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Type 1 Article Archives

September 2014

Young Kayaker Has Eye On The Olympics, Despite Type 1

It’s likely if you tossed the fearless Sage Donnelly over Niagara Falls, she’d probably emerge from the churning waters at the bottom exalted over the ride, as long as she was in her kayak rather than one of those old-fashioned wooden barrels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2014

Once-Weekly Tanzeum for Type 2s Now Available

Tanzeum (albiglutide), a once-weekly injectable drug for type 2s from GSK (GlaxoSmithKline), USA is now available at pharmacies throughout the United States. The FDA approved U.S. sales on April 15.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2014

Computerized Data Causes Some Patients To Lie To Protect Security, Study Finds

Electronic health records might save time and paper, but some patients say they find themselves not being truthful when they see their physicians using them.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 8, 2014

Study Shows New Wound Care Technology

A new wound-care dressing developed by a California firm has been shown to not only reduce the cost of treating wounds, but also to improve the outcomes of those treatments.

That’s good news for diabetics. According to statistics, about 15 percent of those with the disease develop chronic wounds – most often foot ulcers – that can result in amputation.

The was study, conducted at the Southwest Regional Wound Care Center in Lubbock, Texas. They found, Enluxtra Any Wound dressing developed by OSNovative Systems, Inc., reduced medical costs of chronic wound care by 30 percent. In part because it replaces many different products. Including primary foam, the gelling agent alginate, hydrogel dressings, hydro-conductive fiber, super-absorbent collagen, opaque dressing, hydrocolloid, gauze and combination dressings.

Any Wound dressing, crafted of FDA-approved polymers, is designed to sense and accommodate the different parts of the wound that need hydration or absorption, and a single dressing can remain in place for up to seven days.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2014

Eylea Earns FDA Approval To Treat Diabetic Macular Edema

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the eye drug Eylea for the treatment of diabetic macular edema, according to the drug makers Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2014

August 2014

Latest Otelixizumab Study Showed No Beta Cell Benefits

Low doses of the GlaxoSmithKline drug otelixizumab did not preserve the function of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in those newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, according to recent research.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 29, 2014

‘Smart’ Wound-Care Technology Reduces Costs By More Than 30%

Study finds self-adapting dressing significantly reduces cost of care while providing better clinical outcomes and simplifying wound-care procedures.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2014

Genteel: A Pain Free Lancing Instrument

All Dr. Christopher Jacobs’ friend wanted a lancing device that didn’t cause pain.  And after hearing the longtime type 1 diabetic lament the discomfort he felt from the many finger pricks required to test his blood glucose levels, Jacobs was intrigued by the challenge.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2014

Insulin Pumps: Myths And Reality

I don't come to praise insulin pumps, and I don't come to bury them. Instead, I am here to tell the truth, from my experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2014

Dompé Earns Orphan Drug

An Italian-based pharmaceutical company with subsidiaries in New York has been granted orphan drug status for a new drug to treat neurotrophic keratitis, a rare degenerative corneal disease that impacts less than 1 in 5,000 people worldwide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2014

Researching the Cure Beyond The Mouse

For most of us with diabetes, diabetes cure research can feel like it's moving at a glacial pace. If you're a mouse, it's probably pretty exciting, considering researchers are discovering new ways to cure you almost every day. But what progress is being made in curing this disease? Is anyone moving beyond the lab rats and into people living with diabetes? The good news is yes, and there are a lot of people working on finding a cure, and many of them have started or will be starting clinical research in humans soon.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 19, 2014

Newly Discovered Virus Linked To Obesity

If you thought your obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnoses were genetic “gifts” from your family, it could be a virus instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Carrying a Pancreas Outside My Body

One of the pluses of having a working pancreas is that you do not often lose it. The organ just comes along for the ride, as it were, safe inside your abdomen.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2014

New Device Spots Early Signs Of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, a common side effect of diabetes that is linked to a wide range of complications including digestive issues, erectile dysfunction, paralysis of the bladder and intestinal damage, is not only difficult to treat, it’s also difficult to diagnose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2014

