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April 2014

Life With Type 2: The Power of Naming

This is not a religious essay, so please don't take the example below wrong.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2014

Tequila-Related Natural Sweetener Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar

There's sweet news for type 2s who have been longing for the taste of sugar without the nasty side effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2014

Why We Need Them

Endocrinologists are in a funny position when it comes to people with diabetes. We spend so much time with our diseases that we don't really need them to manage things on a daily basis, but we can't write our prescriptions on our own. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2014

Jerry the Bear Guides Kids Through Type 1 Diagnosis

Each year, 186,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and many are the only ones in their family with the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2014

March 2014

Another Blow to the "Saturated Fat Is Bad" School of Thought

Research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and reported on by The New York Times, says that sugary foods and excess carbohydrates, not saturated fat, are the main culprits in the build-up of artery-clogging particles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2014

Weight Watchers Offers Type 2 Program Through Employers

NEW YORK, PRNewswire--Weight Watchers International, Inc. has announced Weight Watchers for Diabetes, a new program that serves the unique needs of employees with type 2 diabetes by integrating personalized coaching from a certified diabetes educator into Weight Watchers' approach to weight loss and management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2014

Mouth Spray Could Aid Weight Loss

Few things are better for us or more difficult to sustain than losing weight. Whatever the cause--genetics, environment, our own bad choices--human bodies can be easily turned into sugar-craving machines. Turning our bodies from that course is easy enough for a week or three, but sustaining weight loss over many months and years is notoriously difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2014

Life-Prolonging Chemical Could Someday Lead to Type 2 Treatment

A recent article in Scientific American discusses a synthetic chemical that has extended the lifespan of lab mice by mimicking the effects of a low-calorie diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2014

February 2014

Life With Type 2: The Caveman's Gift

The Neanderthals--Homo sapiens neanderthalensis--entered popular imagination more than 160 years ago when their remains were first discovered in Germany's Neander Valley (thal in German).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2014

Exercise Can Temporarily Counteract Overeating

With the first few weeks of 2014 done, those with New Year's resolutions to exercise are probably beginning to drop out. After all, how many sub-zero jogs or shaky-legged visits to the gym can one person stand? Not many, that's for sure. But before you abandon that promise altogether, how about another reminder on the usefulness of exercise?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2014

December 2013

Most People Don't Hold Back on Holiday Eating, Poll Finds

A telephone poll of 1,035 adults just released by CNN/ORC International show that 53 percent of Americans don't hold back from eating Christmas holiday foods and treats, and instead indulge themselves because it's a special time of the year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2013

One Meal Daily May Be Better Option for People With Diabetes

While most nutritional experts say that eating three meals a day is important to maintaining a steady metabolism, a new study suggests that one meal a day may be a better option for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2013

Is High Fructose Corn Syrup “the New Trans Fat"?

The non-profit consumer action group Citizens for Health earlier this month called on the Food and Drug Administration to do its part in raising awareness of the dangers of high fructose corn syrup by making an official statement recognizing the sweetener as an unsafe addition to the nation's food supply.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2013

Eating on the Run More Popular Than Ever

As a nation, we love our food and we want it faster than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2013

Swiss Study Suggests Sugar Is the Root of Various Health Problems

Obesity levels have reached their historically highest point--surpassing hunger as a global problem--and type 2 diabetes cases could triple by 2050, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 6, 2013

November 2013

Whole Fruits Lower Type 2 Risk

Eating whole fruits can reduce people's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health---but juicing them can send their risk factors soaring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2013

A Delicious, Diabetes-Friendly Cranberry Sauce!

(Editor's note: With just one week to go until Thanksgiving, we thought you'd enjoy learning about Brenda's time-tested approach to creating a diabetes-friendly traditional turkey day treat.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2013

Study to See If Vitamin D Can Prevent Type 2

The National Institutes of Health is investing millions of dollars in new research to determine if vitamin D supplements play a role in preventing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2013

Life With Type 2: How (Non-Diabetic) Others See Us

It's always fun to get a different take on things. You sit for years a few rows up from first base and then one day you decide to go sit out by left field. Who knew the game could look so different?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2013

October 2013

High Protein at Breakfast Helps Glycemic Control

An Israeli study confirms what nutritionists and dietitians have been advising for years: Starting the day with a big breakfast is good for you--and especially so for type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2013

A DH Classic: Halloween Is More Than Scary for Parents of Trick-or-Treaters with Diabetes

(Editor's Note: We originally published this article in October 2008. Laura Plunkett's observations are timeless, and her comments elicited several interesting responses from readers.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2013

Potluck Pasta Salad

Preparation Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2013

September 2013

Study Concludes Cinnamon Has Some Beneficial Effects

Discussion has gone back and forth for several years now on whether cinnamon might be a powerful, previously unappreciated arrow in the quiver of diabetes medicines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2013

Fruits, Proteins Can Help Thwart Kidney Disease

For those living with type 2 diabetes, kidney disease is unfortunately one of the associated risks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2013

Glucagon Study Shows Promise for Type 1s

In the healthcare field today, perhaps no area holds as much promise and as many perils as weight control. Researchers see the same statistics that the rest of us do. They see the upcoming wave of obesity and diabetes diagnoses. They see the myriad complications that spring up from these conditions. And they want to address the problem in a simple way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2013

Learn To Control Your Diabetes, Before It Controls You

A Diabetes Health Classic. This article originally was published on June 20, 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2013

August 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Can exercise for a short period of time increase liver and cortisol involvement and cause a negative impact on BG levels?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2013

Fresh Tomato & Basil Pasta

Preparation Time: 20minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2013

Medical Foods Help Patients Manage Disease

You know supplements.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2013

Roasted Corn & Roma Tomato Salad

Preparation Time: 30minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2013

Dietary Changes Could Preserve Beta Cells

Type 1 diabetes doesn't happen all at once. Scientists have shown that it's usually a gradual process, in which the insulin-producing beta cells eventually fade out. So wouldn't it be marvelous if the function of those beta cells could be preserved, allowing people newly diagnosed with diabetes to produce some of their own insulin for a longer time?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2013

July 2013

Timing of First Solid Food Intake Linked to Type 1

New parents like British royals Will and Kate might not want to rush the introduction of solid food into their baby's diet. That's not to say they want to put it off, either.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2013

Five Big Diabetes Fears—and What to Do About Them

It's human to be afraid. As cave people, we scurried for safety at the slightest provocation- scared of wolves, and tigers, and thunderstorms. Even today, we jump when someone comes up behind us unexpectedly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 24, 2013

Vitamin D May Lessen Heart Risks, Ease Type 2 Symptoms

A low level of vitamin D in teenagers and young adults who have type 2 diabetes may put them at risk for arterial stiffness. Stiff arteries, that force the heart to beat harder to pump blood, are a known cardiovascular risk factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2013

Scientists Clarify Benefits and Use of Glycemic Index, Load, and Response

BOSTON---An international committee of leading nutrition scientists from 10 countries on three continents has released a consensus statement that concludes that carbohydrate quality (measured by the glycemic index or GI) matters and that the carbohydrates present in different foods affect post-meal blood sugar differently, with important health implications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 21, 2013

Some Diabetes-Friendly Food Options for the 4th

Lazy summer days are ideal for relaxed, romantic picnics under the sun, and there's no day more perfect for picnicking than the 4th of July.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2013

June 2013

Healthy Summer Pasta Salad Recipes

Summer can be a great time for healthy eating for those who are watching their weight, their blood sugar or just want to enjoy food in a good-for-you manner.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2013

Great Pre-Workout Snacks

This month I'd like to pass along some of my most popular snack ideas. These are all delicious, quick, and diabetic friendly:

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2013

How to Help Overweight Kids

(Editor's Note: This article was orginally published in the April 2008 edition of Diabetes Health and later online as article 5658. We are reproducing the article in light of the American Medical Association's recent decision to treat obesity as a disease. That decision will spur much debate, and we think this article will help add some perspective to the discussion.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2013

My Life as a Guinea Pig

About five years ago during a visit to a local endocrinologist, he asked if I might be interested in participating in a Phase 3 study of a new type 2 drug. It didn't take long for me to say yes, especially once he explained how being a study subject worked.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 10, 2013

Fire Up the Grill for a Memorable Summer

This past Memorial day, the first holiday of the summer season, was a chance to shake off cabin fever and fire up the grill-a perfect cooking method for people with diabetes because it requires no added fat but still provides that big punch of flavor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2013

May 2013

Juggling More Than Three Pins

I've been type 1 diabetic for 15 years. It hasn't been easy and I'm still grasping to keep my feet on the ground medically. Every time I think I've got this disease figured out, something new gets thrown at me and I stumble over and over again.  From insulin resistance to pump failures to carbohydrate/insulin sensitivity changes to exercise regimens to health insurance issues to medical bill payments to a seemingly innocent cut on the sole of my foot, etc., I'm getting worn out.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 29, 2013

How Dottie Kept Her Prediabetes in Check

You may be in jeopardy. You may be in danger with blood sugar levels higher than normal. You may have prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2013

10th Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Are there supplements that help to decrease insulin resistance? Are there supplements that can increase insulin resistance?

comments 1 comment - Posted May 22, 2013

Lemony Angel Hair Toss

Recipe of the Week

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2013

Sleep Apnea Is No laughing Matter

Snoring is one of the great clichés. In cartoons, you just know that a blissfully snoring dog, cat, or human is about to be startled by an explosion or some scaringly loud noise.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 17, 2013

Western Diet Linked to Less Graceful Aging

Looking to age gracefully? Then you might want to think twice about that cheeseburger with a side of fries you were planning for lunch.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2013

Eating Well (or at Least Not Terribly) at Fast Food Restaurants

Here's a little secret for those of you looking to eat right: Fast food restaurants don't have to be your enemy. That's right, those brightly lit temples paying tributes to burgers, and fries, and nuggets can provide decent meals if you're in a rush. The key, as always, is to be careful and informed about the choices you make.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 7, 2013

April 2013

Kids’ Meals Low on Nutrients

If you and your family eat a lot of meals out, you may not be getting enough nutrients. That's especially true when it comes to the kids, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2013

How Crunch Time Affects Kids’ Health

Although there are small hints that the American obesity epidemic may be slowing a little, one in every three American kids is overweight or obese. To find out why, National Public Radio, together with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, looked at what goes on in American households between school and bedtime-a period they call "crunch time."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2013

Hank’s Healthy Habits: 13 Steps to a Joyful, Happy Life

He is 89 years old and the picture of health. Yet looking at the robust, healthy, laughing gentleman sitting across the desk from me on this Saturday morning, one would never guess his age. Hank has been married 50 years, is active in his church, and hosts a prayer breakfast most Saturday mornings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2013

Pot Smoking Has Little Lasting Metabolic Effect

While marijuana use may spark an increased appetite for everything from chips to dubious leftover takeout, it has little effect on overall metabolism, according to a new study that appeared recently in the American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2013

Rebates Spur Healthier Eating

The key to encouraging people to choose healthier foods is to make good-for-you items more affordable, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2013

Americans Want Healthy Food in Schools

At a time when more and more Americans are protesting big government, it turns out that a majority of us support new laws setting higher nutrition standards in school, a new survey says.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2013

Why We Don't Keep Our Dietary Resolutions

Every year millions of people with type 2 diabetes vow to change their diets, lose weight, exercise more, and lower their A1c's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2013

We’re Not Bad, We’re Human

I've had type 1 diabetes for 18 years and whenever I hear bad news about someone with diabetes it hits me hard.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2013

March 2013

Idol’s Randy Jackson: “It Always Happens to Somebody Else, Right?”

Twelve years after it began as a summer placeholder designed to keep Fox TV viewers hanging around until the fall season, "American Idol" has become one of this young century's most renowned cultural phenomena. From the show's modest beginning, record producer and musician Randy Jackson has been at its heart, the memorable judge who has popularized such greetings as "Dawg!" and such praises as "I believe she's in it to win it!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2013

Bevs In the ‘Hood: The Beverage Debate Disparity in NYC Neighborhoods

While walking through my mother's New York City neighborhood, El Barrio, or Spanish Harlem recently, I came across an eye-catching series of Warhol-esque signs prominently displayed outside of many bodegas in the neighborhood. The signs read, "I  Big Cans" and may have been produced by beverage manufacturers in response to the recent large beverage ban passed in New York City.  Double-entendres aside on the campaign tag line, I had an issue with these signs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2013

February 2013

Type 2 Insulin Users: No Need to Wait to Eat After Injecting?

For people who take insulin, one of the hardest parts of their routine is injecting themselves before a meal, then having to wait 20 or 30 minutes before eating. For anybody who's hungry and raring to dine, the wait can be frustrating.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2013

Going for Your Goal

To reach your long-term goals for managing diabetes, I think it’s helpful to stop and write down what short-term steps you can take that will help you reach your objectives. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2013

My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I heart carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2013

Diabetes-Friendly Valentine's Day Recipes (Including a Killer Chocolate Cake)

With all the heart-shaped boxes of chocolates filling every aisle of virtually every store this time of year, Valentine's Day can be treacherous for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2013

Take Advantage of Diabetes Health's Special Deal With Living Social

Take advantage of Diabetes Health's special deal with Living Social.  We are offering a one time off subscription rate of $15*, which is 50% savings from the current subscription price.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2013

Pre-Diabetes: Exercise and Diet Are Your Keys to Freedom

If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you have to start looking seriously at how you live your life. Talk to any persons who are insulin-dependent and they will tell you how much they wish they could be in your situation: a point where you can make changes to avoid getting to their stage of the illness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2013

January 2013

#Six and Diabetes: Jay Cutler On Numbers

As an NFL quarterback, Jay Cutler makes his living putting a football into the hands of an open receiver before getting slammed to the ground by a huge defensive lineman.  It's a stressful occupation, all about timing, a little luck, and seeing the big picture in a split second.  

