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Fitness Article Archives

October 2014

College Students Do Gain Weight

Students do tend to pack on a few extra pounds during the college years, experts say, but the so-called “freshmen 15” might be a bit of an overstatement.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2014

Social Networking May Help Boost Weight Loss

While many of us post health and fitness goals (on Facebook or Twitter) in order to hold ourselves more accountable as we strive for our goals, a new study shows that all that social networking may offer some benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2014

September 2014

Weight Loss Can Reduce The Risk Of Kidney Disease

With kidney disease one of the most devastating complications of type 2 diabetes – and a risk for about 35 percent of those with the disease - a new study suggests that losing weight can help significantly lower the risk of nephropathy in overweight or obese adults with type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2014

CDC Predicts 40% of American Adults Will Develop Diabetes

Based on a statistical analysis of almost 600,000 American Adults in three studies, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 40 percent of all U.S. adults 20 years or older will develop type 2 diabetes in their lives. (The risk for men was estimated at 40.2 percent and for women, 39.6 percent.)For Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women, the statistical risk is higher: more than 50 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2014

Fast Food Accounts For 14 Percent Of Caloric Intake For American Kids

Kids – or their parents – might be making smarter choices when they visit fast food restaurants, even though burger joints are still the most popular drive-through stops, according to the results of a new a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2014

Diabetes Patients On Metformin Show Better Lipid Profile

Chinese researchers found that type 2 diabetes patients taking metformin – one of the first lines of defense in the treatment of the disease - attained a better overall lipid profile compared with those who took glipizide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2014

August 2014

Women: Take Charge!

How many women sit in the CEO seat? The number is growing, but not nearly equal to that of men. There may be many reasons for this, and one of the possible explanations may be that some women believe that being “assertive” or “aggressive” are traits that are not “likeable” and inconsistent with how they want to be seen. As women, in both our personal and professional life, we need to worry less about what other people think of us and more about what we need. When it comes to our diabetes, we need to be our own Chief Executive Officer – and for some of us, we may need to step out of our comfort zones to get the care we need.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 23, 2014

Newly Discovered Virus Linked To Obesity

If you thought your obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnoses were genetic “gifts” from your family, it could be a virus instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Diabetes Health: Diabetes Symptoms Crossword Puzzle Solution for #16

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Florida Nutrition Experts Seeing Higher Numbers of Type 2 in Children

Three decades ago, type 2 diabetes wasn’t associated with children, but with middle-aged adults. In the 30 years that have passed since the advent of the Wendy’s “Where’s the Beef” ad campaign, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Apple’s Mac computer, however, a lot has changed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2014

Shift Work Raises Odds of Type 2 Diabetes

Those who work shift work – both steady second or third-shift schedules or swing shifts, which include shifts that rotate between day, afternoon and night work – are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2014

Want Your Kids to Eat Healthily?

If you want your kids to eat healthy foods, keep your mouth shut at the dinner table. That means don’t tell them that the broccoli on their plate is good for them. That goes for the carrots and cauliflower, too.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2014

July 2014

Actress S. Epatha Merkerson Brings Order to Her Diabetes

Award winning S. Epatha Merkerson, Television, film and stage actress, brings a new order to her diabetes management: Get to Your Goals Program, which encourages people with type 2 diabetes to know their A1C, set a goal and take action.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2014

Stress Eating Leads to Weight Gain for Kids

For kids facing stress at home or school, comfort food may lead to unexpected and unwelcome side effects. According to a study from Belgian researchers, that extra eating can lead to increased body fat -- and increased obesity risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2014

Life With Type 2: Lab Rat

Since my diagnosis as a type 2 in 2003, I've participated in three Phase 3 drug studies. I am fortunate to live two miles away from one of the San Francisco Bay Area's premier endocrinologists, Dr. Richard Bernstein (who has the same name as the famous low-carb advocate based on Long Island, New York). Over the years, Dr. Bernstein has established his office as a go-to testing facility for drugs in late-stage development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2014

Southern States Have Highest Obesity Rate

A recent report from the US Centers for Disease Control says that 12 states now have adult obesity rates of 30 percent or higher. Seven of those states are in the South. The CDC data are from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2010 phone survey of 400,000 US adults. Obesity is defined as a body mass index of 30 or more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2014

Teen Energy Sports Drink Consumption: linked to Other Bad habits

Most studies targeting teen beverage consumption focus on sugar-laced sodas, but researchers say adolescents are also drinking many sports drinks and energy drinks, both of which had been linked to other unhealthy habits. According to the results of a new study from Minnesota, teen consumption of sports and energy drinks can lead to more physical activity. It also has been linked to increased consumption of other sugared beverages, cigarette smoking, more time spent playing video games and social media sites.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2014

June 2014

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins: Has A Slam Dunk Formula for Diabetes

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins, affectionately known as “The Human Highlight Film” has a few coaching tips for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2014

Belly Fat Linked to Metabolic Diseases in Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2014

Recession May Have Worsened Obesity

According to a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Great Recession that began in 2008 may have worsened obesity rates in developed nations, including some groups in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2014

Health Awareness vs Weight Conscious

There's a lot of focus on weight loss as of late; not only in the diabetic community, but in the world in general. New ads for gyms and products claiming fast weight loss come out daily, women feel pressured to lose pregnancy weight within minutes from birthing their children, thin models are being airbrushed until they are nearly unrecognizable and diets are being undertaken without people understanding how/why/if it's really going to be effective. Some of my own friends are chronically doing near-starvation diets to shed weight. People seem to be focused on getting the fat off, but unless long term habits are improved, it's not going to stay off. It's great to fight the obesity epidemic, but we can't allow ourselves to go to the other extreme. Carrying excess weight isn't a good thing, but I think we're losing focus on the importance of health versus aesthetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2014

A New Definition for Obesity?

Two groups are proposing a new definition of obesity that considers factors beyond body mass index.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2014

Low-carb diets healthier than low-fat for those with type 2

For those who want to control their type 2 diabetes through their diet, a low-carb diet may be more beneficial than a low-fat one, according to the results of a new study.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 13, 2014

Half of Those With Disabilities Are Inactive

Half of those who are disabled aren't getting the recommended amount of heart-healthy aerobic activity, and it's putting their health at risk, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2014

May 2014

A Spoonful of Splenda

What color is sugar? For most people with diabetes, the colors pink, blue and yellow might come to mind. Many people often rely on the little colored packets of artificial sweeteners when managing their blood sugar or their weight. It might seem like the best alternative compared to the calories and blood sugar spikes that come with regular sugar, but now research suggests that artificial sweeteners, along with some regular sweeteners, aren't as safe as we thought.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 26, 2014

Obesity Risk Tied to Certain Demographics Who Drink Sugary Beverages

Although many of us are learning more about the dangers of sugary beverages - which have been linked to rising cases of obesity and increased rates of type 2 diabetes - there are some groups who seem to have not "gotten the memo."

comments 2 comments - Posted May 25, 2014

Belly Fat Linked To Metabolic Diseases In Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2014

No Such Thing as ‘Healthy' Obesity, Study Says

While the last few years have sparked debate over whether those who are overweight or obese can still be classified as healthy, a new study seems to put the issue to rest.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2014

Obesity Risk Tied to Certain Demographics Who Drink Sugary Beverages

Although many of us are learning more about the dangers of sugary beverages - which have been linked to rising cases of obesity and increased rates of type 2 diabetes - there are some groups who seem to have not "gotten the memo."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 15, 2014

Life With Type 2: Science Catches Up to Our Experiences

Scientists will tell you that they don't consider anecdotes-personal stories about something-to be evidence that establishes a fact. Say you have 10 people swear they've been abducted by aliens, and all of their descriptions of the kidnapers match. That still wouldn't be enough for scientists to declare that aliens are real.
It would take other types of evidence, not just word of mouth, for the actual existence of aliens to be accepted as a plausible explanation for people's reported disappearances.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 14, 2014

April 2014

Postpartum Weight Gain Boosts Risk of Diabetes and Heart Disease

Moms who fail to lose the pounds they gain during pregnancy - or those who gain a few extra pounds in the year that follows birth - may boost the risk of developing both type 2 diabetes and heart disease later on, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2014

Diabetes and Arthritis: a Challenging Combination

For older adults dealing with type 2 diabetes, co-occurring physical problems can make disease management and healthy living a challenge. One of those most challenging-and common- diagnoses is arthritis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2014

Obesity & Insulin Resistance

A University of Sao Paulo study of 135 individuals, half with normal weight and the other half obese, suggests there is a link between obesity and the body's inability to use insulin-insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2014

Tequila-Related Natural Sweetener Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar

There's sweet news for type 2s who have been longing for the taste of sugar without the nasty side effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2014

Why We Need Them

Endocrinologists are in a funny position when it comes to people with diabetes. We spend so much time with our diseases that we don't really need them to manage things on a daily basis, but we can't write our prescriptions on our own. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2014

Sizing Up Gen X

Australia's Generation X population is twice as likely to have developed type 2 diabetes by a certain as baby boomers had at the same age. A national health survey looked at the Gen X population born between 1966 and 1980 and compared its weight and diet to baby boomers born between 1946-1965. The survey found the rate of obesity was 50 percent higher in Gen X.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2014

March 2014

Text Messages Can Stop Type 2 Diabetes

Regular, health-focused text messages can prevent type 2 diabetes, according to new research out of India.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2014

Is Is "Fat Cell Expansion" a Cause of Obesity?

One of the last things we want to hear in a society where most of us work seated at a desk or table is our style of work may be a contributor to the current epidemic obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2014

On "Alert Day," ADA Offers Online Test for Type 2

Today is the American Diabetes Association's 26th Annual Alert Day, when the association reaches out to inform Americans about the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2014

Weight Watchers Offers Type 2 Program Through Employers

NEW YORK, PRNewswire--Weight Watchers International, Inc. has announced Weight Watchers for Diabetes, a new program that serves the unique needs of employees with type 2 diabetes by integrating personalized coaching from a certified diabetes educator into Weight Watchers' approach to weight loss and management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2014

Moving Target

So, what is it that affects my glucose levels and why is it so hard to manage diabetes? In this case, we're talking type 1 diabetes; mine seems to be extremely stubborn and "brittle" by nature. Honestly, sometimes balancing this chronic condition is downright exhausting. Some days it's a scientific equation, weighed and measured, a standard protocol. Other days, it's a roller coaster, a compounding tidal wave, a boxing match.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2014

Mouth Spray Could Aid Weight Loss

Few things are better for us or more difficult to sustain than losing weight. Whatever the cause--genetics, environment, our own bad choices--human bodies can be easily turned into sugar-craving machines. Turning our bodies from that course is easy enough for a week or three, but sustaining weight loss over many months and years is notoriously difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2014

February 2014

Travel: Getting Comfortable Outside Your Comfort Zone

If there's a common word people with diabetes use when their blood sugar drops or goes high, it's "routine"--as in, "Whenever I get away from my routine, that's when I get into trouble." For most of us, traveling isn't part of our routine, so here are some suggestions to find that sought-after balance between "getting away" and "staying OK."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2014

Bariatric Surgery Shows Significant Effect on Obese Type 1s

Here's a development to keep your eye on: Bariatric surgery performed on a small group of morbidly obese type 1s led to considerable weight loss, improved glycemic control, and improved metabolic profiles up to three years later.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 25, 2014

Weekly Potpourri

Blame The Media

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2014

Exercises from Kiley Schoenfeld: The Plank

Happy 2014! This year I am going to break down one exercise per month. I will give the option to progress it through three different levels. It will be up to you to make the decision as to which level is best for you.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2014

Kris Freeman in Sochi: Type 1 Diabetes Skier- 4th Time Olympian

I remember first seeing Kris Freeman when he was 21 at a diabetes conference. Two years after he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, Eli Lilly began sponsoring his dream of becoming an Olympic cross-country skier. During his off-season, you can find Kris at diabetes camps inspiring children to follow their dream. He is the only person with diabetes to compete in a winter endurance sports event at the Olympics.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 7, 2014

Keeping Your Feet Fit for Travel

You're at your destination and ready to see what there is to see. The real question is this: Are you ready to walk?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2014

Bypass Surgery Cuts Heart Risk, Stroke Odds for Type 2s

Not only does gastric bypass help patients drop excess weight, it can also lower the risk of a variety of health problems, especially in those with type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 5, 2014

Stress-Induced Hormone Imbalances Go Far Beyond Insulin in Diabetes

Virtually anything from the stress of a long checkout line to the first signs of menopause can trigger hormone imbalances, which reveal themselves through mood swings, fatigue, migraines, memory problems, and a lackluster sex drive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2014

Exercise Can Temporarily Counteract Overeating

With the first few weeks of 2014 done, those with New Year's resolutions to exercise are probably beginning to drop out. After all, how many sub-zero jogs or shaky-legged visits to the gym can one person stand? Not many, that's for sure. But before you abandon that promise altogether, how about another reminder on the usefulness of exercise?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2014

January 2014

The Mercy of a Slow Decline

A few months ago, I reached 65, the age at which President Franklin Delano Roosevelt thought Social Security benefits should kick in. In that era, almost 80 years ago, reaching 65 was a fairly hard thing to do, and the number of years past that benchmark one could reasonably expect to enjoy was limited.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2014

Global Obesity Rates on the Rise

Obesity rates are rising steadily across the globe, allowing obesity to surpass hunger as a world health crisis, experts say.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2014

Even Small Weight Loss Can Reduce Women's Heart Disease Risk

Losing just 10 percent of body weight can be enough for middle-aged women who are overweight or obese to reduce the risk factors associated with heart disease and diabetes--provided that weight loss is sustained--according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2014

December 2013

Holiday Classic: A Diabetic Chihuahua Is a Child's Christmas Angel

(Editor's Note:This article originally ran in Diabetes Health on January 27, 2008.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2013

Drug Improves Weight and A1c in Patients With or Without Diabetes

According to a study gauging the benefits of the diet drug Qsymia, those who took the drug not only lost weight, but also saw their A1c levels improve, even if they weren't diabetic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2013

Eating on the Run More Popular Than Ever

As a nation, we love our food and we want it faster than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2013

Swiss Study Suggests Sugar Is the Root of Various Health Problems

Obesity levels have reached their historically highest point--surpassing hunger as a global problem--and type 2 diabetes cases could triple by 2050, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 6, 2013

November 2013

NMES Boosts Type 2s' Insulin Sensitivity

People with type 2 diabetes who have trouble with mobility and are unable to exercise may see benefits similar to exercise from neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2013

Vigorous Activity May Be Better for Women Than Moderate Workouts

While any exercise at all is certainly better than living a couch-potato lifestyle, women might see lower blood pressure and less depression with hard-core exercise compared to moderate physical activity, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 23, 2013

Life With Type 2: How (Non-Diabetic) Others See Us

It's always fun to get a different take on things. You sit for years a few rows up from first base and then one day you decide to go sit out by left field. Who knew the game could look so different?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2013

October 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

For type 2's, at what level of ketones should you avoid exercising?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2013

Please, Sir, May I Have Some More?

One might think that Tom Grossman had exhausted his need for physical challenges after participating in the Run Across America-a grueling 15-day test of endurance with runs that covered more than 25 miles a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2013

September 2013

Early Diabetes Interventions May Also Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Lifestyle change, medication both linked to cholesterol improvements

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2013

Commuting on Foot Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk

If your commute to work is short enough to be tackled on foot, you might want to consider setting your alarm a little earlier. Not only could you save big bucks on gas, according to a new study, you might also reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2013

Glucagon Study Shows Promise for Type 1s

In the healthcare field today, perhaps no area holds as much promise and as many perils as weight control. Researchers see the same statistics that the rest of us do. They see the upcoming wave of obesity and diabetes diagnoses. They see the myriad complications that spring up from these conditions. And they want to address the problem in a simple way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2013

Progressions to Belly Toning 101

Let's get to work! Last month I reviewed a handful of exercises to strengthen the belly. This month, I'm going to discuss ways to progress each of those exercises. Once you feel you have truly mastered the basics, try them with an added twist:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2013

Learn To Control Your Diabetes, Before It Controls You

A Diabetes Health Classic. This article originally was published on June 20, 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2013

August 2013

Modest Weight Loss Helps Overweight Teens Avoid Diabetes

According to an article in the Journal of Pediatrics, even a small increase in activity and better eating patterns can help decrease an obese teen's risk of developing diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2013

Inflammation, Not Weight, May Explain Diabetes in Obese People

It's commonly believed that obese people run an especially high risk of developing type 2 diabetes because their extra weight leads to insulin resistance, or because some of their weight is the result of unhealthy diets.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Can exercise for a short period of time increase liver and cortisol involvement and cause a negative impact on BG levels?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2013

To the Extreme

British snowboard champion Christopher Southwell has always lived for the adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2013

Belly Toning 101

I start this month with a powerful quote from the incredible strength coach, Mike Boyle:

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2013

July 2013

Higher Water Intake Tied to Weight Loss

If you still haven't found a reason to drink more water, a new study reinforces what we already have been told-drinking more water may lead to greater weight loss.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2013

Obesity Declared a Disease—Now What?

The statements from august medical authorities were grand and sweeping. This was important news, they said. This would change everything. Pay attention, patients, they said. The experts have spoken, and their word should be taken as final.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2013

Precedent-Setting Ski Champ Remembers the Kids

As if being the first Olympic endurance athlete with type 1 diabetes wasn't enough, there's even more reason to look up to cross-country skiing champ Kris Freeman.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2013

Obesity Drug Beloranib Shows Promise

Massachusetts-based Zafgen, a biopharmaceutical company devoted to treating obesity, may have taken a big step toward making the growing health concern obsolete.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2013

June 2013

Lifestyle Change Can Lessen Sexual Dysfunction in Type 2 Women

While erectile dysfunction gets much of the attention, sexual problems as a side effect of type 2 diabetes are not limited to men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2013

Higher Southern Obesity Rate May Be a Myth

It is commonly thought that Southerners are more overweight than their northern counterparts. Not so according to a study conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and published in the journal Obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2013

How to Help Overweight Kids

(Editor's Note: This article was orginally published in the April 2008 edition of Diabetes Health and later online as article 5658. We are reproducing the article in light of the American Medical Association's recent decision to treat obesity as a disease. That decision will spur much debate, and we think this article will help add some perspective to the discussion.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2013

May 2013

How Dottie Kept Her Prediabetes in Check

You may be in jeopardy. You may be in danger with blood sugar levels higher than normal. You may have prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2013

Myofacial Release: Rolling the Aches Away

The sun is out. Memorial Day is around the corner. I think its safe to say we would all like to pick up the pace of our workouts in order to see some significant results before setting foot on the sandy beaches.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2013

At the Crossroads, I Choose Insulin

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 10 years ago. My response to the news, very typical, was to begin a routine of vigorous exercise and dieting. With a beginner's enthusiasm, I lost almost 30 pounds (down from 220) and drove my A1c three months after my diagnosis down to 5.6%.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 6, 2013

April 2013

How Do You Determine Training Intensity?