For Diabetics And Their Devices, The Present Is Never Enough

Type 1 diabetics seem to always be living in a transitional phase. The technology we have currently is always about to be replaced with newer, better, fresher technology, It's exciting on one hand and exhausting on the other.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2014

Death Risk Higher in Polytrauma Cases for People With Diabetes

Having diabetes increases the risk of complications or death in cases where patients have suffered polytrauma compared with patients who don't have any history of medical comorbidities. (Comorbidities are defined as the simultaneous presence of two chronic diseases in a patient.) Polytrauma is defined as multiple injuries to the body or organs where at least one is life-threatening and exacerbated by the trauma of the other injuries. Such injuries usually occur in situations where the likelihood of substantial injury is high---falls, auto accidents, violent crimes, industrial accidents.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 5, 2014

Insulin pumps lead to lower A1C levels for insulin-dependent type 2s

Insulin pumps can be as beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes that require insulin as they have become for those with type 1, according to a new trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2014

July 2014

Those with diabetes are more likely to develop head and neck cancers, research shows

While experts have long noted that those with diabetes have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular issues, a new study shows the risk of head and neck cancers is also higher for diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2014

USDA Announces $78 Million Available for Local Food Enterprises

The local food movement was given a big boost earlier this month with the announcement that the USDA has plans to invest $78 million into local and regional food enterprises.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Diabetes Health: Terms Used to Describe People With Diabetes for Crossword Puzzle #13

Test your knowledge to see how well you know terms used to describe people with diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2014

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Insulin Device to U.S. Market

Novo Nordisk has introduced the Levemir® FlexTouch® prefilled insulin delivery device to the U.S. market. The device, filled with insulin detemir [rDNA origin], the first of its kind that does not use a pushbutton extension. In a conventional insulin delivery device, a pushbutton extends out from the device. If the called-for dose is large, an extension may cause problems for the user.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2014

How Do You Stay So Positive?

My class was discussing why we cannot just do pancreas transplants so we can cure diabetes,” said a dear friend that volunteers for me at work. It is a lot more complicated than that, sadly. I was touched that he and his college classmates were discussing ways to cure us. As we chatted about the challenges of diabetes and our wishes for a cure, a few other volunteers gathered. When they heard me mention that I have had Type 1 diabetes for twenty years and that I take 5 – 7 injections a day to stay alive and healthy, they all looked shocked and a silence fell over the group. My volunteer said “Wow, how do you stay so positive”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2014

A Primer on Gluten for Celiac Awareness Month

Many people first became aware of how dangerous a slice of bread could be for those with celiac disease when “The View” co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck shared her personal experiences with the genetic autoimmune disorder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2014

Type 2 Drug Slashes Dementia Risk

A new study has surprising implications for a generic diabetes drug. Pioglitazone, which is often prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes, also appears to reduce the risk of developing dementia. The drug was not studied specifically to see if cut the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Instead, researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases combed through a giant database of German health care records. They looked at information from 2004 to 2010, with a gigantic group of subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2014

Mixed Martial Arts Reveals Hidden Strengths After Type 1 Diagnosis

Rob Cooper isn’t one to shy away from a challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2014

U.S. News & World Report Lists Best U.S. Hospitals for Diabetes

News magazine U.S. News & World Report has published a list of the top 10 American hospitals for treating diabetes and delivering endocrinological care.


comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2014

Key Steps in Diabetes Care

Living with diabetes means you need to take extra care to stay healthy. The good news is that even small changes in your lifestyle and habits can make a big difference in managing your blood sugar, staying healthy, and preventing complications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 18, 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

The Invisible Elephant in the Room

Diabetes is the invisible elephant in my room on a regular basis. As a type 1 diabetic, I think about it frequently even if my friends, family, doctors, and the people I encounter daily don’t see it. While diabetes truly is an invisible illness, my blood sugars affect everything I do or even think about doing. My diabetes elephant is there all the time. That elephant does not take days off or breaks. So when such an important medical issue goes unnoticed by a doctor after a lengthy visit, I see a red flag.

