See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated

Heart Care & Heart Disease Article Archives

January 2013

Calcium Score Predicts Cardiovascular Death Risk in Type 2

It's well known that diabetes, an inflammatory disease, increases the risk of developing heart disease and related complications-also the result of inflammation. Now there's a way of predicting which type 2s may be at the highest risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2013

Islet Transplants May Decrease Type 1 Atherosclerosis Risk

Narrowed and hardened arteries-atherosclerosis-are a common risk associated with type 1 diabetes. Fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up to create plaque, which narrows the arteries and makes blood flow more difficult. The increased risk of blood clots often leads to heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2013

May 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 16 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

May 2011

Is Sex Good for Your Heart Health?

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted May 21, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

March 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Michael Hamman

Michael Hamman is a 63-year-old contractor.  He recalls, "I first was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes five or six years ago.  I probably had elevated blood sugar well in advance of that, but I was unaware of it. I don't remember how high my blood sugar was at the time, but I think my A1C was 7.5%.  My blood sugar's never really been awful. Since I started monitoring myself, my sugar readings are normally between 150 and 165.  I think it was pushing 200 before I was medicated, but the medications brought it down. They started me on glyburide and I took that for a long time, and then the A1C was moving up again, so they added the metformin. The A1C now is down in the mid-sixes. They consider it controlled, not well controlled or as good as it could be, but certainly for someone my size, it's probably as good as you can get."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 25, 2011

FDA Accepts Application to Review Dapagliflozin, a Type 2 Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted an application to review dapagliflozin, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2011

“Diabetes Belt” Stretches Across the South

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a swath of the southern U.S. as the country's "diabetes belt." In this region, made up of parts of 15 states, some 12 percent of the population has type 2 diabetes, compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2011

Garlic Oil May Protect Against Diabetes-related Heart Disease

A new report recently published in the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry adds a new punch to the power of garlic in the fight against heart disease. The report concludes that garlic has "significant" potential for preventing cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease that is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2011

Dr. Jane Delgado, Author of The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life

Hispanics are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have type 2 diabetes, and more than a third of working adult Hispanics do not have health insurance. For this audience, Jane Delgado, PhD, has written The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life. Available in both Spanish and English, it's a culturally sensitive and reassuring book that dispels myths and presents detailed science while gently guiding readers toward the right path in caring for their diabetes. The tone is conversational, as Dr. Delgado speaks to her readers like a family member who knows them well and has their best interests at heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2011

February 2011

Statins May Prevent Diabetic-Related Blindness

New University of Georgia research has found that a statin drug that is often known by the brand-name Lipitor may help prevent blindness in people with diabetes. In a study using diabetic rats, lead author Azza El-Remessy, assistant professor in the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, and her colleagues found that statins prevent free radicals in the retina from killing nerves important to maintaining vision. The results of the study are published in the March edition of the journal Diabetologia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Vascular Complications of Diabetes: Due to One Missing Enzyme?

Many tragic complications of diabetes, including amputations, heart attack, stroke, and blindness, are due to blood vessel damage. According to Xiaochao Wei, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, all that vascular damage may be caused by a shortage of one enzyme: fatty acid synthase, or FAS.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

Don't Stress Out: Super Bowl Losses Can Cause Heartbreak

A new study published in the journal Clinical Cardiology reveals that a Super Bowl loss for a home team was associated with increased death rates in both men and women and in older individuals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

January 2011

New Spanish-Language Soap Opera Focuses on Obesity, Healthy Living

DENVER -- New episodes of a critically acclaimed, locally-produced Spanish language soap opera will focus on the obesity crisis in hopes of helping viewers better understand what causes obesity and how they can live healthier lives. The soap opera is called "Encrucijada: Sin Salud, no hay Nada" ("Crossroads: Without Health, there is Nothing").

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Front Labels on Food Packages Are Misleading

After the American Heart Association introduced its heart healthy logo in 1995, manufacturers apparently decided that such "healthy" logos were a pretty good marketing idea. Similar logos, called front-of-the-package labels, or FoP labels, have become popular with several food manufacturers, each of which has developed its own labels using its own criteria. Now, not surprisingly, a study by the Prevention Institute has found that these labels are misleading to customers. According to the Prevention Institute's executive director, Larry Cohen, they "emphasize one healthy aspect to trick [customers] into buying something fundamentally unhealthy." Dora the Explorer Fruit Shapes, for example, prominently labels itself as "gluten free," but does not mention the fact that 58 percent of its calories come from sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Fatty Liver: It's Serious

"Fatty liver" doesn't sound very threatening. In fact, it sounds almost cute, like Fatty Arbuckle. Unfortunately, like Fatty Arbuckle, it's not what it seems. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common liver disease in the United States, comprising a quarter of all liver disease and responsible for a rising number of liver transplants. Approximately 20 percent of Americans may be lugging around a fatty liver.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 13, 2011

Herbs, Sex, and Diabetes

Talk about a win-win situation! It seems that many aphrodisiacs--herbs that boost sexual energy and function--can also bring down blood sugar, cholesterol, and/or blood pressure.  At least four herbs have shown these double benefits in scientific studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2011

December 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

Almonds May Help Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

With nearly 16 million Americans living today with pre-diabetes, a condition that is the precursor to type 2 diabetes, and half of all Americans expected to have some form of diabetes by the year 2020, healthy eating is more important than ever (1,2).  But here is some good news: a recent scientific study shows that incorporating almonds into your diet can help treat and possibly prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2010

November 2010

Saturated Fat A Cause of Heart Disease? Not as Likely as Once Thought

For over 30 years, we have been told over and over by doctors, the media, nutritionists, and food companies that saturated fat is bad for us, causing us to gain weight and contributing to cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has led to a whole industry of low fat and non-fat food options, most claiming that saturated fat is bad for our health.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2010

October 2010

Look AHEAD Study Examines Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss

An intensive lifestyle intervention program designed with weight loss in mind improves diabetes control and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. These are the findings of the four-year Look AHEAD study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) is a multi-center, randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity on the incidence of major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2010

2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care

The 2010 Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care are here! What are the new changes? Watch the YouTube video and learn more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2010

Pre-Diabetes Doubles Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A meta-analysis* of 87 studies  involving  951,083 patients, performed by a Canadian research team, shows that the pre-diabetic condition known as metabolic syndrome increases the risk of heart disease or stroke in patients by a factor of more than two.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2010

September 2010

New Blood Markers for Type 2 Diabetes May Help to Identify Patients at Risk

For the first time, scientists have found that blood levels of some ribonucleic acids (microRNAs) are different among people with type 2 diabetes and those who subsequently develop the disease compared to healthy controls, according to research reported in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

July 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

A diet including coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA), helps combat insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of cells to respond to insulin and take in glucose for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate for insulin resistance by producing even more insulin, but eventually glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Over time, insulin resistance and obesity can lead to pre-diabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

