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Glucose Article Archives

August 2014

Study Found Blood Sugar Levels Not Affected by Sucralose-sweetened Desserts

While there has been much debate recently about the impact of artificial sweeteners on diabetes, a new study finds that desserts sweetened with sucralose don’t impact blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #15

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2014

June 2014

Health Awareness vs Weight Conscious

There's a lot of focus on weight loss as of late; not only in the diabetic community, but in the world in general. New ads for gyms and products claiming fast weight loss come out daily, women feel pressured to lose pregnancy weight within minutes from birthing their children, thin models are being airbrushed until they are nearly unrecognizable and diets are being undertaken without people understanding how/why/if it's really going to be effective. Some of my own friends are chronically doing near-starvation diets to shed weight. People seem to be focused on getting the fat off, but unless long term habits are improved, it's not going to stay off. It's great to fight the obesity epidemic, but we can't allow ourselves to go to the other extreme. Carrying excess weight isn't a good thing, but I think we're losing focus on the importance of health versus aesthetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2014

March 2014

Moving Target

So, what is it that affects my glucose levels and why is it so hard to manage diabetes? In this case, we're talking type 1 diabetes; mine seems to be extremely stubborn and "brittle" by nature. Honestly, sometimes balancing this chronic condition is downright exhausting. Some days it's a scientific equation, weighed and measured, a standard protocol. Other days, it's a roller coaster, a compounding tidal wave, a boxing match.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2014

June 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Juggling More Than Three Pins

I've been type 1 diabetic for 15 years. It hasn't been easy and I'm still grasping to keep my feet on the ground medically. Every time I think I've got this disease figured out, something new gets thrown at me and I stumble over and over again.  From insulin resistance to pump failures to carbohydrate/insulin sensitivity changes to exercise regimens to health insurance issues to medical bill payments to a seemingly innocent cut on the sole of my foot, etc., I'm getting worn out.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 29, 2013

If someone needs to restrict their protein intake because of kidney damage, is it safe to do a low carb diet?

The restriction of protein intake is an outdated thought. It was born of a study by Barry Brenner, at Harvard, back in the 1980s. He did a survey of the diabetologists in Boston asking, "At what blood sugars do you like to keep your diabetics?"  The collective answer ultimately was 250 mg/dl.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2013

April 2013

Smaller, Lighter OmniPod Earns FDA Approval

The FDA recently approved the next-generation OmniPod from Insulet, giving people with insulin-dependent diabetes an even less invasive way to manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2013

March 2013

Diabetes Is No Slam Dunk

Monica Joyce had an idea. It wasn't original, but a good idea inspired by another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2013

October 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

August 2012

Biological Clock Molecule Could Become New Type 2 Treatment

UC San Diego scientists have discovered a molecule involved in regulating the biological clock that could open a new path for treating type 2 diabetes. The molecule, dubbed KL001, controls a key protein, cryptochrome, that regulates the biological clock (circadian rhythm) in plants, animals, and humans. In doing so, cryptochrome indirectly affects the liver's production of glucose. KL001 can be manipulated to induce cryptochrome to slow the liver's glucose production, thus creating a possible new therapeutic approach to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2012

July 2012

My Pump Almost Killed Me... Twice

One of the greatest technological advancements in diabetes care has been the insulin pump.  For one, it gives you the illusion of being "normal" because you no longer have to inject insulin throughout the day. Instead, you "bolus" by pushing a button on the pump itself or using a remote control. It allows better glucose management because you can adjust your basal rate (the "background" insulin dose) by increments of one thousandth of a unit every hour.  Especially when you're moving from the peaks and valleys of NPH or the restraints and hazards of Lantus, the freedom of living with an insulin pump is incredible.  But pumps do not come without their kinks.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

June 2012

9 Tips To Make Testing Pain Free

Did you know there are 9 simple steps that you can take to make testing your blood glucose a lot less painful?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Short Video Shows and Tells Diabetes Basics

A short animated video narrated in a woman's reassuring tone provides a basic look at diabetes. The presentation touches on the science behind the condition and explains important terms, including "pancreas," "glucose," and "insulin." It stresses the importance of regular A1C checks and taking medication if needed, while pointing out the dangers associated with not staying on top of blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2012

May 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

Molecular Switch Could Be Key for Type 2s

With tens of millions of American facing life with type 2 diabetes and many millions more at risk of the disease, scientists are scrambling to unravel novel treatments. The latest breakthrough could come from California's Salk Institute.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2012

February 2012

Diagnosed After Sixty: Medication Not Required

"I knew I didn't eat a totally healthy diet because bread is a big weakness of mine. Worse, exercise was something I kept planning to do but hadn't gotten around to," recalls 62-year-old Laura M., who lives in a New York City suburb. "I had been feeling more tired than usual and had a cut on my right leg that seemed to be healing slowly, but other than that I felt fine. When during the course of an annual check-up, my doctor said I had diabetes, I practically fell apart."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2012

January 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

November 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

October 2011

My Experience With Team Type 1

I first met Team Type 1 in 2006, when I was 17 years old. They were competing in the Race Across America (RAAM), a 3,000-mile race from California to New Jersey, for the first time. When I signed up to be part of the support team for Team Type 1, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I was just happy to be getting a trip to California and to be away from my parents for a week. I had no idea how much work it would take.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2011

September 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2011

More Than Just a Number: Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

So, you're pregnant!  Many who are in your shoes have worked very hard and diligently to begin this excursion.  Others have reached this milestone unintentionally.  Either way, you are about to embark on a journey that will completely challenge everything you know about your type 1 diabetes management.  These next few months will challenge your motives, your emotions, your determination, and everything that makes up who you are. So sink your heels in. Take each step one at a time.  

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2011

When It Comes to Diabetes, Knowledge Truly Is Power

When people are diagnosed with diabetes, things can seem pretty overwhelming. In a short time, they have to absorb a daunting amount of information and start making significant decisions about the way they live their lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2011

July 2011

“Attention: This Is Your Car Speaking.”

How many times has this happened to you? You're driving somewhere and something feels off. You suspect that your blood sugar level may be dropping, but you plow ahead. Now, imagine your car sounding the alarm: "Attention: This is your car speaking. Your blood sugar is low. Pull over and eat a snack."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2011

May 2011

Albertson’s Supermarket Chain Joins Diabetes Alliance

Albertson's LLC, a nationwide supermarket chain with more than 200 stores, has announced that it will participate in the Diabetes Control Program (DCP) of the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance. The DCP works through trained pharmacists to provide education and support to people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2011

April 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2011

September 1991

Vital Energy: A Scientific View of Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease of the substance sugar, but is really about energy. In the final analysis, diabetes is a disease of poor energy metabolism. It is manifest in problems with sugar, the crucial fuel, and insulin, the crucial energy hormone. To understand diabetes, we need to understand biological energy: where it comes from, what it is, and how it works.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

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