comments 18 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2014

Innovative Program: Offers People with Diabetes the Power to Improve Their Own Health

For most people with type 2 diabetes, successful outcomes of the disease usually rely more on living a healthy lifestyle, rather than a medicine chest of prescription drugs. Because it is such a self-managed disease, several high-profile groups are collaborating to create a new kind of the support group to help people stay on track and better manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2014

After 50 years, type 1 Suzi Vietti Has Mastered Her Disease

One thing most people know about 63-year-old Suzi Vietti is never to say “never” to her. It might be one of her most detested words; given the number of times she has heard it.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2014

Fewer Hypoglycemic Episodes With One Insulin in Head-to-Head Comparison

A recently completed study that compared two types of insulin for treating inadequately controlled type 2 patients showed that insulin degludec/insulin aspart produced fewer instances of hypoglycemia than biphasic insulin aspart 30.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2014

June 2014

Embryonic Cloning Takes Step Toward Treating Diabetes

For more than 100 years, scientists have been exploring the possibilities of cloning, which led to the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996 along with a wealth of other developments in the treatment of disease, including the recent embryonic cloning of a woman with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2014

Belly Fat Linked to Metabolic Diseases in Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2014

High Birth Weights Could Put Babies at Risk Later On

Weight matters. Through all the research and studies, diseases and treatments, those two words possess a simple truth. The heavier people are, the more challenges they face in remaining healthy. The thinner we are, the more options we have to stay active and engaged in the world around us.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2014

Low-carb, Vegan Diet Offers Benefits

The public perception of low-carbohydrate diets often involves mounds of bacon, piles of steaks and rivers of cheese. After all, when the Atkins Diet swept the country more than a decade ago, that was one of the ways people described it to their friends -- and one of the ways that critics tried to define it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 23, 2014

Recession May Have Worsened Obesity

According to a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Great Recession that began in 2008 may have worsened obesity rates in developed nations, including some groups in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2014

Why A Diabetes Camp?

After every show, Bret Michaels auctions his shirt and hat to the highest bidders.  A recent show in Maryland, raised more than $3,000. The money goes to his foundation that sends children to diabetes camps for a week at no cost to the family.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 11, 2014

May 2014

FDA Delays Decision on Inhaled Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has delayed until July 15th making a decision on whether to allow the inhaled insulin Afrezza entry into the American market.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 24, 2014

Life With Type 2: Science Catches Up to Our Experiences

Scientists will tell you that they don't consider anecdotes-personal stories about something-to be evidence that establishes a fact. Say you have 10 people swear they've been abducted by aliens, and all of their descriptions of the kidnapers match. That still wouldn't be enough for scientists to declare that aliens are real.
It would take other types of evidence, not just word of mouth, for the actual existence of aliens to be accepted as a plausible explanation for people's reported disappearances.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 14, 2014

March 2014

Do We Really Need Statins?

Ten years ago, I was asked by my endocrinologist to begin using statins to lower my cholesterol. I was barely over 20 years of age and was afraid of possible side or long-term effects. I was nervous about adding yet another drug to my list of daily medications, so I told him I would consider it and went home feeling like a medical disaster. Hello, diabetes complications: We meet again.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 22, 2014

Moving Target

So, what is it that affects my glucose levels and why is it so hard to manage diabetes? In this case, we're talking type 1 diabetes; mine seems to be extremely stubborn and "brittle" by nature. Honestly, sometimes balancing this chronic condition is downright exhausting. Some days it's a scientific equation, weighed and measured, a standard protocol. Other days, it's a roller coaster, a compounding tidal wave, a boxing match.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2014

Celebrating 30 years of the DCCT: Part 2

Three decades ago, the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Study was just beginning. To mark the anniversary of the most important advancement in diabetes care in most of our lifetimes, I've been recalling how the study came about and what it revealed. In short, the DCCT proved the tight control of type 1 diabetes not only was an achievable goal, but that it prevented or delayed complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2014

