Voice Receives A+ Award from the National Federation of the Blind

When the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) hosted its convention June 30 through July 5 in Dallas, Texas, it awarded the Access Plus (A+) Award to Diagnostic Devices, Inc., makers of Prodigy® blood glucose monitoring systems. “The A+ Award program was designed to reward companies that make consumer products that are truly accessible for blind people,” said Eileen Rivera Ley, Director of Diabetes Initiatives for the NFB. The A+ Award is for products that afford the blind the same convenience and features available to everyone else and is awarded only to products and services that meet the highest standards of accessibility.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

Highlights from ADA’s 68th Scientific Sessions

I just returned from the American Diabetes Association’s 68th Scientific Sessions held in San Francisco in June and I’d like to share some highlights:

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

July 2008

Type 2 Diabetes: Is Carb Counting Unnecessary?
Type 2 Diabetes: Is Carb Counting Unnecessary?

You’ve got type 2 diabetes. A few years ago, you started using a long-acting insulin once a day, and your fasting glucose levels and your A1c came down. But now your A1c is creeping back up. Your doctor tells you that you need to add a mealtime insulin to your plan.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2008

“I Can’t Get Divorced, It’s Bad for My Glucose Levels!”

Hostility and anger are associated with higher blood glucose levels in non-diabetic single men, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2008

16-Year-Old Turns Type I Diagnosis into an Opportunity to Create Hip ID Bracelets
16-Year-Old Turns Type I Diagnosis into an Opportunity to Create Hip ID Bracelets

Before diabetes, I was a normal teenager whose greatest worry was whether I’d get an A or a B on a test. I was strong and healthy. Somehow, I took for granted all the freedoms that diabetes took away from me. Last year, at the age of fifteen, I learned that every day, even every breath, that we are given is a true gift.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2008

Children’s Nutrition and Fitness Education Program Scores

WakeMed Health & Hospitals Children’s Diabetes ENERGIZE! program has won the coveted NOVA Award from the American Hospital Association (AHA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2008

The Star-Fish Story, Diabetes, and the Poorest Nation in the World
The Star-Fish Story, Diabetes, and the Poorest Nation in the World

Have you heard the story of the little boy who was on the beach after a storm?  Thousands of starfish had washed ashore, and he picked up one after another and threw them back into the sea.  A man watched him work and after some time said to the boy, “Look at all these starfish.  You’re never going to be able to save them all. Do you think all your work will make a difference?”  The boy thought for a minute as he looked up and down the beach. “I don’t know,” he said as he picked up another starfish and flung it into the brine, “but it sure will make a difference to this one!”

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

Animas to Launch its Wireless Glucose Management System by Mid-August
Animas to Launch its Wireless Glucose Management System by Mid-August

In the wake of its clearance by the FDA, Animas Corporation says it will make its new OneTouch® Ping™ glucose management system available to people with diabetes by mid-August.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

UCSF Is Seeking Volunteers for 8 Clinical Trials
UCSF Is Seeking Volunteers for 8 Clinical Trials

The Diabetes Center at the University of California at San Francisco is currently seeking to enroll patients in five studies of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and three related studies of non-diabetics:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 3, 2008

June 2008

Flying on Insulin

Every pilot’s nightmare is the thought of losing his medical certification and being stopped from flying. That happened to me in May of 1986, when I was diagnosed with type 1. In accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices, Canada, along with every other country in the world, would not allow insulin-dependent pilots to hold any type of pilot’s license. My short eight-year career with Air Canada came to an abrupt end, and I was told in no uncertain terms that I would never be allowed to fly an aircraft again.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Sugar and Diabetes: The Myth That Won't Die
Sugar and Diabetes: The Myth That Won't Die

Years ago, John Bantle, MD, gave brownies to people with diabetes. Brownies made with real sugar. And their blood glucose levels…did not skyrocket.

comments 27 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Interim Study Shows That Intestinal Barrier Produces Weight Loss and Type 2 Remission
Interim Study Shows That Intestinal Barrier Produces Weight Loss and Type 2 Remission

An impermeable liner inserted non-surgically into a portion of the small intestine produces rapid weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes, according to a Montana endocrinologist.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

This Week's Diabetes Research Highlights
This Week's Diabetes Research Highlights

Tekturna Reduces Kidney Disease Indicator

The blood pressure medicine Tekturna (aliskiren) may have a beneficial side effect for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure who are at risk of kidney disease. According to a recent article in The New England Journal of Medicine, the drug reduces proteinuria, a key indicator of kidney disease, by 20 percent in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Diabetes Drugs Are Now the Top Driver In Drug Spending Growth, Says Report
Diabetes Drugs Are Now the Top Driver In Drug Spending Growth, Says Report

Diabetes treatments are now the leading driver of prescription drug spending growth, displacing lipid-lowering drugs, which tumbled in price after a reign of 10 years in the top position. Generic drugs are cutting the cost of treating high cholesterol.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2008

Letter of the Week: Mother Caught Between Medtronic and BlueCross BlueShield  Refuses to Give Up
Letter of the Week: Mother Caught Between Medtronic and BlueCross BlueShield Refuses to Give Up

Dear Diabetes Health,

After reading the story in the April/May Diabetes Health about the mother and daughter who won approval from Blue Cross/Blue Shield to pay for the continuous monitor, I wanted to share our story.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2008

May 2008

Teens on Insulin Pumps - Are They Safe? We Go Into Depth on the Recent News Reports Scaring Teen Pump Users
Teens on Insulin Pumps - Are They Safe? We Go Into Depth on the Recent News Reports Scaring Teen Pump Users

With annual worldwide sales topping 1.3 billion dollars, insulin pumps are one of the most popular devices in the treatment of diabetes. Not only do they allow people with type 1 diabetes to more easily manage their blood glucose levels, but they also help users regain their freedom and enjoy a more normal life.

comments 14 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Type 1s Live Insulin-Free For Up to Two Years, Thanks to Transplanted Human Islet Cells... But There's a Catch
Type 1s Live Insulin-Free For Up to Two Years, Thanks to Transplanted Human Islet Cells... But There's a Catch

HealthDay reports that according to a University of Miami study, people with type 1 diabetes who received transplanted islet cells from human donors lived insulin-free for up to two years.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 30, 2008

Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes
Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes

Is it possible that a dip in the hot tub can cause a dip in the blood sugars? According to a pilot study that appeared in the September 16 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), "hot tub therapy" helped a group of type 2s reduce their blood sugars, lose weight and improve sleep patterns.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 23, 2008

Arizona Law Sets National Example in Giving Students Greater Monitoring Control
Arizona Law Sets National Example in Giving Students Greater Monitoring Control

In the current era of “zero tolerance,” public school students who have diabetes have been caught in a frustrating crossfire.

comments 13 comments - Posted May 22, 2008

Med Student with Diabetes Cautions Against Unrealistic Expectations for CGMs

Dear Editor, I am a medical student in the M.D. program at Oregon Health and Sciences University and a type 1 diabetic of almost 10 years. I use a Medtronic pump and I also use their continuous glucose monitoring system (Paradigm Real-Time).

comments 34 comments - Posted May 22, 2008

AACE Calls for New Standards for Safer Insulin Pump Use

Newswise — “The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists applauds the FDA’s efforts to protect the safety of children and adolescents who are using insulin pumps,” said Dr. Richard Hellman, the Association’s President.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 15, 2008

Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body?  What Do You Feel In Your Mind?
Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body? What Do You Feel In Your Mind?