What is cardio? To some it may mean swinging back and forth on an Arc Trainer with zero resistance while reading a book, and for others, gut-wrenching hill sprints followed by kettle bell swings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2013

Altering Gut Bacteria Could Rival Bypass Surgery Effects

Obese patients hoping to slim down with bariatric surgery may soon be able to get the weight-loss effects of gastric bypass without going under the knife, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2013

Hank’s Healthy Habits: 13 Steps to a Joyful, Happy Life

He is 89 years old and the picture of health. Yet looking at the robust, healthy, laughing gentleman sitting across the desk from me on this Saturday morning, one would never guess his age. Hank has been married 50 years, is active in his church, and hosts a prayer breakfast most Saturday mornings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2013

Insulin Linked to Type 2 Weight Gains

Using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes could lead to weight gain, according to a new study from Tulane University.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2013

The Back Up Plan (Level 2)

In February I posted my original back up plan for last-minute workouts from home or the office.  If you've been consistent, you should be ready for some new exercises.  If not, you can always refer back to the original article for guidance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2013

March 2013

At-Home Workouts Fine for Good Health

Seniors don't have to face off against buff muscleheads at the gym in order to stay healthy, according to a new University of Illinois study that shows a DVD workout can be just as effective for older adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2013

Diabetes Is No Slam Dunk

Monica Joyce had an idea. It wasn't original, but a good idea inspired by another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2013

Idol’s Randy Jackson: “It Always Happens to Somebody Else, Right?”

Twelve years after it began as a summer placeholder designed to keep Fox TV viewers hanging around until the fall season, "American Idol" has become one of this young century's most renowned cultural phenomena. From the show's modest beginning, record producer and musician Randy Jackson has been at its heart, the memorable judge who has popularized such greetings as "Dawg!" and such praises as "I believe she's in it to win it!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2013

Exercise Improves Quality of Life, Study Shows

For a happier life, it's time to get moving. According to a new study out of Great Britain, exercise provides a big boost when it comes to living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2013

February 2013

The Back Up Plan

(Editor’s Note: Check with your physician before undertaking any exercise routine.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2013

Going for Your Goal

To reach your long-term goals for managing diabetes, I think it’s helpful to stop and write down what short-term steps you can take that will help you reach your objectives. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2013

Hormone Could Become Basis for “Exercise Pill”

Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston report that they have discovered a naturally occurring hormone that can direct the body to burn more calories and increase its insulin sensitivity. Their results, based on lab experiments with mice, could potentially lead to therapies for diabetes, obesity, and even muscular dystrophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2013

Short Exercise Bursts May Be as Good as Traditional Workouts

Here's a bit of news that, if conclusively proven, could gladden the hearts of everybody who struggles to get into a regular exercise habit: British researchers say that short 30-second bursts of intense activity, adding up to only 3 minutes per week, duplicate the effects of much longer gym workout or track running routines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2013

Pre-Diabetes: Exercise and Diet Are Your Keys to Freedom

If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you have to start looking seriously at how you live your life. Talk to any persons who are insulin-dependent and they will tell you how much they wish they could be in your situation: a point where you can make changes to avoid getting to their stage of the illness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2013

Exenatide Bests Insulin Detemir in Head-to-Head Test

Sooner or later most type 2s face the choice of whether they should begin using insulin. As the effectiveness of metformin or sulfonylureas fades, physicians often look to insulin as the safest, most effective means of asserting control over blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2013

Mike Fisher, Competitive Snowboarder

Mike Fisher is a 23-year-old from Ontario, Canada, who's been snowboarding since he was 13 years old. At the age of 18, he was involved in a motorcycle crash that necessitated the amputation of one leg below the knee. He says, "At first, I felt that my life was coming to a crashing halt. But I just pushed myself to recover as fast as possible and get my life back on track, go to school, get back into snowboarding and motorcycles-just anything so that my life wasn't affected at all. I had a lot of support, and I would say that I was pretty optimistic about it and took it almost as a challenge. By the time that I was 19, I was happy. I was walking again, I was back in college in London, Ontario, and everything was good. The accident was a minor setback to me, and I rose above it. I was just continuing with my life."

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2013

January 2013

Type 2 Comedian Drew Carey Sheds 80 Pounds, Says No-Carb Diet Did It

Keep a close eye on this story. It has two elements necessary for creating a lot of buzz: a celebrity and his unconventional "cure" for a disease. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2013

The Back Up Plan

(Editor's Note: Check with your physician before undertaking any exercise routine.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2013

Recipes and Tips for a Diabetes-Friendly Eating During the Big Game

CHICAGO, IL -- January 24, 2012 -- The news of celebrity chef Paula Deen having diabetes has triggered a national conversation about how diet affects people with diabetes or those who are at risk of getting it.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2013

Wasting Steps

In our busy lives, saving time-and precious energy-is an important value. Saving steps is a method we often use to preserve our energy, exert less effort, and combine tasks to promote efficiency. But an equally, and perhaps even more, important value than efficiency is promoting good health. As a diabetic, I know that one way I can do this is by using my body to get at least a minimum of exercise each day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

Calcium Score Predicts Cardiovascular Death Risk in Type 2

It's well known that diabetes, an inflammatory disease, increases the risk of developing heart disease and related complications-also the result of inflammation. Now there's a way of predicting which type 2s may be at the highest risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2013

December 2012

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2012

Doctors Can Be Everyday Heroes, Too

Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu, MD, MPH, FACPM is a very interesting man. He served as the Acting Surgeon General of the United States in 2006 and was made Chairman of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in October 2007. The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is designed to serve as a home for the diabetes family and a trusted place of diabetes learning that will inspire diabetes innovation, improved care, and better outcomes worldwide. Through the Institute, Johnson & Johnson is opening and operating state-of-the-art instructional facilities around the world to provide health professionals with education and training aimed at improving diabetes patients' outcomes by working at the community level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2012

Study Says Bypass Surgery Is Not a Cure for Diabetes

A 14-year study that tracked 4,434 obese type 2 patients shows that despite much talk about gastric bypass surgery as a "cure" for diabetes, a majority of the patients who underwent the procedure had no long-lasting remission of their symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2012

Children with Diabetes, You Are My True Inspiration

Jay Hewitt is 41 years old and has lived with type 1 diabetes since 1991. He is an elite Ironman triathlete (2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike ride, 26.2 mile run) and three-time member of the U.S. National Team for Long Course Triathlon. He is a lawyer, the father of a 16-month-old daughter, and a motivational speaker. He speaks to people with diabetes and others all over the world on fitness, nutrition, and achieving goals in life and business. Jay is also captain of Team Joslin at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, MA. Visit Jay's website at www.jayhewitt.com.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 12, 2012

Incorporating Exercise Into a Busy Life

I would exercise if I had more time... if I had a health club membership... if it didn't hurt so much... if I knew what exercises to do... if I could do it with my family... if I could control my blood sugar...

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2012

Five To-Do’s for People Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

There are ways to live with diabetes that allow for optimal health and relative freedom from complications. But to obtain them requires knowledge and know-how.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2012

Behind the Wheel, But Still in Control

Last May, 24-year-old Charlie Kimball was in Car #35, taking Turn 3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the Firestone Freedom 100. He was in radio contact with his pit crew, who informed him that he had a headwind coming out of the turn and onto the 5/8 mile "straight." Charlie kept an eye on the car next to him, moving closer and beginning to crowd it on the inside. Having raced professionally for six years, he knew that he had to make a move, and soon. He shifted into sixth gear and accelerated.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 4, 2012

November 2012

A Rocky Path to Better Blood Sugar

When my doctor said, “You have diabetes.  You’ll have to watch your sugar, change your lifestyle, and lose some weight,” I was dismayed. For one, I was addicted to sugar. Second, I had been trying for years to lose weight, and I knew it just wasn’t possible. Third, I was not adept in the kitchen--toasting bread maxxed out my repertoire.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 11, 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

October 2012

Many Supplements Are Illegally Labeled

According to a report by the inspector general of the US Department of Health and Human Services, dozens of purported weight-loss and immune-system supplements are illegally labeled and do not have appropriate scientific evidence to support their claims.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2012

Are There Benefits to Light Exercise After Eating?

Based on a recent study, the answer appears to be yes, both for those who have diabetes and those who do not.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2012

Join in a Virtual Dance-a-thon, November 10, 2012!

You don't have to live in San Francisco to participate in the annual Dance Out Diabetes dance-a-thon event.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 15, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

September 2012

Miserable? 7 Behaviors You Need to Stop

Diabetes self-care is much more fun when I'm happy. It's so much easier when I have a smile on my face. For a long time I thought negative emotions could be controlled or denied. I thought I could just put on a smile and they would go away. But they didn't.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 15, 2012

Could Skewed Biorhythms Cause Obesity?

According to a Scottish study recently published in Bioessays, the confusing signals created by modern technology's ability to turn night into day may be contributing to the global epidemic of obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2012

Need We Fear Exercise-induced Cardiac Arrest?

The media abounds with stories about the sudden collapse and death of athletes whom we assumed were in the best of health.  When such cases occur, we may become concerned about exercising ourselves.  A recent presentation describing people who had been exercising during or within one hour of a cardiac arrest may assuage these concerns to a degree.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 7, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  In this second part of our interview, I asked him about his motivations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

Mayo Clinic Says Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Forestall Type 2

The Mayo Clinic Health Letter for August 2012 has published three lifestyle changes that could stave off the progression of prediabetes to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The list isn't new, but its periodic reiteration indicates that healthcare researchers and providers have settled on a simple prescription for staying diabetes-free.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 4, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  When I caught up with Steve on a rare day when he happened to be at sea level, I asked him about his mission.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

Paula Deen: Cooking Up a New Life With Diabetes

Paula Deen, a celebrity Southern chef known for her unrestrained love of butter and sugar, is no stranger to the media. She received a flurry of bad press recently when she revealed that she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes three years earlier. Shortly thereafter, she became a spokesperson for Novo Nordisk's Victoza. Following these developments, some critics said that she was a poor role model. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2012

An Amazon Adventure with Bugs, Drugs, and Diabetes

Students in the healthcare field have probably attended a "bugs and drugs" lecture about bacteria and the various antibiotics used in response. Put that on a whole new level, where the "bugs and drugs" are hordes of mosquitoes and peculiar plants, and you would be envisioning my pharmacy rotation in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest. The purpose of the trip was to study medicinal plants and natural medicine, but our group definitely braved the elements as well. A few of the pleasures we got to experience included extreme heat, daily paddling of canoes down the Amazon River, tightly rationed drinking water, bathing with piranhas, stepping in quicksand, eating guinea pig, and almost sinking our canoe in a torrential downpour. Now mix in my diabetes, and you would seemingly have the recipe for the perfect storm.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2012

Type 2 Trudges Across America to Defeat Diabetes

Right from the start, Andy Mandell thought of walking the perimeter of the US to raise awareness for diabetes as a military objective, a special ops mission to draw attention to the dangers of the disease. As someone who has lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 20 years, Mandell saw his role as that of an educator, and he took it seriously, wanting to help others avoid the mistakes he had made after his diagnosis. An active guy who loved running, he followed his doctor's orders--to a degree. He checked food labels to make sure that he wasn't consuming too much sugar, and he continued his vigorous lifestyle. He felt good, so he saw no reason to worry.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2012

Sometimes I Feel Like a Total Slacker

I don't sleep till noon, wait for other people to clean up my messes, or put off doing the laundry until I'm down to my last clean shirt. Still, when it comes to my diabetes, sometimes I can't help but feel like a total slacker.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2012

Biking Away From Diabetes

Martie Neugent's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is one of those moments that he looks back on thankfully. He learned that he had the condition in 2000, at age 32, during what he assumed would be a routine trip to the doctor. Instead, it turned out to be a pivotal opportunity to make one of two choices.  He could go on exactly as he had, adding a cocktail of medications to control his blood sugar levels, or he could make some noteworthy changes and map out a new life. For him, the choice was an easy one. "All my mother's uncles died at a young age," Neugent said about the ravages of diabetes in his extended family. "And my great-grandmother lost her leg. My first thought was that I was probably going to die if I didn't get it fixed."

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 3, 2012

July 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

Sugar Intake and Cardiometabolic Health in Children

On a Sunday morning, a busy couple and their school-age children enter a superstore for their weekly grocery shopping. As they move through the center of the store, their shopping cart fills with packs of flavored yogurt, fruit sauces, fruit bars, fruit juices, flavored milk, prepared school lunches, snacks, and family meal packs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2012

Adding Liraglutide to Insulin May Help Obese Type 1s

New York researchers have reported that obese patients with type 1 diabetes who do not respond well to insulin may be able to improve their blood sugar control by adding liraglutide to their therapy. Liraglutide (brand name Victoza) is an injectible GLP-1 analog* that was introduced to the US market in 2010 to treat people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2012

Type 2: Diabetes Recurrence After Bariatric Surgery May Depend on Diabetes Duration

Bariatric surgery, which alters or blocks portions of the digestive system, has produced long-term remission of diabetes symptoms in many type 2 patients. However, a small study of obese type 2 patients who underwent bariatric surgery shows that the longer they had diabetes, the greater the chances that their disease recurred after surgery. The retrospective study, conducted by Yessica Ramos, MD, at the Mayo Clinic Arizona, found that patients who had had diabetes for five years or longer were nearly four times as likely to experience a recurrence of the disease after the remission brought on by the surgery.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2012

Diabetes: Hospital Bills Cost U.S. $83 Billion A Year

Diabetes affects nearly 25 million Americans, and that number is expected to grow substantially every year. It's the fifth leading cause of death in America, more than breast cancer and AIDs combined. And according to a report released last week from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), it's a disease that’s costing Americans $83 billion a year in hospital fees — 23 percent of total hospital spending.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2012

Searching for Answers

What is the difference between "good carbs" and "bad carbs"?  Is that ache in your side normal or a sign of cancer?  Is blurry eyesight normal for people with diabetes, or should you start a carrot diet to improve your vision?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2012

Obesity Problems Fuel Rapid Surge Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Children

Annie Snyder figured she'd be out of the pediatrician's office in 30 minutes, tops. Then she'd head home, tuck the medical permission for YMCA summer camp in her bag and finish packing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2012

June 2012

Foot Problems Pervasive In The U.S., Linked To Obesity, Sedentary Lives And Diabetes, Says New New IPFH/NPD Study Foot Health Affects Overall Health

Statesville, NC - June, 26, 2012 - A staggering 78% of U.S. adults age 21+ report they have had one or more problems with their feet at some time in their lives, according to The National Foot Health Assessment 2012, a survey conducted for the Institute for Preventive Foot Health (IPFH) by The NPD Group. The most common foot maladies, plaguing both men and women, were ankle sprains (reported by roughly one in three respondents), followed by blisters, calluses, foot fatigue, cracked skin and athlete's foot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2012

Six Mistakes That Marketers Make When Communicating With People With Diabetes

This is an open letter to marketers who target people with diabetes. From the point of view of a person with diabetes, marketers often make the following mistakes when promoting their products to us.

comments 13 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2012

Intensive Wellness Approach Helps Type 2s Lower Drug Doses and Costs

A Florida-based endocrinologist and his team have reported that an intensive 16-week wellness program aimed at type 2 patients yielded some dramatic results: Patients were able to decrease their insulin by 46 percent and their oral medication by 12 percent.  They saw their 30-day prescription costs drop by an average of more than $140 per month, reduced their BMI by 3.07, and experienced a drop of 0.7% in their A1C.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 13 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Breaking Bad Habits

When dealing with a chronic illness, especially one like diabetes that requires 24/7 attention, it's easy to take shortcuts and fall into bad habits.  Ask yourself the following questions to find out if you might be drifting into a few diabetes bad habits:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 4, 2012

May 2012

Study Says Best Drug Combo for Type 2 Kids Is Metformin and Rosiglitazone

A university study has concluded that a combination of metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) is the best drug therapy for controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 children and adolescents. Metformin alone is the drug most often prescribed for young or recently diagnosed type 2 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2012

Five Ways to Rev Up Your Walking Routine

Warmer temperatures bring the opportunity to put on our walking shoes and step outside for our workouts.  But if you, like me, have been walking for many years, you may find yourself bored with the same old routine. To avoid burnout, try these five ways to rev up your walk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2012

The Raw Food Diet:  Should You Try It?

It seems that every few months, we hear about a new diet that, like all the others, promises to yield fast and tempting results. Is the raw food diet any different, and, if so, how?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2012

Five Ways to Get Back on Track When You’re Burned Out

Burnout is common among people with diabetes, especially those who have had the disease for years, even decades. Diabetes management can be exhausting, confusing, and frustrating, particularly when you think you are doing everything right but your blood sugars still fail to cooperate.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 17, 2012

Obesity Could Follow Sleepless Nights

Feeling tired? Your lack of rest may be putting you at increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. That's the conclusion of a new paper, published in The American Journal of Human Biology, that looked at evidence collected from numerous experimental and observational studies. The link was clear: People who got less than six hours of sleep a night were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI) and be obese. The connection found in the study seems stronger for children and teenagers, which is especially worrisome given the skyrocketing rates of type 2 diabetes in young people.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2012

American Idol Judge Promotes Healthy Decisions for Type 2s

American Idol judge Randy Jackson has embarked upon a mission of education and advocacy, urging those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to take a stand for their health and well-being.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2012

April 2012

The Best Ingredient to Diet Success: Diet Management!