June 2010

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Benefit Younger Diabetes Patients

New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and two other major medical associations advise not prescribing low-dose aspirin therapy for women under 60 or men under 50 who have diabetes but no other risks for heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

May 2010

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2010

Physician Survey Reveals That Early Team Approach Is Best Medicine

Early management of type 2 diabetes with an integrated team of specialists, including a dietitian, diabetes educator, endocrinologist, cardiologist, and nephrologist, can significantly reduce the incidence of complications and lower healthcare costs, according to an online survey of more than 300 endocrinologists and family practice physicians. The survey was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., with the goal of determining the most common obstacles for physicians in treating type 2 diabetes patients and preventing complications.  Sermo, the largest physician only online community, conducted the survey.  A significant number of these physicians (44 percent) reveal that 50 percent of their patients develop at least one of the following serious complications:  cardiovascular disease, nerve pain, kidney disease, stroke, blindness, or limb amputation.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

April 2010

A Promising New Drug for Treating Diabetic Macular Edema

Successful clinical trials of a topical drug called mecamylamine may lead to a potent new treatment for the diabetes-induced eye disease known as macular edema. Diabetic macular edema* involves the part of the retina called the macula. High blood sugar levels inflame its blood vessels, leading to leakiness and fluid accumulation. Left uncontrolled, those symptoms can lead to blurriness, impaired vision, and even blindness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 14, 2010

The "Obesity Paradox": Bigger Girth Means Lessened Risk of Cardiac Death

After generations of warnings that obesity is one of the biggest risk factors for heart failure and cardiovascular disease, a University of Rochester study says that it's actually skinny people who run a higher risk of sudden death from cardiac failure. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that non-obese patients who suffered heart failure had a 76 percent greater risk of sudden cardiac death than obese patients.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2010

March 2010

Valsartan (Diovan) Delayed Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Cardiovascular Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Results from a landmark study involving more than 9,000 people showed that the high blood pressure medicine valsartan (Diovan) delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a common pre-diabetic condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Mutation That Affects Response to Smell and Taste Could Lead to Type 2 Diabetes

According to Duke University researchers, a mutation that causes the lack of an insulin-controlling molecule may be a factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The molecule, ankyrin B, is activated in response to the smell and taste of food and leads to the production of insulin in preparation for food intake.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2010

Women Who Drink Moderately Appear to Gain Less Weight than Non-Drinkers

The study started out with nearly 20,000 trim middle-aged and older women. Over time, women who drank alcohol in moderation put on less weight and were less apt to become overweight compared to non-drinkers. This was true even after taking into account various lifestyle and dietary factors that might influence a woman's weight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2010

February 2010

U.S. Senate Report Says Glaxo Knew that Avandia Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

A U.S. Senate Finance Committee report released on February 20 says that Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline's drug for type 2 diabetes, may have caused as many as 83,000 heart attacks between 1999, when the drug was introduced, and 2007. The Senate report, culminating a two-year inquiry into the drug, also says that Glaxo knew about the drug's potential risks years before suspicions began to form regarding a connection between Avandia and heart problems.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

Diabetes Patients More Likely Than Their Doctors to Focus on Immediate, Rather Than Long-Range, Concerns

A university survey of 92 doctors and their 1,200 patients who have diabetes and hypertension shows that the two groups don't always agree on which conditions are the most important to manage. The survey, conducted by the University of Michigan Medical School, asked doctors and patients to rank their top treatment priorities. While 38 percent of the doctors ranked treating hypertension as the most important, only 18 percent of their diabetes patients gave it the same ranking. Instead, diabetes patients are more likely to list pain and depression as the most important targets for treatment. In fact, the patients suffering the most from those conditions were the most likely to list them as priorities.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 16, 2010

Cutting Off the Blood Supply to Fat Cells Could Become a New Obesity Therapy

White fat is the "bad" gut fat associated with obesity and enlarged abdomens. When a pound of new white fat forms in the body, it requires a full mile of new blood vessels to nourish and sustain it. That's because white fat is much like a tumor in requiring a steady blood supply. To build the new blood vessels, it depends on a process called angiogenesis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2010

Death by TV?

Australian researchers who tracked the TV viewing habits of 8,800 people over a six-year span have some sobering statistics for people who love the tube too well: (1) If you watch TV more than two and up to four hours a day, your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease increases by 19 percent. (2) If your viewing habit is more than four hours a day, your risk of death from cardiovascular disease skyrockets by 80 percent.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Severe complications of diabetes higher in depressed patients

Depression raises risks of advanced and severe complications from diabetes, according to a prospective study of Group Health primary-care patients in western Washington. These complications include kidney failure or blindness, the result of small vessel damage, as well as major vessel problems leading to heart attack or stroke.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2010

December 2009

A Prostate Cancer Therapy Increases Risk of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

Regardless of age, men undergoing prostate cancer treatment via androgen deprivation therapy have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A study published in early December by Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston noted that although androgen deprivation therapy has been associated with a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular problems in older men, this is the first time the connection has been noted among men of all ages.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 24, 2009

Lifestyle Changes Work as Well as Surgery for Type 2s Who Have Artery Disease

The combination of type 2 diabetes and mild heart disease is a double whammy that in many cases leads to such intrusive therapies as angioplasty* and can result in death from some sort of cardiovascular event. But a five-year university study of 2,368 type 2 patients with moderate heart disease shows that lifestyle changes and non-intrusive treatments can work just as well at lowering mortality rates as surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2009

Cardiovascular risk in youth with type 1 diabetes linked primarily to insulin resistance

Chevy Chase, MD- According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), youth with type 1 diabetes have now been found to have abnormal insulin resistance. Having abnormal insulin resistance appears to negatively affect heart, blood vessel and exercise function in this population.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

It's All in the Cooking: Omega-3 Fatty Acids are Good for Your Heart When Cooked Properly

It's been known for some time that omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of heart disease, but no one has really known if one dietary source is better than another. For that reason, Lixin Meng, MS, a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, designed a study to compare sources, types, amounts, and frequencies of omega-3 in diets, while taking into account gender and ethnic groups. The study was presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2009

October 2009

The Heart of the Matter: Women with Diabetes are More at Risk

A large Kaiser Permanente study, published this month in Diabetes Care, has found that women with diabetes are 26 percent more likely to develop the very rapid and irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation (AF) than women without diabetes. Although not a killer on its own, AF is a serious condition that requires medical treatment and can cause complications. In addition to fatigue, the poor circulation that results from AF can lead to blood pooling and clotting, ultimately causing a stroke.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2009

August 2009

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) Foretells Cardiovascular Complications