A word of caution about the values used below. This study was conducted using people without diabetes.  Some people with diabetes experience symptoms at higher glucose levels than the study suggests. Other people with diabetes appear to function well with blood sugars in the 30's and 40's (mg/dl). Therefore, the values in the study should only be used as an approximation. This study also used plasma glucose levels. Your values done at home might be 20 percent lower or higher than these lab values. For example, epinephrine release in someone without diabetes would begin at about 63mg/dl with a home blood glucose meter.

comments 43 comments - Posted May 1, 2008

April 2008

To Color or Not to Color Insulin With Vitamin B-12? Our "Help Us Avoid Fatal Mistakes!" Discussion Continues
To Color or Not to Color Insulin With Vitamin B-12? Our "Help Us Avoid Fatal Mistakes!" Discussion Continues

Hi, Keith,
One of our most popular articles right now is about the many, many folks who accidentally mix up their insulin bottles and take a huge dose of fast-acting insulin by mistake, thinking they are taking long-acting.  (See the article and the 22 reader comments here.)

comments 10 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

FDA Clears Medtronic and LifeScan to Market Integrated Wireless Diabetes Management System
FDA Clears Medtronic and LifeScan to Market Integrated Wireless Diabetes Management System

The FDA has cleared the OneTouch UltraLink wireless meter as the only meter certified by Medtronic to wirelessly communicate with its diabetes management products in the United States. The meter uses Medtronic-certified wireless technology to transmit glucose readings directly to MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps and the Guardian® REAL-Time continuous glucose monitoring system. This makes bolus dosing more accurate and easier for patients compared to the manual entry of blood glucose readings.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

Discuss This With Your Opthamologist: Study Finds Retinopathy Doubles Heart Risk
Discuss This With Your Opthamologist: Study Finds Retinopathy Doubles Heart Risk

Here is a troubling finding that you will want to discuss with your opthamologist and cardiologist: Type 2 diabetics who already have retinopathy when they are diagnosed are 2.5 times more likely to develop heart failure than type 2’s who are diagnosed without it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

African-Americans: 12% of the U.S. Population; But 17% of All U.S. People With Diabetes
African-Americans: 12% of the U.S. Population; But 17% of All U.S. People With Diabetes

It is estimated that nearly 3 million African-Americans have diabetes – 17 percent of all diabetes patients in the United States. That figure is growing as the proportion of African-American patients diagnosed with diabetes consistently increases year to year, according to research from GfK Market Measures’ Roper Global Diabetes Group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2008

Online Sweepstakes Contest Will Award 30 Summer Camp Scholarships to Kids

LifeScan, a Johnson & Johnson company that manufactures OneTouch blood glucose meters, is sponsoring an online sweepstakes for children with diabetes that will offer the opportunity to attend a diabetes camp for free this summer.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2008

Medtronic's Milestone Millionth CGM Sensor Sale Increases Pressure on Insurers to Cover the Units
Medtronic's Milestone Millionth CGM Sensor Sale Increases Pressure on Insurers to Cover the Units

Years from now, when we’re looking for significant milestones in the struggle to get insurers to cover the cost of continuous glucose monitors, keep this one in mind: Medtronic has just announced the sale of its one millionth sensor from its line of CGM products.

comments 7 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2008

Type 2 Diagnosis Lit My Fire: 100 Lbs. Down and a 4.9 A1c!
Type 2 Diagnosis Lit My Fire: 100 Lbs. Down and a 4.9 A1c!

In November 2005, with an A1c of 7.5%, I was told that I had type 2 diabetes.  It shouldn’t have come as much of a surprise to me because my mother has type 2 and her mother died from complications due to her uncontrolled diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2008

Delores "Dee" Brehm, Age 77: Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 58 years
Delores "Dee" Brehm, Age 77: Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 58 years

When Dee Brehm was diagnosed in 1949 with type 1 diabetes, her prospects were not bright: a permanent chronic condition, a reduced life span, potentially devastating complications and perhaps no children. She married Bill Brehm in 1952, and they began a partnership knowing that together they would have to manage her disease. Dee subsequently defied the dim outlook for her life: She has two children and six grandchildren, and she has surpassed the half-century mark with this disease having been spared the ordeal of complications.

comments 23 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2008

March 2008

What happened after Blue Cross rejected her daughter Laura's application for a continuous glucose monitor?  Gillian Miller took on the big boys and won!
What happened after Blue Cross rejected her daughter Laura's application for a continuous glucose monitor? Gillian Miller took on the big boys and won!

Fifteen-year-old Californian Laura Miller, a brittle diabetic, and her mother, Gillian, thought they had a strong case when they asked Blue Cross in late 2007 to pay for a continuous glucose monitor for her.

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Legal and Illegal Drugs: What Every Person With Diabetes Should Know Before They Party

Perhaps more than anyone, people with diabetes know that the motto “Just say no” often doesn’t work.

comments 29 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

Blood Sugar Management: the Core of Your Care

Blood sugar control is the heart and soul of diabetes management. How you handle it determines what will be the consequences of your diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Caused by Intestinal Dysfunction
Type 2 Diabetes May Be Caused by Intestinal Dysfunction

NEW YORK – Growing evidence shows that surgery may effectively cure type 2 diabetes – an approach that not only may change the way the disease is treated, but that introduces a new way of thinking about diabetes.

comments 18 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

The ADA and Low Carb Diets

For the first time, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) came out in support of low-carbohydrate diets for people with diabetes who want to manage their weight. The ADA announced this landmark decision in December 2007 with its 2008 clinical practice recommendations. The latest recommendation is in sharp contrast to decades of promoting only low-fat/high-carb diets.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2008

Steps You Can Take to Prevent Foot Amputation
Steps You Can Take to Prevent Foot Amputation

A Diabetes Health advisory board member offers advice on how to treat your feet well and avoid wounds and infections that could lead to amputation. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2008