Food plays an important role in our lives. For most of us, it is more than just a means of sustenance. For some, it is a source of great pleasure. For others, it is a source of painful consequences. And for many, it is both.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

Weight-Loss Surgery Produces Dramatic Results in Type 2s

Bariatric surgery, not medications, may be the key to producing dramatic drops in weight and even the remission of diabetes symptoms among type 2 patients, says a study from the University of Rome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2012

Even 1% Weight Loss Improves Mobility in Older Type 2s

Just a 1 percent weight loss in older people with type 2 diabetes can improve their physical mobility by up to 7 percent, according to a new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2012

Kettlebells Offer a Unique Strength Training Workout

If you look around your health club and discover what appear to be cannonballs with handles placed in a corner, there is no need to walk away in fear: They're just kettlebells, a venerable resistance exercise tool that has been used for years by Russian athletes and has recently been taken up by actors as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 10, 2012

Potassium May Help Prevent Diabetes

To discover the relationship between potassium levels and type 2 diabetes, a Johns Hopkins University study looked at more than 12,000 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), performed in 1987 and 1996. The study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes among study participants went down. The more than 2,000 African Americans in the study had lower average potassium levels than the 9,000 Caucasians and were twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2012

Insulindependence and the Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association Merge

San Diego, CA-Insulindependence has formally merged with the Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association. Both organizations have operated independently since 2005 to provide exercise-related resources for people living with diabetes. With more than 3,000 combined members, they will now become North America's largest nonprofit public benefit organization focused on diabetes and exercise.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2012

Yogurt Drink Tamps Down Type 2 Inflammation

Iranian scientists report that a traditional Middle Eastern yogurt drink, doogh, when fortified with vitamin D, decreases the markers that indicate inflammation in persons with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2012

Surgery Works Better Than Drugs at Blood Sugar Control in Obese Patients

An Ohio-based study of overweight and obese type 2 patients shows that weight loss surgery works much better at controlling blood sugar levels than any known drug treatment.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2012

March 2012

Metformin Shines Again: Long-Term Use Helps Prevent Type 2

Long-term use of metformin as a weight loss aid is both safe and effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, says the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2012

Diabetes and Exercise

Do you struggle with controlling your sugar levels during exercise? When my doctor changed my exercise regimen after my heart attack, my biggest struggle was keeping my sugar levels stable. We all like to see low numbers, but no one likes the shaking associated with low blood sugar or that feeling we have for the rest of the day after our levels have fluctuated. So how low is too low before working out?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2012

Medtronic’s New CAD Stent Is a Boon for Diabetic Patients

(Editor's Note: Some information in this article is from a press release issued by Medtronic, Inc.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2012

Two Studies Confirm the Role of Exercise in Blood Glucose Control

Two recent studies confirm the powerful role that exercise plays in controlling blood glucose levels. The first study, conducted by University of Missouri researchers and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, found that blood glucose levels tend to spike during periods of inactivity. The second study, conducted by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia and published in Diabetes Care, shows that office employees who take short light-exercise breaks every 20 minutes enjoy a 30 percent reduction in blood glucose levels.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2012

February 2012

Diagnosed After Sixty: Medication Not Required

"I knew I didn't eat a totally healthy diet because bread is a big weakness of mine. Worse, exercise was something I kept planning to do but hadn't gotten around to," recalls 62-year-old Laura M., who lives in a New York City suburb. "I had been feeling more tired than usual and had a cut on my right leg that seemed to be healing slowly, but other than that I felt fine. When during the course of an annual check-up, my doctor said I had diabetes, I practically fell apart."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2012

Metformin Could Protect Women Against Endometrial Cancer

British researchers say that metformin, the drug most often used to treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, could provide potential protection against endometrial cancer in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

Routine Tests Can Identify Risk of Gestational Diabetes Years Before Pregnancy

Up to seven years before she becomes pregnant, a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy can be identified based on routinely assessed measures of blood sugar and body weight, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the online issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2012

The Seasons of Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't confine itself to a single week or month. It's a year-round condition, and each season offers its own challenges and opportunities for those of us with the disease. We should be prepared to change and evolve as the seasons shift--not only to stay healthy, but also to enjoy all the fun that our dynamic world offers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 7, 2012

Community-based Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Programs for Children

Due to the rising rates of diabetes and other chronic diseases related to obesity, children are expected to have a shorter lifespan than their parents for the first time in modern history. One in every three children aged two to 19 years is overweight or obese, and one-third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes during their lifetime.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2012

January 2012

MTV’s True Life: I Have Diabetes

With the recent news of Paula Deen's battle with type 2 diabetes, diabetes has been getting some negative coverage in the media. I've even heard comments like " No wonder Paula Deen has diabetes when she eats so much sugar and butter." This is frustrating because it perpetuates the false stereotype that all people with diabetes are the same.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

Diabetes Resolutions for the New Year

A new year means new beginnings. Traditionally, it's a time to resolve to make changes for the better in our lives. This year, I decided to write a resolution list dedicated specifically to diabetes. I hope that some of you will want to try these ideas with me.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2012

Even if They Don’t Add Pounds, Sugary Drinks Up Heart, Diabetes Risks

Some women who drink two of more sugary beverages daily are lucky: their consumption of sweetened drinks doesn't put on extra weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2012

Just 30 Minutes Per Week of Intense Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar

Canadian researchers report that just 30 minutes of intense exercise per week can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after each exercise session and help prevent post-prandial spikes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2012

December 2011

High-Tech Pump Helps Three Type 1s Swim the English Channel

On July 21, Claire Duncan was one of three people with type 1 diabetes on a six-person relay team that swam across the English Channel. The team, swimming to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, covered the 22-mile route in 13.5 hours, starting from a beach between Folkestone and Dover in England and finishing in France near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2011

She Helps Her People Avoid Diabetes

"I wasn't even addressing my high blood pressure until my uncle Jay, in a nursing home at 36, said ‘Don't get diabetes.' ‘I won't,' I promised  him, and it changed my life."

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2011

A Scary Prediction: Half of American Adults Obese

Just take a look around. It's pretty clear that many of us are carrying more weight than we used to. Obesity has skyrocketed in recent years, and it's not about to stop. Roughly one in three adults is obese today, and researchers now predict that 164 million adults will be obese by 2030. That's half of all adults in the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2011

November 2011

New Diabetes-Friendly Sugar Reduces Absorption of Real Sugar

A new diabetes-friendly sugar, proven to help reduce sugar absorption, will soon be added to popular breads and cereals. "Sugir" is real sugar that contains an all-natural, tasteless additive called Emulin. Emulin, a patented formulation of compounds found in fruits, prevents the body from absorbing about a third of ingested sugar. A previous study showed that Emulin blocks the absorption of sugar by more than 30 percent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2011

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2011

Go4Life: Exercise for Better Health

Exercise helps us stay healthy. That's the underlying message of Go4Life, a campaign from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, developed to encourage older people to exercise more. The campaign focuses on four exercise categories: aerobic, strength, balance, and flexibility. "We strongly encourage people to incorporate exercises from each of these four categories into developing their own personal routine," said Dr. Chanda Dutta, chief of the NIA's Clinical Gerontology Branch.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2011

Not Your Father’s Blood Pressure Cuff

A sleek new version of the humble blood pressure cuff is turning heads. The Withings Smart Blood Pressure Monitor just won a 2012 iF product design award for its maker, the French company Withings. The iF product design award is an international prize, sometimes called the "Design Oscar," that is awarded by a German group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 23, 2011

Three Questions That Can Predict a Type 2 Diagnosis

Want a simple way to find out if you or someone you know is likely to develop type 2 diabetes? Just answer these three simple questions!

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2011

Insulindependence

The search for a cure for diabetes is a noble pursuit, but a cure always seems to be another ten years down the road. Finding a way to be healthy in the here and now is what matters for people with diabetes. In 2005, Peter Nerothin started Insulindependence (IN), a nonprofit organization that aims to "revolutionize diabetes management" by leading experiential diabetes education expeditions for type 1 youths.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2011

Choosing a Needle to Inject Insulin: What’s the Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming.  The options are often limited by the patient's healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider.  With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2011

The Stages of Fat Self-Acceptance: A Conversation With Carol Normadi

Carol Normadi is a licensed marriage and family therapist in Northern California who is co-founder of Beyond Hunger, Inc., a group dedicated to helping people overcome obsessive concerns with food. She has co-authored two books on the topic of food obsessions: "It's Not About Food: Ending Your Obsession With Food and Weight" (Putnam, 1998) and "Over It: A Teen's Guide to Getting Beyond Food and Weight" (New World Library 2001).

comments 10 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

Four Tips for a Happier Life With Diabetes

When doctors hand out a diagnosis of diabetes, I wish they'd give you a list of tips that can make life happier living with the illness.  After my diagnosis, I felt ashamed of my diabetes, ashamed of my inability to control it with diet and exercise even though I literally worked out every single day for nine months straight.  I skipped nearly all carbohydrates and didn't eat meat at the time, so all I ate was nuts, cheese, eggs, and vegetables.  The doctor didn't put me on insulin right away because I was eighteen, and she wasn't sure if I had type 1 or type 2. But nothing I did was working. It was soon apparent that I was type 1 and that insulin injections were unavoidable.  I had no idea that it wasn't my fault.  I felt hopeless, hungry, exhausted, and alone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

The New York City YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program

At 330 pounds, Kerry Watterson was tired of not being able to fit into his seat on an airplane. He had a family history of type 2 diabetes, and although doctors said his blood sugar was still at a normal level, he knew it was time to make a change. "I found out about the YDPP [YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program], called the director, and said, ‘I want to do this.' I'm so glad she took me," he says now, one year later.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2011

My Quest for a Smaller Jean Size and A1C

Trying to lose weight as an insulin-injecting person with type 1 diabetes couldn't be more frustrating. It gets on my last nerve that exercise can trigger mind-numbing lows, lows that cause me to inhale a portion of those recently burned calories. That said, I don't skip exercise to avoid lows. I just check my blood sugars more often, use caution with my insulin dosing, and follow the advice of my doctors.

comments 22 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2011

Type 2: Bike Maintenance as Body Maintenance

When first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago, I was scared into a very rigid regime of diet and exercise. The first thing I did was register for the Tour de Cure - a bike ride sponsored by the American Diabetes Association. Establishing a goal served as an incentive to train and exercise daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2011

Diabetes Rock Bottom: How It Led Me to the Greatest Gift of All

I'm just going to come out and say it, the way people do in addiction meetings when they have hit "rock bottom." Hi, my name is Meagan. I was a very uncooperative diabetic for a great many years. I felt lonely, and I hated being different. I rarely checked my blood sugars. In fact, there were times where I didn't even know where my meter was.

comments 12 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2011

The Talk Test Assesses Exercise Intensity

How many times have you been on the treadmill at the gym listening to an in-depth conversation between the stair climbers behind you? How is it possible, you wonder as you huff and puff, for those two to talk and exercise at the same time? Are they not pushing themselves hard enough, or is their ability to talk while climbing evidence of their advanced fitness? And if you find yourself unable to talk while you walk, does that mean you should slow down?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2011

Have You Taken Your Walk Today?

The answer to the looming threat of obesity and cardiovascular disease could be as simple as putting one foot in front of the other. Indeed, according to a new campaign from managed-care giant Kaiser Permanente, walking has benefits in the short and long term.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2011

September 2011

Pritikin and Preventive Health

Imagine if you could keep diabetes at bay for another three or four years with lifestyle changes. Would you change what you ate? Would you commit to an exercise program, maintain a food journal, and join a support group? Imagine if you could take these simple steps and save money. How quickly would you say "Sign me up"?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2011

Do What You Love, and It Will Never Be Work

Being a rookie driver on the fast-paced IndyCar racing circuit is pressure enough for any 26-year-old. But for Charlie Kimball, one of four wheel men on businessman Chip Ganassi's IndyCar race team, there's the added need to manage type 1 diabetes while roaring around the track at speeds that often exceed 200 miles per hour.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 25, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2011

Cutting Calories? Weight Loss Might Take Time

Your dietitian is misleading you. That's the takeaway from an article published recently in the medical journal The Lancet. The rules of thumb that you've been given are wrong. And losing weight quickly and easily by cutting a few hundred calories a day just doesn't happen, scientists say.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2011

Swimmers with Diabetes Cross English Channel

Claire Duncan is one of many people with type 1 diabetes who wears a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump, in this case, an Animas® VibeTM. In an age of almost routine medical marvels, Duncan doesn't really seem to be an exception.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2011

New Free Diabetes Coaching App

Massachusetts-based Quantia Communications has released DailyCoachTM, a fitness coaching app that runs on both iOS and Android and is available free at https://dailycoach.quantiacare.com/. The app also runs on smart phones and tablets and is available on the Web.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 12, 2011

August 2011

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2011

Diabetes and Mammograms

Many women with diabetes feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of family, work, and personal health. Balancing the minutiae of everyday life with the nonstop demands of blood glucose monitoring, exercise, and thoughtful meal planning takes time and effort. So it comes as no surprise that many women with diabetes put off talking to their doctors about breast cancer screening.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 20, 2011

July 2011

Too Much TV Could Be Deadly

Spending too many hours watching TV can also substantially increase your odds of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or dying early. That's the conclusion of a Harvard School of Public Health study that looked at the effects of heavy TV watching.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2011

NYT Article Says Older Diabetes Drugs Are Often the Best

A recent article in the New York Times says that such old prescription diabetes drugs as metformin and generics such as glimepiride are often as effective as or even more effective than newer, more expensive drugs.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2011

Once a Spokesperson for Juvenile Diabetes, Erin Now Suffers From Diabulimia

Erin lay on a bed in the emergency room, finally serious about getting help. Her second episode of diabetic ketoacidosis in a single year had sent her to the hospital shaking and vomiting. For the past seven years, she had been driven by one desire: to lose forty pounds. She refused to give herself her full dose of insulin, fearing weight gain. She hadn't seen her endocrinologist or checked her blood sugar for a year or two.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2011

Continuous Glucose Monitoring:  The Joys and Pains

"Good news," my diabetes nurse educator says to me. "Your new insurance covers continuous glucose monitoring supplies!" I give her a half-smile as my brain screams at me, "CGM?  Really?  Something else to deal with on top of this damn disease, an insulin pump, exercise, and nutrition?"  But I comply, and a CGM is added to the rest of my paraphernalia.

comments 28 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2011

June 2011

Allergan Seeks Lap-Band Surgeries for Obese Teens

Lap-Band manufacturer Allergan has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow surgeries using the device on overweight teenagers as young as 14 years old.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2011

My Lovely Little Insulin Pump

"My pump, my pump, my lovely little pump!"  My sister invented her own version of the Black Eyed Peas' song, "My Humps" to poke friendly fun at my insulin pump.   

comments 20 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2011

Flavonoid Rutin May Help Obesity and Diabetes

An Australian researcher who deliberately fed his lab rats a high-sugar/high-fat diet says that a flavonoid called rutin helped block the growth of fat cells in their abdomens and kept them from putting on weight despite their bad diet. Flavonoids are plant pigments that researchers are finding have beneficial metabolic effects because of their antioxidant capabilities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2011

May 2011

Gene Linked to Type 2, Cholesterol and Obesity

Here's news that has been receiving big play in U.S. and European media: British scientists have found that a gene called KLF14 acts as a "master switch" that controls other genes found in body fat-genes that are major factors in such conditions as type 2 diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol levels, and levels of glucose and insulin. The finding, by researchers at King's College London and Oxford University, could lead to treatments for diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders by targeting the gene.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

Researcher Looks Into Protein That May Prevent Type 2 in Obese People

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $1.15 million grant to a researcher at Eastern Virginia Medical School to investigate a protein that may prevent obese people from developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

It’s Fun to Fend Off Pre-Diabetes at the (New York) YMCA!