One of the major complications of diabetes is diabetic nephropathy, a loss of kidney function that may lead to renal failure.  As kidney disease progresses, the barrier that keeps large molecules out of the urine, called the glomerular barrier, begins to break down.  With the barrier failing, certain large molecules begin to migrate into the urine. One of those hefty molecules is immunoglobulin M, or IgM.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 19, 2009

July 2009

Considerable Risk of Cardiovascular Events May Linger Despite Achieving Target LDL Cholesterol Levels with Statins in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

May 5 - Ann Arbor, MI - In the first study of the effects of statins on the concentrations of both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; known as the "bad" cholesterol) and low-density lipoprotein particles (LDL-P) in patients with metabolic syndrome, it was shown that even though the statins lowered the concentrations of LDL-C to target levels, the patients retained considerable residual risk for cardiovascular events because LDL-P concentrations were not reduced to a similar extent.  A pre-print version of the study in Diabetes Care is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1681, and the final version will be available in print in the June 2009 issue, as well as online at the same URL.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2009

Cardiologists Say Give Statins to People Even If They Don't Have Heart Disease

An analysis of ten trials involving statin therapy among 70,000 participants has led an international team of cardiologists to recommend that that the cholesterol-lowering drugs be prescribed for people who do not have heart disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2009

June 2009

Heart Association Makes It Plain: Get Off Your Duff and Exercise!

The American Heart Association (AHA) has added weight training to the list of exercises it recommends for people with type 2 diabetes to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease. Heart and blood vessel diseases account for nearly 70 percent of deaths among type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2009

May 2009

Type 2 Drugs: EU Approves “Victoza,” FDA Extends Review of “Onglyza”

The European Union's drug regulation agency has recommended that the EU approve the marketing of "Victoza" (liraglutide), a type 2 drug developed by Novo Nordisk.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 6, 2009

April 2009

People with Diabetes Should Be Tested for Heart Fibrillation, Study Says

In an Australian study that tracked 11,140 people with diabetes, researchers found a strong relationship between the presence of atrial fibrillation-abnormal heart rhythm-and an increased risk of cardiovascular problems and death.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2009

Low Birth Weight Could Increase Adult Risk of Diabetes

A study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism of The Endocrine Society says that low birth weight could be associated with a higher incidence of inflammation in adulthood, setting the stage for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 15, 2009

On-Demand Care Worse Than Scheduled Visits in Controlling Blood Pressure for People With Diabetes

Are adults with diabetes better able to manage their disease if they can schedule same- or next-day appointments to see their doctors rather than sticking to appointments made in advance? The conventional wisdom goes that if people with diabetes can more quickly get in to see their doctors whenever problems comes up, the sooner they can receive treatment for it. However, an Indiana University School of Medicine study of 4,060 adults with diabetes being treated at 12 clinics showed that open-ended scheduling produced no benefit and, when it came to blood pressure control, actually worsened patients' conditions.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2009

Adjustable Gastric Banding and Diabetes

Diane Helms has spent most of her life struggling with her weight.  She's tried just about every diet you can name and, despite them all, has watched the pounds pile on year after year. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2009

Moderately Protein-Rich Diet Better for Long-Term Weight Loss, Says University Study

A 12-month university study of 130 persons who ate either a USDA food pyramid-inspired high-carb diet or a diet moderately high in protein showed that members of the higher protein group lost 23 percent more weight and 38 percent more body fat than their high carb counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

March 2009

Experts Affirm That Low-Dose Aspirin Daily Can Help Prevent Heart Attack and Stroke

New guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force state that daily low doses of aspirin-75 milligrams to 81 milligrams-are as effective as higher doses (100+ milligrams) in preventing heart attacks among men and strokes among women. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2009

February 2009

Here’s a One-Two Punch for Lowering Blood Pressure: As You Reduce Your Sodium, Increase Your Potassium

Doctors often tell people with high blood pressure to decrease their consumption of sodium. Now researchers at the Loyola University Health System in suburban Chicago have found that it is probably wise to increase potassium intake at the same time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2009

December 2008

Correct Use of Compression Stockings Is Vitally Important
Correct Use of Compression Stockings Is Vitally Important

A study published in the September American Journal of Nursing (AJN) indicates that graduated compression stockings were used incorrectly in 29 percent of the patients and sized incorrectly in 26 percent of the patients. Compression stockings play an important role in preventing the formation of deep vein clots that can result in pulmonary complications and death

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Mind-Shifting: A Valuable Tool To Control Diabetes

The day I heard "Diabetes is not the leading cause of heart attack, blindness, kidney disease, and amputation," my life changed. I had believed the opposite to be true for the 32 years I'd been dealing with diabetes. Complications had always hung like a knife over my head.

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Women Have Double the Fracture Risk with Avandia and Actos

Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone), two medications used to lower blood sugar in type 2 patients, double the risk of fractures in women, but not in men, says a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

FDA Asks Diabetes Drug Makers To Study Their Medicines’ Potential Heart Risks
FDA Asks Diabetes Drug Makers To Study Their Medicines’ Potential Heart Risks

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended that companies manufacturing diabetes treatment drugs provide evidence that their products will not increase cardiovascular risks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Hope for Healthy Hearts, Women Have the Power to Lessen Risk

Many people think of heart disease as something that mostly afflicts men. But heart disease actually kills more women in the United States than anything else, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. And diabetes plays a stronger role in risk for heart disease in women than it does in men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 15, 2008

November 2008

Scientists Find Compound in Brown Rice Reduces Diabetic Nerve and Vascular Damage
Scientists Find Compound in Brown Rice Reduces Diabetic Nerve and Vascular Damage

A compound in brown rice called acylated steryl glucoside (ASG) can significantly reduce the chances of the nerve and vascular damage that often results from type 1 diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

August 2008

BBC Gets It Wrong About Broccoli’s Curative Abilities
BBC Gets It Wrong About Broccoli’s Curative Abilities

A recent story put out by the British Broadcasting Corporation proclaimed that eating broccoli could reverse the damage to heart blood vessels caused by diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2008

Is This the ACCORD Study’s Silver Lining?