Chronically Elevated Blood Sugar Levels Disable Fasting Switch

Continually revved up insulin production, the kind that results from overeating and obesity, slowly dulls the body’s response to insulin. As a result, blood sugar levels start to creep up, setting the stage for diabetes-associated complications such as blindness, stroke and renal failure. To make matters even worse, chronically elevated blood sugar concentrations exacerbate insulin resistance.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2008

February 2008

A1c's Give Inaccurate Results for Hemodialysis Patients

A1c tests, the standard measurement of blood glucose, underestimate the amount of glucose in people who are on kidney hemodialysis, says a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center study.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2008

The Era of "He Said, She Said": International Study Contradicts Recent ACCORD Mortality Fears

Just after a massive U.S. study dropped its aggressive treatment of blood glucose levels because of increased deaths among type 2 patients, international researchers announced that their similar intense study of tight blood sugar control showed no increased risk of death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2008

Texas Doctor Touts Medtronic's iPro Recorder As a Breakthrough Diabetes Diagnostic Tool
Texas Doctor Touts Medtronic's iPro Recorder As a Breakthrough Diabetes Diagnostic Tool

A Texas endocrinologist who recently put the recently FDA-approved Medtronic iPro continuous glucose recorder through its paces with diabetic patients calls the tool a major step forward in doctors' ability to accurately monitor the disease.

comments 10 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2008

Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely
Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the newest continuous glucose monitoring system from diabetes management device manufacturer Medtronic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2008

U.S. Suspends Study on Intense Blood Sugar Control After Increase in Deaths Among Type 2 Participants

After seeing an increase in deaths among type 2 participants, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has halted the intense blood sugar control portion of its years-long study on controlling cardiovascular risks to people with diabetes.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

ADA's Latest Low-Carb Stance Is Severely Flawed, Says Longtime Low-Carb Advocate Dr. Bernstein

Pioneering low-carb diet advocate Dr. Richard K. Bernstein has responded to the American Diabetes Association's recent support for low-carb diets with a critique of several of the ADA's most cherished notions.

comments 30 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

People with Diabetes Urged to Read Between the Labels of Meal Replacement Bars and Beverages

Recently, meal-replacement bars, powders and beverages have been touted as a popular way of providing nutritious options for today's busy lifestyles, as well as aids for weight loss and poor appetite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2008

Reader Chides TV Program for Inaccuracies About Type 1

I don't know if you watched this show that aired the week of January 20 here in Rochester, N.Y., on WXXI Public TV. The program included a short segment where a 12-year-old type 1 diabetic relied upon a medical dog to avoid seizures. It was very incomplete and misleading.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2008

January 2008

Slim Fast Scare

I just had a frightening experience. A severe hypoglycemic, I took my regular 5 units of R Humulin 30 minutes before lunch. Instead of my normal sandwich and milk at lunch, I drank a glass of Slim Fast with milk. I carefully read the label and figured out that it was almost identical to the sandwich in calories, carbs and sugars.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2008

Fingers Still Crossed - Because We Still Want a Non-Invasive Meter
Fingers Still Crossed - Because We Still Want a Non-Invasive Meter

"It feels like you accidentally pricked yourself with a pin, only it's not accidental and you have to do it over and over again in the same areas."

comments 35 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2008

Insulin, Leptin, Diabetes, and Aging: Not So Strange Bedfellows

To successfully treat any disease, one must know what disease to treat. Treating only a symptom of the disease will leave the underlying disease unchecked and possibly worse. For example, we evolved the "runny" nose to help us clean out upper respiratory infections. So taking a decongestant to eradicate the symptom of a "runny" nose is actually counterproductive for the underlying disease.

comments 23 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2008

Diabetes, Depression and Death
Diabetes, Depression and Death

Startling statistics are only one reason sufferers should get help and why research into this lethal combination must continue.  On the list of deadly diseases in the United States, diabetes ranks fifth. And for so many reasons: major killers like heart attack and stroke are among a slew of diabetes' potentially lethal complications.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2008

NATA Issues Guidelines for Diabetic Athletes

The National Athletic Trainers Association has issued a seven-element plan for helping athletes with type 1 diabetes maintain proper blood sugar levels while competing, training or traveling.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2008

Stress and Staying Alive
Stress and Staying Alive

You and everybody else alive encounter stress, daily, hourly and minute by minute. As unavoidable, inscrutable, and sometimes as aggressive as the IRS, stress is part of the human condition. It is not just a sense of being tense but is any event that causes a complex physiologic response called the "stress response."

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2008

C-peptide Emerging as Significant Factor in Nerve Recovery

Because scientists often tend to dismiss what they don't fully understand, many of them used to think that C-peptide had no physiological function. But while it's true that C-peptide does nothing to lower blood sugar, recent research is finding that it might have a role in preventing diabetes complications.

comments 19 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2008

The History of Human Insulin, Problems, and the Loss of Choice, 1980 to 1993

INDIANAPOLIS, July 21 - Eli Lilly and company today announced that it has begun limited testing in healthy human volunteers of biosynthetic human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology.  The company also announced that it has started construction of the world’s first manufacturing facilities—at a cost of $40 million—to employ recombinant DNA technology to produce the biosynthetic human insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 2008

December 2007

Say It Isn't So! Coffee Raises Glucose Levels?

We can only conclude that the universe is being perverse again when it comes to the way it treats type 2s: Diabetes writer David Mendosa has reported there are new studies show that the caffeine in coffee causes moderate increases in glucose levels.

comments 11 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2007

Bayer Recalls Test Strips After False Readings

Bayer Diabetes Care has recalled 230,000 bottles of Contour TS test strips after finding that the strips resulted in blood glucose readings 5 to 17 percent higher than actual levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2007

The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?
The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?

Recently on "Good Morning America," a friend of mine (and fellow A1c champion) watched author Gary Taubes talk about his new book, Good Calories, Bad Calories. My friend sent this email around: "Taubes says that exercise makes us hungry for carbohydrates and that carbohydrates cause insulin secretion, which creates fat."

comments 49 comments - Posted Dec 27, 2007

Sugar May Stick More Easily to Hemoglobin in Minorities

There's now plenty of evidence that U.S. ethnic minority groups tend to have higher A1c levels than whites. (Your A1c is the percentage of your hemoglobin cells that are glycated - have sugar stuck to them. The higher your blood sugars are, the more sugar sticks to your hemoglobin over time, and the higher your A1c is.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 24, 2007

Interesting Insulin Facts
Interesting Insulin Facts

The name insulin comes from the Latin insula, for islands. It refers to the pancreatic islets of Langerhans that contain the beta cells.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2007

Gumming Up the Insulin Factory In Type 2 Diabetes

In healthy people, beta cells are like tiny factories that churn out insulin. Proinsulin, which is the raw material for finished insulin, is produced in the endoplasmic reticulum deep within the beta cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2007

Conversation Maps Generate Healthy Conversation about Diabetes
Conversation Maps Generate Healthy Conversation about Diabetes