If you have pre-diabetes and live in any of the five boroughs of New York City, get ready to learn a new acronym: YDPP. The initials stand for YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership under which New Yorkers can get enroll in a comprehensive low-cost diabetes prevention program at one of  the city's 27 YMCA branches and affiliates.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2011

March 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Francisco Zepeda

Francisco Zepeda is a 54-year-old native of El Salvador who owns an insurance agency in San Francisco.  Type 2 diabetes runs in his family. He says, "My grandmother lived with diabetes for about 30 years, and my father has it as well. I heard about diabetes all that time, but I never thought that it was going to happen to me. And I still hope that I'm not really diabetic. They say that once your blood sugar goes up, then you are diabetic, but I don't want to believe that I'm diabetic, you know what I mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Michael Hamman

Michael Hamman is a 63-year-old contractor.  He recalls, "I first was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes five or six years ago.  I probably had elevated blood sugar well in advance of that, but I was unaware of it. I don't remember how high my blood sugar was at the time, but I think my A1C was 7.5%.  My blood sugar's never really been awful. Since I started monitoring myself, my sugar readings are normally between 150 and 165.  I think it was pushing 200 before I was medicated, but the medications brought it down. They started me on glyburide and I took that for a long time, and then the A1C was moving up again, so they added the metformin. The A1C now is down in the mid-sixes. They consider it controlled, not well controlled or as good as it could be, but certainly for someone my size, it's probably as good as you can get."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 25, 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

“Diabetes Belt” Stretches Across the South

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a swath of the southern U.S. as the country's "diabetes belt." In this region, made up of parts of 15 states, some 12 percent of the population has type 2 diabetes, compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2011

A Lightweight, Colorful Medical ID Alternative

Silicon wristbands were first popularized by the yellow LiveStrong band and then became widespread as a way to raise awareness for charities. Light, colorful, easy to wear, and inexpensive, they have now become an option for personal identification and medical alert information as well.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 17, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

The Thrill of the Syringe

"Shot, mommy?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

Novo Nordisk Joins Nationwide Diabetes/Pre-Diabetes Treatment Alliance

Novo Nordisk, the world's largest insulin manufacturer, has joined the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance (DPCA), a group whose goals are to reduce people's risk of developing diabetes and to work with people who already have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 4, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

February 2011

Keeping the Weight Off: An Interview with Ellen Granberg, PhD

Ellen Granberg is an obesity sociologist who studies the processes that people go through when they lose weight and keep it off. As she says, "If the problem were that we don't know what people should eat to lose weight, that would be one thing, but we don't have that problem. There are a hundred weight loss plans out there that are perfectly good. We understand all about the physiology of weight loss maintenance and the metabolic impacts, but nothing about the social and emotional impacts. People who sustain weight loss over time move through a lot of different challenges."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

New Clinical Trial Needs Type 2 Patients for Gastric Bypass Surgery

In order to undergo gastric bypass surgery, you must have a BMI of at least 35. If you have type 2 diabetes and would like to undergo the surgery to alleviate your diabetes symptoms, you are out of luck unless you are also morbidly obese. A few less weighty type 2 patients have taken matters into their own hands by deliberately gaining enough weight to qualify, but now there is a less drastic way to qualify for the operation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Tyler Stevenson on Going Away to College with Diabetes

When a young person with type 1 diabetes leaves home for the first time, it's often a difficult adjustment for the parents as well as their child. Tyler Stevenson is 20 years old, in his second year at Florida State. This is what he told us about his life in college with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose glucose has been partially changed into a different sugar, fructose. To make HFCS, you start with corn, then mill it to produce starch -corn starch.  Starch, the most important carbohydrate in the human diet, consists of long chains of glucose. To make corn syrup, you mix the corn starch with water and then add an enzyme, produced by a bacterium, that breaks the starch down into shorter chains of glucose. Then you add another enzyme, produced by a fungus, that breaks the short chains down into glucose molecules. At that point, you have regular corn syrup.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 17, 2011

Dribble to Stop Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The National Basketball Association (NBA), the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) and the NBA Development League, in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and sanofi-aventis U.S., today announced the launch of Dribble to Stop Diabetes, a national multimedia campaign designed to encourage fans to live an active, healthy lifestyle and raise awareness about diabetes prevention, management and the potentially serious health complications that can be associated with the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Diabetes Superfoods

Ever see the top 10 lists for foods everyone should eat to superpower your diet? Ever wonder which will mesh with your diabetes meal plan? Wonder no more. Your list of the top 10 diabetes superfoods has arrived.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Walmart Plans to Sell Healthier Food

Walmart, the nation's largest grocer, averages 20 million customers every single day, so their food policies can affect a lot of people. For one thing, researchers have linked part of the rise in obesity to the prevalence of cheaper food, and Walmart is famous for cheaper food.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Diva TalkRadio Features Black History Month Diabetes Spotlight on Healthy Soulful Cuisine

Diva TalkRadio is an interactive, live internet talk-radio destination that focuses on issues and concerns of those living with, at risk of and affected by diabetes. Divabetic's founder and executive director, Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek serves as the resident host of DivaTalkRadio programs.  This month, Mr. Divabetic shines the spotlight on Constance Brown-Riggs MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN. Constance is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and a National Spokesperson American Dietetic Association. Constance has been honored with the Diabetes Care and Education Practice Group (DCE) 2007 Diabetes Educator of the Year Award. Over the course of her career, Constance Brown-Riggs has established herself as an expert on the subject of nutrition, diabetes and the cultural issues that impact the health and health care of people of color. She is not only versed in the science of medical nutrition, but also has an active nutrition counseling practice through which she sees hundreds of patients. Her ability to translate her academic and clinical knowledge into clear, understandable terms have made her a nationally renowned, sought-after speaker, educator and author. She is passionate about creating opportunities to spread the word about health and nutrition, and developing educational tools which shorten the cultural distance between patients and caregivers. Every aspect of her work supports that mission

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2011

January 2011

New Spanish-Language Soap Opera Focuses on Obesity, Healthy Living

DENVER -- New episodes of a critically acclaimed, locally-produced Spanish language soap opera will focus on the obesity crisis in hopes of helping viewers better understand what causes obesity and how they can live healthier lives. The soap opera is called "Encrucijada: Sin Salud, no hay Nada" ("Crossroads: Without Health, there is Nothing").

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2011

One More Time: Walking A Lot Is Good For You

Taking 10,000 steps a day, or walking about five miles, is very, very good for you. It's even better than walking 3,000 steps a day, which is also extremely beneficial if you walk briskly enough to do it in 30 minutes. The 10,000 steps philosophy is not new--there's even a weight-loss book or two on the topic. But now the 10,000 step regimen has also been linked to an increase in insulin sensitivity in middle-aged adults.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 20, 2011

Scientists Cook Up a Little Brown Fat

Brown fat is an entirely different animal than the white fat that we pack onto our hips to store excess calories.  Instead of storing energy, brown fat actually burns glucose to produce heat (thermogenesis). It's brown because it contains special mitochondria that produce heat from the glucose when activated by cold. Adults don't have much of it, unfortunately, just a few grams if we're lucky. If we had about 50 grams and were cold enough to activate it, it would actually burn about 500 calories a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

Infopia USA's Thermal Weight Scale

Infopia USA's Eocene System is a diabetes management system with a data collection device that gathers data from a meter, blood pressure cuff, and a thermal scale. Readings are stored on Infopia's network and available to you and your health team. See the video on Diabetes Health TV here.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2011

December 2010

February Launch of Childhood Obesity Program at R.I. YMCAs Could Set National Standard

Starting in February, Rhode Island's eight YMCAs will participate in JOIN, a 24-week research study on ways to help obese children and teenagers achieve healthier weight. If it meets its goals, it could become the prototype for a nationwide program that would have a direct effect on the treatment of pre-diabetes in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2010

Lorcaserin Shows Statistically Significant Weight Loss in Patients With Diabetes

Arena Pharmaceuticals and Eisai Inc. recently released results of a phase 3 clinical trial for lorcaserin, a weight-loss drug they are developing in partnership. The trial, called BLOOM-DM (Behavioral modification and Lorcaserin for Overweight and Obesity Management- Diabetes Management), targeted patients with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2010

Diabetes-Depression Connection

A 10-year study by Harvard University scientists found that diabetes puts people at risk for depression and that depression puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes. The two-way connection between the diseases was discovered in 55,000 nurses surveyed over the decade.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

November 2010

Christopher Gorham Grabs Silver and Bronze Medals At International Karate/Kickboxing Championships

Insulet Corp., the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, recognizes the outstanding achievements of Christopher Gorham, age 12, of Waterford, Michigan for bringing home both silver and bronze medals in the Sparring and Forms competitions at the 2010 World Karate/Kickboxing Council World Championships held in Albufeira, Portugal. Chris is a 2nd degree black belt in training for a 3rd degree black belt; he has been in martial arts since he was four years old, competing all over the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2010

At a Loss?

A friend of mine recently remarked that she wants her family to eat healthier, but she just doesn't know that much about nutrition. Though I can sympathize with her in some ways (nutritional education is a daunting and never-ending process), I do feel that the overall American attitude toward food is that ignorance is bliss. It reminds me of the preteen character in the movie Son-In-Law, who puts his sister's bra cups over his ears and tells his parents in a taunting voice, "I can't hear you!"  Unfortunately, what you don't know CAN hurt you, and not just you, but also your family. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2010

Is Correcting Low Blood Sugars Caused by Exercise Making You Fat?

Over the years, I have had many exercisers with diabetes ask me why they're gaining weight instead of losing it. There are two possible answers to that question. One answer is that muscle is heavier than fat, so if you are gaining muscle while losing fat-especially in the early stages of a new exercise program-your scale weight probably doesn't reflect your positive changes in body composition (i.e., less fat, more muscle).

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

Abdominal Pain in Children May be Linked to Fructose Intake

It's a pretty common complaint heard in households around the country: "My tummy hurts." Parents and teachers have been battling this complaint for decades, with children insisting that they are in pain and having no explanation why.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2010

Saturated Fat A Cause of Heart Disease? Not as Likely as Once Thought

For over 30 years, we have been told over and over by doctors, the media, nutritionists, and food companies that saturated fat is bad for us, causing us to gain weight and contributing to cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has led to a whole industry of low fat and non-fat food options, most claiming that saturated fat is bad for our health.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2010

October 2010

Look AHEAD Study Examines Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss

An intensive lifestyle intervention program designed with weight loss in mind improves diabetes control and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. These are the findings of the four-year Look AHEAD study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) is a multi-center, randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity on the incidence of major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2010

Weight Watchers and Merck Collaborate to Help Physicians Fight Obesity Through Lifestyle Management Approach

Weight Watchers International, Inc., the world's leading provider of weight management services, and Merck, a global healthcare leader, announced today an innovative collaboration focused on fighting obesity.  The two companies will launch an initiative in which Merck will provide physicians and other health care providers with educational information about the Weight Watchers® program and its underlying clinical evidence to assist doctors in addressing the ongoing weight management needs of their patients. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2010

New Studies Reveal Hidden Benefits of Exercise for Local Seniors

As the weather turns and leaves begin to fall this year, new research shows that local aging seniors are well served to get up and grab a rake themselves - for more reasons than one. A group of four recent studies published in 2010 Harvard University health and medicine journals shows a surprising and strong connection between seniors, exercise, and mental and physical health, especially among aging women. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2010

Vitamin D Linked to Childhood Obesity

Michelle Obama recently announced that she plans to eliminate childhood obesity in a generation. If all goes according to her plan, childhood obesity will have dropped from the current rate of 32 percent to a rate of 5 percent by 2030. That rate of 32 percent translates to over 25 million obese children and adolescents, so a lot of attention has been given to examining the direct causes of childhood obesity, the factors that contribute, and the best ways to eliminate it altogether.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Let's Move Campaign

Earlier this year, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an ambitious goal: to erase childhood obesity within a generation. If she is successful, the childhood obesity rate will be only 5 percent by 2030, down from the current rate of 32 percent. Ambitious? Yes. Impossible? Not according to her plan.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2010

Sleep Loss Limits Fat Loss

Cutting back on sleep reduces the benefits of dieting, according to a study published Oct. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

Dancing for the Health of It

Dance Out Diabetes is a non-profit organization that addresses a critical component missing in most diabetes programs: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY! Our mission is to help individuals prevent or manage diabetes through dance and education.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2010

Have a Holiday Heart-to-Heart

The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even the occasional family conflict.  Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health is influenced by your family-for better or for worse.  This year, why not start a conversation that benefits everyone?  Gather your family health history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2010

September 2010

Instant Recess

(HealthDay News) -- Think recess, and you'll probably smile. What wasn't to like about a break in the school day set aside for running and playing, for friends and fun? Now fast-forward to your adult life. What if your workplace started offering recess on the job?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2010

From Helpless to Heroic: A Parent's Guide to Changing the Statistics One Child at a Time

I was reading the latest issue of one of my parenting magazines when I came across an article on children and food.  The author suggested offering dessert only two to three times a week instead of every day.  I laughed aloud.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2010

Insulindependence

In late July, five teenagers and five adults hiked to the summit of Mount Shavano, one of Colorado's famed 14,000-foot peaks.  For this particular group, the journey to the top of Shavano was designed to be an intensive educational experience on the topic of diabetes management.  Each teenager had type 1 diabetes, and the adults were mentors dedicated to helping the teens feel more in control of the disease. The team made it to the summit by performing countless blood sugar tests, counting carbs, and experimenting with insulin pump basal rates. The outfit behind the expedition was Testing Limits, an outdoor adventure club just for people with diabetes, operated by the non-profit Insulindependence. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Fantastic Fall Foods and Fun: A Guide to Healthfully Enjoying Fall

Fall is a welcome season, full of bounty and beauty.  The heat of summer gives way to calmer days and crisper evenings.  We trade our shorts and swimsuits for jackets and jeans and enjoy campfires, hayrides, and holiday celebrations.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2010

Long-term Weight Loss may be Harmful to Health

Long-term weight loss may release into the blood industrial pollutants linked to illnesses like diabetes, hypertension and rheumatoid arthritis, researchers said on Tuesday. These compounds are normally stored in fatty tissues, but when fat breaks down during weight loss, they get into the blood stream, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee at the Kyungpook National University in Daegu in South Korea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2010

August 2010

Gene testing could have saved weight-loss drug

(Reuters) - Genetic testing might have helped identify people who would become depressed or suicidal while taking Sanofi-Aventis' weight loss drug Acomplia, which might have helped keep the drug on the market, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2010

Finally, the Pump.

"Absolutely not. I'm not going to mess with that."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2010

July 2010

Moderate Alcohol Intake Lessens Chance of Developing Type 2, Says Dutch Study

While teetotaling is the surest way to avoid abusing alcohol, it turns out that moderate alcohol intake may be one way to stave off the development of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

June 2010

Do You Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

It raises fasting blood sugars. It increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. Millions of people suffer from it. And many don't even know they have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 30, 2010

Harvard Study Says Brown Rice Twice Weekly Can Reduce Diabetes Risk by 10 Percent

White rice and brown rice are reminiscent of those old dramas about identical twins, wherein one turns out to be angelic and the other turns out to be bad news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2010

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Diabetes Linked to High-Grade Prostate Cancer in Obese Men

A Duke University Medical Center study has concluded that obese men who have type 2 diabetes are almost four times as likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer during a prostate biopsy as men who do not have diabetes. When ethnicity is taken into account, obese white men run a five-times greater chance of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

Meat Preservatives, Not Meats Themselves, May Increase the Risk for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, some medical researchers have pointed the finger at meat consumption as a major factor in the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, a meta-analysis conducted by the Harvard School of Medical Health has concluded that it may be the salt and chemical preservatives used in processed meats that lead to health problems, not the meats themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

Ironman Jay

It's early on a Thursday morning in a hotel ballroom in downtown Oakland, and attendees at a breakfast of the annual meeting of the California Dietetic Association are still working on getting fully awake. That problem is solved two minutes after Jay Hewitt, the breakfast's inspirational speaker, takes the stage. Hewitt, a 41-year-old lawyer who was diagnosed with type 1 in 1991, knows his audience is an experienced group of professional dietitians that has dealt with every type of patient and heard every kind of excuse for failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

May 2010

Attending Weight Watchers® Meetings Helps Reduce the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

The 57 million Americans currently living with "pre-diabetes" could benefit from a group weight loss program, like Weight Watchers, according to a new study published in this month's American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. Researchers found that after a 6-month Weight Watchers group program, overweight or obese adults who attended at least two thirds of the weekly sessions, not only lost weight, but also significantly reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels - important indicators of diabetes risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

Avoiding Post-Race Hypoglycemia

I woke up on the floor of my living room, soaked in sweat.  I could not stand, or even sit up.  I could not raise my arms or control my hands enough to grasp anything. Forget reaching for the telephone, even if my brain could have formulated the thought to try.  I could not speak, but I lived alone, so there was no one to hear anyway.  I did not know what day it was, but the hot July 4th late afternoon sun was shining brightly through the windows.  After an unknown period of time, my brain must have had a flash of coherence that I was having severe hypoglycemia. 

comments 8 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

Cutting Fats While Upping High Glycemic Index Carbs Does Your Heart No Favors, Says Danish Study

A Danish analysis of data from 21 research studies on the effects of saturated fat intake has concluded that swapping refined carbohydrates, such as pasta and white bread, for fat causes spikes in blood sugar that are harmful to the heart. However, cutting down on saturated fats while increasing consumption of whole-grain breads and vegetables-low glycemic index* foods-had a discernible positive impact on heart health.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2010

April 2010

SafeSittings Diabetes Babysitting Service

Are you the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes? Do you often wish that you could find a babysitter who understands the "ins-and-outs" of type 1 so that you could enjoy an evening out, assured that your child is in good hands? Or are you a teenager with type 1 who is looking for a way to help children manage their disease, while making a little extra money at the same time?  Then look no further than www.SafeSittings.com. Launched over six years ago in Manhattan by teenager Kimberly Ross, www.SafeSittings.com is a free online service that matches type 1 families with babysitters who also have the disease. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2010

Oy! Cutting Calories May Actually Make You Put on Pounds

-SIGH- A pessimist might say that the following news is another sign that Mother Nature sometimes has one mean sense of humor: Reducing your caloric intake in order to lose weight may, ironically, lead to weight gain.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2010

National Physical Activity Plan Seeks to Reduce Chronic Illness and Obesity

Increasing physical activity for greater health among the American public will take center stage on May 3 with the launch of the National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP or Plan).  The signature events of the launch will be a press conference at the National Press Club and briefings with members of Congress in Washington, D.C.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Prevention Research Center at the University of South Carolina are providing the organizational infrastructure for writing the plan.  The implementation of the plan will be coordinated by the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity (NCPPA).  The goal of NPAP is "to encourage everyone to be more physically active, reduce barriers to inactivity, and make sure our communities and institutions provide opportunities to move." 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 29, 2010

May is National Correct Posture Month: Did You Do Your Posture Exercise Today?