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2013

Type 2 Comedian Drew Carey Sheds 80 Pounds, Says No-Carb Diet Did It

Keep a close eye on this story. It has two elements necessary for creating a lot of buzz: a celebrity and his unconventional "cure" for a disease. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2013

Recipes and Tips for a Diabetes-Friendly Eating During the Big Game

CHICAGO, IL -- January 24, 2012 -- The news of celebrity chef Paula Deen having diabetes has triggered a national conversation about how diet affects people with diabetes or those who are at risk of getting it.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

Festive Lasagna Roll-Ups with Salsa Rosa Sauce

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 60 minutes
Standing Time: 10 minutes

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

December 2012

Study Says Some Type 2 Remissions Possible With Exercise, Diet

One out of nine type 2s who followed an intensive diet and exercise program for one year were able to record normal or prediabetes-level blood sugar levels, according to a study recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2012

Meal Time: Where to Begin?

As we people with diabetes know all too well, diabetes presents some of its greatest daily around the dinner table. This is an area where I still find one of my biggest struggles: the ability to create tasty low-carb meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2012

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2012

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years. Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips. Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town. Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2012

10 Weather and Lifestyle Tips for the Holidays

As the winter holidays approach, with their cold weather and abundant food temptations, Minnesota-based UnitedHealth Group is offering 10 simple tips people with diabetes and prediabetes should follow to help stay healthy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2012

Children with Diabetes, You Are My True Inspiration

Jay Hewitt is 41 years old and has lived with type 1 diabetes since 1991. He is an elite Ironman triathlete (2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike ride, 26.2 mile run) and three-time member of the U.S. National Team for Long Course Triathlon. He is a lawyer, the father of a 16-month-old daughter, and a motivational speaker. He speaks to people with diabetes and others all over the world on fitness, nutrition, and achieving goals in life and business. Jay is also captain of Team Joslin at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, MA. Visit Jay's website at www.jayhewitt.com.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 12, 2012

Five To-Do’s for People Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

There are ways to live with diabetes that allow for optimal health and relative freedom from complications. But to obtain them requires knowledge and know-how.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2012

Paying Attention to Eating Pays Off

Mindful eating may help control weight as well as blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 5, 2012

My Tricks for Great Holiday Eating

While daily meal planning can be tricky when someone in the family is living with diabetes, the holidays can be especially challenging.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2012

November 2012

Type 1 Onset Linked to Low Vitamin D?

A report in the December issue of the journal Diabetologia says that a study of 1,000 active-duty military personnel who later developed type 1 diabetes showed that low levels of vitamin D significantly increased the chances of developing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2012

A CDE’s Tips for Surviving the Holidays if You Have Diabetes

Are you ready to celebrate the holidays? How many festivities are on your calendar this season? It’s time to navigate the minefield of situations that can throw your diabetes off course and send a joyous occasion into the dumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2012

Don’t be a Turkey on Thanksgiving, Plan Ahead!

I really look forward to Thanksgiving. For me, it’s a great time to spend with family and friends, watch some ballgames on TV and eat. All those wonderful traditional dishes that taste so good are ready for my undivided attention. But for a diabetic, Thanksgiving dinner can be a bit tricky when it comes to controlling your blood glucose levels.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2012

Fighting For Test Strips

Recently while I was out shopping with my sister, I tested my blood sugar and found that I had a high reading of 217. Because I had just downed a non-fat pumpkin spice latte and still had active insulin in my bloodstream, I skipped correcting it with an insulin shot and went on trying on clothing and chatting with my sister. When I got to my car afterward, I realized that I felt a little like I was drunk, so I figured that I'd better test my blood sugar again. It was 58.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2012

Deborah Grona: Dancing Back to Life

Deborah Grona hadn't danced with her husband in more than four years. "We fell in love on the dance floor," says Grona, who had been unable to dance, or even stand for short periods of time, since developing the chronic pain that comes with diabetic neuropathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2012

A Rocky Path to Better Blood Sugar

When my doctor said, “You have diabetes.  You’ll have to watch your sugar, change your lifestyle, and lose some weight,” I was dismayed. For one, I was addicted to sugar. Second, I had been trying for years to lose weight, and I knew it just wasn’t possible. Third, I was not adept in the kitchen--toasting bread maxxed out my repertoire.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 11, 2012

Penny Hildreth: Finally Facing Diabetes

It was more than two decades ago, and Penny Hildreth was already feeling overwhelmed by life when she learned that she had type 1 diabetes. She was pregnant with her second child and worried about the baby’s safety after a car accident that had left Hildreth with a broken collarbone, a broken rib, and a punctured spleen. It was the spleen injury that ultimately led to her diagnosis of diabetes, but she was more concerned about the baby, a little girl who was born healthy despite the automobile accident. “I always say that she’s my miracle,” says the 46-year-old Portland resident.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2012

October 2012

Many Supplements Are Illegally Labeled

According to a report by the inspector general of the US Department of Health and Human Services, dozens of purported weight-loss and immune-system supplements are illegally labeled and do not have appropriate scientific evidence to support their claims.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2012

Special Diabetes Coupon Savings from Diabetes Health and CVS Pharmacy

I’m very happy to announce Diabetes Health’s partnership with CVS/pharmacy and welcome you to ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes® from CVS/pharmacy®. If you have diabetes and already have a CVS/pharmacy ExtraCare® card, ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes offers even more benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2012

Bobotie

Introduced to South Africa by the Cape Malays, this Indonesian curried meat loaf is to South Africa what Moussaka is to Greece and Lasagne is to Italy.  Traditionally, Bobotie is served with yellow rice (add turmeric), chutney and banana slices dipped in

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2012

Are There Benefits to Light Exercise After Eating?

Based on a recent study, the answer appears to be yes, both for those who have diabetes and those who do not.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2012

Lemon Sole with Lemon and Basil Stuffing

Let's be honest: it's quite hard to find indigenous American cuisine, because it's usually been influenced by one country or another. This, however, is a dish I had in Boston, albeit made with another fish. It has wonderful flavors and can be prepared in advance and cooked just before serving.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

The Scoop on Fiber

Does consuming fiber really lower blood sugar? How many grams of fiber do you need each day? What’s the difference between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2012

No Bake Chocolate Cookie

A healthy, candy-like cookie that young children and teens will enjoy making. These cookies are high in fiber (1.5 g). therefore, remember to exercise portion control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

September 2012

Paula Deen and Type 2: The Real Story

Celebrity chef Paula Deen was subjected to some withering criticism recently when the public learned that she has type 2 diabetes. How could she push butter and sugar-loaded recipes at TV viewers when she has diabetes, her critics demanded.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 29, 2012

After Twenty-one Years With Type 2 Diabetes, Bonny Damocles Feels Better Than Ever

Bonny Damocles, a longtime fan of TV shows like “Wild Kingdom,” looked at his type 2 diabetes diagnosis as his opportunity to take a walk on the wild side. When the Michigan resident learned that he had diabetes more than two decades ago, he immediately began thinking about how lions survive in the wild as inspiration for his own diet plan.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2012

Federal Trade Commission Charges Children’s Vitamin Manufacturers with Misleading Advertising

If you bought Disney or Marvel children’s vitamins, you may be eligible for a refund.  The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, charged NBTY, the company formerly known as Nature’s Bounty, with making false claims about certain multivitamins.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2012

Peanut Butter Cups

 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

Rich and Poor Need Tailored Strategies to Stay Healthy

Well-to-do people eat more healthy fruits, vegetables, proteins, and unsaturated fats than poorer people, who eat more carbohydrates, according to the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study reported at the European Society of Cardiology in Munich, Germany.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2012

Skillet Chicken Parmesan

Note:
Recipe courtesy of "Eat What You Love: More Than 300 Incredible Recipes Low in Sugar, Fat and Calories" (Running Press 2010)
Although my boys love to order Chicken Parmesan when we dine out, the health content is always a concern -especially since it usually arrives thickly breaded, deeply fried, smothered in cheese, and served on a mountain of spaghetti! Here's a terrific easy stove-top recipe that's filled with all of the same great flavors but none of the excess fat and carbs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

Paula Deen: Cooking Up a New Life With Diabetes

Paula Deen, a celebrity Southern chef known for her unrestrained love of butter and sugar, is no stranger to the media. She received a flurry of bad press recently when she revealed that she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes three years earlier. Shortly thereafter, she became a spokesperson for Novo Nordisk's Victoza. Following these developments, some critics said that she was a poor role model. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2012

Marinated Rainbow Salad Antipasto

The two best ways to increase your family’s consumption of vegetables is to make them taste really good and have them readily available.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2012

Am I Taking Too Much Insulin?

The other day, I read a post in which someone wrote that he had to take a "ton of insulin" to cover some carbs in his meal, and he disclosed the exact dose. The funny thing is, I have often taken that amount to cover my meals. Admittedly, they were higher carb meals, but I never really thought of it as being a "ton" of insulin. When you read something like this, you can't help but wonder if you are doing something wrong on a regular basis. I suddenly felt that maybe I was out of line in taking that particular dose at a normal meal.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 23, 2012

Quick and Easy Huevos Rancheros

Ingredients & Methods

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2012

Type 2 Trudges Across America to Defeat Diabetes

Right from the start, Andy Mandell thought of walking the perimeter of the US to raise awareness for diabetes as a military objective, a special ops mission to draw attention to the dangers of the disease. As someone who has lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 20 years, Mandell saw his role as that of an educator, and he took it seriously, wanting to help others avoid the mistakes he had made after his diagnosis. An active guy who loved running, he followed his doctor's orders--to a degree. He checked food labels to make sure that he wasn't consuming too much sugar, and he continued his vigorous lifestyle. He felt good, so he saw no reason to worry.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2012

Quick And Easy Fiesta Salad

To turn this side dish into a satisfying entrée, top with some chicken or fish, cheese or tofu. Beans add flavor, protein and loads of fiber along with more carbohydrate. You can also add tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, olive oil, salt, pepper, cumin or cayenne pepper, jalapeno or other hot peppers, lime or lemon juice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2012

Lovers of Cheddar and Gouda May Have Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

If you like cheese, there may be cause for celebration. According to a new study, eating cheese may lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2012

Biking Away From Diabetes

Martie Neugent's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is one of those moments that he looks back on thankfully. He learned that he had the condition in 2000, at age 32, during what he assumed would be a routine trip to the doctor. Instead, it turned out to be a pivotal opportunity to make one of two choices.  He could go on exactly as he had, adding a cocktail of medications to control his blood sugar levels, or he could make some noteworthy changes and map out a new life. For him, the choice was an easy one. "All my mother's uncles died at a young age," Neugent said about the ravages of diabetes in his extended family. "And my great-grandmother lost her leg. My first thought was that I was probably going to die if I didn't get it fixed."

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 3, 2012

July 2012

Peanut Butter Cups

Note: Recipe from "Splendid Low-Carbing for Life, Vol. 2" by Jennifer Eloff (www.low-carb.us)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

Can’t Miss Red Snapper in a new light

Let's face it; seafood is a way of life for us here in the South. We find excuses to eat it for any meal of the day, and this red snapper is no different.  I managed to shed some of the sodium by cutting back on the salt, and switching out the butter for some delicious olive oil.  Your whole family will love these healthier, succulent fillets of fish. The name says it all, this is a recipe that you won't want to miss!

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2012

Green Chili Corn Muffins in a new light

Lookin' for bread with a little bite to it? Then you're going to fall in love with these chili corn muffins in a new light. I was able to reduce the fat and sodium by using egg whites and reduced-fat cheese and fat-free buttermilk. They're great for a grilling night!

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 19, 2012

Sugar Intake and Cardiometabolic Health in Children

On a Sunday morning, a busy couple and their school-age children enter a superstore for their weekly grocery shopping. As they move through the center of the store, their shopping cart fills with packs of flavored yogurt, fruit sauces, fruit bars, fruit juices, flavored milk, prepared school lunches, snacks, and family meal packs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2012

Flavorful Soft Tacos

Hearty winter meals such as stews, soups and chili are easy to make in large quantities and later re-heat for another meal. Although cooks love the time-saving quality of leftovers, many people dislike eating the same meal two days in a row.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 13, 2012

A Food for Thought Issue

Over the years, Diabetes Health has covered a vast array of diabetes-related topics, from recipes and sex to celebrity interviews and scientific research. This issue is no exception-I think you'll find a lot to "chew on" here, especially in the three diet-related articles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2012

Bacon-Wrapped Pork Loin Chops

Surprise the dad in your life with this seemingly decadent recipe. Since pork tenderloin is very lean, it can afford the added bacon fat, which gives flavor and helps to tenderize the meat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2012

Searching for Answers

What is the difference between "good carbs" and "bad carbs"?  Is that ache in your side normal or a sign of cancer?  Is blurry eyesight normal for people with diabetes, or should you start a carrot diet to improve your vision?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2012

June 2012

Six Mistakes That Marketers Make When Communicating With People With Diabetes

This is an open letter to marketers who target people with diabetes. From the point of view of a person with diabetes, marketers often make the following mistakes when promoting their products to us.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2012

Eating Breakfast Lowers Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Now there's another good reason to chow down in the morning. According to a study of almost 2,000 men who did not have type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or cancer, those who didn't eat breakfast had a 21 percent higher risk of developing type 2.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 8, 2012

A Spiritual Approach to Diabetes Care

The following article documents a very personal way of approaching diabetes.  Always check with a healthcare professional before changing your diet or your diabetes care regimen.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2012

Breaking Bad Habits

When dealing with a chronic illness, especially one like diabetes that requires 24/7 attention, it's easy to take shortcuts and fall into bad habits.  Ask yourself the following questions to find out if you might be drifting into a few diabetes bad habits:

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2012

ACE and Lilly Diabetes Offer Help Preparing for Diabetes Emergencies ACE and Lilly Diabetes Offer Help Preparing for Diabetes Emergencies

"How To" video also available to guide emergency kit creation

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

USDA Food Recalls Update

When it comes to diabetes management, food is probably the most important component. What we eat affects our blood sugar levels, nutrition, weight, and feelings of satisfaction and well being.

