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Diabetes and Kidney Care (Nephropathy) Article Archives

November 2012

Super-Tight Control of Blood Sugar After Kidney Transplant May Be Counterproductive

To see if tightly controlling blood sugar provides improved results in patients who received a kidney transplant, a group of diabetic post-transplant patients were followed for three days. A subset of the randomly assigned group had their blood glucose kept in tight range with IV insulin, while a control group received insulin as they ordinarily would, via injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2012

May 2012

Molecular Switch Could Be Key for Type 2s

With tens of millions of American facing life with type 2 diabetes and many millions more at risk of the disease, scientists are scrambling to unravel novel treatments. The latest breakthrough could come from California's Salk Institute.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2012

July 2011

Once a Spokesperson for Juvenile Diabetes, Erin Now Suffers From Diabulimia

Erin lay on a bed in the emergency room, finally serious about getting help. Her second episode of diabetic ketoacidosis in a single year had sent her to the hospital shaking and vomiting. For the past seven years, she had been driven by one desire: to lose forty pounds. She refused to give herself her full dose of insulin, fearing weight gain. She hadn't seen her endocrinologist or checked her blood sugar for a year or two.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2011

June 2011

Medical Tourism Offers Big Savings, Big Questions

Need a cheap kidney? How about a quick and easy bypass operation? Medical tourism offers a way for people facing pricey medical procedures to both save money and see another country. And while some, including President Obama, disparage the practice, it's on the rise as healthcare costs in the United States skyrocket beyond the budget of middle-class patients.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2011

March 2011

Alcohol and Sex

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2011

Should States Let Inmates Donate Organs?

If a prisoner on death row wants to donate his organs, should he be allowed to do it?

comments 19 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

February 2011

Diabetes Leads to Kidney Disease? That's News to Many Type 2s

It apparently comes as a surprise to many people with type 2 that diabetes can cause kidney disease. In fact, many diabetic patients don't realize that that their condition can cause kidney problems until after they've already developed kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2011

January 2011

Flushing Away High Blood Sugar

Most type 2 meds work by increasing insulin production in one way or another. The extra insulin lowers blood sugar by ushering it out of your bloodstream and into your cells, where it may, unfortunately, make you fat. Wouldn't it be nice if instead, you could lower your high blood sugar by just flushing it right down the toilet?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2011

July 2010

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

August 2009

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) Foretells Cardiovascular Complications

One of the major complications of diabetes is diabetic nephropathy, a loss of kidney function that may lead to renal failure.  As kidney disease progresses, the barrier that keeps large molecules out of the urine, called the glomerular barrier, begins to break down.  With the barrier failing, certain large molecules begin to migrate into the urine. One of those hefty molecules is immunoglobulin M, or IgM.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 19, 2009

Two Drugs Disappoint as Type 1 Kidney Treatments, But Shine With Eyes

The theory of unintended consequences has gotten another boost. Although two drugs designed to slow the loss of kidney function in people with type 1 diabetes turned out to be busts, they had a wonderful but entirely unexpected side effect: Eye damage was reduced by 65 to 70 percent in the patients taking them.

comments 6 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2009

March 2009

Early Detection Aims to Reverse Rising Rate of Kidney Disease

A report commissioned by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is being published in this month's issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the National Kidney Foundation's journal. Led by kidney specialists Dr. Andrew S. Levey at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, and Dr. William McClellan at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, the panel of experts designed a comprehensive public health strategy to prevent the development and complications of chronic kidney disease in the U.S.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2009

February 2009

Surgeons Remove Healthy Kidney in Innovative Way

In what is believed to be a first-ever procedure, surgeons at Johns Hopkins have successfully removed a healthy donor kidney through a small incision in the back of the donor's vagina.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2009

January 2009

Utah Jazz Owner Miller Suffers Double Amputation Due to Type 2 Complications

Utah Jazz owner, Larry H. Miller had his legs amputated six inches below the knee last week. A spokesman for the successful pro basketball team told the Associated Press that the surgery was due to complications from type 2 diabetes. The spokesman noted that Miller was already using a wheelchair before the surgery. Miller is 64 years old.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2009

Metabolic Syndrome Could Be Kidney Disease Precursor in Type 2s

Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong report that having metabolic syndrome may raise the risk of chronic kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2009

December 2008

Mind-Shifting: A Valuable Tool To Control Diabetes

The day I heard "Diabetes is not the leading cause of heart attack, blindness, kidney disease, and amputation," my life changed. I had believed the opposite to be true for the 32 years I'd been dealing with diabetes. Complications had always hung like a knife over my head.

