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High Blood Sugar Article Archives

August 2014

Study Found Blood Sugar Levels Not Affected by Sucralose-sweetened Desserts

While there has been much debate recently about the impact of artificial sweeteners on diabetes, a new study finds that desserts sweetened with sucralose don’t impact blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2014

July 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

September 2013

Five More Common Diabetes Fears

Fear is a funny thing. In a controlled situation, say a movie theater or roller coaster, it can be exciting. It gets our blood pumping, gets our adrenaline racing. But in the real world, where anything can happen and safety isn't assured, fears can get out of hand.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2013

February 2013

Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself as a Newly Diagnosed Teen

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault." You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2013

Mike Fisher, Competitive Snowboarder

Mike Fisher is a 23-year-old from Ontario, Canada, who's been snowboarding since he was 13 years old. At the age of 18, he was involved in a motorcycle crash that necessitated the amputation of one leg below the knee. He says, "At first, I felt that my life was coming to a crashing halt. But I just pushed myself to recover as fast as possible and get my life back on track, go to school, get back into snowboarding and motorcycles-just anything so that my life wasn't affected at all. I had a lot of support, and I would say that I was pretty optimistic about it and took it almost as a challenge. By the time that I was 19, I was happy. I was walking again, I was back in college in London, Ontario, and everything was good. The accident was a minor setback to me, and I rose above it. I was just continuing with my life."

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2013

December 2012

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2012

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2012

November 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

October 2012

Under Physical Stress, Insulin-Producing Cells Regress

Scientists generally think that decreased insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is due to the death of the organ's beta cells. However, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center report that the beta cells do not die, but instead revert to a more basic cell type.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2012

May 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

April 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

January 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

November 2011

Helping African Americans F.A.C.E. Their Risk for Diabetes

Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie recently spoke with television and movie actor Anthony Anderson, who has taken a lead role with Eli Lilly & Company's F.A.C.E. campaign, a diabetes outreach to African Americans. A veteran of more than 20 films, Anthony, age 41, currently plays Detective Kevin Bernard on NBC's Emmy Award-winning drama, "Law & Order."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2011

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2011

The New Girl

It's hard being the new person at work.  It's even harder when you're the new person and you have diabetes. Whenever I start a new job, thoughts race through my mind: Will I go low while I'm training?  Will I have quick access to snacks?  Will I be able to check my blood sugar without an audience?  How about taking an insulin injection at the lunch table?  It isn't easy feeling forced to expose so many personal details to people you just met.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2011

An Unexpected Grief Down Under

Anyone who has lost a close family member to type 2 diabetes understands the grief and paralysis it creates, especially when the one who died was only 53.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2011

Blood Sugar Extremes Can Affect Young Brains

Sometimes it feels like diabetes is driving you crazy. But what if the disease is actually changing your brain? That's the disturbing suggestion of a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study suggests that both high and low blood sugars affect the brain development of young people with diabetes, but in different ways.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2011

September 2011

Ketones, Shmeetones.

When you live with diabetes, there's a lot to do.  Checking blood sugars.  Counting carbs.  Exercising.  Not to mention all those fun-filled doctors' appointments.  So the last time your physician or diabetes educator suggested ketone testing, it's completely understandable that your head was nodding but your mind was thinking "No way, Jack."  But before abandoning the idea completely, there are a few things you should know.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2011

June 2011

Diabetes Treatment Should Be More Flexible

Diabetes treatment standards for frail older adults should be more flexible than those for younger adults, focusing more on day-to-day quality of life and less on long-term results, according to a geriatrician at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2011

May 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Gene Thornton

Gene Thornton was in the Army in Germany when he got type 1 diabetes. It was 1965, 46 years ago, and he was 24 years old. This is his story, in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 10, 2011

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 5, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

March 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Francisco Zepeda

Francisco Zepeda is a 54-year-old native of El Salvador who owns an insurance agency in San Francisco.  Type 2 diabetes runs in his family. He says, "My grandmother lived with diabetes for about 30 years, and my father has it as well. I heard about diabetes all that time, but I never thought that it was going to happen to me. And I still hope that I'm not really diabetic. They say that once your blood sugar goes up, then you are diabetic, but I don't want to believe that I'm diabetic, you know what I mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

FDA Accepts Application to Review Dapagliflozin, a Type 2 Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted an application to review dapagliflozin, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2011

September 1991

Diabetes And Doing Your Best

If you are searching around for an inspirational book, look no further. Diabetes and Doing Your Best is a personal account of a young teen's early experience with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

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