May is National Correct Posture Month, so take a look at how hours of computer hunching, slouching while cell phone texting and video-game slumping is affecting your posture.  It's not just kids with backpacks or cane-carrying seniors---studies show poor posture is a major cause of back and neck pain for all ages, and over time often contributes to digestive and cardiopulmonary problems.  The good news: there are easy things people can do to strengthen posture.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2010

Smart Insulin

A team of researchers from Case Western University published an article revealing their invention of a "smart" insulin molecule that binds considerably less to cancer receptors and self-assembles under the skin. To provide a slow-release form of insulin, the compound self-assembles under the skin by "stapling" itself together with zinc ions. Zinc staples connect the pieces of the insulin puzzle together to create a functional protein.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

What People with Type 1 Diabetes can Learn from Type 2s

Admit it, Type 1s. In weaker moments, you look down your noses at the Type 2 diabetics. You know that their disease can result from poor lifestyle choices. You know that their treatment regimen, compared with yours, is simple.

comments 36 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

Gene Makes People Fat, Raises Alzheimer's Risk

(Reuters) - A variant of an obesity gene carried by more than a third of the U.S. population also reduces brain volume, raising carriers' risk of Alzheimer's disease, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

New Model for Chronic Disease Prevention

YMCA of the USA, the nation's leading non-profit service organization dedicated to healthy living, and UnitedHealth Group, a diversified health and well-being company, today announced a partnership to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes in the United States. In this first of its kind collaboration, UnitedHealth Group will reimburse YMCAs offering the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2010

Antidote to Guilt About Not Doing Enough Exercise Is a HIT

Most people who have pre-diabetes know that exercise is a key element in successfully avoiding full-on diabetes. But lack of time-either for real or as an excuse-often gets in the way.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2010

March 2010

Tyler's Top Ten Tips for Teens

Experience is a great teacher, but sometimes it's not the best way to learn, especially when it comes to your medical needs. Smart people learn from their mistakes, but wise people learn from other people's mistakes. In my ten years with diabetes, I have found that to eliminate problems, you need to anticipate your needs. A few moments of preparation can ensure a great afternoon of fun with your friends, a better grade on a test, or participation in a sporting competition without any complications.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery Could Be Key to Reversing Diabetes in Non-Obese Patients

A controversial New York doctor is poised to begin surgical trials on non-obese diabetes patients in an attempt to reverse their disease with gastric bypass surgery. Dr. Francesco Rubino, the chief of gastrointestinal surgery at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, believes that because gastric surgery has been shown to be highly effective in remitting diabetes symptoms, the procedure should now be allowed among non-overweight type 2s.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2010

February 2010

Handing down the Genes. Part 3 (of 3)

This is the third - and final - installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part III: "Nutrition and Exercise Tips"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 19, 2010

Eating Low-Carb Meals After Exercise Increases Insulin Sensitivity

A university study says that aerobic exercise, a known means of increasing insulin sensitivity, is most effective if the meals following it are low in carbohydrates. The study also revealed that consuming a low-calorie meal after exercising does not increase insulin sensitivity any better than eating a low-carb meal after a workout. In addition, it found that the beneficial effects of exercise are immediate and do not build up over time or last very long. Improvements in metabolism, including insulin sensitivity and lowered blood pressure, occur directly as a result of the latest exercise session, but taper off within hours or days. There is no "storing up" the benefits of exercise.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2010

Kris Freeman Today Show Interview

Kris Freeman, a member of the United States cross-country ski team has a story unmatched in Olympic competition history. Freeman, 28, is the first athlete with Type 1 diabetes to compete in an Olympic endurance event.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 2 (of 3)

This is the second installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part II: "Preventing Type 2 in Children"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 13, 2010

"America's Silent Killer" on The Oprah Winfrey Show

CHICAGO, IL - On Thursday, February 4, Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and more reveal the staggering human cost of the growing diabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic on a special episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show. Before a studio audience comprised of all diabetics and their families, Oprah and Dr. Oz reveal the latest facts and figures, share stories of those affected, and hold a no-holds-barred, revealing conversation about risk factors, diet and lifestyle.

comments 17 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 1 (of 3)

This is the beginning of our three part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part I: "When to Worry-and When Not to-About Your Child's Increased Risk for Diabetes."

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Death by TV?

Australian researchers who tracked the TV viewing habits of 8,800 people over a six-year span have some sobering statistics for people who love the tube too well: (1) If you watch TV more than two and up to four hours a day, your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease increases by 19 percent. (2) If your viewing habit is more than four hours a day, your risk of death from cardiovascular disease skyrockets by 80 percent.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Cost the U.S. $218 Billion in 2007: En Route to $336 Billion by 2034

A study commissioned by healthcare company Novo Nordisk has reported that the cost of diabetes and pre-diabetes to the U.S. economy in 2007 was $218 billion. The study, conducted by The Lewin Group, projected that by 2034, the two conditions will cost the economy $336 billion per year.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 3, 2010

January 2010

Meditation Medication

Living with a chronic condition like diabetes can be a challenging and stressful experience. Unfortunately, all the worry about blood glucose and the constant effort to balance insulin against food intake and exercise can itself raise blood glucose levels. But stress management can help control the stress hormones that affect blood glucose levels. Yoga practice, for example, can have a calming effect and play a major role in stress management.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 21, 2010

Obesity Action Coalition Set to Launch National Weight Awareness Campaign

Tampa, Fla. - On January 18, 2010, the Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) will launch a national weight and health awareness campaign aimed to encourage the American public to assess their weight and urge them to speak to their doctor about their weight. The goal of this campaign is to get the American public to start looking at weight and its impact on their health and the health of their loved ones.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2010

Out of Love

Dear Diabetes Health, I hope you can help me. I am 49 years old and was diagnosed with type 2 five years ago.  My husband still wants sex. I don't even want him to touch me.  He is very mean to me. He yells at me and calls me names.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2010

Quitting Smoking and Diabetes Risk

"People who give up smoking are prone to developing diabetes because they gain weight," TheTimes reported. It said a study has found that quitters are twice as likely as smokers, and 70% more likely than non-smokers, to have type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2010

Pedometer Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk By Half

Using a pedometer as part of a structured education programme could reduce the chances of Type 2 diabetes by more than 50 per cent in those at risk of developing the condition, reveals a new Diabetes UK-funded study1 out today.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 5, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

December 2009

One in Five Type 2s Is Morbidly Obese - 100 or More Pounds Overweight

Researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago report that 20.7 percent of all American adults who have type 2 diabetes are "morbidly obese," a description that applies to people who are 100 or more pounds overweight. The researchers said that the figure for African Americans is even higher, with one out of three type 2s in that group falling under the definition of morbidly obese.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

Diabetes Surgery Summit Issues Call to Use Bariatric Surgery as a Type 2 Treatment

Fifty science and medical diabetes experts, representing 22 international organizations*, have issued a consensus statement that calls for bariatric surgery to be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. The statement, published online November 23 in the Annals of Surgery, is seen by attendees at the recent Diabetes Surgery Summit in Rome as the precursor to the establishment of a new medical discipline, "diabetes surgery."

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

Hey, I'm not Fat!

A study presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions said that eight percent of obese people misunderstand their body size and don't feel they need to lose weight.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2009

Consensus Statement Recognizes the Legitimacy of Surgery as a Dedicated Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Carefully Selected Patients

NEW YORK (Nov. 23, 2009) - A first-of-its-kind consensus statement on diabetes surgery is published online today in the Annals of Surgery. The report illustrates the findings of the first international consensus conference - Diabetes Surgery Summit (DSS) - where an international group of more than 50 scientific and medical experts agreed on a set of evidence-based guidelines and definitions that are meant to guide the use and study of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes. The document is considered to be the foundation of diabetes surgery as a medical discipline of its own.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2009

Nutrisystem Steps Up to Help Stop Diabetes with $100,000 Pledge

HORSHAM, Pa.-- (BUSINESS WIRE)--Nutrisystem, Inc. (NASDQ: NTRI), a leading developer of weight loss products and services, today announced its company-wide support for the recently launched Stop DiabetesSM  movement from the American Diabetes Association. On the heels of the successful launch of Nutrisystem D, its program designed to help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight, Nutrisystem has implemented a $5.00 contribution for every person who shares their story on the American Diabetes Association's Stop Diabetes website, up to $100,000 through December 31, 2009.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

Q & A: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have  type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

Parade Magazine's Ad Linking Gastric Banding to Type 2 Control: Opening a Campaign for a New Means of Treating Diabetes?

An ad in the November 15, 2009, edition of Parade magazine may be the opening salvo in a campaign to push adjustable gastric bands as a weight loss aid to help overweight type 2s dramatically improve their symptoms or even go into remission.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2009

October 2009

Study Shows Resolution of Type 2 Diabetes in Morbidly Obese Patients; Data Published in Annals of Surgery

LEXINGTON, Mass., October 27, 2009 - GI Dynamics, a leader in non-surgical treatments for type 2 diabetes and obesity, today announced data which support the safety and efficacy of the EndoBarrierTM Gastrointestinal Liner for pre-surgical weight loss treatment, along with a positive effect on glucose homeostasis in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to the study, mean excess weight loss (EWL) achieved after 12 weeks post implantation was 19.0 % for EndoBarrier patients versus 6.9 % for control patients (p<0.002).  The results of this European weight loss study were published today in the advance online publication of Annals of Surgery.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

A Big Bone of Contention: Should Bariatric Surgery Become a Standard Type 2 Diabetes Therapy?

A recent and contentious meeting of diabetes experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Vienna, Austria, has continued the intense international debate over whether bariatric surgery should become a treatment for type 2 diabetes or continue to be reserved only for the extremely obese.

comments 13 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2009

Study Shows a Little Money Buys a Lot of Calories at City Corner Stores

October 12, 2009. Philadelphia, Pa. - Children in Philadelphia who attended public schools and shopped at corner stores before or after school purchased almost 360 calories of foods and beverages per visit, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics. Chips, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages were the most frequently purchased items. This is the first study to document both what foods and beverages children purchased in local corner stores on their way to and from school, and the nutritional content of those items.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2009

Phentermine the Phoenix Rises Again

The demise of Fen-phen dealt a body blow to hopes for an obesity pill that is actually effective. Unfortunately, the fen in Fen-phen, fenfluramine, caused grave pulmonary hypertension and heart valve problems. The phen part of the drug, though, was apparently just an innocent bystander. And now phen (phentermine) has resurfaced in a new pill that has posted some amazing results in Phase III clinical trials. Patients who were treated for 56 weeks with the new drug, Qnexa, lost an average of 14.7 percent of their weight, or 37 pounds.

comments 8 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2009

Doctors Can Be Everyday Heroes, Too

Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu, MD, MPH, FACPM is a very interesting man. He served as the Acting Surgeon General of the United States in 2006 and was made Chairman of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in October 2007. The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is designed to serve as a home for the diabetes family and a trusted place of diabetes learning that will inspire diabetes innovation, improved care, and better outcomes worldwide. Through the Institute, Johnson & Johnson is opening and operating state-of-the-art instructional facilities around the world to provide health professionals with education and training aimed at improving diabetes patients' outcomes by working at the community level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

September 2009

Using the Medicine Wheel to Control Type 2 Diabetes

The way information is presented to us makes a big difference in whether we are able to integrate that information into our daily lives. Although graphs and numbers may sway some people, putting educational materials into a culturally relevant context can be more effective. A recent study, for example, has found that a dietary program based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition can change eating patterns among Native Americans, who have the highest rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease of all ethnic groups. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2009

Watching the Brain Reveals Willpower in Action

For most of us, the biggest problem with losing lots of weight is the demoralizing process of watching ourselves gain it all back. But some people who lose weight manage to keep it off for good. How do they do it? Researchers from the Miriam Hospital recently examined their brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging and actually saw their restraint in action.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 25, 2009

New Understanding of Leptin's Role in Appetite and Bone Mass Could Lead to Treatment for Obesity

Scientists have noted for a long time that the hormone leptin suppresses appetite. That's why they have been puzzled by the high levels of leptin found in obese people-shouldn't leptin decrease their appetites and act as a curb on their weight? Leptin also suppresses bone mass accrual, yet obese people do not suffer from loss or weakening of bone mass, despite their high leptin levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 25, 2009

New Research Shows Direct Link Between Soda and Obesity

DAVIS, CA, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009 - While health officials have long suspected the link between obesity and soda consumption, research released today provides the first scientific evidence of the potent role soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages play in fueling California's expanding girth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2009

Exercise, Even Without Weight Loss, Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Teens

Even if they don't lose weight, a moderate aerobic exercise program can improve insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents who are sedentary.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2009

Team Type 1's Aldape is Missouri's Mountain King

Kansas City, Mo. - Moises Aldape helped Team Type 1 stamp its authority on the Tour of Missouri Sunday by winning the Michelob Ultra King of the Mountains title.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 22, 2009

Walking Into Your Nineties

Suppose you've always wanted to start exercising, but you've procrastinated for awhile, a very, very long while. In fact, you are a comfortably sedentary 85 years old now, and it seems like it's too late to do any good. Well, according to new research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, it's never too late.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2009

Liver Fat Bests Visceral Fat in Revealing the Metabolic Complications of Obesity

Visceral adipose tissue (VAT), familiarly known as visceral fat, has long been associated with metabolic risk. But VAT is closely correlated with liver fat, also called intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content. As a result, Samuel Klein of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, set out to determine if liver fat is more closely correlated with complications in obese patients than VAT.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2009

Welcome News on the Beverage Front: Non-Sugar Sweeteners Help With Long-Term Weight Control

Here's a sweet bit of news: Drinking sugar-free beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners increases "dietary restraint," the ability of people to maintain long-term weight loss.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2009

Learning Self-Control is the Key for Kids to Remain Healthy

According to a recent  Pennsylvania study, kids need to learn to control themselves when it comes to food. Obviously, self-control is important for us all, kids and adults alike, when it comes to weight management. It’s equally apparent that children need to be taught by their parents to make healthy food choices. But parents who strictly forbid their children to eat many foods might be contributing to a lack of self-control in their offspring, thereby creating the very chubbiness that they were trying to avert.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

August 2009

Behind the Wheel, But Still in Control

Last May, 24-year-old Charlie Kimball was in Car #35, taking Turn 3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway during the Firestone Freedom 100. He was in radio contact with his pit crew, who informed him that he had a headwind coming out of the turn and onto the 5/8 mile "straight." Charlie kept an eye on the car next to him, moving closer and beginning to crowd it on the inside. Having raced professionally for six years, he knew that he had to make a move, and soon.  He shifted into sixth gear and accelerated.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2009

Surfing with Type 1

Initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Rob subsequently discovered that he had type 1. Knowing that he needed to exercise more, he returned to professional surfing. Today, he is a sponsored professional athlete who uses a CGM.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2009

A Chat with Kelli Kuehne on Life, Golf, and Diabetes

In 1994, Kelli Kuehne was on a roll. That year, she won the United States Girls Junior Amateur Golf Championship and a year later, she won the U.S. Women's Amateur Golf Championship, repeating that win in 1996 while also taking the British Ladies Amateur Golf Championship. The roll continues. Today, Kelli Kuehne is still playing matches in the LPGA and, through it all, has never allowed type 1 diabetes to beat her on the golf course or in her life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Yale Enzyme Discovery Offers Hope for a Therapy That Reduces Appetite and Ups Energy

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, have found a brain enzyme that, when blocked, curbs appetite and increases energy levels-both crucial factors in controlling and losing weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2009

Thoughtful Consumption: People with Diabetes Have Been Leading the Pack All Along

Never underestimate the power of people with diabetes and their families. When we as a consumer group purchase more fruits and vegetables, walk or bicycle instead of taking the car, and educate ourselves about a healthy lifestyle, we are addressing global issues as well as personal ones and can have a strong, positive effect on the future.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2009

Hormone-Based Drug Drops Rats' Weight by a Quarter in Just Seven Days—Precursor to a Human Weight Loss Drug?

For obese people, who often go on to develop type 2 diabetes, the magic bullet would be a drug that causes weight loss without surgery or the misery of drastic diets that often fail. So, news about a drug that produced dramatically slimmer lab rats in just a week should make them-and people with diabetes-perk up.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2009

Type 2 Diabetes, Triglycerides, and the Good Kind of Fat

This article was submitted by GlaxoSmithKline, makers of LOVAZA, a medication to lower very high triglycerides, made from omega-3 fish oil.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2009

Discovery of Link Between Obesity and Type 2 Opens Path to Possible New Treatment

Obesity has always been one of the major precursors to type 2 diabetes because of its ill effects on the body's ability to properly use insulin. But until now, scientists haven't been able to say with certainty just what happens in obese people to increase their insulin resistance. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2009

Incorporating Exercise Into a Busy Life

I would exercise if I had more time... if I had a health club membership... if it didn't hurt so much... if I knew what exercises to do... if I could do it with my family... if I could control my blood sugar...

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2009

Celebrating the 4th of July: Tips for Parents of Kids with Diabetes

Patriotism, parades, parties, and pyrotechnics - July Fourth is a high intensity day of celebrations and national pride. In many towns, families move from one exciting event to the next, and the day can be very unpredictable. Still, parents of children with diabetes want carefree time with their families, and children don't want to think about diabetes details. A bit of advanced planning and packing can make this festive day much easier.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2009

June 2009

Heart Association Makes It Plain: Get Off Your Duff and Exercise!

The American Heart Association (AHA) has added weight training to the list of exercises it recommends for people with type 2 diabetes to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease. Heart and blood vessel diseases account for nearly 70 percent of deaths among type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2009

A Call to Allow More People to Undergo Bariatric Surgery

A surgeon who has been at the forefront of exploring bariatric surgery as a potentially curative treatment for type 2 diabetes is calling for it to be made accessible to more people.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2009

Duodenal Switch Surgery Better Against Type 2 Diabetes Than Gastric Bypass

Over the years, gastric bypass surgery has proven an effective means of controlling-and even reversing-type 2 diabetes in
"super-obese" patients (those with a body mass index of 50 or above; usually more than 200 pounds above ideal body weight).