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Rethinking the Treatment of Diabetes

The first time I presented medical research findings, I was not yet a physician. The year was about 1975. I was in my early forties and a mid-career engineer. The forum was a scientific symposium on diabetes. At the time, I felt that I had discovered the holy grail of diabetes care and was eager to share what I had learned.

comments 22 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

October 2008

Inexpensive Drug Improves Kidney Function and Could Reduce Need for Dialysis
Inexpensive Drug Improves Kidney Function and Could Reduce Need for Dialysis

Pentoxifylline, a drug used to treat patients with circulation problems, may also benefit those with kidney disease caused by diabetes and other conditions.  Specifically, pentoxifylline decreases proteinuria, the abnormal leakage of protein into the urine, according to two articles in the September issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

August 2008

10 Warning Signs of Kidney Disease

Last week was Kidney Disease Awareness and Education Week. Kidney disease is considered a "quiet disease," and many people don't recognize its early warning signs.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

March 2008

New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life
New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life

“You need dialysis” are words nobody wants to hear. But today kidney failure doesn’t have to mean driving to and from a clinic three times a week and having a lesser quality of life. Hemodialysis (HD) can safely be done in the privacy of your home in two new ways: daily and nocturnal home HD, both of which can help you feel better and live longer.

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

February 2008

A1c's Give Inaccurate Results for Hemodialysis Patients

A1c tests, the standard measurement of blood glucose, underestimate the amount of glucose in people who are on kidney hemodialysis, says a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center study.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2008

January 2008

C-peptide Emerging as Significant Factor in Nerve Recovery

Because scientists often tend to dismiss what they don't fully understand, many of them used to think that C-peptide had no physiological function. But while it's true that C-peptide does nothing to lower blood sugar, recent research is finding that it might have a role in preventing diabetes complications.

comments 19 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2008

December 2007

Religious Group Tries to Donate Kidneys to Strangers

Today's Wall Street Journal article on kidney donations highlights a topic that can be important to people with diabetes. Many people on donor recipient lists have diabetes. (Currently 75,000 people in the United States are awaiting organ transplants.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2007

High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Linked to Type 1 Kidney Disease
High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Linked to Type 1 Kidney Disease

Everyone knows that elevated sugar levels and long-time type 1 diabetes are risk factors for kidney disease. But now researchers have learned that high blood pressure, high lipid levels, and male gender are also risk factors for renal failure.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2007

October 2007

The Third World Kidney Day: Looking Back and Thinking Forward
The Third World Kidney Day: Looking Back and Thinking Forward

March 13, 2008, heralds the third annual World Kidney Day - an event that will be celebrated in more than 60 countries. We take this opportunity to recount how this concept has gained worldwide traction and momentum and to reflect on the challenges faced by its creators and supporters.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 29, 2007

September 2007

Dialysis, Without Fear
Dialysis, Without Fear

Dialysis is a subject cloaked in alarming myths and misconceptions. The public mind tends to envision dialysis patients as huddled in seedy clinics, hooked up to machines like iron lungs and knocking weakly at death's door.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 8, 2007

May 2007

Test Predicts Kidney Problems Ten Years Ahead of Time
Test Predicts Kidney Problems Ten Years Ahead of Time

A new study of the much-studied Pima Indian tribe has identified a set of urine proteins that predicts who will get diabetic nephropathy ten years down the line.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2007

March 2007

Dr. White Answers Your Medication Questions

Q: Are there any long-term side effects of the popular drugs to treat type 2 diabetes?