Several months ago researchers suspended work on the landmark ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) study, which tracked 10,251 type 2s, some of them undergoing very tight control of their blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2008

June 2008

Experimental Heart Drug Shows Unexpected Benefit In Preventing Onset of Diabetes
Experimental Heart Drug Shows Unexpected Benefit In Preventing Onset of Diabetes

Canadian researchers report that succinobucol, an anti-oxidant drug used to treat cardiovascular inflammation, appears to have a beneficial effect in lowering the risk of developing diabetes. Even patients who already have diabetes, they say, achieve better blood sugar control while on the drug.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2008

May 2008

When It Comes to Diabetes, Erectile Dysfunction Is the Canary in the Coal Mine
When It Comes to Diabetes, Erectile Dysfunction Is the Canary in the Coal Mine

Two new studies say that erectile dysfunction (ED) may be a warning sign of diabetes, as well as a warning of approaching cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

April 2008

Discuss This With Your Opthamologist: Study Finds Retinopathy Doubles Heart Risk
Discuss This With Your Opthamologist: Study Finds Retinopathy Doubles Heart Risk

Here is a troubling finding that you will want to discuss with your opthamologist and cardiologist: Type 2 diabetics who already have retinopathy when they are diagnosed are 2.5 times more likely to develop heart failure than type 2’s who are diagnosed without it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

February 2008

Higher Middle-Age Heart Rates Increase Diabetes Risk Later in Life

Researchers tracking heart rates as a predictor of life expectancy have found that higher-than-normal heart rates in middle-aged people increase their risk of developing diabetes later in life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2008

U.K. Study Says Older People with Diabetes Run Greater Risk of Disabilities

A British study of 800 people 65 and older concludes that people with diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to experience difficulties walking, dressing and climbing stairs.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 26, 2008

African-Americans Shown to Benefit from Single Pill for Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

A Wayne State University Health Clinic study has shown that a single pill containing both a blood pressure-lowering drug and a cholesterol-lowering drug may be of particular benefit for African Americans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2008

High Levels of "Good" Cholesterol May Be a Bad Thing

That ancient Greek advice, "moderation in all things," may apply not only to human conduct, but also to the natural world.

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2008

Study Says Diet High in Whole Grains Lowers Risk of Diabetes, Cardio Disease

The debate between low-carb and low-fat diet advocates took a dramatic turn in January with the American Diabetes Association's limited approval of low-carb diets as weight-loss aids. Momentum seemed to have shifted to low-carb proponents.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2008

U.S. Suspends Study on Intense Blood Sugar Control After Increase in Deaths Among Type 2 Participants

After seeing an increase in deaths among type 2 participants, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has halted the intense blood sugar control portion of its years-long study on controlling cardiovascular risks to people with diabetes.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

January 2008

Study Aims to Prove by 2010 Insulin's Ability to Ease Heart Attack Damage

By mid-2010, an international clinical trial now underway may conclusively confirm insulin's ability to limit damage from heart attacks. The trial, called INTENSIVE, will be conducted at 90 centers in the United States, Canada, Brazil and Argentina.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2008

U.K., Aussie Researchers Recommend Statin Therapy for Most People With Diabetes
U.K., Aussie Researchers Recommend Statin Therapy for Most People With Diabetes

Statins, the drugs now widely used to control "bad" LDL cholesterol in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, should be offered to most people with diabetes regardless of their age, sex or cardiovascular health and history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2008

November 2007

High Blood Pressure Triples Likelihood of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers recently followed 38,000 healthy women for ten years to learn if their initial blood pressure influenced whether they developed type 2 diabetes later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2007

October 2007

Black Box Warning For Actos and Avandia

The FDA has spoken: the heart risk warnings on labels of Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone) will now be surrounded by an emphatic black outline known as a black box. Black boxes will also be added to the warnings on Avandaryl (rosiglitazone and glimepiride), Avandamet (rosiglitazone and metformin), and Duetact (pioglitazone and glimepiride).

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2007

Even Lean People with Type 2 Diabetes have Increased Inflammation

According to a recent study reported at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), people with type 2 diabetes have significantly higher average white blood cell counts, no matter if they are fat or thin.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2007

Actos and Avandia: New Heart Risk Studies

The September 2007 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has published two new studies, one a meta-analysis of Avandia (rosiglitazone) and the other a meta-analysis of Actos (pioglitazone).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2007

September 2007

New Drug Might Lower Both Bad Cholesterol and Blood Sugar

In two recent studies, WelChol, a drug already approved for lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol was found to lower A1c's in patients with type 2 diabetes. The first study showed that WelChol, when added to insulin, lowered A1c's by an average of 0.5% compared to a placebo group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2007

A Heart Full of Fat Precedes Type 2 Diabetes

Studies of rats, those ever-useful creatures, have already shown that a fatty heart accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the heart fat produces toxins that cause heart cell death and then heart failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2007

Lower A1c Means Lower Risk of Heart Surgery Complications

In the August 2007 edition of The Lancet, Argentinian researcher Dr. Diego Lowenstein reported that the higher your A1c, the higher your risk of major complications after heart bypass surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2007

Heart Attack Ups Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Heart Attack Ups Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A study published in the August 2007 Lancet examined 8291 Italians who'd recently had a heart attack. Three years later, a full third of them had developed either type 2 diabetes or impaired fasting glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2007

August 2007

Hostile Men: Inflamed in More Ways Than One
Hostile Men: Inflamed in More Ways Than One

A study out of Duke University has found that men who are hostile, depressed, and angry aren't just lousy company; they're also more likely to get sick on you down the road.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2007

For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play
For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play

The possibility of heart disease is a nagging worry when you have a child with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-nine percent of type 1 children have at least one cardiac risk factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2007

Low Carb Diet Alters Hormone Levels to Fight Metabolic Syndrome
Low Carb Diet Alters Hormone Levels to Fight Metabolic Syndrome

Recently, four men and sixteen women with metabolic syndrome, weighing an average of 200 pounds, were put on the low carb South Beach diet for three months.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 17, 2007

People Without Insurance Need More Medicare Services
People Without Insurance Need More Medicare Services

A new report in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that if people are uninsured between the ages of 50 and 65 and if they have cardiovascular disease or diabetes, they will require costlier and more intensive services from Medicare than previously insured people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2007

Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat
Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat

Central adiposity, visceral fat, intra-abdominal fat, or a big belly, they all mean the same thing: increased risk of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2007

The Latest About Avandia and Actos

On July 30, 2007, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel voted 22 to 1 to keep Avandia on the market, right after agreeing by a vote of 20 to 3 that Avandia does increase heart risks. Now the FDA will decide what kind of warning should appear on the Actos and Avandia labels. It has already called for a black box warning, the sternest possible, on Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2007

July 2007

Statins and Fibrates Help Stop Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy (limb nerve damage) eventually afflicts fifty percent of people with diabetes; worse still, it leads to an amputation every fifty seconds world-wide. At the moment, nothing is approved in the U.S. to treat peripheral neuropathy, only to alleviate the pain that it causes. That might change soon, however.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2007

In Type 1 Diabetes, Fat May Lower Severity of Heart Disease
In Type 1 Diabetes, Fat May Lower Severity of Heart Disease

According to the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study, a sixteen-year examination of 225 type 1 patients, fat puts you at greater risk of heart disease; once you do get heart disease, however, it's less severe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2007

Type 2 Diabetes Cuts Eight Years Off Life
Type 2 Diabetes Cuts Eight Years Off Life

A study published in the June 2007 Archives of Internal Medicine has calculated that a person with type 2 diabetes is more than twice as likely to develop heart disease as someone without diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2007