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2009

Restored Leptin Sensitivity in Lab Mice Produces Normal BG, Increased Activity—Without Need for Weight Loss

Obese lab mice with severe type 2 diabetes had their blood glucose levels restored to normal and experienced a doubling in physical activity when sensitivity to the hormone leptin was restored to a portion of their hypothalamus.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2009

Jocks & Talks: Diabetes, Exercise, and Sports

The 2009 North American Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association's North American Conference will be held June 25th to 28th at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2009

May 2009

Once Sneered at as a

For generations, people have run hot and cold on the usefulness of vibrating exercise machines. There are plenty of comedy sketches in 1930s movies that portray overweight people being violently shaken around the midriff by a vibrating machine in the hope of strengthening their muscles and metabolizing fat. Those who have disdained such machines have reasoned that they substitute a mechanism's work for the work that exercisers should be doing themselves. After all, how can a machine do for you what you won't do for yourself?

comments 2 comments - Posted May 28, 2009

Antioxidants Take a Hit: Vitamins C and E May Work Against Your Attempts to Stave Off or Deal With Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, you know that regular sustained exercise is one of the best and easiest ways to manage the disease. At the same time, proper nutrition-eating low glycemic foods, avoiding carbohydrates, and taking supplements, such as vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids-is the other key to non-medicinal control of blood sugar levels.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 26, 2009

Too Much Food Is Responsible for Most of the U.S. Rise in Obesity Since 1970, Says Study

Sometimes complex problems have simple answers. Take the alarming rise in obesity in the United States since 1970. Researchers have speculated in the past that the cause might be a combination of factors, perhaps a lack of exercise working in concert with the spread of cheap high-calorie junk food.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 23, 2009

Moderate Exercise Enough to Reduce Belly Fat and Stave Off Metabolic Syndrome

Doctors who treat diabetes must often feel like moms who spend 18 years reminding their kids to pick their socks up off the floor. "It just takes two seconds, and your reward is a clean room and a less grumpy mother."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 22, 2009

Attention Healthcare Professionals: Grants Available for Integrating Patient-Recorded Observations into Clinical Care Processes

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has issued a call for proposals through its national program, Project HealthDesign: Rethinking the Power and Potential of Personal Health Records. Grant recipients will work to assess and test the potential of "observations of daily living" (ODLs) to help patients and physicians better manage chronic illnesses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

April 2009

Eating Like an Ironman

What do you eat in a 140 mile Ironman triathlon?  I get that question a lot. It's been said that the Ironman race is 10% fitness, and 90% nutrition. That's a bit of an exaggeration, but for those of us with diabetes, that's our daily life.  Nutrition affects everything we do. Exercise, sleep, driving a car, all of those activities require a person with diabetes to think about the carbohydrates they have consumed and when they will eat or drink them again

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2009

Hot Pockets of Brown Fat Burn Up Calories

Three studies just published in the New England Journal of Medicine have discovered that most adults have several grams of brown fat sequestered in little pockets on their necks and backs. It's a tiny amount, but it's big news because brown fat is not your everyday fat, the unwelcome white variety that stores calories and makes us hate mirrors. Brown fat is a busy little heat-producing fat that actually burns calories.  It's brown because it contains special mitochondria, tiny factories within the fat cells that produce heat, lots of it, when activated by cold. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2009

50 Reasons Why Diabesity Wasn’t Prevalent 50 Years Ago

The following list shows 50 of the ways we have "convenienced" ourselves into diabesity. Before the technology boom, most Americans were active at work, at home, and at play. Much of what we did was manual, so we burned off the calories that we took in. When you consider that we did many of these activities on a regular basis, it is easy to see how we were able to remain trim. Obviously, no single one of these activities burns a large amount of calories by itself, but taken together, it is easy to see that the number of calories burned really begins to add up. (By the way, if you remember any of the things on this list, you don't have to tell anyone.) 

comments 12 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2009

Joy Pape’s New Book: Living with Diabetes Day-to-Day

Long before Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN, served a stint as the clinical editor and contributing columnist for Diabetes Health Professional, she was a seasoned diabetes expert who knew her way around almost every aspect of the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2009

Formerly Fat Elders Wear Out Earlier

Well, it's official: If you're elderly and fat, you're more likely to have problems getting around than if you're thin and elderly. A new study proves it.  But here's the real kicker: If you're thin and elderly, but you used to be fat, you're more likely to develop problems getting around than people who were never fat.  As a matter of fact, you're almost as likely to have mobility problems as people who are fat and elderly. Apparently, you just can't win for losing. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2009

Scientists Ponder Why Exercise Helps Control High BG in Type 2s

Understanding which proteins help control blood glucose during and after exercise could lead to new drug therapies or more effective exercise to prevent type 2 diabetes and other health problems associated with high blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2009

Adjustable Gastric Banding and Diabetes

Diane Helms has spent most of her life struggling with her weight.  She's tried just about every diet you can name and, despite them all, has watched the pounds pile on year after year. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2009

Moderately Protein-Rich Diet Better for Long-Term Weight Loss, Says University Study

A 12-month university study of 130 persons who ate either a USDA food pyramid-inspired high-carb diet or a diet moderately high in protein showed that members of the higher protein group lost 23 percent more weight and 38 percent more body fat than their high carb counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

March 2009

Living Well Program in Vermont Promotes Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2s

The following is a Q&A with Judith Waldrop, who participated in Living Well, a week-long residential program designed for women with type 2 diabetes. The program is a joint effort of the healthy weight loss pioneers at Green Mountain at Fox Run and the Joslin Diabetes Center. This year, Living Well will take place April 19-25, 2009. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Sled Dogs’ Fat-Burning Capabilities Could Hold a Key to Type 2 Treatments

One of the most impressive feats of endurance in the animal world is performed by the sled dogs that run up to 100 miles per day in such races as Alaska's Iditarod, a grueling 1,161-mile trek from Simpson to Homer. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2009

If You Think Cat Naps Are the Answer to Short Nighttime Sleeps, Brits Say Naps Not Good Type 2

If you fancy cat naps and think that they might be a handy way to circumvent the ill effects of too little sleep at night (see Sleeping Less Than 6 Hours a Night? Your Risk of Developing a Type 2 Precursor Is Nearly 5x Higher), think again: A British study of the napping habits of more than 16,000 people in China has concluded that taking a nap even once a week can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 26 percent over people who never take naps.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2009

Many Factors Make Type 2 Diabetes a Challenge

There's a perception out there that people with type 2 could control their disease if they just tried hard enough. But self-control and will power are not the whole story. A new study published in this month's Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness includes "eating out, lack of social support and high-risk lifestyles" as just a few of the roadblocks that stop patients with type 2 diabetes from controlling their condition. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2009

Living With Diabetes: New Hope for Health

New cases of adult type 2 diabetes have increased by more than 90 percent in the past 10 years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease and Prevention.(1) Equally troubling is the dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes among children. Recent reports reveal a 200 percent increase in hospitalizations for children with type 2 diabetes, a condition that was rarely diagnosed in children decades ago.(2) In the words of the CDC, "Diabetes is common, disabling, and deadly."(3)

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2009

Who Woulda Thought? Eat Fewer Calories, Lose Weight

The old joke has a man going to the doctor and saying, "It hurts when I do this. What should I do to make it go away?" 

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2009

Hare Beats Tortoise! Scottish Study Finds Quick Bursts Beat Steady Exercise in BG Control

A few quick, intense bursts of energy, such as 7.5 minutes per week of sprints on a stationary bicycle, may be just as good as 30 minutes per day of moderate exercise in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. In fact, say researchers at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, such short bursts may be even more effective. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2009

Diabulimia: What It Is and How To Treat It

A few years ago a young man named Jeff came into my office seeking help to lose weight.  He was 5'10" tall and weighed 130 pounds. Jeff denied starving himself, denied making himself throw up, and denied over-exercising. I tried to convince him that he was actually 30 pounds underweight. As I looked for the most effective ways of motivating him to restore his health, he brought up the fact that he had type 1 diabetes.  Jeff said that he rarely gave himself insulin and that he had "diabulimia." I had never heard of diabulimia and had no idea what I was dealing with. I gave him a list of clinicians and asked him to call me back after he made appointments with an endocrinologist and a psychotherapist.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2009

February 2009

Team Type 1 Expands to a Family of Five

Over the past few years, Team Type 1, a team of elite and professional cyclists living with type 1 diabetes, has competed in races like the Tour of Georgia and the AT&T Austin Downtown Criterium, and it has twice won the ultra-endurance, 3,052 mile Race Across America (RAAM).   

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2009

January 2009

Bulking Up In Pursuit of Athletic Prowess Has Consequences Later On

The appearance of professional football player William "Refrigerator" Perry used to bother me. It was clear that he had been encouraged to get really big, and I worried about all that extra weight he carried. There were others almost as heavy, of course, but the Fridge was especially likable-he had charisma and an obvious sense of humor. (For fun, he once boxed 7-foot, 7-inch super-skinny former NBA player Manute Bol. He even entered the 2003 Nathan's Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest, coming in about 40 hot dogs behind the winner.) I worried about his health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2009

It’s Not Too Late to Follow Your New Year’s Resolution

Remember that New Year's resolution that you made a few weeks ago?  Oh yeah, that one.  How's that going?  If you're like most people, you may have started to slack off just a little bit.  Or even worse, maybe it's already a distant memory.  No worries, I won't tell.  Let's get you going again.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 27, 2009

Pre-Existing Drugs May Restore Sensitivity to Leptin, an Appetite Suppressing Hormone

Hearts in the medical community beat with considerable excitement at the discovery of leptin in 1994. A hormone produced by fat, leptin has a very useful talent: it tells the brain when to stop eating. So hopes were high that leptin would become the basis of an anti-obesity treatment. What could be simpler than to dose an obese person with a hormone that says, "You're not hungry any more, and you want to stop eating."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2009

Physical Activity Doesn’t Reduce Obesity On Its Own

Current thinking has it that obese people are obese because they engage in less physical activity and burn fewer calories than their thinner counterparts. But suppose you could show that obese women burn just as many calories as their thinner, supposedly fitter counterparts?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2009

Butt Fat Outdoes Gut Fat in Protecting Against Diabetes

Tell this to your non-diabetic friends and relatives: The next time they look in a full-length mirror, they shouldn't be too quick to dismiss their ample hips and bottoms. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2009

Protein That Helps Form Organs Could Control Obesity and Diabetes

According to biologists at the Baylor College of Medicine, limiting the copies of a gene that produces a protein affecting organ development serves to decrease fat cell size in mice, enhance their responsiveness to insulin, and increase their energy level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2009

Unhealthy Weight Loss Methods Tempt Teens With Diabetes

About half of young people who have diabetes report having tried to lose weight at one time or another, says a Kaiser Permanente Southern California study reported in the December 2008 issue of Diabetes Care

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

Metabolic Syndrome Could Be Kidney Disease Precursor in Type 2s

Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong report that having metabolic syndrome may raise the risk of chronic kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2009

Type 1.5 Diabetes

Type 1.5 diabetes, also known as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA), is an autoimmune disease that falls between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes because it has characteristics of both. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

Bypass Surgery Offers Drastic Weight Loss and Remission for Obese Type 2 Teens

In a recent study, obese teens with type 2 diabetes who underwent gastric bypass surgery not only lost a third of their weight, but also experienced the complete remission of their disease.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

December 2008

Study Suggests That Losing Weight, Not a Low-Fat Diet, Reduces Post-Menopausal Women’s Risk of Type 2

Post-menopausal women hoping to avert type 2 diabetes stand a better chance of success if they rely on losing weight rather than on a low-fat diet, according to results of a 12-year study conducted by the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center in Seattle. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Woman Loses 134 Pounds in One Year

About a year ago, Cheryl Tooke found herself in the last place she ever wanted to be. She weighed 268 pounds, and her doctor had just diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes.

comments 85 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Mr. Universe Assaulted by Police During Low Blood Sugar Episode
Mr. Universe Assaulted by Police During Low Blood Sugar Episode

Diabetes Health magazine recently had the pleasure of interviewing Doug Burns for a lengthy feature.  He is a well-spoken and forthcoming man with a good sense of humor and an easy-going manner. Altogether, he comes across as a very nice person. On Sunday, however, Doug Burns was severely beaten by police during an episode of low blood sugar that occurred at a movie theater in Redwood City, California.

comments 60 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Hope for Healthy Hearts, Women Have the Power to Lessen Risk

Many people think of heart disease as something that mostly afflicts men. But heart disease actually kills more women in the United States than anything else, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. And diabetes plays a stronger role in risk for heart disease in women than it does in men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 15, 2008

Four Exercise Strategies for Keeping the Weight Off During the Holidays
Four Exercise Strategies for Keeping the Weight Off During the Holidays

The holiday season presents many challenges for individuals with diabetes. don’t mean to rain on your fruitcake, but research indicates that weight gain during the holiday season is typically on the order of 5 to 10 pounds.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2008

For Many Type 1s, Fear of Hypoglycemia Prevents Exercise
For Many Type 1s, Fear of Hypoglycemia Prevents Exercise

More than 60 percent of adults with type 1 diabetes are not physically active, according to a study in the November 2008 issue of Diabetes Care. Their reason is fear that exercise will bring on hypoglycemia, leading to such severe consequences as loss of consciousness or even death.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

Incidence of Diabetes in Postmenopausal Women Not Reduced By a Low-fat Diet

Next week we'll publish a great article written by Dr. Richard Bernstein. MD. Dr. Bernstein is a long-term proponent of paying more attention to carbs rather than fats (though he certainly doesn't advocate that you can have all the fats you want!) While Dr. Bernstein has been telling us about the benefits of low carb for over 30 years, there is still much skepticism about his (and many other's-Gary Taubes, anyone?) low carb results. The establishment has been slow to be convinced, despite the many research trials that back up their findings.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

Newly Diagnosed People With Diabetes See a $4,200 Increase in Their Annual Medical Expenses
Newly Diagnosed People With Diabetes See a $4,200 Increase in Their Annual Medical Expenses

People who have been newly diagnosed with diabetes will spend substantially more in the first year on medical costs than their non-diabetic counterparts-an average of $4,174 for a 50-year-old-according to RTI International, a non-profit research institute in North Carolina.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

Are You an Athlete with Diabetes? Then You Need This Book! (Part 2)

Last week we published an excerpt from Chapter 4 of Sheri Colberg's revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg has a PhD in exercise physiology, is a Diabetes Health board member, and is herself an athlete with diabetes. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

Things I’ve Learned Along the Way: Notes From a Type 2 Diagnosed in 2003

Once you're diagnosed with type 2, you begin a long, often trial-and-error journey toward creating a daily routine that accommodates your disease without making you feel like an invalid.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!
Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!

Diabetes Health board member Sheri Colberg, PhD, has published a completely revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg, a diabetic athlete herself, has a PhD in exercise physiology. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Facing the (Food and Fitness) Facts: 11 Myth-Busters to Help You Take Charge of the One Thing You Can Control These Days

No doubt about it: Most of us have never felt less in control of our destinies. The stock market is bottoming out and no one knows what to do about it. Jobs are down, food prices are up, and who knows what's going on with gas. To make things even more expensive, the holidays are upon us. Mix all these factors together, and you have a recipe for runaway stress and anxiety. But there is one thing you can control: your body weight. That's right. Now is the time to get fit, lose any extra pounds that might be hanging around, and develop the habits that will keep your weight at a healthful level over the long term. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes
Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes

Becoming pregnant for the first time can be overwhelming for any woman, especially if that woman has diabetes. When my husband and I decided we were ready to have children, the first thing I did was make an appointment with my endocrinologist. Diagnosed when I was fourteen, I've had type 1 diabetes for twenty-four years. My doctor explained that I would need to be in tight control for three months before I could even think about babies, so I got right to work. Learning everything I could about diabetes and pregnancy, I was pleased to discover that with education, support, and practice, a woman with diabetes has every opportunity for a healthy pregnancy.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

The Revised Village People Lyric May Soon Be “It’s Fun to Exercise at the YMCA,” Thanks to Its Diabetes Prevention Program
The Revised Village People Lyric May Soon Be “It’s Fun to Exercise at the YMCA,” Thanks to Its Diabetes Prevention Program

With more than 2,500 facilities serving 10,000 communities that run the gamut from big-city downtowns to small rural sites, the YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association) could turn out to be a powerful tool in the fight to prevent diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 17, 2008

Olympic Swimmer Gary Hall, Jr., Jumps In For World Diabetes Day Swim-A-Thon

Gary Hall, Jr., an Olympic swimmer and ambassador of the Inspired by Diabetes program, will host a swim clinic in conjunction with Drew University's World Diabetes Day Swim-A-Thon on Saturday, November 15, 2008.  The event, which begins at 10 a.m. with a two-hour clinic given by Hall, is followed by the swim-a-thon. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2008

Water Exercises For Improving Your Glucose Tolerance
Water Exercises For Improving Your Glucose Tolerance

Have you ever thought of water exercise as a convenient and effective workout alternative? If not, now might be the time for you to leave the land and get into the water. This workout will challenge your body in a new way, increasing your endurance and muscular strength.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2008

October 2008

How Diabetes Topics in the News Can Start to Feel Like a Game of “Telephone”

A recent Wall Street Journal article shows once again how misinformation about diabetes-related topics can be spread by even the most expert journalists.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives
Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives

I have had type 1 diabetes for 16 years and, after a long path with many ups and downs, I have finally achieved optimal diabetic health. I have discovered the special lifestyle and diet mix that works and have brought my A1c from 11.4% to 5.2% while increasing my energy and overall health. I'm an elite athlete who plays professional ice hockey, and I currently run marathons. 

comments 19 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

You Can Do It! Just 2.5 Hours of Physical Activity a Week Makes a Big Difference

Regular exercise is a large component of maintaining health for people with type 2 diabetes and, let's face it, everyone else. According to the new "Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans" written by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), adults need at least two-and-a-half hours every week of moderate aerobic physical activity. Children should have at least one hour of physical activity every day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

Need Gastric Bypass? Put a Sock in It! The EndoBarrier Gastrointestinal Liner

In gastric bypass surgery, the surgeon basically lops your small intestine in two and then hooks it back up again in such a way that it's much shorter than before. With the first section of your small intestine out of commission, food flows directly from your stomach to the middle of your small intestine. When less intestine is available to absorb food, less food is absorbed, not surprisingly. It works, but it's not pretty. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

Investigational Weight Loss Drug Discussed at Obesity Society Annual Meeting

Orexigen Therapeutics has announced that the investigational weight loss drug Contrave (naltrexone SR/bupropion SR) reduced the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease, by 50 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 13, 2008

Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes
Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes

I'll never forget the afternoon of January 22, 2003, and the phone call that came from Derek's pediatrician. I was just leaving my classroom that day when I noticed the light on my phone lit up, alerting me to a new voicemail. My heart stopped when I listened to the message.  The doctor asked me to call him back as soon as possible.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