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2007

February 2007

Allied Against Kidney Disease On World Kidney Day

BRUSSELS - 1 February 2007. Globally more than 500 million individuals, or about one adult in ten, have some form of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Approximately 1.5 million people must be kept alive with dialysis, and wait up to seven years for a transplant - if one is available.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2007

April 2006

PKC Inhibitor Maintains the Kidney Health of Your Type 2 Patients

For type 2s who suffer from kidney disease, treatment with ruboxistaurin was shown to reduce albuminuria and maintain estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for more than one year. Ruboxistaurin—a PKC inhibitor manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company—may have added benefit in established therapies for diabetic kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Type 2s With Kidney Disease Better Off Seeing a Pharmacist-Diabetes Specialist Team

Hong Kong researchers say that if you have type 2 and suffer from kidney disease, you may be better off getting structured care from a pharmacist-diabetes specialist team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diabetic Patients With Kidney Disease Should Be Treated Aggressively From the Get-Go

Italian researchers say that kidney disease is a “significant predictor” of death, and that people who have kidney problems at the time of their diabetes diagnosis should be treated aggressively from the onset.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

September 2005

Overweight Type 1s More Susceptible to Complications Than Normal-Weight Type 1s

Diabetes duration and A1C remain the gold standard for determining whether you may develop retinopathy and neuropathy. However, if you are a type 1 with a weight problem, you may not be slowing down the progression to these microvascular complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

July 2005

How Sugar AGEs You
How Sugar AGEs You

Although the complications of diabetes are well known, scientists don’t fully understand the mechanisms that underlie them. However, a key to the mystery lies in what are known as advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

How to Preserve the Life of Your Diabetic Kidneys
How to Preserve the Life of Your Diabetic Kidneys

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of kidney failure, which soaks up a large part of the national health care dollar. However, kidney disease is preventable and treatable once present.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

February 2005

Saving Kidneys With Simple Testing
Saving Kidneys With Simple Testing

In November 2004, the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) asked national health bodies around the world to consider the urgent implementation of proactive albumin (protein) screening in urine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

October 2004

What Are the Keys to Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease?

Annual screening for microalbuminuria (low levels of protein in the urine, indicating early signs of kidney disease) in type 1 diabetes should begin with puberty and/or after five-year disease duration of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

Smoking Increases Diabetes Risks

Swedish researchers say that smoking is associated with both poor blood glucose control and microalbuminuria (protein in the urine) that indicates early kidney disease and increased heart disease risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

What Are the Keys to Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease?

Annual screening for microalbuminuria (low levels of protein in the urine, indicating early signs of kidney disease) in type 1 diabetes should begin with puberty and/or after five-year disease duration of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

June 2004

Getting to the Heart of Early Kidney Disease

The risk of cardiovascular events and death in people with diabetes and high blood pressure is two to eight times higher when microalbuminuria is present.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

April 2003

Web-Based School Provides Info About Your Kidneys

Kidney School is a new, free interactive learning resource on the Web. It offers educational materials designed to teach kidney patients about kidney disease, treatment options and day-to-day coping skills.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Heart Rate Variability Can Predict Kidney Function

A new study has examined the relationship of decreased heart rate variability—the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate—to protein in the urine and observable kidney disease. The study reports that severely reduced heart rate variability at baseline was associated with progressive kidney deterioration one year later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Risk Assessment for People Who Developed Type 2 at a Young Age

Pima Indians who developed type 2 diabetes before they were 20 years old later developed kidney disease at the same rate as those who got type 2 as adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

March 2003

ACE Inhibitor Offers Best Kidney Protection for African-Americans

A recent study comparing three classes of blood pressure medications found that an ACE inhibitor did the best job of slowing kidney disease in African-Americans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Death Rates Higher in For-Profit Dialysis Centers

An average of 2,500 premature deaths per year occur in for-profit kidney dialysis centers in the United States, according to research that analyzed data from eight large observational studies covering the years 1973 through 1997 and including more than 500,000 patient-years of data.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Siblings of African-Americans With Diabetes Often Have Kidney Problems, Too

If you're an African-American with diabetes and kidney disease, chances are good that your brother or sister might have kidney disease, too.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Planned Care Enhances Quality of Both Diabetes Care and Control

When a "planned care" system of healthcare delivery was instituted in three primary-care practices in Wisconsin and Minnesota, it resulted in better care by physicians and in better diabetes control for their patients, according to researchers from the Mayo Health System Diabetes Translation Project.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