Amid Accusatory Debate, FDA Puts Black Box Warning on Avandia and Actos

In a congressional hearing on June 13, 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revealed that it has called for a black box warning, the sternest possible, on both Actos and Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2007

June 2007

Diabetes Decision-Making Tools Improve Patients' Medication Understanding and Follow-Through
Diabetes Decision-Making Tools Improve Patients' Medication Understanding and Follow-Through

A study from the Mayo Clinic has found that using a decision-making tool with patients when discussing medication options makes them more likely to take their prescribed medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2007

Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk of Diabetes and Heart Attack
Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk of Diabetes and Heart Attack

Two new research reports, presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference, indicate that obstructive sleep apnea ups your risk of type 2 diabetes and increases your risk of heart attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2007

A Year of Anti-Clotting Medicine Reduces Stenting Risk in People
A Year of Anti-Clotting Medicine Reduces Stenting Risk in People

Patients with diabetes are less likely to have a heart attack or die if they stay on anti-clotting medication for a full year after a stenting procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2007

TZD Beats Sulfonylurea in Artery Wall Competition
TZD Beats Sulfonylurea in Artery Wall Competition

Thinner artery walls are a good thing, because thicker ones indicate atherosclerosis and an increased risk of heart attack. In a study published in the December 2006 Journal of the American Medical Association, pioglitazone (Actos, a thiazolidinedione) was compared to glimepiride (a sulfonylurea) with regard to carotid artery thickness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2007

Drug Company Funding of Drug Trials Greatly Influences Outcome

University of California, San Francisco - In head-to-head trials of two drugs, the one deemed better appears to depend largely on who is funding the study, according to an analysis of nearly 200 statin-drug comparisons carried out between 1999 and 2005.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2007

May 2007

The Sad State of Diabetes Complications in America

A report released at a recent meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), called “The State of Diabetes Complications in America,” has revealed some pretty depressing facts about the consequences of diabetes today.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2007

Study Explains Heart Disease-Diabetes Connection
Study Explains Heart Disease-Diabetes Connection

People with type 2 diabetes are far more likely than others to die from heart attacks due to reduced blood supply to the heart. Recently, a team of researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center found one reason why.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2007

February 2007

ACE Inhibitors Beneficial in Hypertensive Type 2

Patients with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes benefit from taking an angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE) inhibitor to lower blood pressure—even if they have no evidence of kidney or heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

October 2006

Exercise a Good Protector Against Heart Problems in People With Type 1

Australian researchers say type 1s who regularly exercise are protecting themselves against cardiovascular disease “through the preservation of vascular compliance.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

Models for Predicting Heart Problems in Type 1s Called Unreliable
Models for Predicting Heart Problems in Type 1s Called Unreliable

Current models for predicting coronary heart disease in type 1s are poor, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

September 2006

Exercise Research

Walking to Work Decreases Type 2 Risk Japanese researchers say that the duration of a walk to work is associated with a decreased risk of incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

August 2006

Exercising With High Blood Pressure
Exercising With High Blood Pressure

Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects about 50 million individuals in the United States and about 1 billion worldwide. It is the most common diagnosis, associated with 35 million office visits and a risk factor for heart disease, stroke and renal failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

July 2006

NBA Legends Frazier and Monroe Team Up Once More to Educate
NBA Legends Frazier and Monroe Team Up Once More to Educate

For basketball fans, the 1973 New York Knicks are the stuff of legend. That year, not only did they compile a record of 57 wins and 25 losses en route to becoming NBA champions, but they also boasted a starting lineup of players all of whom are now members of the NBA Hall of Fame.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2006

January 2006

Researchers Argue the Case for Low-Carb Diets in Diabetes Management

In a review paper published in the July 2005 issue of Nutrition and Metabolism, researchers at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at the State University of New York say that a high-carbohydrate diet raises postprandial plasma glucose and insulin secretion, thereby increasing risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

November 2005

Low Glycemic Load Diets Improve Heart Health

A diet with a low glycemic load may be more effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk than a conventional energy-restricted, low-fat diet, according to the researchers at Children’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

September 2005

Take Diabetes to Heart

Even if you are a type 1 who has never had coronary heart disease (CHD), researchers say you should be treated as aggressively as people who do have CHD.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Actos May Improve Heart Safety in Type 2s

Actos, an insulin sensitizer in the glitazone class of type 2 oral diabetes medications, was found to reduce carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) as well as insulin resistance in a German study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Take Your Medicine!

Failure to reach LDL (“bad”) cholesterol targets is a common problem for people with diabetes. Achieving those goals may have much to do with adherence to taking statin meds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

July 2005

It’s Easy, It’s Cheap—And It’s Underutilized
It’s Easy, It’s Cheap—And It’s Underutilized

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the primary cause of diabetes-associated death and disability. Research published in the American Journal of Cardiology has demonstrated that many patients with diabetes already have evidence of early stage CVD, and it is essential that these patients be treated early to reduce their risk of future cardiovascular events.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

Linking the Eyes and the Heart
Linking the Eyes and the Heart

People with retinopathy have a higher rate of congestive heart failure (CHF), even those without preexisting coronary heart disease, diabetes or hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

May 2005

C-Reactive Protein and Heart Disease

Many people don’t realize this, but the only reason many of us are so concerned about our cholesterol levels is that to date, cholesterol has given us a “best guess” as to our risk for heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

C-Reactive Protein, LDL and Statin Therapy

Patients who have low C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, a marker of inflammation, after statin therapy have better clinical outcomes than those with higher CRP levels, regardless of the resultant level of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, according to the multicenter PROVE IT-TIMI 22 clinical trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

April 2005

Healthy Arteries Needed
Healthy Arteries Needed

Diabetics have an increased mortality associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) progression.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

How to Stay on Track With Your Exercise Program
How to Stay on Track With Your Exercise Program

Have you ever quit soon after starting an exercise program? If you have, you are not alone. Lots of people start a new activity with the best of intentions, but before long, they stop. If you are sitting on the sidelines, here are some tips to help you get back on track:

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

March 2005

Tracking Cardiovascular Health in Type 2s

Two years of statin therapy showed no effect on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in people with type 2 diabetes without apparent cardiovascular disease. However, there was a significantly lower cardiovascular event rate, according to researchers in the Netherlands.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

January 2005

Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Medications

The risk of cardiovascular disease is greatly increased in people with diabetes. To address the problem of diabetes complications, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has developed “The ABCs of Diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

December 2004

Keep Those Leg Arteries Limber
Keep Those Leg Arteries Limber

Stiffness and impaired blood flow in the arteries of the lower legs may help identify diabetic patients with possible coronary artery disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

October 2004

Evaluating the Heart and Lungs at Work

Are you all worked up because your physician has ordered you to have a stress test?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