Celebrating 30 Years of the DCCT: Part 1

What do three decades mean to you? In absolute terms, 30 years is a serious amount of time. If you're under the age of 40, for example, it's the vast majority of your life. But in the world of medical research, where studies can take many years to complete--and even longer to affect everyday practice--three decades can go by surprisingly quickly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2014

57% of Type 1s Expect a Cure by 2024

New York, NY (PRWEB)--More than half of people who have type 1 diabetes or have a family member or close friend with the disease expect a cure to be found in the next 10 years, according to a semi-annual survey conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2014

February 2014

Bariatric Surgery Shows Significant Effect on Obese Type 1s

Here's a development to keep your eye on: Bariatric surgery performed on a small group of morbidly obese type 1s led to considerable weight loss, improved glycemic control, and improved metabolic profiles up to three years later.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 25, 2014

Weekly Potpourri

Blame The Media

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2014

Having Kids Could Cut Risk of Death for Type 1s

Parenthood might have surprisingly beneficial effects for people with type 1 diabetes, according to a new Finnish study. Its analysis of data over four decades shows that people both with and without diabetes who had children died at half the rate of those who didn't have kids over that span of time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2014

How Much Does an Olympian Cross Country Skier Train and What Does He Eat?

On Friday, the official opening day of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, we featured an interview with Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman, a type 1 who is participating in his fourth Olympiad. We thought it would be interesting to delve a little more into Kris's training regimen, including the foods he eats to fuel the high energy demands of his races.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2014

January 2014

Type 1 Drug Wins Orphan Status

DV-100, a drug designed to halt the body's autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that leads to type 1 disease, has won orphan drug status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2014

Afraid of the Dark

One of the scariest moments of my diabetes life, so far, happened recently. Just a few months ago, after an intense cardio workout, I experienced something terrifying. It was so scary, it left me shaking, sobbing, and curled up like a baby in my husband's arms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2014

Asian Companies to Collaborate on Type 1 Antibody Treatment

Two Asian companies--BioLineRx of Israel and JHL Biotech of Taiwan--have agreed to collaborate on the development and marketing of BL-9020, a monoclonal antibody that could become a significant means of treatment for early-stage type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2014

People with Type 2 Also Suffer Dawn Phenomenon

Researchers have found that the dawn phenomenon, a rise in blood glucose in the early morning hours, affects both people with type 1 and people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2014

December 2013

Finding Joy and Having Fun Every Day: the Diabetic Parent Journals, Part 3

Most of the time, I'm the teacher and my two-and-a-half year old son is the student. But not always. Right now, my son is teaching me about acceptance. He looks at the day--or whatever situation he's in--and embraces it for what it is. If rain falls, he delights in it, telling me with a huge grin that, "Rain fall! From sky!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2013

Skin Disease Drug Holds Promise for Type 1s

File this news under "potential breakthrough you didn't see coming." Researchers have tried--and seem to have succeeded--in slowing the destruction of beta cells by treating recently diagnosed people with type 1 diabetes with alefacept, a drug usually prescribed to treat psoriasis, a disorder that leaves skin red and itchy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2013

"Artificial Pancreas" Could Benefit From Inhaled Insulin Therapy

For people with type 1 diabetes who follow medical research, development of a closed-loop, "artificial pancreas" has always been the Holy Grail. Such a system would combine an insulin pump with a continuous glucose monitor to provide constant control of blood glucose levels. But what if such a system was only a start? What if it might work better when combined with another therapy altogether?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2013

November 2013

The Bionic Type 1 Woman

I've been gone a few months. On September 9, 2013, my life took a tragic turn. I found out my brother died. He was my hero and my best friend. He lost a lifelong battle with alcohol and drug addiction. Although my family and I hurt and will never understand his pain, we smile knowing he no longer has to struggle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2013

Let's Be Honest

There are many rules to keeping diabetes "well managed." When I was diagnosed many years ago, I was told of the food allotments, the glucose checks, the exercise requirements, carbohydrate limitations, etc. There were many restrictions, and yet, the doctors told me I could live a "normal" life. As normal a life as anyone else in the world, so long as I followed the accompanying list. I shake my head and smile as I wonder, "What does that even mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2013