But as careful as we are about our food choices, sometimes the people who supply that food are not as careful. Fortunately, government agencies like the US Department of Agriculture help protect us by issuing recalls and warnings about foods and food suppliers that fail to meet minimum sanitary and health standards.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 31, 2012

Summer Pasta Salad Contest

To salute this popular side dish, Dreamfields Pasta is kicking off its second annual "Pastapalooza" Pasta Salad Contest. Each week from Memorial Day through Labor Day, one entrant will become eligible to win a free case of Dreamfields Pasta. Additionally, the 14 weekly winning recipes will be shared on Facebook and Twitter.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 30, 2012

Diabetes on the Rise in Saudi Arabia

Diabetes is increasingly taking hold in Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Middle East.  According to Dr. Ala Alwan, assistant director general for noncommunicable diseases and mental health at the World Health Organization (WHO), the problem is already vast and is increasing at an alarming rate.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 27, 2012

Around the Table: A Dinner Host's Responsibility With Paula Deen

Recently, I was cuddling my sleeping toddler and watching a recorded episode of The View. If you've never seen the show, five well-known women discuss "hot topics" and interview guests. On the day I watched, their guest co-host was Paula Deen, the Southern chef who is best known for adding endless sticks of butter to her recipes.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 23, 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2012

The Raw Food Diet:  Should You Try It?

It seems that every few months, we hear about a new diet that, like all the others, promises to yield fast and tempting results. Is the raw food diet any different, and, if so, how?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2012

Five Ways to Get Back on Track When You’re Burned Out

Burnout is common among people with diabetes, especially those who have had the disease for years, even decades. Diabetes management can be exhausting, confusing, and frustrating, particularly when you think you are doing everything right but your blood sugars still fail to cooperate.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 17, 2012

Making a Healthy Choice for Breakfast

For people with diabetes, breakfast is more than just a morning meal. According to recent research, it may hold the key to good blood glucose numbers for the rest of the day.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2012

Obesity Could Follow Sleepless Nights

Feeling tired? Your lack of rest may be putting you at increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. That's the conclusion of a new paper, published in The American Journal of Human Biology, that looked at evidence collected from numerous experimental and observational studies. The link was clear: People who got less than six hours of sleep a night were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI) and be obese. The connection found in the study seems stronger for children and teenagers, which is especially worrisome given the skyrocketing rates of type 2 diabetes in young people.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2012

$18 For A Baby Aspirin? Hospitals Hike Costs For Everyday Drugs For Some Patients

This story was produced in collaboration with USAToday

comments 0 comments - Posted May 9, 2012

Insulin degludec

Novo Nordisk's new variety of long-lasting insulin, insulin degludec, reduces low blood sugars while improving overall control, according to a pair of studies published in the prestigious journal The Lancet on April 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2012

Changing Habits in Midstream

About 16 years ago, after some routine blood work, I was told by my doctor that he wanted me to see an endocrinologist because he suspected diabetes. I went to see the endo, and, sure enough, his suspicions were confirmed. I had type 2 diabetes, and I had some serious changes to make.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 2, 2012

April 2012

FDA Warns Diabetes Patients About Combining Aliskiren

On April 19, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning to diabetes patients not to combine the blood pressure medication aliskiren (Tekturna) with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The warning also applies to patients who have renal impairment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2012

The Best Ingredient to Diet Success: Diet Management!

Food plays an important role in our lives. For most of us, it is more than just a means of sustenance. For some, it is a source of great pleasure. For others, it is a source of painful consequences. And for many, it is both.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2012

Vitamin Deficiencies in People With Diabetes: the Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, "I can't have surgery because I won't heal." That is certainly not the case, however.  Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2012

FDA Gives Go-ahead to Bayer’s CONTOUR® Next EZ

The US Food and Drug Administration has okayed US sales of Bayer HealthCare's CONTOUR® Next EZ blood glucose monitoring system. The new BGM, currently available in other countries as the CONTOUR XT, will be available in the US market this summer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

Weight-Loss Surgery Produces Dramatic Results in Type 2s

Bariatric surgery, not medications, may be the key to producing dramatic drops in weight and even the remission of diabetes symptoms among type 2 patients, says a study from the University of Rome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2012

The ADA Chicago Expo Dishes Up Southern Hospitality and Much More

I was a mixture of nerves and excitement as I met one of my favorite celebrity chefs at the American Diabetes Association's Expo in Chicago on April 14th.  Jamie Deen, Paula Deen's adorable, blue-eyed, dimpled son, was there doing a food demonstration, meeting with fans, and extending a healthy dose of warm smiles and pure southern hospitality.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2012

Low Glycemic Bread From Alvarado Street Bakery

Many people with diabetes have had to eliminate traditional flour breads and refined starches from their diets because of the way they spike blood sugar. "Diabetic Lifestyles Bread" from Alvarado Street Bakery is a nutritious alternative to traditional flour breads and causes a much slower rise in blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2012

Even 1% Weight Loss Improves Mobility in Older Type 2s

Just a 1 percent weight loss in older people with type 2 diabetes can improve their physical mobility by up to 7 percent, according to a new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2012

To Love a Diabetic

To love a diabetic is to be a doctor. It means helping her to remember her medications. It means driving her for an hour to the only 24 hour pharmacy when she's gotten the flu and can't take the Nyquil in the refrigerator. Or driving her to the hospital when the simple flu turns into bronchitis and her blood turns acidic.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2012

Sam Talbot, Top Chef

North Carolina-born chef Sam Talbot first came to national attention when he placed third in the Season 2 run of Bravo's Top Chef  TV competition. Sam, who has type 1 diabetes and wears an insulin pump, held the executive chef position at several New York City restaurants, including Black Duck, Williamsburgh Cafe, and Punch, before opening his current restaurant, the acclaimed Surf Lodge, in Montauk on Long Island.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2012

Eating White Rice May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

An examination of several studies that included a total of 350,000 people has linked high consumption of white rice with an increase in type 2 diabetes. A comparison of the studies that were conducted in China and Japan, where white rice is a staple, indicated that people there were 55 percent more likely to develop the disease than Asian people who ate the least rice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2012

Potassium May Help Prevent Diabetes

To discover the relationship between potassium levels and type 2 diabetes, a Johns Hopkins University study looked at more than 12,000 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), performed in 1987 and 1996. The study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes among study participants went down. The more than 2,000 African Americans in the study had lower average potassium levels than the 9,000 Caucasians and were twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2012

Kale Chip Recipe

INGREDIENTS
1 large bunch (about 1 1/4 pounds) kale, stems and center ribs discarded, leaves roughly torn
2 sheets nori, cut into 1-by-2-inch strips
1/4 cup Roasted Garlic Oil* (see below)
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Grated zest of 1 lemon

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2012

A Matter of Taste

The best things in life are often right in front of our noses, but we tend to take them for granted. William Bell put it best in 1961 when he recorded the soul classic "You Don't Miss Your Water (‘Til Your Well Runs Dry)" on Stax records. He realized just how true his words were in 1965, when Otis Redding re-recorded the song and had a much bigger hit with it. Even the Byrds had a semi-hit when they released the song in 1968 and again in 1990, as did Peter Tosh with his reggae version in 1972. Poor William Bell....his well never even filled up before it went dry. The concept is quite simple, really. All that goodness is surrounding each and every one of us, and we don't have a clue until it's gone.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 5, 2012

FDA Says Levemir OK for Pregnant Women

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that Levemir is safe for use by pregnant women and does not increase the risk of harm to children in the womb.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2012

Yogurt Drink Tamps Down Type 2 Inflammation

Iranian scientists report that a traditional Middle Eastern yogurt drink, doogh, when fortified with vitamin D, decreases the markers that indicate inflammation in persons with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2012

Surgery Works Better Than Drugs at Blood Sugar Control in Obese Patients

An Ohio-based study of overweight and obese type 2 patients shows that weight loss surgery works much better at controlling blood sugar levels than any known drug treatment.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2012

March 2012

Spring Break With Diabetes

It's spring break again, when thousands of people head to the beach. A lot of wonderful things come with being out and about on spring break, but if you have diabetes, there are also several things you should consider. There's going to be more traffic, fewer parking places, lots of people, an abundance of uncalculated carbohydrate sources, and longer waits for everything, to name just a few.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Study Shows Vitamin D Wards Off Stroke

Everyone needs vitamin D to be healthy and maintain strong bones, but a new study has found that it may also protect against stroke. In the study, 21,000 people aged 45 and older answered a food questionnaire. According to the findings, presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference, there was an 11 percent reduction in stroke among those who consumed the most vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2012

Please Don’t Imply That I Caused My Diabetes.

When it comes to diabetes, people often blame the patient instead of the disease. I cannot think of another chronic illness for which this is the case. Much of the public seems to believe that we bring diabetes on ourselves. When people with diabetes are diagnosed with complications, uninformed observers often insist that it happened because they were "bad diabetics." Comments like "She didn't take care of herself" make me instantly defensive and angry. How can anyone know what that person went through on a day-to-day basis with her diabetes?

comments 11 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2012

Little Diabetes Warriors

Sometimes I feel like an idiot. It usually happens when I read a blog by one of my favorite "D" parents telling about how their children are handling life with type 1 diabetes. These brave kids put up with the same things that adults with diabetes do, and some are literally too young to even understand what's going on. Reading about these little warriors makes me regret even more the fact that I wallowed in self pity all afternoon just because my blood sugar didn't cooperate flawlessly during my daily walk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2012

Veganism and Diabetes

As I was sitting in the hospital after a heart attack, my cardiologist walked in and said, "You have to stop eating meat." "Red meat?" I asked hopefully. "All meat," he replied firmly. It was disconcerting, to say the least, because meat has been in my life since I could feed myself. But my cardiologist explained, "If you don't want to end up back here again, you will start on an plant-based diet immediately." That day, I stopped eating meat. In fact, I asked the hospital food service to switch me to a vegetarian diet.

comments 9 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2012

February 2012

Diagnosed After Sixty: Medication Not Required

"I knew I didn't eat a totally healthy diet because bread is a big weakness of mine. Worse, exercise was something I kept planning to do but hadn't gotten around to," recalls 62-year-old Laura M., who lives in a New York City suburb. "I had been feeling more tired than usual and had a cut on my right leg that seemed to be healing slowly, but other than that I felt fine. When during the course of an annual check-up, my doctor said I had diabetes, I practically fell apart."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2012

Gluten-Free Diet Doesn’t Lower Diabetes Risk

A gluten-free diet in the first 12 months of life does not lower the risk of later developing type 1 diabetes in children who have a family history of the disease, says a German study. Previous studies had suggested that babies whose diets included gluten in their first months of life might be more likely to develop type 1 than youngsters whose diets did not.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 22, 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

Diabetes and Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

“You Have Diabetes.” Momentary Panic, Then Dedication and Determination

My best friend from high school, Katherine, married a wonderful man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a little over two years ago. John Schaaf, now 60, lives with Katherine in Berkeley, Calif., and works for Chevron Corporation in nearby Richmond.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2012

Spotlight on Supplements

Cinnamon, chromium, and alpha-lipoic acid are dietary supplements that have been studied for diabetes management, but are not commonly found in daily multivitamins. Chromium* and cinnamon have the least supportive evidence of efficacy, while some studies have found alpha-lipoic acid to be promising, at least subjectively, in reducing the discomforts of peripheral neuropathy.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 12, 2012

The Seasons of Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't confine itself to a single week or month. It's a year-round condition, and each season offers its own challenges and opportunities for those of us with the disease. We should be prepared to change and evolve as the seasons shift--not only to stay healthy, but also to enjoy all the fun that our dynamic world offers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 7, 2012

An Inside View of Barley Beta Glucan

Barley has more beta glucan fiber than any other grain, and it has repeatedly established positive clinical results with regard to diabetes control. It not only boosts immune function by supporting macrophages and neutrophils, lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and helps control obesity, but also attenuates postprandial glucose levels, improves insulin sensitivity, and promotes a feeling of satiety.

comments 6 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2012

January 2012

Cutting Carbs Two Days Each Week May Lead to Weight Loss

If you, like many people with diabetes, are trying to lose weight, you might be more successful if you cut back on carbohydrates for just two days a week instead of undertaking an unrelenting low-calorie diet. A recent report found that women who banished carbohydrates for two days a week and ate normally the rest of the time lost about nine pounds in four months, compared to the five pounds lost by women who cut back to roughly 1,500 calories every day.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2012

Lessons Learned About Diabetes and Self-Care

In my work as a prevention health technician in the Lakota community of South Dakota, I encourage people to ask questions and learn the facts about diabetes. Once they are aware of what diabetes is and how they can prevent or control it, they become empowered.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2012

A Heart Attack at Age 35

Like I did, you may take it for granted that you don't have to worry about having a heart attack. You may assume that heart attacks only happen to senior citizens. But I am living proof that there is no age limit to heart attack. At age 35, just three days after Christmas, it happened to me.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2012

“Grip, Rip, and Sip”

Ethan Lewis, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12, founded GlucoBrands only 11 years later. The company produces a portable, inexpensive, tasty, fast-acting glucose gel that people can take to quickly restore healthy blood sugar levels when they experience hypoglycemia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2012

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Remote Diabetes Monitor

Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc., has announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has given it the go-ahead to market its mySentry monitor, which allows caregivers to check the blood sugar of a diabetic person sleeping in another room. The bedside monitor, which costs around $3,000, works in tandem with Medtronic's MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, a combined insulin pump/continuous glucose monitor unit.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2012

Diabetes Resolutions for the New Year

A new year means new beginnings. Traditionally, it's a time to resolve to make changes for the better in our lives. This year, I decided to write a resolution list dedicated specifically to diabetes. I hope that some of you will want to try these ideas with me.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2012

Dietary Supplements: Know Before You Swallow

A dietary supplement, also known as a food supplement or nutritional supplement, contains a "dietary ingredient" intended to supplement the diet by providing an element that might not otherwise be consumed. "Dietary ingredients" include vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and substances such as enzymes, organ tissues, and metabolites. Dietary supplements, which may be extracts or concentrates, come in many forms, including tablets, capsules, soft gels, gelcaps, liquids, powders, and bars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2012

Recovery

My baby girl had just been born. I was in the postoperation room after going through a cesarean section. My husband went to get my parents, who had been waiting for twelve hours in the waiting room. A nurse laid my little girl in an incubator next to my bed and checked her blood sugar, which was normal, in the mid-40 range. Fifteen minutes later the nurse checked her again, and it registered in the mid-30s. I watched as the nurse fed my baby her first ounces of food. I was still too numb to even know that I had legs, much less to be able to wiggle my toes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2012

Even if They Don’t Add Pounds, Sugary Drinks Up Heart, Diabetes Risks

Some women who drink two of more sugary beverages daily are lucky: their consumption of sweetened drinks doesn't put on extra weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

As Diabetes Increases Among Hispanics, Prevention Program Shows Promise

An article in an Indiana newspaper documents an alarming rise in diabetes among Arizona's Hispanics, especially along the US border with Mexico. The Republic, published in Columbus, Indiana, reports that 13.5 percent of residents in Arizona's Yuma County had diabetes in 2010. Almost 60 percent of the border county's nearly 200,000 residents are Hispanic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2011

Standing Up For Sugar, the Hypoglycemia Alert Dog  

We are a tight-knit community.  I'm not talking about my neighbors in my hometown of Chicago.  I'm talking about my worldwide neighbors in the diabetic online community.  Anyone dealing with diabetes knows the bond that it brings.  When a person with diabetes is wronged, the rest of us feel the sting.  Most of us living with diabetes have stories about people badgering our diet choices, saying inappropriate or insensitive things, and, sadly, crossing the line even further.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2011

Are You Prepared for the Holidays?