August 2004

Heart-Smart Supplements

Diachrome, a patented combination of chromium picolinate and biotin, significantly lowers coronary risk factors in type 2s. According to a small study presented at an American Heart Association meeting, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB), held in May in San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

Take Your Diabetes to Heart
Take Your Diabetes to Heart

Heart disease is the number one killer of all Americans, and it plays a role in the deaths of nearly 80 percent of people who have diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

July 2004

HDL: The ‘Good’ Cholesterol

There are two main types of cholesterol, LDL and HDL.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

C-Reactive Protein and Type 2 Diabetes

What Is C-reactive protein?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Getting to the Heart of Early Kidney Disease

The risk of cardiovascular events and death in people with diabetes and high blood pressure is two to eight times higher when microalbuminuria is present.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Another Blow to the Trans Fat Rep

“Trans fatty acid [TFA] intake is positively associated with markers of systemic inflammation in women,” say Harvard Medical School researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

May 2004

Angioplasty Outcomes Worse With Diabetes

Even with contemporary improvements in angioplasty (percutaneous coronary intervention) methods, such as stents and the administration of platelet antagonists, diabetes is still a major factor in mortality risk for heart-related complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

The Mighty Multipurpose Statins

Cholesterol-lowering statins significantly lower the increased concentrations of coagulation and inflammation markers, both cardiovascular disease risk factors common in type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

April 2004

Aspirin Benefit Blunted in People With Diabetes

An aspirin a day has long been a low-cost preventive therapy to reduce cardiovascular events.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Women, Diabetes and Heart Disease

Researchers have long believed that pre-menopausal women with type 2 may lose the protection against cardiovascular disease provided by estrogens to non-diabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

March 2004

Do TZDs Heighten Your Risk of Heart Failure?

Type 2s who take thiazolidinediones (TZDs) such as Avandia and Actos face an increased risk of heart failure, and researchers suggest that physicians should consider alternative therapies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Control Your BGs and Protect Your Arteries

Calcification, or hardening, of the arteries occurs in all populations but can be particularly damaging to people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

February 2004

Pravachol: How Cholesterol-Lowering May Help You

The cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol (pravastatin), when administered at 40 milligrams per day over six years, helps prevent cardiovascular events including stroke in people with diabetes or with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and established coronary disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

New Pill May Work Cardiovascular Wonders

It seems too good to be true, but researchers from Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry in London are advancing a new therapy to reduce the cardiovascular risk factors of high blood cholesterol, blood pressure, blood homocysteine levels, and platelet clumping—all in one pill.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

January 2004

Team Work

If you can’t find the name of your medication in our Type 2 Drug charts, there’s a good chance your medication is a combination product — in other words, two drugs combined in one tablet or capsule.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

In 1978, after prolonged hospitalization, my father died from consequences of diabetes associated with abnormal lipids and high blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

May 2003

Blood Pressure Treatment Lacking in People With Diabetes

With clinical trials demonstrating the importance of tight blood pressure control for people with diabetes, you'd expect that those individuals would be receiving intensive treatment for high blood pressure. In most cases, however, you'd be wrong.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Lower Blood Pressure Healthy for the Lower Extremities... and the Heart!

If you have peripheral arterial disease (PAD)—narrowing and hardening of the arteries that supply blood to the legs and feet—and want to lower your risk of a heart attack or stroke, you should aim to keep your blood pressure low, advises a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Diabetes Incidence Lower in Women Receiving Hormone Therapy

In women with heart disease, hormone therapy reduced the incidence of diabetes by 35 percent, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

April 2003

Heart Rate Variability Can Predict Kidney Function

A new study has examined the relationship of decreased heart rate variability—the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate—to protein in the urine and observable kidney disease. The study reports that severely reduced heart rate variability at baseline was associated with progressive kidney deterioration one year later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Death Rate Triple for Men with Metabolic Syndrome

A middle-aged man with a "beer belly," unhealthy cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and elevated blood glucose is three times more likely to die from cardiovascular problems and twice as likely to die from other causes as a man who doesn't have this metabolic syndrome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

March 2003

Diuretics Better for Blood Pressure Than More Expensive Drugs

What's the best drug to combat high blood pressure and lower the incidence of heart failure and hospitalization for heart failure?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Morning High Blood Pressure Predicts Complications for Type 2s

Waking up with high blood pressure isn't good for you if you have type 2 diabetes, say researchers in Japan who studied the incidence of micro- and macrovascular complications in 170 people with type 2 diabetes. Participants in the study were treated with medications to lower blood glucose and blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

C-Reactive Protein Is a Better Predictor of Heart Problems Than Cholesterol

Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a protein produced by the liver that is present only during episodes of inflammation, better predict the risk of having a cardiovascular event than levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

January 2003

Medications Help Control Lipid Levels and High Blood Pressure

A campaign aimed at educating people with diabetes about their increased risk of heart disease and stroke is called "Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes"—in other words, control your A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

High Blood Pressure in Kids Predicts Insulin Resistance

If your teenager has high blood pressure, researchers in the Czech Republic suggest taking steps to ward off insulin resistance. They add that high blood pressure is also associated with low folate levels and a high homocysteine level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Vitamin E Supplementation Is Ineffective in Some Cases

A recent study conducted as part of the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trial found that vitamin E supplementation had no effect on cardiovascular disease, other coronary risk factors, or kidney disease in middle-aged and elderly people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

ARB Drug Controls Blood Pressure and Protects Kidneys

Irbesartan (Avapro), an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), reduces 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as albumin excretion rate (AER) in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

December 2002

Blood Pressure Drug Approved to Treat Heart Failure

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Diovan (valsartan), a medication for high blood pressure, to treat heart failure in people who cannot tolerate ACE (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) inhibitors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Waist Circumference a Better CVD Forecaster Than BMI

The circumference of your waist better forecasts the likelihood of cardiovascular disease (CVD) factors than your body mass index (BMI) does, according to Columbia University researchers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 2002

High Blood Glucose Worsens Stroke Outcome

Do high blood-glucose levels lead to more severe strokes? Or does having a high blood-glucose level mean that you had a more severe stroke? Researchers studying the puzzle say their results suggest the former.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Even Young Girls Should Watch Their Lipid Levels

High levels of cholesterol in girls early in life are associated with increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, say researchers based in Philadelphia and New Orleans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Habla Español?