Conversation Maps look like a set of very large and colorful children's placemats. Three feet wide and five feet long, each map is covered with a kids-book-style landscape painting illustrating one of five topics:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2007

Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change
Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change

To conclude our pump survey, we asked you how you'd like to see pumping improved. As usual, you came up with a plethora of intriguing suggestions, although some were a bit more visionary than others: One reader said, "I wish someone would invent a device that could be waved over a meal, and it would display the number of carbs in the meal."

comments 43 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2007

November 2007

Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication
Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication

I learned that I had type 2 diabetes in February 1994. A dozen years later, I knew I had to make a change. Technically speaking, I was "morbidly obese." I'm tall - 6 feet, 2½ inches - but I tipped the scales at 312 pounds and had a body mass index (BMI) of 40.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2007

Why Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy May Be The Best Choice for Type 2 Diabetes

Many medications, both oral and injectable, exist to manage blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Even insulin has many different formulations, including fast-acting and long-acting analogs as well as various pre-mixed combinations of faster and slower acting insulins in the same vial.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2007

The Princess and the Pancreas: A Fable About Type 1 Diabetes
The Princess and the Pancreas: A Fable About Type 1 Diabetes

Once upon a time in a land called Sweeten, there lived a beautiful princess named Princess Tootsweet. She had long flowing hair, large dark eyes, and a lazy pancreas.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2007

Tethys Bioscience's New Way to Predict Type 2 Diabetes

Many tests try (and many fail) to accurately predict whether a person will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. But they often test for single conditions, like impaired glucose tolerance, that don't appear until the road to diabetes is already well begun.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2007

Dogs Have Known It All Along: Exhaled Breath Can Identify Low Blood Sugar
Dogs Have Known It All Along: Exhaled Breath Can Identify Low Blood Sugar

It's well known that dogs can somehow sniff low blood sugars. Many people credit their dogs with waking them up when they were dangerously low. How the dogs do it has been a mystery, but now there's evidence that they may be sniffing methyl nitrates on their owners' breath.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 18, 2007

You Knew It All Along: High Blood Sugar Makes Your Kids Act Up

Parents have always said that they can tell when their children's blood sugar is high by their kids' behavior, which tends to change, and not for the better, when their sugar is high. Now a formal study has confirmed just that.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2007

The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It
The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It

Diabetes educators are no less than a lifeline for patients, providing vital insights into the self-care behaviors that keep diabetes in check: managing blood sugar, dosing medications and insulin, exercising, and understanding all the numbers involved.

comments 30 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2007

Sitagliptin and Metformin a Useful Combo For Type 2s

A recent study has found that the combination of metformin and sitagliptin lowers A1c's better than either drug alone, apparently because their different mechanisms work together synergistically.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2007

Going SoLo Is a Healthy Way to Snack
Going SoLo Is a Healthy Way to Snack

SoLo Gi® Low Glycemic bars are delicious. We can vouch for that because we've eaten our way through all five flavors. And because they're clinically validated to have a very low glycemic index, they don't raise your blood sugar like other snack bars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2007

Managing Your Diabetes During a Natural Disaster
Managing Your Diabetes During a Natural Disaster

Floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, and fires strike fast, creating challenges that can be especially difficult for people with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2007

What's a Glucose Clamp, Anyway?

In research reports, they're always talking about glucose clamps. Two types of clamps are quite commonly used, but they have nothing to do with the common definition of the word clamp. Instead, they are used to measure either how well you metabolize glucose or how sensitive you are to insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2007

High Blood Pressure Triples Likelihood of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers recently followed 38,000 healthy women for ten years to learn if their initial blood pressure influenced whether they developed type 2 diabetes later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2007

Diabetes Increasing along U.S. - Mexico Border

El Paso, Texas, October 31, 2007 - Diabetes has become the leading cause of death in Mexico and the third-leading cause of death among those living along the U.S. side of the border, according to a new study presented today by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2007

October 2007

More Technology Patients Won't Use
More Technology Patients Won't Use

This morning, a major meter manufacturer announced that its blood glucose meters will now operate on Microsoft's HealthVault. HealthVault is an online service that allows a patient to store and manage his health records without paying a fee.

comments 32 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2007

Is the Glycemic Index Really Reliable?

When calculating glycemic index (GI) values, glucose is arbitrarily given the highest GI value: 100. To assign a GI value to another type of carb, a complex process is used to compare the blood sugar response elicited by the test carb to the blood sugar response provoked by glucose.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research
A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research

The take-home message from the Tufts study is that the GI value of white bread is 70. That's nothing new: The same value has been found in dozens of other studies around the world (1).

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

Chip Sullivan
Chip Sullivan

Chip Sullivan is a golf pro. This June he played his best game ever, beating the top club professionals in the country and qualifying for the fourth time to play against the likes of Tiger Woods in the PGA championship tour.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2007

Risk of an Obese Child Rises With Mother's Glucose Levels During Pregnancy

The higher your blood glucose is during pregnancy, the greater your child's chances of growing up to be obese, according to a recent study published in Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2007

Charcot Foot: A Story of Foot Reconstruction
Charcot Foot: A Story of Foot Reconstruction

Josephine Kulman has had type 1 diabetes for 45 years, ever since she was five years old. For much of her life, her blood sugars were rarely in control.

comments 32 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2007

Pretty in Pink: The New UltraMini Meter
Pretty in Pink: The New UltraMini Meter

Want a meter that matches your ensemble of the day? LifeScan has the very thing. Now you can get their OneTouch UltraMini blood glucose meter in pink, black, silver, or green.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2007

"Psychologically Dependent" Type 2s Use Too Many Test Strips?

According to Pulse, the UK's leading medical weekly, a review of the evidence has concluded that for type 2s on oral medication whose A1c's are below 7.5%, blood glucose monitoring offers "little advantage and may increase the likelihood of hypoglycemia."

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2007

September 2007

A1c Closer to Becoming ADAG

In August, a number of august organizations agreed to report the A1c in a new way, as a number called an A1c-derived average glucose, or ADAG.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2007

The International Diabetes Federation Announces Post-Meal Glucose Target

Until now, there were only two blood sugar numbers you had to worry about: your A1c and your fasting glucose level. The first, according to IDF guidelines, should be 6.5% or below, and the second 100 mg/dl or below.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2007

My Diabetes and I, Partners Through the Years
My Diabetes and I, Partners Through the Years

It will soon be November, and National Diabetes Month will be here once again. It's a time when I like to reflect upon my past with diabetes and try to look into the future.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2007

Onward and Upward With Diabetes
Onward and Upward With Diabetes

Swaying in rhythm like drunk fans singing their team fight song, we campers bellowed our camp theme, clapping and banging on dining tables: "Shock, shock for Camp Firefly! We take the insulin - try not to cry!"