If you have diabetes, you know all too well what's going to happen between now and the end of the year. You'll be forced to make some quick and painful decisions at sumptuous holiday feasts. Do you refuse the lavish, carbohydrate-rich fare and give up on the fun of the season? Or do you go whole hog, eating everything in sight, and hope that your insulin or medication can take up the slack?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

Why Didn’t Someone Tell Me That?

I wish there were a fail-safe manual for diabetes. Just when I'm thinking about how great my blood sugars have been, bam! I see a 300 on my meter, or a 40. It's so hard to know why: The off numbers could be due to hormones, stress, sickness, an incorrect carb count, varying activity levels, or any combination thereof. With diabetes, you really do learn as you go. Here are a few things I have learned along the way.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2011

A Single Healthy Choice Slashes Type 2 Risk

Here's good news for people who love nuts and Greek yogurt! Replacing even one serving of red meat with these tasty foods can substantially lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 11, 2011

New Type 2 Drug Targets Blood Sugar and Cholesterol

Drug company Merck aims to give people with type 2 diabetes two treatments for the price of one. The new therapy, called Juvisync, was just approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. It's not a radical new treatment, but instead a helpful combination of two familiar standbys: Juvisync unites the active ingredients in blood sugar-lowering Januvia and cholesterol-lowering Zocor in a single tablet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2011

She Helps Her People Avoid Diabetes

"I wasn't even addressing my high blood pressure until my uncle Jay, in a nursing home at 36, said ‘Don't get diabetes.' ‘I won't,' I promised  him, and it changed my life."

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2011

Big Differences in How Men and Women Cope with Type 2 Diabetes

Women are better at coping with problems than men, right?  Not when it comes to being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to a new survey, that diagnosis had a greater negative impact on women's emotional outlook and adherence to diet and exercise than the same diagnosis given to men. The survey was conducted in September 2011, and included 831 completed responses from 458 women and 373 men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2011

Is It Possible to Tame Type 2 Diabetes?

Jeff O'Connell is the author of "Sugar Nation: The Hidden Truth Behind America's Deadliest Habit and the Simple Way to Beat It."  I discovered his book while browsing the shelves of my local library, and I could hardly put it down. Though I have type I diabetes and O'Connell's book focuses on type 2, I found many of his thoughts applicable to my own health. His book is no doubt controversial, so I wanted to delve deeper into his daring claims and share his responses with the diabetic community. After reading my interview with Jeff, please leave a comment below to let Diabetes Health know what you think.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2011

November 2011

New Diabetes-Friendly Sugar Reduces Absorption of Real Sugar

A new diabetes-friendly sugar, proven to help reduce sugar absorption, will soon be added to popular breads and cereals. "Sugir" is real sugar that contains an all-natural, tasteless additive called Emulin. Emulin, a patented formulation of compounds found in fruits, prevents the body from absorbing about a third of ingested sugar. A previous study showed that Emulin blocks the absorption of sugar by more than 30 percent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2011

Helping African Americans F.A.C.E. Their Risk for Diabetes

Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie recently spoke with television and movie actor Anthony Anderson, who has taken a lead role with Eli Lilly & Company's F.A.C.E. campaign, a diabetes outreach to African Americans. A veteran of more than 20 films, Anthony, age 41, currently plays Detective Kevin Bernard on NBC's Emmy Award-winning drama, "Law & Order."

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2011

An Interview With Mike Golic

Mike Golic is the co-host of ESPN's wildly popular radio show, "Mike and Mike in the Morning." Before beginning work as a broadcaster in 1995, he played for nine years as a defensive tackle in the National Football League, including stints with the Houston Oilers, Philadelphia Eagles, and Miami Dolphins. About five years ago, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Since then, he has become involved in getting the word out about type 2, including the potential danger of hypoglycemia. He is a spokesman for "Blood Sugar Basics," a website and outreach program co-sponsored by Merck and the American College of Endocrinology.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

The Holidays With Diabetes

Living with diabetes, you are already hyper-aware of food, but the holidays seem to heighten that awareness. Faced with your aunt's delicious homemade cornbread and your grandma's famous sweet potato casserole, you may find yourself digging through your closet for your old carbohydrate-counting books and guessing at your insulin adjustments. Who wants to go through the holidays with the added stress of high blood sugars and associated mood swings, especially when your family is already driving you nuts? No, thanks.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2011

The New Girl

It's hard being the new person at work.  It's even harder when you're the new person and you have diabetes. Whenever I start a new job, thoughts race through my mind: Will I go low while I'm training?  Will I have quick access to snacks?  Will I be able to check my blood sugar without an audience?  How about taking an insulin injection at the lunch table?  It isn't easy feeling forced to expose so many personal details to people you just met.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2011

What Not to Say to the Newly Diagnosed

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I recall the numerous comments that people blurted out in an attempt to make me feel better about my situation.  But the truth was that I just needed to be treated like everyone else.  I was in the midst of a confusing, depressing, and life-altering diagnosis.  The last thing I needed was a pat on the back that felt more like a slap in the face.

comments 11 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2011

An Unexpected Grief Down Under

Anyone who has lost a close family member to type 2 diabetes understands the grief and paralysis it creates, especially when the one who died was only 53.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2011

Baby, Diabetes, and Me

I thought I had seen it all as a person with diabetes. Going to college, marriage, moves, career changes, you name it. I had soldiered on through them all, my control shifting from tight to loose to somewhere in the middle as the situation changed. I had adapted pretty well, I told myself.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2011

Preconception Counseling and Birth Control Options

Being your own advocate is imperative for women with diabetes, especially when it comes to gynecologic care. As soon as a young woman is ready to become sexually active, she needs to talk with her doctor about contraceptive options. This conversation should continue through the time when she is ready to stop taking contraceptives and prepare for a family.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2011

The Stages of Fat Self-Acceptance: A Conversation With Carol Normadi

Carol Normadi is a licensed marriage and family therapist in Northern California who is co-founder of Beyond Hunger, Inc., a group dedicated to helping people overcome obsessive concerns with food. She has co-authored two books on the topic of food obsessions: "It's Not About Food: Ending Your Obsession With Food and Weight" (Putnam, 1998) and "Over It: A Teen's Guide to Getting Beyond Food and Weight" (New World Library 2001).

comments 10 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

October 2011

Scary and Sweet

October is my diagnosis month. At 14 years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few weeks before Halloween. I remember thinking, at least I'm too old for trick or treating. My younger sister had been diagnosed six months earlier, however, and at 10 years old, she still loved to trick or treat. To ease her pain, my parents got creative and shifted the emphasis of Halloween off sweets and onto scary: Haunted houses, hayrides, and parties with bowls full of smushed tomatoes for witches hearts and cold grapes for eyeballs became our annual tradition. My sister and I still said no to most of the sugary sweets, but we were the first ones to say yes when the doors of the haunted house opened.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2011

The New York City YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program

At 330 pounds, Kerry Watterson was tired of not being able to fit into his seat on an airplane. He had a family history of type 2 diabetes, and although doctors said his blood sugar was still at a normal level, he knew it was time to make a change. "I found out about the YDPP [YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program], called the director, and said, ‘I want to do this.' I'm so glad she took me," he says now, one year later.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2011

What Are Ketones, and Why Are They Important to Diabetes Self-Management?

All blood tests are tools. Some are to diagnose diabetes, some are to help you manage your diabetes on a daily or long term basis and some are to keep you safe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2011

My Wife Has Diabetes—And I’ve Never Felt Better

Like many people, I have a soft spot for salty chips, butterscotch sundaes, cheesecake, meat loaf, mashed potatoes, fried chicken, and countless other comfort foods. A couple of martinis, accompanied by plump, red, pimento-filled olives, are another pleasant indulgence. And martinis were exactly what my wife Pat and I were drinking during the 2-for-1 Happy Hour at a chic Atlantic City bar during a vacation about five years ago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2011

The Second Trimester- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Welcome to the second trimester!  By now, many type 1s are experiencing fewer hypoglycemic episodes, and insulin resistance is just beginning to rear its head.  You're on the other side of the miscarriage worry hump and getting settled into the pregnancy routine.  Congratulations!  Take a few minutes each day to celebrate your successes and pat your stomach with a smile, knowing you are doing the best you can to give your growing child everything she needs.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 26, 2011

GlucoLift: An All Natural Glucose Tab for People With Diabetes

Wrongly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 30 years old, Chris Angell spent several frustrating weeks trying to make sense of his condition and not understanding why he wasn't getting any better. His diagnosis was eventually changed to type 1 diabetes, but Chris never received the necessary education to get his blood sugars in control. "I didn't know what I was supposed to be eating or how to count carbs, and I really felt isolated," he says.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 25, 2011

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Diabetes Education

Diabetes is a life-long, 24-hour-a-day disease that requires self-management, time, and lots of patience. Most people with diabetes know where their numbers should be, but many struggle to follow recommended behaviors. Despite the availability of new medications and treatment devices, as well as the emphasis placed on diabetes treatment adherence over the last decade, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data show that 45 percent of patients with diabetes have not achieved A1Cs lower than 7% (an average of approximately 150-170 mg/dL).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2011

My Quest for a Smaller Jean Size and A1C

Trying to lose weight as an insulin-injecting person with type 1 diabetes couldn't be more frustrating. It gets on my last nerve that exercise can trigger mind-numbing lows, lows that cause me to inhale a portion of those recently burned calories. That said, I don't skip exercise to avoid lows. I just check my blood sugars more often, use caution with my insulin dosing, and follow the advice of my doctors.

comments 22 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2011

Type 2: Bike Maintenance as Body Maintenance

When first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago, I was scared into a very rigid regime of diet and exercise. The first thing I did was register for the Tour de Cure - a bike ride sponsored by the American Diabetes Association. Establishing a goal served as an incentive to train and exercise daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2011

Life With Kolumbo, My Hypoglycemia Alert Dog

It is raining today. Kolumbo, my hypoglycemia alert dog, hates the rain. I think I have the only Labrador in the world that hates getting wet. I opened the screen door this morning to feel the breeze and hear the rain. Unfortunately, while the door was open, a fly decided to come inside. When I say that Kolumbo is a lazy dog, I really mean it. He lay on his bed and watched the fly go around and around. then opened his mouth, thinking that the fly might just go in. I heard the snap of his teeth as he tried to get the fly.

comments 13 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2011

Preconception Counseling and Birth Control Options

Being your own advocate is imperative for women with diabetes, especially when it comes to gynecologic care. As soon as a young woman is ready to become sexually active, she needs to talk with her doctor about contraceptive options. This conversation should continue through the time when she is ready to stop taking contraceptives and prepare for a family.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2011

Novo Nordisk Files for FDA Approval of New Insulin

A brand new insulin will soon be on pharmacy shelves in the United States if Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has its way. The company has filed for approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell insulin degludec, an original formulation that lasts an extra-long time. Insulin degludec is injected only once a day. Once under the skin, the dose of insulin is absorbed slowly and consistently, allowing for better nighttime control, according to Novo. Most importantly, test subjects had a low rate of hypoglycemia on the drug.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2011

Celebrating Caregivers

My mother died unexpectedly this summer. While her loss was sad and sudden, I have many reasons to celebrate her life and the guidance she offered me. When I was diagnosed with diabetes as a child, she took it upon herself to learn the ins and outs of diabetes care. For most of the next decade, she oversaw my treatment.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2011

Yes, I Can Eat That

Sometimes I don't feel like explaining myself. Sometimes I just want to eat a pastry in public in peace, without the "diabetes police" showing up and giving me their two cents. When that happens, I can usually handle it without my blood pressure rising. I politely explain to these well-meaning people that I'm perfectly in control of my diabetes and that as long as I count the carbohydrates and take my shot, I can eat anything I please. Occasionally though, I find myself getting irritated and angry. I get tired of defending myself all the time.

comments 26 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2011

September 2011

Pritikin and Preventive Health

Imagine if you could keep diabetes at bay for another three or four years with lifestyle changes. Would you change what you ate? Would you commit to an exercise program, maintain a food journal, and join a support group? Imagine if you could take these simple steps and save money. How quickly would you say "Sign me up"?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2011

Do What You Love, and It Will Never Be Work

Being a rookie driver on the fast-paced IndyCar racing circuit is pressure enough for any 26-year-old. But for Charlie Kimball, one of four wheel men on businessman Chip Ganassi's IndyCar race team, there's the added need to manage type 1 diabetes while roaring around the track at speeds that often exceed 200 miles per hour.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 25, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2011

Do You Have a Diabetes Sick Day Plan?