January 2003

Test Can Predict Foot Problems

A test that measures muscle activity can predict the development of foot ulcers, while other tests can predict amputation and even death, say researchers at the Manchester Royal Infirmary in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

The Renal/Retinal Link

Renal (kidney) function declines more rapidly in people with type 2 diabetes who have both retinopathy and proteinuria (protein in the urine).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

ARB Drug Controls Blood Pressure and Protects Kidneys

Irbesartan (Avapro), an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), reduces 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as albumin excretion rate (AER) in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

December 2002

People With Diabetes Can Donate Kidneys

When people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes donate a kidney, the rejection rate is no different than in cases in which the donor does not have diabetes. However, the recipients of kidneys from type 1 or 2 donors have a greater incidence of proteinuria—an excessive amount of protein in the urine, a sign of kidney disease—and are more likely to have elevated blood-glucose levels requiring treatment after the transplant.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

High Overnight Blood Pressure Leads to Kidney Disease

A five-year study measuring overnight blood pressure in 75 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes revealed that high nighttime blood pressure can lead to kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

High Overnight Blood Pressure Leads to Kidney Disease

A five-year study measuring overnight blood pressure in 75 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes revealed that high nighttime blood pressure can lead to kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Popular Diet Might Damage Kidneys

Cutting your carbs and increasing your protein intake? You could be damaging your kidneys, according to researchers who studied the effects of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet on 10 people who did not have diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

Animal or Vegetable?

Should you skip eating animal protein in favor of vegetable protein if you have type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria (a sign of kidney disease)?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

September 2002

What Can You Do to Prevent Kidney Disease?

1) Control Your Blood Pressure

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Diabetes and Kidney Disease

Everyone needs to start giving kidney dysfunction and cardiovascular disease equal standing as complications in diabetes mellitus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

August 2002

Heartening News

Unless you are undergoing kidney dialysis or have congestive heart failure, having diabetes puts you at no more risk of having a heart attack or dying following major surgery on blood vessels than people without diabetes, researchers say.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

April 2002

JDRF Seeking People With Type 1 Diabetes to Participate in Study

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) is seeking participants for a study on the role that genes play in the development of diabetic kidney disease in people with type 1 diabetes. Entitled the "Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKindD) Study," it requires participants and their parents to submit blood and urine samples and medical histories.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

The Earlier the Better

People with end-stage kidney disease who receive dialysis in the morning may survive longer than those who receive the same treatment at other times of the day, according to researchers from Emory University.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

March 2002

Are Pancreas Transplants Successful If You Have Had a Kidney Transplant?

Q: Are pancreas transplants very successful for someone who has had a previous successful kidney transplant? I have been considering a pancreas transplant, but several doctors have told me the success rates are not that good and that, in some cases, the individual develops a milder form of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

Don’t Inhale This

If you have type 1 diabetes with an A1C greater than 8% and you are also a smoker, you are at higher risk for microalbuminuria—abnormal levels of protein in the urine that signal kidney complications—warn researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

January 2002

Vitamin Power

Short-term treatment with vitamins C and E lowers the urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) in people with type 2 diabetes who have micro/macroalbuminuria, according to a team of Danish researchers. In the September 2001 issue of Diabetic Medicine, they suggest that further long-term, large-scale studies of this albuminuria-reducing treatment modality are needed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Blood Pressure Medicine Does It Again

Nearly one-quarter of research subjects with type 1 diabetes who had diabetic kidney disease showed signs of remission of their kidney disorder after beginning treatment with angiotensin-converter enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, say researchers at the Steno Diabetes Center in Gentofte, Denmark.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

Dining Guide Gives Tips for Healthful Restaurant Eating

The National Kidney Foundation has issued a dining guide that will help people with kidney problems maneuver their way through restaurant menus and make healthy eating choices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

New Strides in Prevention

Taking Cozaar (losartan potassium) may prevent the progression of kidney disease, say researchers at Harvard. The drug, FDA-approved to treat high blood pressure and hypertension, was shown to lower the risk of kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in people with type 2 diabetes. Results of the study were published in the September 20 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

November 2001

One Down

Researchers in the United Kingdom say that the anti-rejection medication sirolimus (Rapamune) allows for the early withdrawal of the anti-rejection drug cyclosporine in people who have had a kidney transplant.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