Creating Harmony With Diabetes

I awake at 1:00 am with a feeling of sickness in my stomach. I wonder if it's from anxiety created by a weird dream, hormonal imbalances, and/or high blood sugar. Or did I go to bed angry? The deep-sunken feeling of thick stagnant sludge in my stomach begins to settle into my consciousness. My Mini Mag flashlight illuminates the blood sugar meter, which reads 357. I remember in my high blood sugar fogginess that my blood sugar was 140 before I went to sleep, and I did nothing out of the ordinary. Now, only a few hours later, I am rudely awakened and have to force myself to gather my senses to correct the situation. Fluctuations in blood sugar are mind boggling and frustrating, not to mention the feelings of irritability, anger, fatigue, victimization, and depression that come along in daily life with diabetes. It can create a sense of failure if one does not get a handle on creating a healthy mind, body, and spirit.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

September 2008

Getting Middle Schoolers to Exercise

Joel Shpigel's dad was considered a "large" man. He was 37 the day he had a "heart scare." "He didn't have a heart attack, but his doctor said he was headed for one," Shpigel recalls. His father decided to begin exercising. Joel, who was also overweight, decided to join him.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 29, 2008

Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe
Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe

These days, Doug Burns is a modern Sampson. The reigning Mr. Universe, he’s two hundred pounds of sheer muscle and the picture of good health. Of the skinny little boy with type 1 who used to work out in the woods alone, all that remains are a wry sense of humor and an attractively self-deprecating manner. They’re unexpected in a man who’s triumphed in the uber-masculine world of bodybuilding, but there’s a lot that’s unexpected about Doug Burns.

comments 31 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Shedding Habits and Pounds: No Brand-Name Diets, No Gym Memberships

I remember the call from the doctor's office two weeks after a long overdue annual physical. I sat in the examining room expecting to hear the usual "lose weight" diagnosis. I had been feeling tired and had been making more than a few daily trips to the bathroom. But in spite of the fact that my grandmother, father, cousin, and brother all suffered from type 2 diabetes, I was not prepared for my doctor's stern warning: My sugar had been totally out of control for several months. I needed to adjust my diet and lifestyle immediately. I was a 40-year-old chocoholic and totally calorie clueless. I also weighed 255 pounds. The doctor prescribed an oral medication and told me that monthly visits for testing would now be required. I thought, OK, I can do this.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 18, 2008

On the Ball: Alleviating Back Pain

Four out of five adults experience back pain during their lifetime. The problem becomes chronic for five to ten percent of sufferers. Back pain can result from being overweight, sleeping on an uncomfortable bed, or incurring an injury. The best way to alleviate back pain, according to Timothy J. Gray, DO, in his book Back Works, lies in a solid exercise program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes
As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes

With 21 million U.S. residents now officially diagnosed as having diabetes, healthcare professionals are looking at another statistic that is causing them many a sleepless night: The Centers for Disease Control estimate that there are 57 million people with pre-diabetes in the United States. (Pre-diabetes is defined as impaired fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl, impaired glucose tolerance of 140 to 199 mg/dl, or both.)

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

August 2008

Byetta Takes a Beating as Feds Question Its Safety; Defender Chides FDA for Bureaucracy and Bad Science

Byetta has had a tough past few days. A lawsuit by a Virginia man alleges that the drug caused his life-threatening bout of severe pancreatitis, and there are rumblings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that it may force Byetta's makers to attach a "black box" warning to its container and packaging-a stern, highlighted caution about potentially dangerous, even fatal, side effects. 

comments 19 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

Sleep Apnea and Diabetes

Imagine someone pressing a pillow over your face while you sleep. You wake up and struggle for air. After 10 seconds, you're allowed to breathe again. But pretty soon, the pillow goes back over your face.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

Reaching the Finish Line
Reaching the Finish Line

As an Ironman triathlete with type 1, I get asked a lot of questions.

How do you control your blood sugar during a race?

What foods do you eat?
What products do you use?
How do you balance work, family, training, and diabetes?


Sometimes, people simply ask me if I am nuts. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

BBC Gets It Wrong About Broccoli’s Curative Abilities
BBC Gets It Wrong About Broccoli’s Curative Abilities

A recent story put out by the British Broadcasting Corporation proclaimed that eating broccoli could reverse the damage to heart blood vessels caused by diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

July 2008

Children’s Nutrition and Fitness Education Program Scores

WakeMed Health & Hospitals Children’s Diabetes ENERGIZE! program has won the coveted NOVA Award from the American Hospital Association (AHA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2008

Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls
Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls

Metformin, combined with dietary changes and exercise, seems to help obese pre-diabetic adolescents, especially girls, lose weight, says a report in the June 2008 Journal of Pediatrics.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

Amputee Coalition of America Enjoys Record Attendance at its National Conference
Amputee Coalition of America Enjoys Record Attendance at its National Conference

The 2008 Amputee Coalition of America’s annual national conference in Atlanta June 19 through 22 set new attendance records, driven by interest in the proposed federal prosthetic parity law and other issues of importance to amputees.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

June 2008

Interim Study Shows That Intestinal Barrier Produces Weight Loss and Type 2 Remission
Interim Study Shows That Intestinal Barrier Produces Weight Loss and Type 2 Remission

An impermeable liner inserted non-surgically into a portion of the small intestine produces rapid weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes, according to a Montana endocrinologist.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Stacking the Deck: Carb Cards Make Counting Carbs a Cinch

This year Carb Cards™ have added calorie and fat gram information to the 3rd edition of the carbohydrate counting flashcards. Twelve new cards with information on such foods as oatmeal, beans, and fish have been added to the revised 55-card deck to encourage healthier choices and more variety in meal planning.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 26, 2008

EatSmart Scale Lives Up to Its Name
EatSmart Scale Lives Up to Its Name

When you have diabetes, you make the acquaintance of a lot of high-tech tools to help you manage it: monitors, meters and pumps. One very handy tool that sometimes gets overlooked is a digital scale for weighing and analyzing the nutritional content of food.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2008

Sign Up to Join Diabetes Health's Visionary Plan

Dear friends of Diabetes Health,

We value your hard-earned diabetes wisdom and we want you to share it with the world! Please join us as a professional or lay diabetes advisor in one of our Diabetes Health website content Rooms.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2008

May 2008

Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission
Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission

Dear Diabetes Health,

I appreciated Jamie Bailes’ (April/May 2008) article on helping overweight kids. To me, it illustrated the complexity of weight regulation and the folly of linking it to one factor (fat).

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes
Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes

Is it possible that a dip in the hot tub can cause a dip in the blood sugars? According to a pilot study that appeared in the September 16 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), "hot tub therapy" helped a group of type 2s reduce their blood sugars, lose weight and improve sleep patterns.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 23, 2008

Letter of the Week: Joan Hoover Says Amphetamines Should Not Be Prescribed to Stop Onset of Type 2 in Overweight Children

Editor's Note: This week's letter is from Joan Hoover, one of our favorite and most outspoken board members. Joan is also our patient advocate advisor. She is a tireless diabetes educator and advocate for people's access to clear, accurate, and unbiased information about the disease. When Joan speaks, we sit up and listen! Her letter is addressed to Editor-in-Chief Scott King and Diabetes Health pharmacy advisory board member R. Keith Campbell. Campbell had commented favorably on news that a doctor had successfully treated obesity in children by prescribing amphetamines.

comments 7 comments - Posted May 22, 2008

Illinois Doctor Prescribes Amphetamine To Help Kids Lose Weight and Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Teenage obesity is a growing problem. Not only does it make teens susceptible to type 2 diabetes, but it's also very hard on the teens themselves, who are often bullied or ostracized because of their weight. What can a doctor do when a teen can't seem to lose weight with diet and exercise?

comments 8 comments - Posted May 22, 2008

Spencer Helps Me Exercise
Spencer Helps Me Exercise

You can't have diabetes without knowing about the merits of exercise.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 8, 2008

The Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association Conference

The Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association Conference will feature speakers from the sports and health care professions, the latest research on diabetes, a discussion on the role of exercise in insulin pump therapy, and advances in diabetes treatment and management.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2008

April 2008

How We Learned to Stop Procrastinating and Love Exercise
How We Learned to Stop Procrastinating and Love Exercise

Have you ever met anyone who thinks they get enough exercise? Everywhere you look there are books, web sites, exercise videos and articles telling people how to get started and how to stay motivated. Our family certainly avoided any kind of exercise plan. Although we played in the yard, took walks, rode our bikes, and played soccer, I never woke up thinking, "What can we do for exercise today?" Even though I knew we weren't active enough, I didn't want another thing to do.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

"I Don't Live Like I Have Diabetes"
"I Don't Live Like I Have Diabetes"

A Question-and-Answer Session With Jordan Hoese, A 14-Year-Old Type 1 Marathon Runner.

comments 16 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

Texans: DiabetesAmerica Offers Free Online Health and Lifestyle Classes
Texans: DiabetesAmerica Offers Free Online Health and Lifestyle Classes

DiabetesAmerica, a network of diabetes care and management centers across Texas, is offering free online health and lifestyle classes to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

Her Last-Minute Competition Entry Nets This Playwright Professor a $100,000 Grant

It’s late October, 2007, and Prof. Wendy Coleman has just learned about a competition called the Bayer Dream Fund. Coleman, a type 2 who was diagnosed in 2005, has been told that the fund grants a large cash award to the competition winner – money the winner can use to fund a personal project designed to spread the word about managing and living successfully with diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2008

March 2008

Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21
Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21

Professional surfer Scott Dunton, 21, has two missions in life: To keep climbing in the rankings as one of the world’s top competitive surfers, and to spread the word to children and teenagers everywhere that having diabetes doesn’t mean life’s joys come to a halt.

comments 16 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Research Into Natural Herbs Leads To Lower A1c, 190-lb Weight Loss

I am a diabetic and was taking four insulin shots per day and still had problems with my sugar. I did two months of research on the Web because I had to find a way to get off the shots. I hate needles I was astonished at what I found on natural herbs!

comments 38 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

Legal and Illegal Drugs: What Every Person With Diabetes Should Know Before They Party

Perhaps more than anyone, people with diabetes know that the motto “Just say no” often doesn’t work.

comments 29 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

Exercise: A Proven Way to Improve Diabetes

It's not easy to do, but regular exercise is a wonderfully effective way to control your blood sugar and fend off the other metabolic effects of diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

Type 2 Diabetes May Be Caused by Intestinal Dysfunction
Type 2 Diabetes May Be Caused by Intestinal Dysfunction

NEW YORK – Growing evidence shows that surgery may effectively cure type 2 diabetes – an approach that not only may change the way the disease is treated, but that introduces a new way of thinking about diabetes.

comments 18 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

A New Paradigm for Eating Foods With a Low Glycemic Impact

What is the secret of effective weight management? When a person develops type 2 diabetes, this is a critical question. Losing weight is one of the most successful ways of dealing with this disorder. This is the challenge that I faced when I diagnosed as diabetic about 15 years ago. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2008

February 2008

U.K. Study Says Older People with Diabetes Run Greater Risk of Disabilities

A British study of 800 people 65 and older concludes that people with diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to experience difficulties walking, dressing and climbing stairs.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 26, 2008

January 2008

Gastric Banding Reverses Impact of Type 2 Diabetes

A new world-first study by Monash University researchers has found gastric banding surgery has a profound impact on one of society's biggest health issues - diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 23, 2008

NATA Issues Guidelines for Diabetic Athletes

The National Athletic Trainers Association has issued a seven-element plan for helping athletes with type 1 diabetes maintain proper blood sugar levels while competing, training or traveling.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2008

December 2007

Excuse Me While I Clip on Some Motivation
Excuse Me While I Clip on Some Motivation

Forget the inspirational tapes and cancel the personal trainer! People with diabetes looking for motivation when it comes to exercise may have to look no further than the lowly pedometer.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2007

Diabetes Experiences and Art
Diabetes Experiences and Art

David Bradley, age 44, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1991. A talented artist who recently went on the pump, he expresses his experiences with diabetes through his multimedia art.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 2007

November 2007

Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication
Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication

I learned that I had type 2 diabetes in February 1994. A dozen years later, I knew I had to make a change. Technically speaking, I was "morbidly obese." I'm tall - 6 feet, 2½ inches - but I tipped the scales at 312 pounds and had a body mass index (BMI) of 40.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2007

Study Explains Why I'm Fat and You're Not: Over-Eating Linked to Low Dopamine

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter; that is, a molecule that carries messages between neurons in your brain. It's a feel-good neurotransmitter that makes you think "I want that! I'm going to get it! And wow, that was great!"

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2007

We May Be Fatter, But We Think We Look Darn Good
We May Be Fatter, But We Think We Look Darn Good

In a recent 35-page report, two economists attempted to explain why we're all getting fatter. First, relative to consumer goods as a whole, the price of a calorie has dropped by 36 percent since 1977.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2007

Insulin on the Brain Makes For A Shorter Life?

Fact One: Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is a protein that sits on cell surfaces; its job is to allow those cells to respond to insulin.
Fact Two:
Starved mice, which have low blood levels of insulin and heightened insulin sensitivity, live longer than well-fed mice.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2007

Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults
Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults

A study of 2543 obese Mayo Clinic patients has revealed that only 505 of them were formally diagnosed as obese. If they were diagnosed, it was more likely to be done by a resident than by a staff physician.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2007

Leptin: Could It Be The Connection Between Obesity and Diabetes?

The word leptin comes from the Greek word leptos, meaning thin. A hormone produced by fat cells, it binds to a spot in the brain known as the satiety center, thereby announcing to the brain that the body has had enough to eat, that plenty of energy is stored in the fat, and that there is no need to eat any more right now. In short, its effect on the brain is to reduce appetite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2007

It Looks Like Our Society Actually Wants All Our Kids to be Fat!
It Looks Like Our Society Actually Wants All Our Kids to be Fat!

Right now, nearly one in six children is overweight. Given the findings of a group of studies recently published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, however, it's a wonder that they all aren't fat. Their environment is certainly working against them.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2007

You Can Only Resist So Much Temptation: Study Shows That Self Control Can Get Depleted
You Can Only Resist So Much Temptation: Study Shows That Self Control Can Get Depleted

According to recent research, we have a finite amount of temptation-resisting resources. If we use up all our self-control resisting one temptation, we don't have any left to use against another temptation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 4, 2007

Diabetes Increasing along U.S. - Mexico Border

El Paso, Texas, October 31, 2007 - Diabetes has become the leading cause of death in Mexico and the third-leading cause of death among those living along the U.S. side of the border, according to a new study presented today by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2007

October 2007

Infectobesity: Catching Obesity From A Virus

Human adenovirus-36 (AD-36) is an unwelcome visitor already because it causes colds, infections like pink-eye, and small intestine inflammation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2007

Why Some Obese People Don't Get Type 2 and Some Lean People Do

Whether or not you get fat is not the critical factor in developing type 2 diabetes, according to a recent mouse study by Texas researchers; instead, it's where that fat is packed away.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 16, 2007

A Bit of Exercise, But a Lot of Benefit
A Bit of Exercise, But a Lot of Benefit

There's been a plethora of research lately documenting the health benefits of any sort of exercise, no matter how modest. The most recent documents a twelve-week study of 106 sedentary middle-aged folks who were assigned to one of three regimens: walking thirty minutes three days a week; walking thirty minutes five days a week; or doing nothing at all.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2007

Symlin Promising as Weight Loss Drug
Symlin Promising as Weight Loss Drug

Symlin, or pramlintide, is synthetic amylin, a natural hormone that slows stomach emptying and leads to a feeling of fullness. Currently Symlin is used to dampen blood sugar rises in people with diabetes, but it's showing potential as a weight loss drug as well, according to a recent study.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 12, 2007

Aerobic and Resistance Exercise: Good Alone,  but Best Together
Aerobic and Resistance Exercise: Good Alone, but Best Together

A study comparing the benefits of aerobic versus resistance training has found that either is good, but both are better, when it comes to lowering A1c's in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2007

September 2007

Chinese and South Asians Carry More Visceral Fat

Fat deep inside your abdomen, called visceral fat, collects and clusters around your vital organs. From there, it sends out proteins and hormones that are associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2007

A Heart Full of Fat Precedes Type 2 Diabetes

Studies of rats, those ever-useful creatures, have already shown that a fatty heart accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the heart fat produces toxins that cause heart cell death and then heart failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2007

Calling All Diabetic Exercisers: Help Write a Book

Sheri Colberg, PhD, is writing the 2nd edition of her book, The Diabetic Athlete. Updated throughout, it will cover the use of the newest insulins, new medications like Symlin and Byetta, and all the latest devices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2007

Bariatric Surgery Extends Life For Very Obese People

Two large studies, both published in the New England Journal of Medicine, have just confirmed that if you're obese, weight loss surgery can make you live longer. A Swedish study tracked about 4000 obese people, about half of whom had undergone gastric bypass or lap band surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2007

People on Low Glycemic Diets Lose More Weight

An Australian review of six short clinical trials has found that low glycemic diets (which involve eating foods that raise blood sugar slowly instead of quickly) cause about two pounds more weight loss than calorie-restricted diets.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2007

August 2007

Walk, Don't Run: Moderate Exercise Best To Lower Bad Triglycerides
Walk, Don't Run: Moderate Exercise Best To Lower Bad Triglycerides

If breaking into a run is about as appealing to you as breaking into a rash, here's a bit of good news for you. Six months of moderate exercise, to the tune of walking about twelve miles a week, lowers your VLDL (bad) triglycerides much more than a daunting twelve to twenty weekly miles of jogging on a treadmill.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2007

Chris Jarvis Wins Rowing Gold at Pan Am  Games: Olympic Gold Medal winning rower wins gold yet again at the Pan Am games in Rio de Janeiro
Chris Jarvis Wins Rowing Gold at Pan Am Games: Olympic Gold Medal winning rower wins gold yet again at the Pan Am games in Rio de Janeiro

A Canadian Olympic rower and marathon runner, Chris Jarvis, age 26, exhibits the endurance of most elite athletes. However, few would know that for nearly 13 years he has lived and struggled with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2007

For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play
For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play

The possibility of heart disease is a nagging worry when you have a child with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-nine percent of type 1 children have at least one cardiac risk factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2007

Visceral Fat Leads to Increase in Vitamin A Transporter

Visceral fat (fat around your internal organs) is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk, but it's hard to measure without using fancy imaging techniques.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2007

Lite For Life:  A Weight-Loss Program Founded on Blood Sugar Control
Lite For Life: A Weight-Loss Program Founded on Blood Sugar Control

There are plenty of corporate weight-loss programs around, but Lite For Life is a weight loss program with a difference: Its philosophy is based upon the work of Seale Harris, a diabetes pioneer who discovered hyperinsulinism (excess secretion of insulin related to insulin resistance) in 1924.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2007

In Eight Years, Seventy-Five Percent of Americans Will Be Overweight
In Eight Years, Seventy-Five Percent of Americans Will Be Overweight

America is fat now, but we'll be even fatter later. According to a meta-analysis of twenty studies and four national surveys, 75 percent of us will be overweight, and 41 percent of those will be downright obese, by the year 2015. Even our children, nearly a quarter of them, will be overweight or obese by then.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2007

The Scarlett O'Hara Effect:  Just One Inch Off Your Waist Cuts Risk of Metabolic Syndrome
The Scarlett O'Hara Effect: Just One Inch Off Your Waist Cuts Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

A French study, recently published in Diabetes Care, tracked the effects of swelling and shrinking waistlines on risk of developing metabolic syndrome (often considered a precursor of type 2 diabetes).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2007

Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat
Researchers Find a New Marker of Deep Belly Fat

Central adiposity, visceral fat, intra-abdominal fat, or a big belly, they all mean the same thing: increased risk of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2007

July 2007

Making Mice Fat or Thin with an Injection
Making Mice Fat or Thin with an Injection

Stressed mice get fat, according to a study out of Georgetown University Medical Center. And now they know the mechanism that does it; in fact, they can manipulate that mechanism to make the mice fat, or they can block the mechanism and keep the mice from getting fat no matter how stressed they may be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2007

Fat Friends Make You Fat?
Fat Friends Make You Fat?