October 2013

Life With Type 2: "Nano, Nano," as Mork Almost Said

Comedian Robin Williams got his start on TV in 1978 in the comedy "Mork and Mindy," about a wacky alien, Mork (Williams), who comes to live in a boarding house run by a cute young woman (Pam Dawber). In that popular sitcom, Mork would always greet people by saying, "Nanu, Nanu," which was "Hello" on his home planet of Ork.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

For type 2's, at what level of ketones should you avoid exercising?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2013

A New Dawn for Inhalable Insulin?

Few treatments for type 1 diabetes have been as elusive and long-promised as inhalable insulin. The concept has always sounded remarkable: Instead of jabbing themselves with needles, type 1s (and insulin-using type 2s) could take a quick puff on an inhaler to get a dose of insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2013

Experimental Drug Holds Promise for New Type 1s

One of the most intriguing areas of type 1 diabetes research focuses on newly diagnosed patients. Given that the disease occurs after an autoimmune response damages the body's insulin-producing beta cells, scientists have looked to new type 1s as fertile ground for experimentation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2013

Automatic Bolus Calculator Pays off With A1c Drops

For people with type 1 diabetes (and some with type 2), the question is simple-and crucial: How much insulin should you give yourself with a meal?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2013

Becoming Mom

Ever since I was a girl, I wanted to be a mother. I understood that I wasn't ready emotionally or physically, but at a young age I simply had the feeling that being a mother was what I was meant to do with my life. I was smart, attractive, motivated, driven, and could be anything that I wanted to be. And I wanted to be a mom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2013

Byetta for Type 1s? It Could Be Possible

Many people with type 2 diabetes are familiar with Byetta, a drug that helps raise their insulin levels. But a new study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests that the drug, known generically as exenatide, might have a role to play for people with type 1 diabetes as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2013

September 2013

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Artificial Pancreas

The FDA has approved a new, automated artificial pancreas system from Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2013

The Diabetic Parent Journals Part. 2: Something Out of Nothing

We all start from nothing. When we're born, we're blank slates, minds looking outward, ready to absorb the love of our parents and the lessons of a rapidly shifting world. And we all grow. We learn those lessons. We grow up. Our minds expand and develop in a multitude of unexpected directions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2013

$Millions Going to Big Diabetes Non-Profits, But With Little Accountability

When it comes to research, you would expect that the wants of those living with type 1 diabetes would be totally in line with the goals of scientists seeking a cure for the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2013

Money and Medication

Money. No one wants to talk about it, but it affects all of us. In the United States of America, having a health condition can put you in the poorhouse. In a recent survey, the U.S. Census determined that medical bills were the biggest cause of bankruptcy filings in 2012. Many people will even hesitate to take their necessary medications in order to slow the financial bleed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2013

Fighting My Lifelong Enemy, Diabetes

"For the joy of the Lord is your strength." Nehemiah 8:10

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2013

Glucagon Study Shows Promise for Type 1s

In the healthcare field today, perhaps no area holds as much promise and as many perils as weight control. Researchers see the same statistics that the rest of us do. They see the upcoming wave of obesity and diabetes diagnoses. They see the myriad complications that spring up from these conditions. And they want to address the problem in a simple way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2013

Five More Common Diabetes Fears

Fear is a funny thing. In a controlled situation, say a movie theater or roller coaster, it can be exciting. It gets our blood pumping, gets our adrenaline racing. But in the real world, where anything can happen and safety isn't assured, fears can get out of hand.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2013

Chronic Fatigue Common in Type 1s, Says New Study

Are you a person with type 1 diabetes? Do you often feel tired? A new study suggests that you're not alone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2013

August 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Is it important to determine the exact type of diabetes you have if you're already on insulin and maintaining very good blood sugar control, and if so, why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2013

To the Extreme

British snowboard champion Christopher Southwell has always lived for the adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2013