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2007

Junk Food is Replacing Potatoes and Leading to Type 2 Diabetes in Peru
Junk Food is Replacing Potatoes and Leading to Type 2 Diabetes in Peru

For at least 12,000 years, Peru has been inhabited by descendants of the Inca civilization. For countless generations, the farmers of the Peruvian Andes have lived on potatoes, cornmeal cakes, and alpacha, or goat meat.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 8, 2007

Blood Glucose Meters For Type 2s: Why Aren't They More Useful?

We recently wrote about a study which concluded that blood glucose meters are a waste of time for people with type 2 diabetes who are not using insulin ("Is Using a Meter a Waste of Time for Type 2s?"). Our readers vehemently disagreed with that conclusion.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 6, 2007

August 2007

Big News About Vitamin B and Diabetes

People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have about three-quarters less thiamine (vitamin B) in their blood than people without diabetes, according to new research out of Warwick Medical School in England. And it's not because they're not eating enough thiamine.

comments 5 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2007

Incretin Therapy Is Rather Good At Lowering Blood Sugar, Says Study Review
Incretin Therapy Is Rather Good At Lowering Blood Sugar, Says Study Review

A meta-analysis of 29 studies, none longer than six months, has shown that incretin therapies (like Byetta and Januvia) are moderately effective in lowering blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes, especially after meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2007

The Eocene System Makes Your Meter Into a Management Tool
The Eocene System Makes Your Meter Into a Management Tool

Everyone knows that for meter manufacturers, a meter is simply a means of selling a lifetime of strips. The Eocene blood glucose meter is no different in that respect, but it does have something extra to offer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 14, 2007

Milk Lowers Men's Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Milk Lowers Men's Metabolic Syndrome Risk

A study of 2,375 middle-aged British men reports that those who drank at least a pint of milk a day were 62 percent less likely than non-milk-drinkers to have metabolic syndrome (defined as raised levels of two or more of the following: blood glucose, insulin, blood fats, body fat, and blood pressure).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2007

The Blood Sugar Puzzle: The CareLink System Puts the Pieces Together For You
The Blood Sugar Puzzle: The CareLink System Puts the Pieces Together For You

Diabetes is a chronic yet manageable malady; as such, it requires constant interaction between the person and the disease. You must pay attention to the endless flow of information produced by your various management tools.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 10, 2007

Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat
Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat

Central adiposity, visceral fat, intra-abdominal fat, or a big belly, they all mean the same thing: increased risk of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2007

Is Using a Meter a Waste of Time for Type 2s?

According to a University of Oxford study led by Dr. Andrew Farmer, home monitoring of glucose with a meter did not improve glucose control in non-insulin-requiring people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2007

July 2007

This Month's Charts: Fast-Acting Glucose, Syringes, Pen Needles and Lancing Devices
This Month's Charts: Fast-Acting Glucose, Syringes, Pen Needles and Lancing Devices

This issue, we lay out the many devices with which diabetic people must poke themselves: syringes, pen needles, and lancing devices. And we top them off with a sprinkling of sugar: a chart outlining all the sources of fast-acting glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2007

After All These Years:  Gerald Cleveland, Age 91, Has Had Type 1 Diabetes for 75 Years
After All These Years: Gerald Cleveland, Age 91, Has Had Type 1 Diabetes for 75 Years

A life-time resident of the Syracuse, New York, area, Gerald Cleveland has had a history of not quite coming out on top - at least until now.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2007

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 117 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2007

Presto Chango! The A1c Is Being Transformed Into The AG

An A1c assesses glycated hemoglobin; that is, it tells you how many of your red blood cells have glucose stuck to them. The higher the percentage of hemoglobin cells that are sugared up, the higher your average BGs were over the preceding three months.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2007

Prevent Birth Defects: Don't Get Pregnant Until Your Sugar Is Controlled

Two-thirds of pregnancies in women with diabetes are unplanned. How long after conception do those women realize they're pregnant? They may be eight weeks into their pregnancy before they know it's happened.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2007

Once-Weekly Byetta LAR (exenatide long-acting release): So Far, It Works
Once-Weekly Byetta LAR (exenatide long-acting release): So Far, It Works

It's a fact that Byetta reduces A1c's, post-meal and fasting glucose levels, and weight in people with type 2 diabetes. The drawback is that it's another injection twice a day. In response, Amylin, the maker of Byetta, has developed exenatide LAR, a form of Byetta that is injected only once a week.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2007

Pig Islets Transplanted into Human With Type 1 Diabetes

Recently we wrote that Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand company, was about to begin transplanting pig islets into humans in a year-long Phase I/IIA clinical trial in Moscow, Russia ("Piglet Islets Soon Tested in Humans").

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 12, 2007

Gestational Diabetes Definition Soon to Change

How elevated does your blood sugar have to be before you're diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Not near as elevated as we used to think, according to the findings of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2007

Are You and Your Diabetes Ready for a Hospital Stay?

You have made a point of checking your blood glucose and getting your annual eye and foot checkups. You track your blood cholesterol and blood pressure. But now the pain in your hip is unbearable and interfering with your walking program, so your doctor suggests hip surgery. You will be admitted to the hospital for hip surgery, not diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2007

Paper Planning Tool Proven To Improve Management Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Sidney, NY, July 6, 2007 - A study by the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston has found that the AT-A-GLANCE® Balance & Stretch® Day Planner is an effective tool in improving the management of type 1 diabetes in children. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) highlighted the results of the study at its 67th Scientific Session in Chicago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2007

Cinnamon Puts the Brakes on Post-Pudding Blood Sugar Swings
Cinnamon Puts the Brakes on Post-Pudding Blood Sugar Swings

If you like cinnamon on your pudding, you could be in luck. In a Swedish study of fourteen healthy pudding-eating subjects, a teaspoon of cinnamon sprinkled on top dampened the post-meal blood glucose rises usually seen after a pudding fest.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2007

LifeScan Awards Prize for Athletic Achievement: Athletes with Diabetes Recognized for Outstanding Accomplishments

Colorado Springs, CO, July 2, 2007 - LifeScan, Inc. announced the 2007 recipients of the LifeScan Prize for Athletic Achievement on June 30 at the annual meeting of the Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association (DESA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2007

June 2007

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome a Common Cohort of Diabetes
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome a Common Cohort of Diabetes

Do you think you might have carpal tunnel syndrome? If you have diabetes, your assumption is more likely to be correct, because carpal tunnel syndrome is fifteen times more common in people with diabetes than in the general population.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 29, 2007

Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes
Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes

Kevin Powell is an athlete, first and foremost. Twice a year, he competes in an Ironman event, a grueling test of endurance that entails a 2.4-mile swim and a 112-mile bike ride, topped off by a full marathon of 26.2 miles.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