"Si Tiene Diabetes, Cuide Su Corazón" (If you have diabetes, take care of your heart) is a campaign launched in late July 2002 by the U.S. National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to call attention to the fact that Hispanic and Latino Americans with diabetes are at higher risk for heart disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Getting a Leg Up

Obesity and weight gain before diagnosis of diabetes are associated with future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among women with type 2 diabetes, say Harvard researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

An Epidemic of the Times: Physicians Urged to Monitor for Insulin Resistance Syndrome

A committee of experts from the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) reports that as many as one in three Americans have Insulin Resistance Syndrome, or pre-diabetes - a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Getting a Leg Up: Controlling Weight Early Pays Off

Obesity and weight gain before diagnosis of diabetes are associated with future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among women with type 2 diabetes, say Harvard researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

Children of Type 1 Moms Could Be at Risk for Heart Disease

Young children whose mothers had type 1 diabetes while pregnant could be at higher risk to develop heart disease in later life than children whose mothers did not have type 1 diabetes during pregnancy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Which Comes First?

The risk of heart disease begins about 15 years before a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in women, and it is nearly as high before the women develop diabetes as it is after diagnosis, say researchers who have been studying 117,629 female nurses since 1976. None of the women studied had signs of heart disease at baseline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Which Comes First? Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke Begins Before Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

The risk of heart disease begins about 15 years before a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in women, and it is nearly as high before the women develop diabetes as it is after diagnosis, say researchers who have been studying 117,629 female nurses since 1976. None of the women studied had signs of heart disease at baseline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

September 2002

A Common Cause

Type 2 diabetes can be predicted by increases in microalbuminuria (a measure of protein in the urine). In addition, microalbuminuria, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease develop together over a period of more than two decades, leading researchers from the Framingham Offspring Study in Massachusetts to believe that the three conditions have a common cause.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Hearty Advice

People who have a heart attack but have not been previously diagnosed with diabetes should be checked for pre-diabetes—formerly called impaired glucose tolerance—or even diabetes itself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Heart Test Can Predict Mortality

Stress echocardiography, which can detect abnormalities in the wall of the heart during exercise, can predict mortality in people who have diabetes as well as either known or suspected coronary artery disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Keeps the Heart Attacks Away

Forget about an apple a day—as many as 11,000 heart attacks and more than 8,000 lives could be saved each year if 90 percent of people with diabetes took an aspirin a day, according to estimates from a simulation model.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

August 2002

Heartening News

Unless you are undergoing kidney dialysis or have congestive heart failure, having diabetes puts you at no more risk of having a heart attack or dying following major surgery on blood vessels than people without diabetes, researchers say.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

January 2002

More Than Just Your A1cs

Managing your blood-glucose levels is not the only treatment needed to avoid diabetes-related complications, according to several health advocacy groups. Controlling blood pressure and cholesterol is also important in preventing heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death for people with diabetes, say the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

One Study Shows Estrogen May Lower Risk for Heart Disease; Another Says It Could Increase Risk

Taking estrogen decreases the risk of heart disease slightly in post-menopausal women with diabetes, say researchers in New Zealand. Patrick J. Manning, MBChB, and colleagues, from the departments of medicine at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, demonstrated positive changes in the blood cholesterol and blood-clotting factors of middle-aged women with diabetes when they were given hormone replacement therapy. Findings were published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

November 2001

A Silent Killer

The majority of people at risk for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) - a silent killer affecting millions - do not even know it, according the National Council on the Aging (NCOA). Diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors in getting the disease, says the organization, yet results of a recent survey show that people are not aware of and are not being screened for it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

Massive-Scale Study Coming Up To Determine If Major Diabetes Drugs Will Offset Type 2 and Heart Disease

Novartis Pharma AG, of Basel, Switzerland, announced the launch of a massive-scale diabetes prevention trial aimed at finding out if taking a Starlix (nateglinide) or Diovan (valsartan) over a long period of time will offset diabetes and heart disease. The trial will be conducted on individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

October 2001

A Life Saver in More Ways Than One

Endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo have shown that, in human studies, insulin can also be used to treat heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

August 2001

A Person's Pulse Can Predict Heart Disease

Pulse pressure—which helps identify artery stiffness—can reveal whether or not a person with diabetes is at risk for heart disease, say researchers in Wales.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

A Do-Good Drug

The insulin-resistance drug metformin (Glucophage) has been shown to improve more than just insulin sensitivity in the body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

Niacin Shown to Control Cholesterol in the Body

A recent study shows that taking extended-release niacin, a vitamin known to lower cholesterol, helps reduce risk of cardiovascular disease without affecting sugar levels in the body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

May 2001

A Side Effect Worth Noting

Heart disease medicine may protect people from diabetes, say researchers in the January 23 issue of Circulation: The Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

Aspirin Shown to Help Prevent Heart Failure in People with Diabetes

Aspirin has been shown to help prevent heart disease among people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended the over-the-counter pain reliever to diabetic adults who have cardiovascular disease or are at risk for it.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

Angioplasty More Dangerous for Patients with Diabetes

The results of new research shows that people with diabetes have a higher chance of death after undergoing angioplasty.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

April 2001

A Matter of the Heart and Kidney: Angiograms May Cause Kidney Damage

Marilyn never expected that a routine heart exam would cause kidney damage. But it did.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2001

March 2001

One More Reason to Control Glucose

Lowering your after-meal BG levels can also lower your risk of heart disease. Researchers who determined that measuring blood-glucose levels two hours after eating say after-meal BG levels are a better indicator of risk factors for heart disease than either fasting levels or HbA1cs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

February 2001

Many Type 2s May Have Heart Disorder and Not Know It

The January issue of Diabetes Care reports that many people with diabetes may have a heart disorder called left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD), despite being in good control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

‘E’ in Vitamin E Stands for Everything

In yet another study examining the benefits of vitamin E supplementation, researchers have proclaimed that routine vitamin E use may have a beneficial effect on the hearts of people with type 1 diabetes. They add that vitamin E should be considered a life-long part of a type 1's vitamin regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

February 2000

Getting to the Bottom of the French Paradox : Moderate Red Wine Consumption is Good for the Heart

In spite of a diet rich in saturated fat, the French have a much lower rate of cardiovascular disease than Americans. Researchers attribute this to the consumption of red wine, which has the power to bolster antioxidants in blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Zocor Reduces Heart Risks in People With Diabetes

Merck & Co., Inc., recently announced that people with high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes cut their risk of a heart attack by as much as 42 percent when taking Zocor, their cholesterol-lowering drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Book Explains Diabetes in Practical and Lighthearted Style

You may not be a dummy, but chances are you are overwhelmed by all the diabetes information you are bombarded with, information that can be highly complex, technical and fast-changing. Information about diabetes can be difficult to incorporate into a healthy life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

December 1999

ACE Inhibitors Decrease Heart Attacks in People with Diabetes

Angiotensin Converter Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can now be added to the drug arsenal for the prevention of heart disease in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

November 1999

American Heart Association Tells Doctors to Get More Aggressive on Diabetes

Better late than never! The American Heart Association (AHA) has finally classified diabetes as a "major modifiable risk factor" for the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

September 1999

Alcohol Intake Reduces Heart Disease in Type 2s

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin in Madison are saying that light to moderate alcohol consumption decreases the risk of death due to coronary heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