It's that time of year again: flu season. I never thought much about getting a flu shot until fourteen years ago, when I ended up in the emergency room with the flu and a staggering blood sugar of over 800 mg/dL. I had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a few years before and had never discussed a sick day plan with my doctor. But during this experience, I discovered that diabetes and the flu get along about as well as a house cat and a junkyard dog.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2011

My Guardian Angel Against Low Blood Sugar

"I just read 10 sentences, but what did I read? Why doesn't it make sense to me? Is that the home phone ringing? What is happening around me?"

comments 13 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2011

Cutting Calories? Weight Loss Might Take Time

Your dietitian is misleading you. That's the takeaway from an article published recently in the medical journal The Lancet. The rules of thumb that you've been given are wrong. And losing weight quickly and easily by cutting a few hundred calories a day just doesn't happen, scientists say.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2011

A Low-tech Diabetes Logbook

It may sound silly to say this, especially in this era of computing and high technology, but in our house, one of the most important tools in managing diabetes is a notebook, an ink pen, and three brightly colored magic markers. Of course, I'm talking about the logbook. That's not to say we don't also rely on complicated software to help track our daughter's blood sugars. But when it comes to understanding and using the data to our advantage, there is some truth to the age old belief in hands-on training.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 16, 2011

We Still Have Hope

My son just turned twenty. For the first time, we didn't have a cake, ice cream, friends, balloons, or presents. He spent the day in jail. With vivid memories of his heroin-addicted evening in the ICU several months ago, we had nursed high hopes that his life would be on the mend. But healing takes time, and life doesn't always deliver the happy ending we long for.

comments 9 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2011

Together, On Our Own

"If you weren't having this conversation with me, who, other than your wife, would you be having it with?"  That question, in response to something I'd said about treating my nine-year-old daughter's diabetes, was posed to me over the phone by a friend I had made less than six months earlier. She has a daughter too, the same age as mine, who also has type 1. Their diagnosis came a couple of years before ours, so I respect her experience and opinion, and so does my wife, Franca.            

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2011

Ketones, Shmeetones.

When you live with diabetes, there's a lot to do.  Checking blood sugars.  Counting carbs.  Exercising.  Not to mention all those fun-filled doctors' appointments.  So the last time your physician or diabetes educator suggested ketone testing, it's completely understandable that your head was nodding but your mind was thinking "No way, Jack."  But before abandoning the idea completely, there are a few things you should know.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2011

9 Safe Driving Tips

An estimated 34 million Americans will be on the road during Labor Day weekend, many of them with type 2 diabetes. Road travel can interfere with blood sugar management and lead to low blood sugar, which can cause serious complications, such as loss of consciousness, if not treated quickly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2011

A Nutty Way to Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrates can increase blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, as well as contribute to weight gain.  A recent study shows that eating two ounces of raw, dry, or roasted nuts daily as a replacement for two ounces of other carbohydrates may control blood sugar levels and cholesterol in type 2 diabetes without packing on the pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2011

When It Comes to Diabetes, Knowledge Truly Is Power

When people are diagnosed with diabetes, things can seem pretty overwhelming. In a short time, they have to absorb a daunting amount of information and start making significant decisions about the way they live their lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2011

August 2011

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2011

Adding Spices to High-Fat Meals Can Knock Down Triglycerides

Spices not only add zing to meals, but they may also reduce the high levels of triglycerides produced by eating high-fat meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2011

High Carb, Low Glycemic Diets, With Riva Greenberg

Carbohydrates have become the ugly stepsister in the family photo album of healthy eating. Standing in the grocery aisle, consumers study ingredients and food labels, counting and analyzing the carb content of their foods. In the last decade, the popularity of low carb diets rose to dramatic heights as Americans gravitated toward the South Beach, Atkins, and Zone diets. Fruits were forsaken for plates piled high with steak and eggs.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2011

Diabetes on The Big Day

Walking down the aisle of our church, I held onto my Dad's arm and tried to breathe deeply, but the flutters in my stomach and beads of sweat sliding down the back of my legs made me wonder if my blood sugar was dropping. When I reached the front of the church, I took my future husband's hands and saw that he was shaking too. I breathed a sigh of relief and realized it was just nerves.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 23, 2011

Diabetes Philosophies: Mine and Yours

I recently finished reading Amy Stockwell Mercer's book, The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes.  In Chapter 1, the author discusses a topic that I find critical to the well-being of people with diabetes: Developing a personal diabetes philosophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2011

Metformin Helped My Type 1 Diabetes

My name is Katherine Marple, and I've had type 1 diabetes for 13 years. I'm the first in my family to have the disease, so I've done most of the research and made most of the discoveries on my own. One of those discoveries was the power of metformin (in addition to insulin) to help me control my diabetes.

comments 16 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2011

New App Available: iEatOut Allergy Free

A new food-oriented app is now available for people with diabetes: iEatOut Gluten & Allergy Free. The app, designed for the iPhone and iPod Touch. provides instant access to tips for safely eating out for people with food allergies. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2011

Parenting Style Impacts Control of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

As a dad, do you tend to be authoritative and have high expectations of your child's self control? Do you set clear limits and command respect, without bulldozing him or her? If so, you may be helping your child with type 1 diabetes stick to his or her treatment regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2011

FDA Approval Sought for “iglucose” Tracking Technology

Florida-base PositiveID Corp. has filed a 510(k) application with the U.S Food and Drug Administration to market its "iglucose"TM diabetes management system.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 10, 2011

Color Pictures of the 10 Worst Foods for People With Diabetes!

Our office manager sent us this link to a site with beautiful color photos of 10 foods that people with diabetes should avoid.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 9, 2011

Canadian “Diabulimia” Study Seeks DH Readers’ Input

The University of Quebec is sponsoring an online survey (go to www.eddiabetes.com) directed at people with diabetes who may have an eating disorder.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2011

Vitamin D May Reduce Risk for Type 2

A Boston-based study has found that vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes by improving their beta cell functioning.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2011

July 2011

“Attention: This Is Your Car Speaking.”

How many times has this happened to you? You're driving somewhere and something feels off. You suspect that your blood sugar level may be dropping, but you plow ahead. Now, imagine your car sounding the alarm: "Attention: This is your car speaking. Your blood sugar is low. Pull over and eat a snack."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2011

Too Much TV Could Be Deadly

Spending too many hours watching TV can also substantially increase your odds of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or dying early. That's the conclusion of a Harvard School of Public Health study that looked at the effects of heavy TV watching.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2011

Before Disaster Strikes

With severe weather predicted for Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Meredith Cummings thought carefully about where to park her car-eyeing the large trees in her historic neighborhood-when she arrived home on the afternoon of April 27. As she walked to her door, she reassured herself: Those trees had been there for more than 100 years. What were the odds of them coming down today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2011

Omega-3 Could Help Block Diabetes Onset

Italian researchers have found that increased consumption of omega-3 fatty acids leads to a decrease in insulin resistance, a common precursor to the development of type 2 diabetes. It also improves lipid profiles and adiponectin levels. (Adiponectin is a protein that is involved in metabolizing glucose and fatty acids. Low levels are associated with insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2011

NYT Article Says Older Diabetes Drugs Are Often the Best

A recent article in the New York Times says that such old prescription diabetes drugs as metformin and generics such as glimepiride are often as effective as or even more effective than newer, more expensive drugs.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2011

“Good” Brown Fat Might Help People Lose Weight

Body fat is like two twins: one evil and one good.  In this case, white fat-the kind that likes to cluster around the abdomen and hang on to calories-is the bad stuff. The "good" fat is brown, and it has been found to assist the body in burning calories, thus helping keep weight down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2011

A New Normal

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on June 25, 2009. At the time, I was a few weeks shy of my nineteenth birthday and had just finished my first year of college at the State University of New York at New Paltz.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2011

Type 2 Drug Victoza Helps Type 1s, Too

Victoza, a drug aimed at type 2 diabetes, may turn out to be a boon for type 1 diabetes patients as well. A small clinical study shows that patients with well-controlled type 1 who took Victoza daily for just one week experienced a 15 percent drop in their blood sugar levels. Patients who took the drug over a full 24-week test period needed less and less insulin, decreasing their average mealtime dose by seven units and their all-day insulin requirement by eight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 48 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

Diabetes and Depression Offers Big Challenges

If you have diabetes, you're more likely to be depressed than people without the disease.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2011

Roger Hurdsman Making Diabetes A Family Affair

Roger Hurdsman lives in Roy, Utah, surrounded by women. His wife of four years, Hilary, is there, along with his two young daughters, Bonnie and Tess.  He seems to be handling the estrogen well though, perhaps because he devotes his days  to designing software for the Department of Defense. He is able to spend time with computers and gadgets before being inundated with tea parties and dress-up when he gets home.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2011

Goodbye, Pyramid; Hello, MyPlate

Say goodbye to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's old Food Pyramid. The tapered food guide is giving way to MyPlate, a colorful visual aid that shows the rough proportions of fruit, vegetables, protein, grains, and that dairy people should consume at every meal.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2011

June 2011

Looking at Cannabis Based Type 2 Treatment

One of the classic effects of cannabis on people is raging hunger-the "marijuana munchies." The drug has been used to good effect on people with diseases that diminish appetite, helping them to regain a healthy interest in food. So it is a bit ironic that British drug maker GW Pharmaceuticals has created a cross-bred cannabis plant whose appetite-suppressing qualities could be used to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities - Part 2

In the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to be aware of the new realities. In this article,  I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 71 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2011

Allergan Seeks Lap-Band Surgeries for Obese Teens

Lap-Band manufacturer Allergan has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow surgeries using the device on overweight teenagers as young as 14 years old.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2011

My Lovely Little Insulin Pump

"My pump, my pump, my lovely little pump!"  My sister invented her own version of the Black Eyed Peas' song, "My Humps" to poke friendly fun at my insulin pump.   

comments 20 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2011

Flavonoid Rutin May Help Obesity and Diabetes

An Australian researcher who deliberately fed his lab rats a high-sugar/high-fat diet says that a flavonoid called rutin helped block the growth of fat cells in their abdomens and kept them from putting on weight despite their bad diet. Flavonoids are plant pigments that researchers are finding have beneficial metabolic effects because of their antioxidant capabilities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2011

Father's Day Reflections

With Father's Day just around the corner, I thought it would be nice to stop for a moment and reflect on what dads do for us, especially dads who have diabetic children. The pressure and emotional aspects of diabetes can be overwhelming, not to mention the stress it can put on a family. For every needle prick, shot, and counted carb my father (and mother) helped me with, I want to say thanks.

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2011

Balancing Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Max Bruno, a freshman at the State University of New York at New Paltz, tries to get to the gym about four times a week. He says that he knows his limits for working out, but likes to push himself.  "I just have to be careful," he explains. "About an hour or so after I'm done working out, my blood sugar drops really low."

comments 14 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2011

FDA Moves to Restrict Access to Three GSK Diabetes Drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has said that starting on November 18, 2011, it will restrict retail pharmacy sales of three diabetes drugs manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline: the stand-alone Avandia (rosiglitazone) and the combination drugs Avandamet (rosiglitazone and metformin) and Avandaryl (rosiglitazone and glimepiride).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2011

Survey Shows Cost Catching Up to Taste in Food-Buying Decisions

As prices rise, Americans are beginning to pay almost as much attention to the cost of food as they do to its taste. That's one of the findings of the 2011 Food & Health Survey, recently published by the International Food Industry Council Foundation (IFICF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2011

May 2011

New App Shows Which Prescriptions Can Drain Nutrients

"Nutrient Depletions" is a new smart phone app that allows users to see which of their prescription medications may be draining nutrients from their body. The app, available at iTunes stores for $1.99, works on Apple's iPhone, iTouch, and iPad products.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 31, 2011

Overweight Diabetics Earn Less

A Dallas-based marketing research firm survey of 9,265 respondents indicates that people with diabetes earn less and weigh more than their non-diabetic counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2011

Maple Syrup-A Sweet Surprise

Meet the latest superfood: maple syrup.  Wait a minute...maple syrup? The super-sugary stuff poured on pancakes and waffles and used to glaze hams? That maple syrup?

comments 9 comments - Posted May 24, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

Prediabetes Sweet Tooth Doesn’t Always Lead to Weight Gain

A new study says that people who consume a "moderate" amount of candy per day have a slightly lower body mass index than people who don't eat candy.  They also run a 15 percent lower risk than the general population of developing metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2011

Moms of Children with Diabetes Tell Their Stories, Ask to Support Research For a Cure

HOLLYWOOD, FL -- They come from New York, Miami, Milwaukee and more. They have children of all ages with type 1 diabetes - and they're on a mission to find a cure. They're the "Real Moms of the DRI Foundation" and in honor of Mother's Day they're asking millions of moms - and others - to support the Diabetes Research Institute, a world leader in cure-focused research.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2011

FDA Approves Indian Drug Maker’s Diabetes Drug Trial

The drug discussed below is for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 6, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

Medtronic Announces Mac-Compatible Diabetes Management Software

Medtronic, Inc., says that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the marketing of the company's CareLink® Personal 5.4 Therapy Management Software for the Mac OS platform.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 116 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose sugar, glucose, has been partially changed into another type of sugar, fructose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Can Beta Blockers Encourage Weight Gain? Aussie Study Says Yes

Beta blockers, which many people with diabetes take to control high blood pressure, may be one of the reasons why type 2s often tend to gain and keep weight. That's the conclusion of a study from St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2011

Jeff and Natalie Kolok: The Definition of Parenting

Jeff and Natalie Kolok live in northwestern Vermont with their three children: Naomi, 16, and Johanna and Nicholas, each ten years old. Both Johanna and Nicholas have type 1 diabetes, Johanna since age four and Nick since age six.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 7, 2011

Sanofi-Aventis Announces Blog, App, and Social Media Sites

France-based pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis has announced the availability of several new media designed to help the company communicate with people who have diabetes.
• A blog, "Discuss Diabetes," offers health, nutrition, and lifestyle information, as well as a way to offer suggestions to the company. The blog is available at www.discussdiabetes.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2011

March 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

FDA Accepts Application to Review Dapagliflozin, a Type 2 Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted an application to review dapagliflozin, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2011