Sometimes the Good News Gets You Through the Rough Stuff

Thrilled, elated, ecstatic, joyful-these are all accurate descriptions of my feelings after my doctor appointment today, but somehow they don't seem to be enough. Words can't quite express the feeling that you get when you get a good report from the doctor after having what seems like bad report after bad report.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2013

Book Review: Raising Teens with Diabetes

Raising Teens with Diabetes: A Survival Guide for Parents by Moira McCarthy, Spry Publishing, 272 pages, $15.95. ISBN: 978-1-9381720-20-1

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2013

Diabetes awareness mission takes flight

Jason Harmon had dreams of taking to the skies as a commercial pilot, but a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes crashed his plans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2013

The Agony of Type 1 Hope

I can only speak as a type 2. I don't for a second think that the problems I encounter managing my diabetes compare to what people with type 1 go through.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2013

Type A Type 1s May Run Lower Mortality Risk

New research suggests that type 1s' personality types could affect their mortality risk. While that might sound peculiar at first, the research results-culled from 22 years of study-make some important connections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2013

Dietary Changes Could Preserve Beta Cells

Type 1 diabetes doesn't happen all at once. Scientists have shown that it's usually a gradual process, in which the insulin-producing beta cells eventually fade out. So wouldn't it be marvelous if the function of those beta cells could be preserved, allowing people newly diagnosed with diabetes to produce some of their own insulin for a longer time?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2013

July 2013

Timing of First Solid Food Intake Linked to Type 1

New parents like British royals Will and Kate might not want to rush the introduction of solid food into their baby's diet. That's not to say they want to put it off, either.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2013

NFL Player Reaches Out to Inspire, Empower Young Type 1

Despite living with type 1 diabetes, fourth grader Joey Balistrieri wanted nothing more than to play football. But it would require advice from a professional player, Houston Texan tight end Jake Byrne, to convince Joey's mom to let her son take the field.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 29, 2013

Precedent-Setting Ski Champ Remembers the Kids

As if being the first Olympic endurance athlete with type 1 diabetes wasn't enough, there's even more reason to look up to cross-country skiing champ Kris Freeman.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2013

It's Going to Be Okay

A friend of my sister's toddler was recently diagnosed with type 1. My heart ached at the thought. I immediately wanted to reach out to this mom whom I've never met, but knew she would not be in the state of mind to talk about this traumatic event just yet.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2013

Have Boston Researchers Found Type 1's Root Cause?

Will people with type 1 diabetes ever see an end to their need for insulin?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2013

Amina's Pas de Deux With Type 1

Amina Kolenc knew as soon as she could walk that she wanted to be a ballerina. And she wasn't going to allow a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at age 5 and a half - several years after she started studying dance - to derail her dreams.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2013

Managing Diabetes and My Day Job

There are no vacations or even lunch breaks from diabetes. In addition to my day job, it can be overwhelming and frustrating. Diabetes often seems like a full-time job on top of my actual full-time employment. The other day I had to knock back a Watermelon Quick Sticks glucose packet while riding to a work function with my assistant. I didn't want to admit I was in danger of going low. I wanted to pretend I no longer worked at my diabetes job. Sadly though, diabetes isn't a job you can quit.  My lunch was delayed and there were no snacks in sight, only a couple of glucose packets in the bottom of my purse.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 2013

October 2012

What is Affordable Health Care?

Dear Editor,

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2012

Special Diabetes Coupon Savings from Diabetes Health and CVS Pharmacy

I’m very happy to announce Diabetes Health’s partnership with CVS/pharmacy and welcome you to ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes® from CVS/pharmacy®. If you have diabetes and already have a CVS/pharmacy ExtraCare® card, ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes offers even more benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2012

July 2012

Type 1: New Drug Class Could Lead to Neuropathy Relief

University of California researchers report that they have found a new class of drugs that could lead to a pain relief treatment for people who have diabetic neuropathy. The drugs, which were successfully tested on lab animals, are anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit the action of an enzyme called soluble epoxide hydrolase. The enzyme is key to the transmission of pain sensations. Previous research has shown that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase also lowers blood pressure and protects against kidney damage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2012