September 2001

One Better Than the Other

Australian researchers are saying the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril (Aceon) is more effective than the calcium channel blocker nifedipine (Procardia) in slowing the progression of kidney disease in people with diabetes who have normal blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

August 2001

To Sell or Not to Sell: The Controversy Surrounding Live Kidney Sales
To Sell or Not to Sell: The Controversy Surrounding Live Kidney Sales

After four years on dialysis, with no sign that he was nearing the top of the transplant waiting list, Moshe Tati decided to buy a kidney. This was easier than he had imagined. Several months previous, the name and telephone number of an organ broker had been passed, furtively, around his dialysis group. At the time, Moshe did not think he would use the telephone number. He thought he would wait.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

First Things First

Don't look for rising blood pressure as a first indicator of impending kidney disease if the subject is a child.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

When Fishy is Good

According to researchers in Sweden, eating fish protein reduces the risk of developing microalbuminuria, a condition marked by protein in the urine that is associated with kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

April 2001

A Matter of the Heart and Kidney: Angiograms May Cause Kidney Damage

Marilyn never expected that a routine heart exam would cause kidney damage. But it did.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Putting the Brakes on Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetes is the most common single cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States and Europe. In the United States, diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease) accounts for about one-third of all cases of ESRD. Most patients with ESRD usually go on dialysis or require a kidney transplant to survive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

To Prevent Kidney Disease: Make Your Check List and Read It Twice

To prevent or slow progression to end-stage renal disease, Robert Stanton, MD, chief of nephrology at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston recommends taking the following steps:

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

March 2001

Urine Test May Predict the Future

Can you tell if little Susie or Johnny is likely to experience diabetes-related kidney problems in later years? Even if the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is fairly new?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

February 2001

Vitamin Combo May Protect Kidney Disease

A healthy dose of vitamins may be a valuable tool in lowering urinary albumin excretion rates in people with type 2 diabetes. Unveiled at this year's August meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a recent Danish study found that taking large daily doses of vitamins C and E significantly reduced short-term levels of albumin excretion in the urine (Diabetologia, Vol. 43, Suppl. 1, p. A36).

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 2001

August 2000

Eating Chicken May Help Control Diabetic Kidney Disease

Beef may be what's for dinner, but eating a mostly chicken diet can greatly reduce one's chances of developing kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

June 2000

New Protein Product May Benefit People at Risk for Kidney Disease

Quintessence, a proprietary formulation of essential amino acids, may be used to supplement protein needs for patients with kidney failure who require a low-protein diet. In addition, Quintessence, manufactured by Calwood Nutritionals of Baltimore, can be used to enhance nutritional status in people with a normal protein intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

January 2000

Testing for Albuminuria

Jane Botcha has had diabetes for over six years. When she was tested in 1996, her microalbuminuria was 2.4. In 1997 it rose to 7.4, and this year it was 17.1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

November 1999

Study Aimed at Finding Genetic Link to Diabetic Kidney Disease

Researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston have launched the Joslin Kidney Study to search for genetic components that make some people with type 1 diabetes prone to kidney complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

July 1999

Neoral Comes to the Rescue of Kidney Transplant Patients

Kidney transplant patients who suffered high blood sugar when taking the antirejection drug tacrolimus (Prograf) demonstrated improvement when they were switched to the antirejection drug cyclosporin (Neoral).

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 1999

March 1999

Conflicting Recommendations on When to Start ACE Inhibitors to Prevent Kidney Disease

The jury has been out on whether people who are at risk for diabetic kidney disease but have normal blood pressure should use angiotenisin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Traditionally, ACE inhibitors have been used to treat people with hypertension, but lately, they have become a mainstream treatment option of diabetic kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

NIH to Recruit Candidates for Islet and Kidney Transplant Study

As early as this summer, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will begin recruiting candidates with type 1 diabetes for a new islet and kidney transplant study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

December 1998

Vitamin C Helps Fend off Kidney Disease in Individuals with Diabetes

Current evidence suggests that lipoproteins (such as LDL-cholesterol) need to be oxidized to cause atherosclerosis. Such oxidative stress appears to be increased in diabetes, which causes additional atherosclerosis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