Alcohol and Sex

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

The Thrill of the Syringe

"Shot, mommy?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

The Great Lancing Debate

My almost 20 years as a diabetes educator have been memorable in many ways, but certain moments stand out more than others.  Because blood glucose testing is an important part of diabetes management for everyone I see, I try to assess each person’s skills and habits in this key area.  I’ll never forget the time I asked a client how often he changed his lancet.  He had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about four years earlier and was checking regularly, so it seemed like a reasonable question.  He proceeded to look at me with a puzzled expression and say, “You mean you’re supposed to change those things?”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2011

Garlic Oil May Protect Against Diabetes-related Heart Disease

A new report recently published in the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry adds a new punch to the power of garlic in the fight against heart disease. The report concludes that garlic has "significant" potential for preventing cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease that is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 3, 2011

Dr. Jane Delgado, Author of The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life

Hispanics are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have type 2 diabetes, and more than a third of working adult Hispanics do not have health insurance. For this audience, Jane Delgado, PhD, has written The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life. Available in both Spanish and English, it's a culturally sensitive and reassuring book that dispels myths and presents detailed science while gently guiding readers toward the right path in caring for their diabetes. The tone is conversational, as Dr. Delgado speaks to her readers like a family member who knows them well and has their best interests at heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2011

Diabetes Drug Prompts Charges, Calls for Reform in France

Scandal swirling around a former diabetes drug has upended medical regulation in France, with the country's health minister promising tough new reforms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2011

February 2011

Keeping the Weight Off: An Interview with Ellen Granberg, PhD

Ellen Granberg is an obesity sociologist who studies the processes that people go through when they lose weight and keep it off. As she says, "If the problem were that we don't know what people should eat to lose weight, that would be one thing, but we don't have that problem. There are a hundred weight loss plans out there that are perfectly good. We understand all about the physiology of weight loss maintenance and the metabolic impacts, but nothing about the social and emotional impacts. People who sustain weight loss over time move through a lot of different challenges."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 27, 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

Tyler Stevenson on Going Away to College with Diabetes

When a young person with type 1 diabetes leaves home for the first time, it's often a difficult adjustment for the parents as well as their child. Tyler Stevenson is 20 years old, in his second year at Florida State. This is what he told us about his life in college with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2011

Does Coffee Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

Folks who need that morning cup of coffee to get going may be protecting themselves from type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. UCLA researchers wrote in the journal Diabetes last month that drinking four cups of coffee a day reduced women's chance of developing type 2 by a bit less than half. What's more, the scientists point to a specific reason why all that java has a beneficial effect: a protein known as sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Scientists have suspected for some time that SHBG was connected to diabetes development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2011

Medical Food Treats Neuropathy

Of all diabetic complications, neuropathy is one of the scariest and most difficult to treat. Nerve damage in the feet, leading to numbness or pain and, in severe cases, to foot ulcers or amputations, affects up to 60 percent of diabetics, according to recent research.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 17, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose glucose has been partially changed into a different sugar, fructose. To make HFCS, you start with corn, then mill it to produce starch -corn starch.  Starch, the most important carbohydrate in the human diet, consists of long chains of glucose. To make corn syrup, you mix the corn starch with water and then add an enzyme, produced by a bacterium, that breaks the starch down into shorter chains of glucose. Then you add another enzyme, produced by a fungus, that breaks the short chains down into glucose molecules. At that point, you have regular corn syrup.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 17, 2011

Tyler's Ten Objectives for Staying Healthy

Everywhere you look, there seems to be a great tasting high carb meal, dessert, or snack staring back at you. While away at college last fall, I found a t-shirt picturing a cupcake above a skull and crossbones. For me, that image really sums up how we need to deal with being diabetic while being constantly tempted by sugary treats.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Peeling a Grape Ups Your BG Test Results

According to a new study published in Diabetes Care, your finger-prick blood glucose test may be "abnormally and significantly high" if you test after handling fruit without first scrubbing your hands thoroughly and vigorously. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

Diabetes Superfoods

Ever see the top 10 lists for foods everyone should eat to superpower your diet? Ever wonder which will mesh with your diabetes meal plan? Wonder no more. Your list of the top 10 diabetes superfoods has arrived.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Walmart Plans to Sell Healthier Food

Walmart, the nation's largest grocer, averages 20 million customers every single day, so their food policies can affect a lot of people. For one thing, researchers have linked part of the rise in obesity to the prevalence of cheaper food, and Walmart is famous for cheaper food.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

Lilly and the JDRF Partner to Fund Regenerative Medicine Research in Type 1 Diabetes

INDIANAPOLIS and NEW YORK - Eli Lilly and Company and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) today announced that they have signed an agreement to fund early-stage research that could enable patients with type 1 diabetes to regenerate insulin-producing cells destroyed by the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

Diva TalkRadio Features Black History Month Diabetes Spotlight on Healthy Soulful Cuisine

Diva TalkRadio is an interactive, live internet talk-radio destination that focuses on issues and concerns of those living with, at risk of and affected by diabetes. Divabetic's founder and executive director, Max "Mr. Divabetic" Szadek serves as the resident host of DivaTalkRadio programs.  This month, Mr. Divabetic shines the spotlight on Constance Brown-Riggs MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN. Constance is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and a National Spokesperson American Dietetic Association. Constance has been honored with the Diabetes Care and Education Practice Group (DCE) 2007 Diabetes Educator of the Year Award. Over the course of her career, Constance Brown-Riggs has established herself as an expert on the subject of nutrition, diabetes and the cultural issues that impact the health and health care of people of color. She is not only versed in the science of medical nutrition, but also has an active nutrition counseling practice through which she sees hundreds of patients. Her ability to translate her academic and clinical knowledge into clear, understandable terms have made her a nationally renowned, sought-after speaker, educator and author. She is passionate about creating opportunities to spread the word about health and nutrition, and developing educational tools which shorten the cultural distance between patients and caregivers. Every aspect of her work supports that mission

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2011

January 2011

Front Labels on Food Packages Are Misleading

After the American Heart Association introduced its heart healthy logo in 1995, manufacturers apparently decided that such "healthy" logos were a pretty good marketing idea. Similar logos, called front-of-the-package labels, or FoP labels, have become popular with several food manufacturers, each of which has developed its own labels using its own criteria. Now, not surprisingly, a study by the Prevention Institute has found that these labels are misleading to customers. According to the Prevention Institute's executive director, Larry Cohen, they "emphasize one healthy aspect to trick [customers] into buying something fundamentally unhealthy." Dora the Explorer Fruit Shapes, for example, prominently labels itself as "gluten free," but does not mention the fact that 58 percent of its calories come from sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Insulin's Partner: Amylin

Insulin has a companion, and it's called amylin. Amylin is a small hormone that is released along with insulin by the beta cells of the pancreas in response to a meal. When people are insulin-deficient, they are amylin-deficient as well. Amylin wasn't even discovered until 1970, and it was not until the 1990s that scientists began to figure out what amylin does. But they now know that it partners with insulin to help control blood sugar levels, each in its own way:

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 28, 2011

Getting Personal With Bret Michaels

It's Labor Day weekend in Pittsburgh, just outside of the Steelers' Heinz Field, and the Bret Michaels Band has come home for some hard-driving rock and roll.  The 20,000 screaming fans are a generational mix, shrieking 16-year-old girls side-by-side with moms and dads who have temporarily abandoned their parental roles to dance, sing the familiar words to "Look What the Cat Dragged In," and howl into the nighttime air. On stage is Bret Michaels, the boy from Butler, Pennsylvania, a coal mining town just an hour north.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2011

Kombiglyze Komes to a Pharmacy Near You

The kuriously named Kombiglyze XR, a combination of Onglyza (saxagliptin) and the old reliable metformin, has arrived at pharmacies and is available by prescription to people with type 2 diabetes. It's similar to Janumet, an older medication that's a combination of Januvia (sitagliptin) and metformin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

The Lowdown on Downloading

It doesn't matter if you're a computer geek or complete technophobe: If you've ever made the effort to download your blood glucose meter, you probably don't have a clue about what to do with the data once you've gotten it.  That needs to change. Those of us who live with diabetes need to become more adept at analyzing our own data, to see what's working and what isn't both for our own sake and that of our time-strapped healthcare providers. .

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

Why We Underestimate Our Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

You'd think the world would be running through the streets in a movie-style panic. An epidemic of unprecedented proportions is inexorably advancing.  In our lifetimes, half of us may develop a devastating disease that could cause us to go blind, lose a leg, or die far too soon. But we aren't in a panic. The authorities are talking it up, of course, but most of us aren't doing much at all to prevent type 2 diabetes. We're getting fatter by the year, and we're moving less and less.  Many of us who already have type 2 diabetes are not making the changes that could keep its consequences at bay. Why not?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 24, 2011

What do I do now, Coach?

Self-management is the key to healthy living with diabetes, but there are always challenges to maintaining optimum blood glucose levels.  Lagging motivation and focus can be obstacles, and adjusting diet and medications to meet changing conditions is challenging. If you have ever wished for a person to help you improve your skills, someone who could offer informed guidance between appointments with your doctor - you may have been wishing for a diabetes coach. Diabetes coaches are personal trainers for individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes. This unique branch of diabetes education delivers ongoing, one-on-one consulting from a trained certified diabetes educator.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2011

AADE Game Day Tips for People with Diabetes

Despite what many think, diabetes does not have to deter people who have the disease from enjoying Super Bowl Sunday parties along with everyone else, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). In fact, managing your diabetes is often an exercise in moderation, more than anything else. With more than 24 million people in the U.S. who have diabetes, this is a very real issue, but there is no reason diabetics can't enjoy the festivities -- and the food -- at Super Bowl parties. The AADE put together the following tips for people with diabetes who want to enjoy the food - but need a little guidance about how to eat smart given all of the Super Bowl food temptations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 19, 2011

Vitamins C and E Affect Metabolic Syndrome in Ecuador

On the outskirts of Quito, the capital of Ecuador, meals are likely to be based on white rice, potatoes, sugar, and white bread. Given their reliance on high carbohydrate foods that are low in essential nutrients, many of the residents are overweight and malnourished at the same time.  The lack of vitamin C in their diet may contribute to metabolic syndrome, according to researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and the Corporacion Ecuatoriana de Biotecnologia. The researchers also concluded that vitamin E may have a protective effect against metabolic syndrome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2011

Diabetes Management in Flu Season

The crowd in the small Boston theater laughed and clapped. The comedy show was a good one, and I was enjoying it from a cramped seat in the balcony. It was October 29, a Friday, and while it was brisk outside, winter hadn't yet clamped down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 11, 2011

Type-1 University Now Open for Enrollment

Introducing "Type-1 University" (T1U) - the online school for people with diabetes who use insulin, including parents and caregivers.  The school can be found only in cyberspace - at www.type1university.com

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

Herbs, Sex, and Diabetes

Talk about a win-win situation! It seems that many aphrodisiacs--herbs that boost sexual energy and function--can also bring down blood sugar, cholesterol, and/or blood pressure.  At least four herbs have shown these double benefits in scientific studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2011

DiabetesSisters' National Conference Addresses Unique Challenges of Women with Diabetes

RALEIGH, NC- DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce that registration for the 2011 Weekend for Women Conference in Raleigh, NC will open on January 1, 2011 at 8am.  The Conference, a revolutionary national weekend conference designed specifically for women with diabetes, will take place April 29 - May 1, 2011 at the Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2011

President Obama Signs Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 Into Law

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 represents a major step forward in our nation's effort to provide all children with healthy food in schools. Increasingly schools are playing a central role in children's health. Over 31 million children receive meals through the school lunch program and many children receive most, if not all, of their meals at school. With over seventeen million children living in food insecure households and one out of every three children in America now considered overweight or obese, schools often are on the front lines of our national challenge to combat childhood obesity and improve children's overall health. This legislation includes significant improvements that will help provide children with healthier and more nutritious food options, educate children about making healthy food choices, and teach children healthy habits that can last a lifetime. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2011

December 2010

February Launch of Childhood Obesity Program at R.I. YMCAs Could Set National Standard

Starting in February, Rhode Island's eight YMCAs will participate in JOIN, a 24-week research study on ways to help obese children and teenagers achieve healthier weight. If it meets its goals, it could become the prototype for a nationwide program that would have a direct effect on the treatment of pre-diabetes in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2010

Einstein College of Medicine Receives $600,000 Grant to Study Resveratrol's Impact on Pre-Diabetes

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City has received a $600,000 grant from the American Diabetes Association to study the effects of resveratrol on lowering impaired glucose tolerance in older adults.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

Abbott Diabetes Care Announces Recall of Certain Lots of Blood Glucose Test Strips in the United States and Puerto Rico

Abbott Diabetes Care today announced that it has initiated a recall of 359 lots (approximately 359 million strips) of Precision Xtra®, Precision Xceed Pro®, MediSense® Optium, Optium, OptiumEZ and ReliOn® Ultima Blood Glucose Test Strips in the United States and Puerto Rico.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 22, 2010

Abuse in Childhood and Teens May Set Many Women on the Path to Type 2

Women who experienced sexual or physical abuse in childhood and adolescence-whether moderate or severe-run a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who were not abused, according to results from a study recently reported online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 16, 2010

Almonds May Help Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

With nearly 16 million Americans living today with pre-diabetes, a condition that is the precursor to type 2 diabetes, and half of all Americans expected to have some form of diabetes by the year 2020, healthy eating is more important than ever (1,2).  But here is some good news: a recent scientific study shows that incorporating almonds into your diet can help treat and possibly prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

Holiday Travel Tips for People With Diabetes

"Don't leave home without it" has a whole new meaning this holiday season. With holiday travel up from last year and increased security- and consequent delays- at airports, it's more important than ever for those with diabetes to properly prepare for their holiday travel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2010

Valeritas Receives FDA Clearance for the V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device

Valeritas, Inc., a medical technology company committed to the development and commercialization of innovative drug delivery solutions, announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has cleared the company's V-Go Disposable Insulin Delivery Device for the continuous subcutaneous delivery of insulin in preset basal rates and with on-demand bolus dosing for adult patients requiring insulin.  V-Go devices will be available in a preset basal rate to deliver 20, 30 or 40 Units of insulin in one 24-hour period (0.83 U/hr, 1.25U/hr or 1.67U/hr respectively) and on-demand bolus dosing in 2 Unit increments (up to 36 Units per one 24-hour time period).