According to a new article in the New England Journal of Medicine, obesity is socially contagious, spreading from person to person within a social network. If your friend becomes obese, your odds of becoming obese go up 57 percent. And if your portly friend considers you a friend as well, your odds of becoming equally plump rise 171 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2007

From Fat To Fit: Turn Yourself Into a Weapon of Mass Reduction
From Fat To Fit: Turn Yourself Into a Weapon of Mass Reduction

This book chronicles one woman's lifestyle change and how her journey ignited a popular movement called the "Meltdown" that brought an entire county together in a community-wide weight loss experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2007

Alli Can't Do It All: Pills May Increase Unhealthy Behavior

On one hand, GlaxoSmithKline really, really wants you to take their new over-the-counter diet pill, alli. On the other hand, they don't want you to abandon healthy habits in favor of pill popping.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2007

In Case You Had Any Doubts: Exercise Is Tops For Blood Sugar Control
In Case You Had Any Doubts: Exercise Is Tops For Blood Sugar Control

An overview of 103 research reports comprising 10,455 subjects has found that it's better to stick to exercise than to spread yourself too thin by trying to change your activity level, diet, and medication all at the same time.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2007

Obese At Eighteen?  Toss a Coin to See If You'll Get Diabetes
Obese At Eighteen? Toss a Coin to See If You'll Get Diabetes

Obese eighteen-year-old boys with a body mass index between thirty and 35 have a one in two chance of developing diabetes later in life. The odds are even a bit worse for obese young women. These were the dismal findings of a study just published in Diabetes Care using data from the National Health Interview Survey of 780,694 people between 1997 and 2004.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2007

A Pilgrimage to Peace With Diabetes
A Pilgrimage to Peace With Diabetes

Each year, one hundred thousand peregrinos, or pilgrims, set out for Santiago De Compostela in northwestern Spain to visit the bones of St. James buried beneath the cathedral. Called El Camino de Santiago, it's one of the world's largest Christian pilgrimages.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 6, 2007

Your Plate Can Help You Lose Weight
Your Plate Can Help You Lose Weight

Dishware is destiny, according to new research just published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. There exists a plate that has just been scientifically proven to cause weight loss. And it's a mighty cute little piece of pottery to boot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2007

Mountains and Diabetes: Fourth International Event to Challenge Diabetes Perceptions and Myths

Bozeman, Montana - Many people consider a diagnosis of diabetes a sentence to a life full of limitation. "That's not so," says Jeff Mazer, the Bozeman organizer of MADiDEA 2007, an event highlighting how to live a full life with diabetes while addressing the challenge of managing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2007

LifeScan Awards Prize for Athletic Achievement: Athletes with Diabetes Recognized for Outstanding Accomplishments

Colorado Springs, CO, July 2, 2007 - LifeScan, Inc. announced the 2007 recipients of the LifeScan Prize for Athletic Achievement on June 30 at the annual meeting of the Diabetes Exercise and Sports Association (DESA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2007

June 2007

Bariatric Surgery: The Operation Diet
Bariatric Surgery: The Operation Diet

Bariatric Surgery isn't just for weight loss anymore. It's been shown to be possibly curative of type 2 diabetes even in the absence of major weight loss following the surgery. Here's the rundown on how it works.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes
Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes

Kevin Powell is an athlete, first and foremost. Twice a year, he competes in an Ironman event, a grueling test of endurance that entails a 2.4-mile swim and a 112-mile bike ride, topped off by a full marathon of 26.2 miles.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

Symlin Curtails Fast Food Binges in Weight Loss Study
Symlin Curtails Fast Food Binges in Weight Loss Study

As many of us know to our dismay, the desire to chow down fatty, sugary food can be very strong indeed. In a recent six-week study of 88 obese, non-diabetic men and women, Symlin, a synthetic hormone currently used to dampen diabetic blood sugar swings, was found to dampen those very desires.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 27, 2007

Watching TV Directly Correlated to Higher A1c's in Kids with Type 1 Diabetes
Watching TV Directly Correlated to Higher A1c's in Kids with Type 1 Diabetes

Every hour that type 1 children spend watching cartoons, sitcoms, and even, alas, public television, correlates to an increase in A1c, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2007

Creating a Family Culture of  Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time
Creating a Family Culture of Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time

Several years ago, my husband Brian and my son Danny were eating at the Food Court of a local mall. "Dad, when someone gets three wishes from the genie in the lamp, why don't they just wish for more wishes?" Danny asked. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2007

Team Type 1 Races Across America to Raise Diabetes Awareness
Team Type 1 Races Across America to Raise Diabetes Awareness

Twenty-five years ago, at the age of seven months, Phil Southerland was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the time gave his mother very dismal predictions about his prospects, but he blew all those right out of the water.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 13, 2007

May 2007

Gastric Bypass Surgery Being Considered as Treatment for Type 2
Gastric Bypass Surgery Being Considered as Treatment for Type 2

Bariatric surgery, formerly used only for treating obesity, is being explored as a cure for type 2 diabetes in normal weight or moderately overweight people.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 19, 2007

Humor Article: Regular Exercise Reverses Aging (and Makes You Feel Good Naked!)
Humor Article: Regular Exercise Reverses Aging (and Makes You Feel Good Naked!)

In any one-on-one contest, My Beloved beats me every which way. Smarter and more attractive, with better genes and the clout of a Harvard degree, she’s got me by the proverbials. But I maintain an edge in one tiny area. And my edge is gaining as we’ve begun checking our rear view mirrors for that era called Middle Age.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 11, 2007

Insulin Resistance Leads to LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults)

Overweight and insulin resistance may contribute to LADA, a form of type 1 diabetes, according to results of a study by Dr. Sofia Carlsson and her fellow researchers from Stockholm.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2007

New Type 2 Drugs Januvia and Byetta Offer Big Benefits
New Type 2 Drugs Januvia and Byetta Offer Big Benefits

The 21st century may be remembered as the time when diabetes became a worldwide epidemic. However, it may also be known as the time when the disease was cured.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 3, 2007

Gary Hall, Type 1 Swimming Champion, Uses His Sponsors to Promote Diabetes Awareness
Gary Hall, Type 1 Swimming Champion, Uses His Sponsors to Promote Diabetes Awareness

In the world of competitive swimming, type 1 athlete Gary Hall is a living legend. He was the oldest Olympic swimmer in eighty years when he won gold in the last Summer Olympics. He’s the fourth most decorated Olympian of all time.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2007

April 2007

Prescription For Exercise: The Physician's Role In Helping Patients
Prescription For Exercise: The Physician's Role In Helping Patients

Paper from University of Michigan family physicians details ways primary care doctors can help sedentary patients get moving.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2007

Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.
Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.

If food groups were sporting leagues, carbs would be the NFL. You've got your low carb teams, your high carb vegan teams, and your middling carb teams—and each team believes that truth is on its side.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat
Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat

Carbs and carbs alone, not fat, increase body weight. It doesn't matter whether the carbs are from sugar, bread, fruit, or vegetables: They’re all rapidly digested and quickly converted to blood glucose.  A short time after a carb-rich meal, the glucose in your bloodstream rises rapidly, and your pancreas produces a large amount of insulin to take the excess glucose out.

comments 26 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Vegan Diet is Best
Why the Vegan Diet is Best

Remember the big picture: Populations that stick to traditional high-carbohydrate diets (for example, Asian rice-based diets) typically have low rates of obesity and diabetes. When they abandon traditional rice-based diets in favor of meatier Western fare, carbohydrate intake falls, but weight problems and diabetes increase.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Low Carb Diet is Best
Why the Low Carb Diet is Best

When I developed diabetes in 1946, physicians thought that the high illness and death rate of diabetics was due to dietary fat and the supposedly resultant elevation of serum cholesterol. Since the DCCT trial, the scientific literature overwhelmingly supports the role of elevated blood sugar in all long-term diabetic complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan
Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan

Let’s be realistic and take a long-term perspective in this “which diet is best” debate, rather than wasting time quibbling over extremes—from low-carb to vegan. You’ll have type 2 diabetes for the rest of your life, and you’ll likely struggle with weight management throughout your life as well. The major challenge in weight loss, and even more so in weight maintenance, is long-term adherence.

comments 13 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education
Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education

The story of Doug Burns’ arrest during a low blood sugar episode has generated a lot of comments from the diabetes community. How did it happen, why did it happen, and how could it have been handled differently?

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 19, 2007

Geocaching For Diabetes Awareness
Geocaching For Diabetes Awareness

Want to get some exercise, hunt for treasure, and raise diabetes awareness at the same time? Play the “Unite for Diabetes Travel Bug Challenge.”  It’s a geocaching game with a high purpose, and all you need to play is a Global Positioning System unit (GPS) and a sense of adventure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2007

Portion Distortion: Why Bigger Really Isn't Better
Portion Distortion: Why Bigger Really Isn't Better

Ah, the good life. Dining out, shopping for clothes, dining out, shopping for clothes, dining out, shopping…wait a minute. Is there a pattern here?  Americans are eating out more and more, and leading researchers say that’s a big part of why so many of us are overweight. The biggest part of that big part? Big portions–Portion Distortion!

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2007

Lifting Depression Lowers Blood Sugar
Lifting Depression Lowers Blood Sugar

It’s well known that depression is not good for your sugar numbers and that alleviation of depression is accompanied by improved glucose control. The question has been whether the improvement is due to body weight reduction and better self-care, or whether it might be partially due to healing of the depression condition itself, independent of the aforementioned two factors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2007

Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave
Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave "Good Enough" Alone

There's an ancient Greek myth about a man named Sisyphus who was cursed to roll the same rock up a hill, then see it roll down, then roll it up again, for eternity.  There's something a bit like diabetes self-care in that myth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2007

Tai Chi To the Rescue: Research Supports Efficacy of Tai Chi As An Exercise for Everyone
Tai Chi To the Rescue: Research Supports Efficacy of Tai Chi As An Exercise for Everyone

You may have seen a group of senior citizens practicing the slow, rhythmic reaching and deliberate stretching movements known as tai chi. Tai chi is considered a soft style martial art, applied with deep relaxation or "softness" in the musculature. Young or old, sick or healthy, even wheel-chair bound:  everyone can take up tai chi. And oddly enough, tai chi’s gentle motions burn more calories than surfing and nearly as many as downhill skiing.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2007

Diabetic Cancer Survivor Rides to Inspire
Diabetic Cancer Survivor Rides to Inspire

To be a cancer surviving athlete is to be admired. That has not been the case for me as a diabetic athlete. There has never been a special finish line acknowledging the courage, perseverance, and sheer determination it takes to live with diabetes and be out on that course riding, running, or walking. I want this to change.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2007

Ringing a Bell for Health

I was really pleased to see the article about Andy Bell, (“Buffed Into Health”). I am a sociology professor at William Woods University and have forwarded this article to the nurse on campus, as well as to the Human Performance Department.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2007

When You Couldn't Care Less
When You Couldn't Care Less

Have you lost interest in the world around you? Are you more difficult to engage in conversation or in doing chores? Have you lost interest in doing things or in starting new activities? Are you apathetic or indifferent?  If your answer to these questions is yes, then you may be suffering from apathy syndrome.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 5, 2007

March 2007

Reach Over the Counter for Orlistat: Weight loss drug now available without prescription
Reach Over the Counter for Orlistat: Weight loss drug now available without prescription

GlaxoSmithKline announced in February 2007 that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved orlistat for over-the-counter use. It’s been christened “alli,” and it contains 60 mg of orlistat, as opposed to the prescription form, Xenical, which contains 120 mg of orlistat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2007

Glycerine and Exercise - Q&A

Q: I’m reading “The Diabetic Athlete,” by Sheri Colberg-Ochs. She writes that it’s good for diabetics to take some glycerol (glycerine) when exercising. Is this pure glycerol or is this in powder form? Here in Denmark I can get only the glycerol liquid, and I thought it was a constipation product.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2007

Social Walking is the Ticket to Exercise Success
Social Walking is the Ticket to Exercise Success

Think back to the first time you tasted alcohol or puffed your first cigarette. As odd as it sounds (and unfortunately), after your first distaste you may have learned to like them. Obviously, we can condition ourselves to enjoy, even relish, something we once hated. This can and does work for the positive as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2007

Good Neighbor Pharmacy To Be Official Medical Supply Sponsor Of Eight Ironman Events: Good Neighbor Pharmacy’s Diabetes Shoppe also sponsors “Iron Andy” Holder

Valley Forge, Pa. - Good Neighbor Pharmacy®, a 25 year old network of independently owned pharmacies with over 2,700 locations nationwide, is proud to be the “Official Medical Supply” sponsor of the 2007 Ironman 70.3 California and seven other Ironman events.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2007

Adult Diabetes Camp
Adult Diabetes Camp

Diabetes camp isn’t just for kids anymore. For type 1 athletes who want expert coaching on how to fit diabetes management into intense physical training, Stroke, Spin, and Stride’s week-long summer camp for grown-ups fits the bill. Says camp founder Matthew Corcoran, M.D, “We’ve hand-chosen our team of coaches and medical staff, and we’ve designed our programs to foster highly individualized attention.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2007

Low Carb Questions and Answers From an Atkins Proponent
Low Carb Questions and Answers From an Atkins Proponent

Are ketones a healthy or an unhealthy sign?
Ketones in the urine can be a danger sign if your blood sugar is too high and insulin levels are too low. It can indicate acidosis, an abnormal condition usually occurring in people with out of control type 1 diabetes requiring immediate medical attention. Ketones can also occur because of other metabolic conditions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2007

Jay Hewitt Responds to Diabetes Health Reader Questions
Jay Hewitt Responds to Diabetes Health Reader Questions

Jay Hewitt is a 39-year-old who has had type 1 diabetes since 1991. He is also an elite Ironman triathlete, tops in a demanding sport that requires a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a 26.2-mile run. A three-time member of the U.S. National Team for Long Course Triathlon, he is captain of Team Joslin at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, MA.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2007

February 2007

Mainstream Press Calls Type 2s Couch Potatoes After Study in Diabetes Care
Mainstream Press Calls Type 2s Couch Potatoes After Study in Diabetes Care

A study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care revealed that only 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes get regular exercise, compared to 58 percent of people without diabetes. Among people who were at risk for the disease, as the number of risk factors increased, the amount of exercise decreased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2007

Shocker! Weight Loss Reduces Diabetes Risk
Shocker! Weight Loss Reduces Diabetes Risk

The diabetes research community was knocked on its ear when findings were published stating that any efforts to reduce the risk of developing type 2 should start with weight reduction.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Majority of Edmonton Protocol Participants Don’t Stay Off Insulin After One Year

Despite successfully restoring insulin production and blood-glucose stability after transplantation, insulin independence is usually not sustainable after the Edmonton Protocol.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Better to Keep Weight In Check During Infancy

Researchers in Finland are advising parents that excess weight gain during infancy increases the risk of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

January 2007

Break It Up, Break It Up

Researchers at Indiana University have found that breaking your daily walk into several short episodes is better for your blood pressure than one sustained bout of exercise.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2007

Buffed Into Health
Buffed Into Health

It was supposed to be a simple test: I’d pee in a cup, listen to my doctor’s suggestions to feel better, and go home with a prescription. Except on that day, it wasn’t that simple. I sat in the exam room and waited for my doctor to return. When he finally did and started to talk, saying that he suspected diabetes, I remember seeing my mom’s face fall.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2007

December 2006

Moderate Weight Loss Good for the Arteries

University of Pittsburgh researchers say that moderate weight loss improves arterial stiffness in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

Hypos Decreased During Exercise When Basal is Discontinued

“Discontinuing basal insulin during exercise is an effective strategy for reducing hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes,” say researchers from Tampa, Florida, “but the risk of hyperglycemia is increased.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

November 2006

Stocking-Stuffer Strategies to Stay the Course During the Holidays
Stocking-Stuffer Strategies to Stay the Course During the Holidays

The holidays are here again and, as we all know, the month of December is one of the biggest threats to both the dietary and exercise regimens to which we have so faithfully adhered since, well, the end of the last holiday season.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2006