Mobile Technology and Blood Glucose Monitoring
Mobile Technology and Blood Glucose Monitoring

Adolescents don't always check their blood glucose levels as often as they should. Because frequent monitoring is a keystone of diabetes care, this can make their parents frantic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2007

Partake of Some Prickly Pear Pad With That Burrito: It May Lower Post-Meal Glucose Rises in Type 2 Diabetes
Partake of Some Prickly Pear Pad With That Burrito: It May Lower Post-Meal Glucose Rises in Type 2 Diabetes

Prickly pear pads, otherwise known as nopales, are a staple of Mexican cuisine: People in mid- to low socioeconomic populations in Mexico tend to eat them about three times a week. Apparently they're pretty tasty when stripped of their prickles and boiled up in bite-sized pieces.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2007

Results of Our Insulin Pump Survey
Results of Our Insulin Pump Survey

The results of our pump survey are in, and we had 841 respondents! Clearly, people are passionate about pumping, both pro and con. In fact, they seem to be more passionate about pumping than about sex, judging by the far greater response we got to this survey than we did to our survey about women and sex!

comments 9 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2007

Made From Gymnema Sylvestre: A pill that kills your taste for sugar, and an extract that reportedly cuts high blood sugar

A company called Sugarest has developed a pill made from the Indian herb Gymnema sylvestre that purports to deaden your ability to taste sugar, thereby rendering sweets tasteless.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2007

Permanent Neonatal Diabetes: One Gene Makes All The Difference

Imagine your delighted shock if, after living with type 1 diabetes since infancy, you suddenly learned that you weren't type 1 after all. If you were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within the first six months of life, especially if your birth weight was low, there's a chance that instead you have permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2007

May 2007

Updated: Analysis Associates Avandia With Greater Risk of Heart Attack

Analysis of several recent studies indicates that Avandia (rosiglitazone), a type 2 diabetes medication that's been taken by more than six million people worldwide, is associated with a 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and with a borderline-significant increased risk of heart attack-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2007

Hope or Hooey? Two Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Meters On the Horizon

Two new meters that purport to measure your blood glucose without a fingerstick are currently in the works–again.  The road to a non-invasive meter is one that many have traveled before, but no one, thus far, has ever reached the market. 

comments 7 comments - Posted May 30, 2007

Zip the Dog's Nose Knows Lows:  Diabetes Alert Dog Saves a Life
Zip the Dog's Nose Knows Lows: Diabetes Alert Dog Saves a Life

That long snout on a typical dog is there for a very good reason. It gathers up scent molecules and sends them deep down to special sniffing cells that hold 25 times the number of scent receptors that we humans have.  Dogs can sense complex odors that are 100 million times weaker than our little noses can.  Among those scents is the chemical mix that bodies manufacture when they are getting dangerously low on blood sugar.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 29, 2007

Letter from a Reader: An Unentitled Life
Letter from a Reader: An Unentitled Life

A type 1 diabetic, 21 years old, pedals a bicycle for nine straight days, nine hundred miles from Tecumseh, Michigan, to Grand Island, Nebraska.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2007

What's the Best Meter? It's the One that You'll Use
What's the Best Meter? It's the One that You'll Use

Meters have come a long way since 1969, when the first meter went on the market. The meter measured the amount of light reflected off a Dextrostix, a paper strip that turned various shades of blue, depending on blood glucose level, after a large drop of blood was placed on it and then washed off.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2007

One Less Worry: Hypos Don't Damage Brain Power
One Less Worry: Hypos Don't Damage Brain Power

Aggressive management of diabetes can lead to more episodes of severe low blood sugar, but a new study has found that these episodes apparently don’t impair cognitive (thinking) function.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2007

When Insurance Is Out of Reach
When Insurance Is Out of Reach

While much of the diabetes community eagerly anticipates the latest research and treatment, many diagnosed with the disease struggle to gain access to doctors and the most basic supplies because they are poor or uninsured.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 17, 2007

New Zealand Pig Islet Trial One Step Closer to Reality
New Zealand Pig Islet Trial One Step Closer to Reality

Eight New Zealanders with type 1 diabetes are hoping to receive pig islet transplantations by the end of the year, now that the company Living Cell Technologies (LCT) has surmounted the first of three regulatory hurdles in pursuit of permission for a twelve-month trial in New Zealand.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2007

Become a Champion for Diabetes Patients: Help Others Manage Their Diabetes

Sanofi-aventis and the Patient Mentor Institute are looking for people with diabetes to become patient mentors with the A1C Champions® program – a unique, patient-to-patient approach to diabetes education.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 12, 2007

New Drug May Reverse Retinopathy: How It Works
New Drug May Reverse Retinopathy: How It Works

Let’s start from the beginning. First, you’ve got the endothelium.  What’s that, you ask? Well, endo means “internal” and thelium means “cellular layer.” The endothelium, therefore, is the layer of cells that lines the heart, blood vessels, and certain other cavities in the body.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 11, 2007

In the Know with Continuous Glucose Monitors: The Latest in Diabetes Care
In the Know with Continuous Glucose Monitors: The Latest in Diabetes Care

Continuous Glucose Monitors Are Revolutionary - I’ve always believed that if I could give myself insulin conveniently and constantly knew my blood glucose, I could control my blood sugar almost as well as a non-diabetic person. Nine years ago, an insulin pump made the first condition come true. Since then I have been waiting for the magic blood sugar machine.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 10, 2007

Why Not Make Meter to Meter Comparisons?
Why Not Make Meter to Meter Comparisons?

Ever try to check one meter against another by testing with both at the same time and seeing if their results match up?  Ever wonder why they might not?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2007

New Type 2 Drugs Januvia and Byetta Offer Big Benefits
New Type 2 Drugs Januvia and Byetta Offer Big Benefits

The 21st century may be remembered as the time when diabetes became a worldwide epidemic. However, it may also be known as the time when the disease was cured.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 3, 2007

Type 1 Diabetes: A Parent's Perspective
Type 1 Diabetes: A Parent's Perspective

Last summer our family changed forever when Lauren, our nine-year-old daughter, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. A whirlwind of shock, anger, and worry engulfed me as I watched an incurable chronic illness move into our home.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 1, 2007

April 2007

Joslin Diabetes Center Offers Quick Tips for Summer Eye Care
Joslin Diabetes Center Offers Quick Tips for Summer Eye Care

The crack of the bat on Opening Day at Fenway Park is a sure sign that summer is on its way. From the Green Monster seats to the dunes of Cape Cod, summer means bright sun, ultraviolet rays and of course, sunglasses. But did you know that people with diabetes need more than sunglasses to protect their eyes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2007

Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat
Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat

Carbs and carbs alone, not fat, increase body weight. It doesn't matter whether the carbs are from sugar, bread, fruit, or vegetables: They’re all rapidly digested and quickly converted to blood glucose.  A short time after a carb-rich meal, the glucose in your bloodstream rises rapidly, and your pancreas produces a large amount of insulin to take the excess glucose out.

comments 26 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan
Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan

Let’s be realistic and take a long-term perspective in this “which diet is best” debate, rather than wasting time quibbling over extremes—from low-carb to vegan. You’ll have type 2 diabetes for the rest of your life, and you’ll likely struggle with weight management throughout your life as well. The major challenge in weight loss, and even more so in weight maintenance, is long-term adherence.

comments 13 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

58 Healthy Years with Diabetes, and He Remembers Every Low Blood Sugar: Hypoglycemia - Sometimes Humorous, Sometimes Not
58 Healthy Years with Diabetes, and He Remembers Every Low Blood Sugar: Hypoglycemia - Sometimes Humorous, Sometimes Not

Dismal Predictions - In 1949, at the age of 13, I was diagnosed with diabetes. I was told that I would have to take shots for life and that my life would probably last only 25 years longer. Furthermore, I could eat no candy, and all my children would be diabetic.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2007

The Incretin Saga: Mimetics, Enhancers, and Inhibitors
The Incretin Saga: Mimetics, Enhancers, and Inhibitors

A lot of new medicines have come out, with a pile of new acronyms:  GLP-1, DPP-4, BYOB…well, that last one is probably familiar, but a little background on the other two might not be out of place. You’re going to be seeing a lot more of them in the future, and it’ll help to be on speaking terms.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 20, 2007

OneTouch® Meter Upgrade Offered To OneTouch® Users At No Charge
OneTouch® Meter Upgrade Offered To OneTouch® Users At No Charge

Milpitas, CA, March 30, 2007 – LifeScan, Inc., maker of OneTouch® Brand Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems, is offering customers that own one of several models of OneTouch Brand Systems a no-charge meter upgrade to one of the company's latest, most innovative meters.(1)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2007

Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education
Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education

The story of Doug Burns’ arrest during a low blood sugar episode has generated a lot of comments from the diabetes community. How did it happen, why did it happen, and how could it have been handled differently?

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 19, 2007

GlucoLight's OCGM Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitor In Clinical Trials.

GlucoLight's continuous, non-invasive device is a novel approach to glucose monitoring in the acute care environment.  Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the device is able to measure blood glucose levels through a unique anatomical area in the skin that shows physiological changes that directly correlate to changes in blood glucose.  The GlucoLight monitor displays real time glucose measurements with an initial single point calibration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2007

Diabetes Risk Factors Appear Earlier in Women Than in Men
Diabetes Risk Factors Appear Earlier in Women Than in Men

Obviously, risk factors for Type 2 diabetes show up long before clinical diagnosis of the disease. For women, however, this risk can be detected much earlier than previously thought. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2007

High Sugar Levels Can Cause Birth Defects: Joslin Study Tells How
High Sugar Levels Can Cause Birth Defects: Joslin Study Tells How

Women with diabetes are up to five times more likely than the general population to have a baby with birth defects, especially of the heart and spinal cord, organs that form within the first few weeks of pregnancy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2007

Chromium Picolinate a Good Pick

A December 2006 review of clinical studies on chromium picolinate, published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, confirmed that chromium picolinate improves blood glucose control and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2007

Pycnogenol’s Latest Bragging Rights
Pycnogenol’s Latest Bragging Rights

Upcoming research in the Journal of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice reveals that Pycnogenol (pik-naw-jin-all) that many-talented extract of pine tree, is 190 times more effective than the prescription medicine acarbose (Precose) in slowing uptake of glucose after a meal, thereby preventing after-meal glucose spikes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2007

Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave
Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave "Good Enough" Alone

There's an ancient Greek myth about a man named Sisyphus who was cursed to roll the same rock up a hill, then see it roll down, then roll it up again, for eternity.  There's something a bit like diabetes self-care in that myth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2007

A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady
A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady

What’s the most important goal for kids and families dealing with diabetes? Learn all you can, and then strive for the best possible blood glucose levels without excessive hypoglycemia. This is a tough goal to attain. Our tools, food, insulin, and monitoring, while the best they have ever been, are still imprecise. And although optimal glucose control is critical for immediate and long-term health, one must always be wary of severe and recurring hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2007

Dr. Hering Pig Islet Pioneer
Dr. Hering Pig Islet Pioneer

Dr. Bernhard Hering of the University of Minnesota is recognized the world over as the premier expert on pancreatic islet transplants. He sees islet transplantation as the best hope for the cure of type 1 diabetes, and his optimism is supported by his research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2007

Riding the Roller Coaster
Riding the Roller Coaster

To the general public, the mood swings of a teenager are the wildest personal roller coaster around. But there’s another roller coaster out there that puts that kiddie ride to shame: the mood swings of a diabetic person like me. In an average teenager, hormones cause mood swings.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 11, 2007

Breathalyzer Test for Diabetes In the Offing?

It’s well known that people with uncontrolled diabetes sometimes suffer from ketoacidosis, in which their breath gives off the strong odor of nail polish remover. Well, nail polish remover is made of acetone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2007

Tips for Successful Blood Sugar Monitoring
Tips for Successful Blood Sugar Monitoring

Here are some useful tips to help you choose a meter that’s right for you - and continue to use it successfully.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2007

March 2007

Medtronic Gets FDA Approval of CGMs For Kids and Launches a New Guardian
Medtronic Gets FDA Approval of CGMs For Kids and Launches a New Guardian

Medtronic has received FDA approval for pediatric models of both of its REAL-Time continuous glucose monitors, the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System and the Guardian REAL-Time System. Previously approved only for adults, both pediatric models will be appropriate for kids ages 7-17.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2007

Diabetes Alert Day is March 27, 2007: Joslin Diabetes Center Reminds People with Diabetes to Schedule Annual Eye Exams to Preserve Vision
Diabetes Alert Day is March 27, 2007: Joslin Diabetes Center Reminds People with Diabetes to Schedule Annual Eye Exams to Preserve Vision

BOSTON - March 23, 2007 - Did you know that diabetes is the number one cause of preventable vision loss and blindness? Did you also know that an annual eye exam can lead to early detection of diabetic retinopathy and other eye disease, a frequent complication of diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2007

Dr. White Answers Your Medication Questions

Q: Are there any long-term side effects of the popular drugs to treat type 2 diabetes?