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 9, 2010

Kaiser Permanente Announces $20,000 Grant to Support Innovative Program for Those Served by the Institute for Human Services

Kaiser Permanente presented a $20,000 grant to the Institute of Human Services to support vocational skills training in urban agriculture and an edible gardening initiative in conjunction with IHS' Rooftop Garden project at its Women's and Family Shelter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2010

New Facebook Game Aims to Stem Type 2 Diabetes Among Latinos

An estimated two million Latinos in the United States have type 2 diabetes, a full 10 percent of the Latino population. Facebook, the fourth most popular Internet site among Latinos, reaches nearly 45 percent of the Latino population that goes online.  Put those two facts together, and you have the audience for a new online game, HealthSeekerTM Explorando tu Salud, Paso a Paso ("Exploring Your Health, Step by Step").

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2010

November 2010

Drug Shortage Worries the Medical Community, Calls for Emergency Action

The newest threat to patient health may not be the flu or other epidemics. It could be a major shortage of prescription drugs. The shortage has reached the level of a "national public health crisis," according to a survey conducted by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) this summer. Survey respondents said shortages in the past year were "the worst ever, without a glimmer of hope for any improvement in the near future."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2010

At a Loss?

A friend of mine recently remarked that she wants her family to eat healthier, but she just doesn't know that much about nutrition. Though I can sympathize with her in some ways (nutritional education is a daunting and never-ending process), I do feel that the overall American attitude toward food is that ignorance is bliss. It reminds me of the preteen character in the movie Son-In-Law, who puts his sister's bra cups over his ears and tells his parents in a taunting voice, "I can't hear you!"  Unfortunately, what you don't know CAN hurt you, and not just you, but also your family. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2010

Diabetes and Pregnancy: The Battle to Have a Baby

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 23 years ago, I remember being told that having children would be a very difficult challenge.  I was seven years old at the time - still a child myself - and had no interest in becoming a mom.  My own mother was very distressed at this news, but I didn't pay it any mind.  I had other things to focus on:  trees to climb, bikes to ride, and friends to play with.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 18, 2010

This World Diabetes Day, Measure Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Imagine a pandemic. A disease comes into a community and then spreads across borders, causing disability and death in its path.  Scientists fight to contain its spread, and doctors try to mitigate its effects.  Most people associate this kind of scenario with a pathogen: a virus or bacteria, like HIV or avian flu, that has found a way to exploit the human body.  In fact, however, the overwhelming majority of pandemics are the result of noncommunicable diseases that are not spread by pathogens: conditions like cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 12, 2010

Diabetes Month: Get Involved!

In celebration of diabetes, I want to encourage my readers to get involved in the diabetes community.  There are several reasons why this is important.  For one, when you are personally invested, you are also personally encouraged.  Secondly, you can use your diabetes experiences to motivate others.  And finally, getting involved can be a way of giving back to the world that has given you opportunities to live a better life with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2010

JDRF Clinical Panel Recommends Next Steps for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Testing

WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 10, 2010 --- Diabetes experts at a meeting convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) took the next step in advancing efforts toward the development of an artificial pancreas: putting forth clinical recommendations to ensure the safe and effective testing of artificial pancreas technology in real-life situations. We are pleased at today's meeting there was a strong consensus among leading clinicians, researchers and industry leaders regarding the path toward outpatient studies for both low-glucose suspend and artificial pancreas systems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

Is Correcting Low Blood Sugars Caused by Exercise Making You Fat?

Over the years, I have had many exercisers with diabetes ask me why they're gaining weight instead of losing it. There are two possible answers to that question. One answer is that muscle is heavier than fat, so if you are gaining muscle while losing fat-especially in the early stages of a new exercise program-your scale weight probably doesn't reflect your positive changes in body composition (i.e., less fat, more muscle).

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

Abdominal Pain in Children May be Linked to Fructose Intake

It's a pretty common complaint heard in households around the country: "My tummy hurts." Parents and teachers have been battling this complaint for decades, with children insisting that they are in pain and having no explanation why.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2010

Saturated Fat A Cause of Heart Disease? Not as Likely as Once Thought

For over 30 years, we have been told over and over by doctors, the media, nutritionists, and food companies that saturated fat is bad for us, causing us to gain weight and contributing to cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has led to a whole industry of low fat and non-fat food options, most claiming that saturated fat is bad for our health.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2010

October 2010

Diabetes and the Flu

As flu season approaches, many people are debating whether they should get a flu shot. As everyone knows, getting the flu is not fun. In fact, it can be downright miserable. But for those with diabetes, the flu can mean more than a cough, running nose, and body aches--it could mean more severe complications, and sometimes even death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2010

Dermagraft

It sounds like science fiction: a substitute for human skin, derived from human cells and used to treat difficult-to-treat diabetic foot ulcers. But it's a real product, called Dermagraft, manufactured and sold by a real company, Advanced BioHealing. The Connecticut-headquartered company is expanding its operations in Tennessee, part of an aggressive growth strategy to spread the word about its existing product and develop new ones.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Diabetes Self-Management Tips, Free Health Screenings at Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid Clinics

Nearly 1,200 Rite Aid stores nationwide will host Diabetes Solutions Days on Nov. 2, 3 or 4 offering free health screenings and self-management solutions to patients living with diabetes, care-givers and those concerned about diabetes. Visitors also can get vaccinated against flu and/or pneumonia for $24.99 or $50 respectively, although many insurance plans including Medicare cover the cost. Vaccinations are especially important for diabetes patients because flu and pneumonia combine for the deaths of 10,000 to 30,000 diabetes patients annually, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2010

Trapped Underground for 70 Days with Diabetes

Imagine that you're a miner. Imagine you have diabetes (that, at least, shouldn't be too hard). Now, imagine that you have to spend two months trapped underground with other miners. How would you do?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2010

Diabetes Risk May Fall as Magnesium Intake Increases

Getting enough magnesium in your diet could help prevent type 2 diabetes. Dr. Ka He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have found that people who consumed the most magnesium from foods and vitamin supplements were about half as likely to develop diabetes over the next 20 years as people who took in the least magnesium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2010

Weight Watchers and Merck Collaborate to Help Physicians Fight Obesity Through Lifestyle Management Approach

Weight Watchers International, Inc., the world's leading provider of weight management services, and Merck, a global healthcare leader, announced today an innovative collaboration focused on fighting obesity.  The two companies will launch an initiative in which Merck will provide physicians and other health care providers with educational information about the Weight Watchers® program and its underlying clinical evidence to assist doctors in addressing the ongoing weight management needs of their patients. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2010

Reducing Health Costs Through Lower Food Prices

Reducing the cost of low-carbohydrate foods for people with diabetes could significantly reduce medical costs associated with the disease that affects more than 23 million Americans, according to a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2010

Calibra Gains FDA Clearance to Market Finesse

Calibra Medical has announced that it received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its FinesseTM insulin patch-pen for up to three-day use with Novo Nordisk's Novolog® rapid-acting insulin. This much-anticipated step closer to market release follows the announcement in January that Calibra received FDA clearance for the device for use with Eli Lilly's Humalog® rapid-acting insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2010

Vitamin D Linked to Childhood Obesity

Michelle Obama recently announced that she plans to eliminate childhood obesity in a generation. If all goes according to her plan, childhood obesity will have dropped from the current rate of 32 percent to a rate of 5 percent by 2030. That rate of 32 percent translates to over 25 million obese children and adolescents, so a lot of attention has been given to examining the direct causes of childhood obesity, the factors that contribute, and the best ways to eliminate it altogether.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Let's Move Campaign

Earlier this year, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an ambitious goal: to erase childhood obesity within a generation. If she is successful, the childhood obesity rate will be only 5 percent by 2030, down from the current rate of 32 percent. Ambitious? Yes. Impossible? Not according to her plan.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2010

Can You Keep A Secret?

The day I learned that I had type 1 diabetes was no doubt one of the most heart-wrenching, confusing, and angry days of my life. But I quickly decided that I had to channel those feelings into something productive, something worthwhile. I gained confidence as a person with diabetes, and even though, yes, the shots stung, I wasn't going to flinch. Welcome to my life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2010

Sleep Loss Limits Fat Loss

Cutting back on sleep reduces the benefits of dieting, according to a study published Oct. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2010

The Cost of Diabetes

In July, I went to order a refill of my pump and was refused. My account was overdue, and my pump company wouldn't issue a refill until I could pay at least $400 of the $1200 I owed. I didn't have $400. I am a freelance writer and stay-at-home mom with a knack for stretching my husband's paycheck. I'd been making small monthly payments of about $50 because that was all we could afford, but now they wouldn't send me any more. So I went to the pharmacy and bought a box of syringes for $25. I didn't want to go back to multiple daily injections, but I didn't see that I had a choice.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 9, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

Have a Holiday Heart-to-Heart

The holidays are known as a time for family gatherings, catching up with relatives, and sometimes even the occasional family conflict.  Like drama at the holiday dinner table, in many ways your health is influenced by your family-for better or for worse.  This year, why not start a conversation that benefits everyone?  Gather your family health history.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2010

September 2010

The Scarlet 'D'

Do you ever wish you could leave your diabetes at home?  Maybe you're at a holiday party, chit chatting with your buds gathered around the bar enjoying an adult beverage (or two), maybe grazing at the table of cookies, cakes and other tempting morsels.  "Oh, I think I'll try one of those.  Maybe one of those too.  I didn't bring my diabetes with me, so I don't have to think about it tonight."  Diabetes is not last year's outfit you can leave at home, or a bad relationship you can dump and move on.  It is more like a tattoo.  It goes everywhere with you.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2010

FDA Significantly Restricts Access to the Diabetes Drug Avandia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it will significantly restrict the use of the diabetes drug Avandia (rosiglitazone) to patients with Type 2 diabetes who cannot control their diabetes on other medications. These new restrictions are in response to data that suggest an elevated risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients treated with Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2010

"What's For Dinner?"

"What's for dinner?" is a commonly asked question in many households.  As children, spouses, friends, and others stream into your home after work, school, or a day of errands, they are eager to sit down, enjoy a meal, and unwind.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Hillary Clinton, Ban Ki-Moon Launch Global Nutrition Initiatives

NEW YORK (Sept. 21, 2010) - Millions of children's lives could be saved as a result of the long-awaited global focus on nutrition announced today, Save the Children said.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition

New research findings reveal that one of America's favorite colorful fruits, blueberries, have properties that help to improve factors related to pre-diabetes and decrease inflammation in obese men and women. Chronic low-grade inflammation related to obesity contributes to insulin resistance, a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. "This is an excellent example of the importance of clinical trials to building our knowledge-base in helping to improve public health," said Steven Heymsfield, PBRC Executive Director

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

Rustic Sausage and Angel Hair Pasta

Delicious turkey sausage and earthy mushrooms make this dish stick-to-your-ribs hearty for those cool autumn days. Try it with a spinach salad and enjoy the season.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2010

Penne with Broccoli, Ham, and Cheese

A recipe that always comes out when there is leftover ham in the refrigerator, this colorful and very healthy dish tastes great. Use just deli ham from the grocery store or dress it up with some fancy cured ham such as real Italian Prosciutto.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2010

From Helpless to Heroic: A Parent's Guide to Changing the Statistics One Child at a Time

I was reading the latest issue of one of my parenting magazines when I came across an article on children and food.  The author suggested offering dessert only two to three times a week instead of every day.  I laughed aloud.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Diabetes and Alcohol: What You Need to Know

If you are meeting a friend for a drink after work or attending a holiday party where alcohol is being offered, is it a health risk or a benefit?  The medical and nutrition literature reports that moderate consumption of alcohol can offer some health benefits, particularly for your heart. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 defines drinking in moderation as no more than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men. One drink, by definition, is a 12-ounce beer, eight-ounce glass of malt liquor, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor.  Moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke, lower the risk of developing gallstones, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes. Studies show  that those benefiting from moderate consumption are middle-aged and older adults.  It is not recommended, however, that anyone begin drinking or drink more frequently on the basis of health considerations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2010

Immune System Genes Show Links to Type 1 Diabetes

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but international researchers have found a link between the blood sugar disorder and a network of immune system genes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2010

Fantastic Fall Foods and Fun: A Guide to Healthfully Enjoying Fall

Fall is a welcome season, full of bounty and beauty.  The heat of summer gives way to calmer days and crisper evenings.  We trade our shorts and swimsuits for jackets and jeans and enjoy campfires, hayrides, and holiday celebrations.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2010

The Highs and Lows of Going Back to School

Going back to school can be a little scary for someone with diabetes. There are a lot of things to think about when it comes to making it through the school day without having problems with your blood sugar levels. In school, we strive for that all important "A" on a test; to score 100. The same is true about blood sugar/glucose levels; the closer I come to keeping my blood sugar level at "100," the better for my health and the better for my grades; high and low blood sugars aren't helpful in keeping a clear, quick-thinking mind. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2010

August 2010

THE Diabetes Dude Ramps Up an Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The Flamingo Flock diabetes awareness campaign is the brainchild of 9-year-old Noah Brokmeier, "The Diabetes Dude."  Noah's blue flamingos are landing on lawns nationwide and appearing at big events like the Boston Marathon. Wherever they go, the birds pose for pictures, which are then posted on Noah's website, www.thediabetesdude.com. The location of the birds is also flagged on his "official flamingo tracking map," to show the progress and growth of the campaign.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2010

'Sugar Crush' (Diabetes Dietary Supplement) Clinical Research Presented at the 37th Annual AADE Meeting

NaturEra, (http://www.NaturEra.com) a dietary supplements emerging leader, this month announced the launch of its new Sugar Crush dietary supplements would take place at the American Association of Diabetes Educators meeting in San Antonio, Texas.  Sugar Crush research has been accepted for Poster presentation at the AADE meeting.  The full clinical research study (http://www.naturera.com/Manuscript.pdf) shows that NaturEra's 'Sugar Crush' and 'Sugar Crush Daily' dietary supplement formulas used in combination lower and maintain healthy blood sugar levels for people with diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 26, 2010

The Fruit Factor

In the early days after my type 1 diabetes diagnosis, I sentenced a lot of foods to what I came to think of as my personal DO-NOT-EAT list, often with only slight provocation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 25, 2010

FDA Approves Mobile App for Managing Diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared Baltimore-based health software company WellDoc to begin marketing the DiabetesManager® System, a mobile phone application designed for patients and healthcare providers who are dealing with type 2 diabetes. The company, founded in 2005, plans to start selling the product early next year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2010

Finally, the Pump.