June 2012

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

A small Chinese study has reported that 15 of 28 young type 1 patients, aged 14 to 30 years, who underwent an experimental adult stem cell procedure were able to stay off insulin injections for an average of 18 months. Though not conclusive, the study highlights an interesting avenue of research that could eventually dramatically reduce insulin dependence among type 1s.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds

SAN DIEGO - June 15, 2012 - Dexcom, the leader in continuous glucose monitoring, is proudly sponsoring the efforts of the Diabetes Formation Flight USA(DFFUSA.org) - three pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes using Dexcom's Seven Plus as part of their effort to set new transcontinental world speed records while raising funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Another Day, Another Battle

Last year, I gave birth to my daughter and shared my pregnancy and birthing experiences with you. The pregnancy was a very difficult but extremely rewarding experience. A few months after our daughter was born, my husband and I discussed whether we'd have another child. On one hand, I went through several insulin shock comas, severe insulin resistance, and pre-eclampsia, ending in an emergency cesarean section. Because my first pregnancy was so tough, we weren't sure if we wanted to risk another one. On the other hand, if we did have two children, we wanted them to be very close in age so that they could bond well. We figured that if the two children were around fifteen months apart, then my daughter would be too young to feel any tension about having another baby in the house. We hoped they'd be close enough in age that they would always have one another as a companion.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 13 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Type 1: FDA OKs Levemir for Two- to Five-Year-Olds

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Novo Nordisk's Levemir basal insulin for type 1 children aged two to five years. The FDA decision makes Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) the only basal insulin approved for use in this age group.
Levemir, introduced to the US market in 2006, was previously approved for older children and adults with type 1 diabetes, as well as insulin-using type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2012

“Reprogrammed” Cells in Mice Reverse Late-stage Type 1 Diabetes

A successful experiment on mice with type 1 diabetes, which involved "reprogramming" their immune systems to stop attacks on pancreatic beta cells, may point the way to an eventual cure for the disease in humans.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 15, 2012

April 2012

All in the Family

My oldest nephew, James, has a double whammy to deal with.  His aunt, yours truly, has type 1 diabetes, and so does his father. I was in the room when my sister had an ultrasound during her pregnancy with James, and I clearly remember the doctor asking her if anyone in her family had diabetes.  We shared a look as she informed the doctor of my diabetes and her husband's diabetes.  I know we also shared a silent prayer as the reality hit us that diabetes might be passed on to her children.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2012

Weight-Loss Surgery Produces Dramatic Results in Type 2s

Bariatric surgery, not medications, may be the key to producing dramatic drops in weight and even the remission of diabetes symptoms among type 2 patients, says a study from the University of Rome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2012

Imagining the Unimaginable

As I listen to the news of the recent Mega Millions jackpot of over $600 million, my dreams aren't about fast cars, vast mansions, or plush vacations. My thoughts revolve around my diabetes. How awesome would it be to have the best care that money can buy?

comments 7 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2012

March 2012

Please Don’t Imply That I Caused My Diabetes.

When it comes to diabetes, people often blame the patient instead of the disease. I cannot think of another chronic illness for which this is the case. Much of the public seems to believe that we bring diabetes on ourselves. When people with diabetes are diagnosed with complications, uninformed observers often insist that it happened because they were "bad diabetics." Comments like "She didn't take care of herself" make me instantly defensive and angry. How can anyone know what that person went through on a day-to-day basis with her diabetes?

comments 11 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2012

January 2012

Surgery Doesn’t Have to Be an Ordeal for People With Diabetes

North Carolina-based Marc S. Stevens, MD, FACS, is one of the top orthopedic surgeons in the country. Previously, while practicing in Little Rock, he was named Arkansas Physician of the Year.  In addition to his orthopedic expertise, Dr. Stevens has developed a reputation as an expert in nutrition, especially as it relates to wound healing, bone and joint health, and healthy weight. To learn more about Dr. Marc S. Stevens go to www.DRSHealthInc.com

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2012

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