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2007

Joslin Researchers Discover a Surprising Culprit in the Search for Causes of Diabetic Birth Defects: Protein Makes It Possible for High Blood Glucose to Enter Embryonic Cells
Joslin Researchers Discover a Surprising Culprit in the Search for Causes of Diabetic Birth Defects: Protein Makes It Possible for High Blood Glucose to Enter Embryonic Cells

Boston - March 5, 2007 - Over the past several years, Joslin Investigator Mary R. Loeken, Ph.D., and her colleagues at Joslin Diabetes Center have unlocked several mysteries behind what puts women with diabetes more at risk of having a child with birth defects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2007

New Joslin Study Reveals How a Specific Fat Type Can Protect Against Weight Gain and Diabetes

BOSTON - March 1, 2007 - A new study from Joslin Diabetes Center may shed light on why some people can eat excessive amounts of food and not gain weight or develop type 2 diabetes, while others are more likely to develop obesity and this most common form of diabetes on any diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2007

Duane Reade Establishes Flagship Diabetes Resource Center in New York City

NEW YORK - Feb. 28 - Duane Reade Holdings, Inc., the leading drug store chain in the New York metropolitan area, today announced the launch of the Diabetes Resource Center, a comprehensive training and educational facility for patients with diabetes mellitus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2007

Here’s Looking at Your BGs, Kid
Here’s Looking at Your BGs, Kid

If Professor Brent Cameron has his way, people with diabetes will soon be able to measure their blood glucose by simply shining a light into their eye.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2007

February 2007

Joslin Study Finds Increased Use of Insulin Pumps, New Insulin Types Give Teens More Tools to Better Manage Diabetes

BOSTON - Feb. 27, 2007 - It is widely recognized that the teenage years are often a challenging time for youth with diabetes to maintain good blood glucose control. Hormonal changes, peer pressure, food temptations, and resistance to following good health practices are among the factors that make it difficult for many youngsters. Unfortunately, poor diabetes control places youth at increased risk of developing complications from diabetes later in life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2007

ACCU-CHEK makes a ‘Spirited’ Entry Into the Pump Market
ACCU-CHEK makes a ‘Spirited’ Entry Into the Pump Market

On October 10, 2006, Roche Diagnostics announced the launch of the first ACCU-CHEK branded insulin pump—the ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump system.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2007

National Foundation For Infectious Diseases Urges Increased Influenza Vaccination Rates For Persons With Diabetes

BETHESDA, MD - February 21, 2007 - The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is calling for the medical and public health community to increase alarmingly low influenza vaccination rates among persons with diabetes – the fifth deadliest disease in the U.S.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2007

Piglet Islets Soon Tested in Humans
Piglet Islets Soon Tested in Humans

Six people are about to receive pig islet transplantations for the first time, as a New Zealand company called Living Cell Technologies (LCT) begins a year-long Phase I/IIA clinical trial in Moscow, Russia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 22, 2007

Nancy Found Her Problem and Her Solution
Nancy Found Her Problem and Her Solution

Nancy was totally blindsided when she found out she had diabetes. A 56-year-old lab technician at the time, Nancy was doing some work in the lab. She tested her own A1C and found a reading of 7.3%.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2007

Contour Accurately Detects Hypoglycemia

Data presented at the November 2006 Diabetes Technology Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, found that the Contour Blood Glucose Meter from Bayer accurately detects hypoglycemia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Miscoded BG Meters Can Lead to Insulin Errors

On November 6, 2006, Bayer HealthCare issued a news release that addressed the issue of miscoded blood glucose meters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Guardian RT Called Effective in Recognizing Late-Night Lows After a Workout

Medtronic MiniMed’s Guardian RT is being called a “useful and important diagnostic tool for a phenomenon known as nighttime ‘late-onset hypoglycemia’.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

ACCU-CHEK makes a ‘Spirited’ Entry Into the Pump Market
ACCU-CHEK makes a ‘Spirited’ Entry Into the Pump Market

Roche Diagnostics recently announced the launch of the first ACCU-CHEK branded insulin pump—the ACCU-CHEK Spirit insulin pump system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Breastfeeding May Lower Type 2 Risk Later in Life
Breastfeeding May Lower Type 2 Risk Later in Life

UK researchers says that breastfeeding in infancy is associated with “a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, with marginally lower insulin concentrations in later life, and with lower blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in infancy.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Twice Daily Lantus Better for BG Rises

U.K researchers say that twice-daily injection of insulin glargine (Lantus) helps to alleviate blood glucose rises in the late afternoon and drops toward the end of a 24-hour period that are frequently seen in type 1s who inject Lantus once daily with a meal-time fast-acting insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

High BGs Affect Emotion and Behavior of Type 1 Kids
High BGs Affect Emotion and Behavior of Type 1 Kids

In kids with type 1, higher BGs can mean higher rates of affected emotion and behavior. That was the finding of Australian researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

The Oral Exam: Staying Up-To-Date with Type 2 Medications

It’s not easy to navigate the crowded waters of type 2 oral medications. There are dozens of them, and their names have a lot in common with tongue twisters. They’re hard to pronounce, and harder to remember. But they’re necessary. Of the 20 million Americans with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2. Although some people with diabetes are able to manage their condition through diet and exercise alone, the majority cannot control their blood sugar without medication. According to the CDC, among adults diagnosed with diabetes, 57% take oral medication; 16% take insulin; 12% take both insulin and oral medication; and only 15% take neither insulin nor oral medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Making a Difference: A New Column
Making a Difference: A New Column

You might know me as the publisher of Diabetes Health. I’m also a mother of two, the daughter of a woman who died of type 2 diabetes, and a theater buff. But from now on, I hope you’ll come to know me as someone who brings important stories to you every issue, stories about people who are making a difference in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Women, Sex, and Diabetes
Women, Sex, and Diabetes

Although most research about the effect of diabetes on sex has focused on men, some studies report that women are at higher risk for sexual dysfunction than diabetic men. It’s high time that the woman’s side of the story was given the attention that it deserves.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 2007

December 2006

Software Upgrade Makes Control a Little More EZ
Software Upgrade Makes Control a Little More EZ

The new ezManager Plus from Animas Corporation is an upgrade from the older ezManager product, and adds the ability to download information from the Animas IR1000/1200 insulin pumps and numerous blood glucose meters. The ezManager Plus is actually two programs— one for a PDA and one that runs on Windows-based PCs. The Palm OS (PDA) application lets you count carbohydrates, calculate insulin dosages (carbohydrate dosages, too) and log meals, insulin, blood glucose and activity.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

Insulet Corporation Wins Medical Device Innovation Award

In November 2006, Insulet Corporation, maker of the OmniPod Insulin Management System, announced that it had won a Nixon Peabody/Smith & Nephew Medical Device Innovation Award from the Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council (MassMEDIC).

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

LifeScan’s ‘Mini Meter’ Goes Easy on the Checkbook
LifeScan’s ‘Mini Meter’ Goes Easy on the Checkbook

LifeScan promotes its new OneTouch UltraMini meter for people with diabetes who don’t have health insurance coverage.