August 1999

Vitamins C and E Reduce the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women With Diabetes

Vitamin C and E supplements reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in women with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

July 1999

Egg Consumption Could Cause Heart Disease in People With Diabetes

People with diabetes might have an increased risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke if they eat one or more eggs per day.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 1999

May 1999

Calcium Channel Blockers Reduce Stroke and Heart Trouble in Elderly People with Diabetes

Treatment with nitrendipine, a calcium channel blocker, was proven to be beneficial in older patients with diabetes and hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

December 1998

Holiday Gifts from the Heart

Tis the season for gift giving. Every year, the kid in me loves to exchange Christmas "wish lists" with my husband, Danny. Year after year, his wish remains that I continue to take good care of my diabetes and stay healthy until he can figure out a way to find the cure. I am always moved by his kindness, partnership and generosity of spirit. This year, I wondered how other families with diabetes feel about holiday gifts. I thought you might enjoy hearing some responses to my question.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

September 1998

Do Sulphonylurea Drugs Cause Heart Attack?

In the June issue of Diabetologia: the Journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, researchers argued whether sulphonylurea drugs (such as Micronase, Glucotrol, DiaBeta, Glynase, Amaryl and Diabinese) pose an increased cardiovascular risk for individuals with type 2 diabetes and heart disease. (Sulphonylurea drugs are prescribed to help stimulate the beta cells of individuals with type 2 diabetes; it may also increase the sensitivity of muscle tissue to the hormone.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

August 1998

Research Raises Eyebrows

It's impossible to pick out the "best" research, particularly when there is so much interesting scientific work to choose from. My choice of what to include in this report, while necessarily arbitrary, was guided by what seemed most interesting to me. So if you've been involved in a particular research project that I've omitted, please accept my apologies. Here are the new findings that I would like to share.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

July 1998

Heart Disease Hidden in Type 1s

According to a study presented last month at the ADA's 58th Annual Scientific Sessions, people with type 1 diabetes often have serious, symptomless cardiovascular problems much earlier in life than would be expected in people without diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

April 1998

Hypertension May be Genetic Link to Renal Disease

If you have type 1 diabetes, check your family history. Patients with type 1 diabetes whose parents had high blood pressure (hypertension) showed a greater incidence of diabetic nephropathy compared to patients whose parents did not, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes. Study authors Johan A. Fagerudd, et al. also reports that patients with type 1 diabetes have a greater chance of developing hypertension, and at a younger age, if their parents had hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

January 1998

Heart Medicine Helps Neuropathy

New research shows that mexiletine, long used for cardiac arrhythmia, can help reduce the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Hearty News: Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Treatment Saves Lives

Chronic hypertension and heart attacks, both of which are more common in the diabetic population, damage and subsequently weaken the heart muscle and often lead to heart failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

December 1997

An Aspirin a Day Keeps the Heart Attack Away

Since the 1980s, aspirin has been hailed as the superman of over-the-counter drugs for the secondary prevention of heart attacks. Now the ADA is recommending that people with diabetes who are at high risk of cardiovascular problems take aspirin once daily.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 1997

October 1997

Farming Hearts, Livers and Pancreases?

What is on the horizon in organ transplants? Will hearts, livers, pancreases and kidneys be grown in a laboratory? Not in the near future, but doctors at Harvard have used cells from animal fetuses to produce new bladders and windpipes for sheep.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

August 1997

Type 1, Your Cycle, and Your Heart

Women with type 1 diabetes are more prone to experience premature menopause and, as a result, are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

July 1997

Good News in the Fight Against Heart Disease

Cardiovascular disease kills approximately 3,000 Americans each day. While this figure is alarming, people with diabetes have even more reason to be concerned as they are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. But take heart; there is good news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

June 1997

Gastric Emptying Linked to Cardiovascular Complication

Researchers have discovered that cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CANP) affects more than the heart. A new study shows that the diabetes complication is also related to slower gastric emptying in people with type I diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

March 1997

New Test May One Day Detect Approaching Heart Disease

A new indicator of atherosclerosis for people with type 2 diabetes has been discovered. French scientists have found that the levels of a blood protein called A-IV is a very strong indicator of arterial problems in the heart, limbs and brain.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

February 1997

The AHA Advocates Vitamin E in the Fight Against Heart Disease

A new study shows vitamin E reduces heart attacks by 75 percent. Results like this, and those from similar studies, have led the American Heart Association to name vitamin E the fourth most noteworthy health aid for heart disease in its review of 1996 research advances.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

March 1996

Reduce Heart Disease By 50%, Expert Touts Exercise, Not Drugs

The February issue of Diabetes Health included an article titled "Diabetes Expert Offers Tips on Understanding and Preventing Heart Disease: Drugs are the Answer" by Alan Marcus, MD. The article emphasized the use of medication to control high blood pressure and cholesterol and to prevent heart disease in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

February 1996

Diabetes Expert Offers Tips On Understanding And Preventing Heart Disease: “Drugs Are The Answer”

Heart disease is a health concern for everyone, but it should especially concern people with diabetes. Alan Marcus, MD, a diabetes expert on DIABETES HEALTH's medical advisory board, says people with diabetes are at special risk for heart disease and should be careful to control high cholestrol and blood pressure levels with the right drugs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

January 1996

Heart Bypass Surgery Better than Angioplasty for Diabetic Heart Patients

If you are in need of heart surgery and have diabetes, you may want to consider a report issued by the NIH Department of Health and Human Services and published in the September issue of Gratefully Yours, from the National Library of Medicine. It has been found that people who have coronary artery bypass graft surgery live longer than those who undergo angioplasty.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

November 1995

Diabetes Makes You 5 Times More Likely To Have A Heart Attack

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

November 1993

Fish, Heart Disease, and Diabetes

In past studies, fish oil has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of heart disease, but a new study from the Netherlands indicates that for people with diabetes, this may not be the case. The study, published in the July 1993 issue of Diabetes Care, took place over a 16 year period and included 272 people from the town of Rotterdam, 27 of whom had diabetes and 56 with glucose intolerance. Fish intake was the equivalent of 1 meal of fish per week.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1993

December 1992

Reverse Hardening of the Arteries

Alan Marcus MD, an endocrinologist and diabetes specialist, is extremely active in the diabetes community. He serves on many advisory boards and speaks frequently to groups of all sizes. His practice is in Laguna Hills, CA, and he serves as Asst. Clinical Prof. at USC.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 1992

November 1992

Dr. Marcus’ Diabetes Tip

Dr. Alan Marcus is a diabetes specialist who practices in Laguna Hills, California. He is also a medical advisor to MiniMed Technologies and a spokesperson for Novo Nordisk Insulin. Dr. Marcus also serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine for the USC School of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1992

©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.