October 1998

New Kidney Test Makes Things Easier

Bayer Inc. has developed a new test which simplifies screenings for kidney disease, and could potentially save the lives of many people with diabetes. Kidney disease leads to other illnesses and dependence on kidney dialysis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

July 1998

Teen Smoking: Gateway to Kidney Disease

In addition to the host of health risks that smoking presents to all people, studies have shown that adult type 1 smokers are at increased risk to develop macrovascular and microvascular diabetic complications, especially retinopathy and nephropathy. A recent study from Germany shows that markers of microvascular complications are also found in teen smokers with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

April 1998

Hypertension May be Genetic Link to Renal Disease

If you have type 1 diabetes, check your family history. Patients with type 1 diabetes whose parents had high blood pressure (hypertension) showed a greater incidence of diabetic nephropathy compared to patients whose parents did not, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes. Study authors Johan A. Fagerudd, et al. also reports that patients with type 1 diabetes have a greater chance of developing hypertension, and at a younger age, if their parents had hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

January 1997

Protein Targeted to Prevent Kidney Disease

The Philadelphia-based Exocell, Inc. has recently signed an agreement with Eurand International for the clinical development of an orally administered compound that could help prevent diabetic kidney disease. The compound, EXO-226, will be produced and supplied by Eurand for use in the first phase of clinical trials for FDA approval. Exocell anticipates that these trials will begin in early 1997.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

July 1996

Study Raises Questions About Dual Pancreas-Kidney Transplants

A study published in the December 1995 issue of Lancet, indicating a dual pancreas-kidney transplant may be more dangerous than previously suspected, has stirred controversy at the University of Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

March 1995

Diabetes is the Leading Cause of Renal Failure in New Zealand

Diabetes-induced nephropathy is now the leading cause of end-stage renal failure in New Zealand, according to the Department of Medicine at Auckland Hospital in New Zealand.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

Drug Watch: Two Treatments Which May Need More Scrutiny:

Though it may be a promising alternative for many people with type 2 diabetes, the drug metformin may cause severe side effects, even death, in some patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

January 1995

Long-Time Diabetes A Risk Factor For Renal Failure

A study was conducted by the School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland to determine the proportion of end-stage renal failure in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1995

May 1994

Blood Pressure Medicine Reverses Kidney Failure

The largest and longest study ever conducted to learn about the effects of a medication on people with nephropathy recently concluded. It found that a drug called Captopril can slow or halt the progression of nephropathy (kidney disease) in people with diabetes who show signs of this complication. Captopril is an ACE inhibitor, a medication used to treat hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1994

March 1994

Rate of Nephropathy Among People with IDDM has Decreased

According to a report from the University Hospital in Linkoping, Sweden, the incidence of nephropathy has decreased dramatically. The report is based on a study of 213 people with type I diabetes, who had been diagnosed before the age of 15 between 1961 and 1980.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1994

Smoking Associated with the Progression of Nephropathy

Researchers at Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf, Germany have linked smoking with the progression of diabetic nephropathy in people with type 1 diabetes undergoing hypertension therapy. The study was conducted over one year and included 34 smokers, 24 ex-smokers (anyone who had quit prior to the study), and 35 non-smokers, all of whom had both retinopathy and nephropathy (to insure that diabetes was the cause).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1994

July 1993

DCCT Study Participants Share Reactions

For the last ten years the DCCT has been a big part of the participants' lives, affecting everything from what they eat to how they control their diabetes. The study is over now; the doctors have proven the effectiveness of intensive therapy, they have told us that tight control is the new standard in diabetes care. But they have not told us what the new therapies are like and how they affect our day to day life. For that we must talk to the participants themselves. We contacted eleven of the patients for their insights on the study and the therapies they used.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1993

January 1991

The Fight to Derail Kidney Disease: Simple Tests, Effective Drugs Help Improve the Odds

Improved blood sugar control, smoking cessation and aggressive blood pressure treatment are mainstays for preventing or treating the development of kidney disease in people with diabetes. Increasingly, physicians are also turning to a class of drugs called ACE inhibitors to slow the progression of kidney disease in their patients.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 1991

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