"Absolutely not. I'm not going to mess with that."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2010

Kids' Fructose Consumption Can Lead to Big Adult Bellies

Children who consume a lot of high-fructose corn syrup in soft drinks and processed foods as they're growing up may run the risk of turning many of their fat cells into belly fat when they reach adulthood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2010

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

The Long awaited Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act 2010 (SS 3307) has passed the Senate, after a push by the ADA membership and other advocates, urging Senators to get the job done!  The Act, which passed the Senate unanimously, now moves to the House where it is expected to pass.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2010

Obesity Intervention Study Produces Mixed Results

The HEALTHY program, a three-year government-funded intervention in middle schools that was designed to lower overall rates of overweight and obesity among students, has produced mixed results.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2010

Lower-Carb Diet Better Than Low-Fat for Obese Insulin-Resistant Women

Insulin-resistant obese women lost more weight after 12 weeks on a low-carbohydrate diet than they did on a low-fat diet, according to a study conducted by the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno. (The study was funded by Jenny Craig, a company that sells diet foods.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2010

Red Wine Ingredient Increases Insulin Sensitivity, Works Against Retinal Disease

Two recent research studies on humans indicate that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine and peanuts, increases insulin sensitivity in older and obese people. A third study, done on mice, shows that resveratrol may someday become a powerful tool in therapies directed at macular degeneration and other retinal maladies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

July 2010

Making an Ordinary Day Extraordinary

Now that it's summer, I'm enjoying a typical teacher's vacation: summer break. I have three months of freedom, which for many is a dream come true. However, I live in the sweltering Midwest, where it's typical to see mid-summer temperatures of one hundred degrees or more, with an even higher heat index.  These oppressive temperatures can continue into late October.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Type 2 Risk Information to Share with Your Friends and Loved Ones

Learn Your Risk for Diabetes and Take Steps to Protect Your Health. If you are diagnosed in the early stages of diabetes, you can take better care of yourself and get treatment. If you have pre-diabetes, you can take steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

FDA Freezes Long-Term Study on Diabetes Drug Avandia

A long-term study on the safety of a popular diabetes drug was put on hold Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, while the FDA considers whether it's too dangerous to continue.  Several large studies have linked the drug, Avandia, to a higher risk of heart attacks and other heart problems. While other studies have not found the same risk, last week an FDA advisory panel recommended that the drug not be sold without a stronger warning label or possibly limits on who could receive it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

Nutraceuticals and Natural Supplements for Treating Type 2 Diabetes: An Overview

From environmentally friendly hybrid cars and heating with solar power to organic or natural foods, our culture is increasingly embracing green strategies. "Using natural dietary supplements to support healthy blood sugar levels and minimize the impact of glycation is a rational continuation of this green philosophy," says Steven Joyal, MD, vice president of Scientific Affairs and Medical Development for the Life Extension Foundation in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (www.lef.org). He is also author of the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2010

U.S. Advisers Reject Vivus' Fat Pill

(Reuters) - The first new prescription weight-loss pill in more than a decade failed to win backing from U.S.health advisers, who said safety concerns about the drug outweighed its ability to help obese patients shed pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2010

Moderate Alcohol Intake Lessens Chance of Developing Type 2, Says Dutch Study

While teetotaling is the surest way to avoid abusing alcohol, it turns out that moderate alcohol intake may be one way to stave off the development of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Sweet Escape

There's nothing quite like a dip in the Mediterranean Sea at sunset. The warm, clear water, shimmering clouds, and sound of families enjoying aperitifs at beachside cafes--it was the perfect start to a late-summer Italian holiday. We were visiting my boyfriend's brother, who had moved from England to Genoa a few years prior. It was my first time across the Atlantic, so my boyfriend Dunstan and I tried to make it count with 10 days filled with dinners, family celebrations, a road trip to Rome, hiking, and plenty of swimming.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years.  Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips.  Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town.  Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2010

Ignorance Is Bliss or Knowledge Is Power?

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the disease became my entire life. I was drowning in paperwork telling me who to pay, what to eat, how to medicate, and what to do if I got sick. But as months and years passed, diabetes management became just a part of my goal to live healthfully. I realized that I couldn't compartmentalize my health. I cannot pinpoint when my obsession with all things healthy started, but once it did--well, I've never looked back. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

Orange-Ginger Glazed Salmon

Salmon is one of the world’s healthiest foods. Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, vitamins D and B12, and protein, it’s an absolute powerhouse of good nutrition. Better yet, it tastes great! Perfect for the hot days of summer the sweet orange-ginger glaze is tinged with just a tinge of heat. If you prefer, an indoor grill or sauté pan can be used to cook the salmon.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Vitamin D Deficiency Common in People With Poor Diabetes Control

In a recent study of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and glucose intolerance in people with type 2 diabetes, more than 90 percent of the type 2 diabetes patients were found to be deficient in vitamin D, with their control over the disease worsening as their deficiency increased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 4, 2010

Traveling Wisely With Diabetes

Summer has arrived, and for many, that means it's time to take that long-awaited vacation. Visions of sunny beaches, gourmet meals, mountain resorts, adventurous excursions, and campgrounds dance in our minds. The word "vacation" is typically a synonym for "letting it all go."  No worries. No cares. Just pure indulgence. But for people with diabetes, an upcoming vacation can bring on anxiety and stress. For many of us, our disease thrives on routine and predictability, and vacations do not adhere to our everyday lives.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

A diet including coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA), helps combat insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of cells to respond to insulin and take in glucose for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate for insulin resistance by producing even more insulin, but eventually glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Over time, insulin resistance and obesity can lead to pre-diabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

June 2010

Harvard Study Says Brown Rice Twice Weekly Can Reduce Diabetes Risk by 10 Percent

White rice and brown rice are reminiscent of those old dramas about identical twins, wherein one turns out to be angelic and the other turns out to be bad news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2010

Getting Back to Basics When Life Gets In the Way

One day as I was multi-tasking (making dinner, washing dishes, supervising my daughter, returning phone calls), I suddenly grew very annoyed at the music we were listening to. I had recently purchased a children's CD for my daughter, and it hit me that all the songs sounded the same.  What a waste of twelve dollars, I thought, as I headed toward the CD player to shut it off.   As I reached down to hit the "off" button, I noticed a small, unfamiliar icon on the display screen. I crouched down to further examine and then laughed aloud.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2010

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Depomed recalls 52 lots of diabetes drug

(Reuters) - Drug developer Depomed Inc (DEPO.O) said it will recall 52 lots of its diabetes drug Glumetza due to the presence of traces of a certain chemical in the tablet's 500 mg bottle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

I Can't Look at Chips as Just Chips

I am that mom.  The one who buys organic foods, bakes her own bread, bans high fructose corn syrup and trans fats, and always totes around healthy snacks.  I don't drink soda, my toddler has never consumed fish sticks, and not once since her birth have we visited McDonalds for a "value" or Happy Meal.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2010

Safe Chemicals Act of 2010 and You

We all know that certain chemicals in everyday products are harmful:  mercury and lead, just to name a couple. But how harmful, and what can we do about it?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2010

Government Goes Undercover to Investigate Supplements

That confused-looking old man in the dietary supplements aisle was more than he seemed. He was actually an undercover government agent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2010

The Other: How Spouses of Diabetics Deal

It's a cool Sunday evening, and I'm sitting in a lively Italian restaurant. My husband is across the table.  We've just placed our orders, and we're engaged in easy conversation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2010

Meat Preservatives, Not Meats Themselves, May Increase the Risk for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, some medical researchers have pointed the finger at meat consumption as a major factor in the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, a meta-analysis conducted by the Harvard School of Medical Health has concluded that it may be the salt and chemical preservatives used in processed meats that lead to health problems, not the meats themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

10 Tips for Being the Good Patient

I've been told by my medical team, those who work hard to make sure I live a healthy life with my diabetes, that I am a "good patient."   They are pleased that I do what I am supposed to:  check my blood sugar, keep my appointments, eat healthy foods, and exercise. They also remark that they wish all their patients took their diabetes management as seriously as I do.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2010

FREE iPhone Diabetes Applications

With the rise of the iPhone and the creation of hundreds of thousands of iPhone applications, it's only natural that several wonderful apps have appeared to make life easier for diabetes patients. Here is a quick look at 10 FREE applications, in no particular order, to help you choose the right ones for you.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 2, 2010

Ironman Jay

It's early on a Thursday morning in a hotel ballroom in downtown Oakland, and attendees at a breakfast of the annual meeting of the California Dietetic Association are still working on getting fully awake. That problem is solved two minutes after Jay Hewitt, the breakfast's inspirational speaker, takes the stage. Hewitt, a 41-year-old lawyer who was diagnosed with type 1 in 1991, knows his audience is an experienced group of professional dietitians that has dealt with every type of patient and heard every kind of excuse for failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

May 2010

Billions Needed to End US Child Hunger and Obesity

US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on Monday urged Congress to plow billions more dollars into programs to end the twin scourges of child obesity and hunger, which impact children, the economy, and national security.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2010

America’s Favorite Farmers Markets

American Farmland Trust (AFT) is pleased to announce its 2010 "America's Favorite Farmers Markets" online contest kicks off on June 1 at http://www.farmland.org/vote. The contest is a nation-wide challenge to see which farmers markets can rally the most support from its customers. The goal is to promote the connection between fresh local food and the local farms and farmland that supply it.  

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

Abbott Receives FDA Clearance for New, Easier-to-Use FreeStyle Lite® Test Strips

Abbott announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new FreeStyle Lite blood glucose test strips. The new FreeStyle Lite test strips minimize interference during blood glucose testing and are designed to offer a better testing experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

Attending Weight Watchers® Meetings Helps Reduce the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

The 57 million Americans currently living with "pre-diabetes" could benefit from a group weight loss program, like Weight Watchers, according to a new study published in this month's American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. Researchers found that after a 6-month Weight Watchers group program, overweight or obese adults who attended at least two thirds of the weekly sessions, not only lost weight, but also significantly reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels - important indicators of diabetes risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

Why Drugstore Genetic Tests Upset the FDA

On Tuesday, Pathway Genomics announced that their personal genetic testing kit (InsightTM Saliva Collection Kit) would soon be available at the pharmacy chain Walgreens. The next day, the FDA released a letter it had sent to Pathway Genomics on Monday saying hold on, there was no approval on record for Pathway's Genetic Health Report. By Thursday, Wallgreens announced that it was delaying the sale of the genetic testing kits.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 12 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

FDA’s Bad Ad Program

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has launched a "Bad Ad Program," an outreach effort aimed at educating healthcare providers and urging them to report misleading drug advertisements. The Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications (DDMAC), in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, administers the program.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

Cherry Berry Pie Cups

Nobody will believe you created these perfect cherry "pies" in under 30 minutes. (And of course you don't have to tell). Fresh raspberries complement the cherry pie filling perfectly and add a fresh homemade quality while refrigerated piecrust makes them as easy as, well, pie!

comments 2 comments - Posted May 11, 2010

Avoiding Post-Race Hypoglycemia

I woke up on the floor of my living room, soaked in sweat.  I could not stand, or even sit up.  I could not raise my arms or control my hands enough to grasp anything. Forget reaching for the telephone, even if my brain could have formulated the thought to try.  I could not speak, but I lived alone, so there was no one to hear anyway.  I did not know what day it was, but the hot July 4th late afternoon sun was shining brightly through the windows.  After an unknown period of time, my brain must have had a flash of coherence that I was having severe hypoglycemia. 

comments 8 comments - Posted May 8, 2010

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

Osiris Therapeutics announced that it has been granted Orphan Drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Prochymal as a treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. The FDA instituted the Orphan Drug Act to promote the development of treatments for underserved patient populations. To be eligible for Orphan Drug designation, the treatment must target a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 new patients per year in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Tyler’s Top Ten Sports Tips

My last ten tips were meant to give you an idea of what to think about before you plan your day (Tyler's Top Ten Tips). Now I'm going to give you my top ten tips for how to manage your blood glucose levels while playing sports. These should help you keep everything in control and allow you to relax and have fun while playing.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 5, 2010

Surprise! Metformin Works Differently Than Thought

CINCINNATI - The popular diabetes medication metformin works in different fashion than the current widely accepted view. This new finding could lead to wider use of the drug-particularly in people with cancer.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 4, 2010

Everyday Chicken Caesar Salad

Chicken Caesar Salad is undoubtedly one of the most popular (if not the most popular) entrée salad featured on restaurant menus. But what most people don't realize is that most recipes for Chicken Caesar Salads contain more fat and calories than a loaded Big Mac-that's a big problem, especially if you are watching out for your health.  Here's an easy way to create a delicious and healthful restaurant-quality Chicken Caesar right at home. To enjoy it as a side salad, simply leave out the chicken.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 3, 2010

Cutting Fats While Upping High Glycemic Index Carbs Does Your Heart No Favors, Says Danish Study

A Danish analysis of data from 21 research studies on the effects of saturated fat intake has concluded that swapping refined carbohydrates, such as pasta and white bread, for fat causes spikes in blood sugar that are harmful to the heart. However, cutting down on saturated fats while increasing consumption of whole-grain breads and vegetables-low glycemic index* foods-had a discernible positive impact on heart health.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2010

April 2010

Oy! Cutting Calories May Actually Make You Put on Pounds

-SIGH- A pessimist might say that the following news is another sign that Mother Nature sometimes has one mean sense of humor: Reducing your caloric intake in order to lose weight may, ironically, lead to weight gain.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2010

Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Specially Bred Pigs

NEW YORK, April 27, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation announced today that it is partnering with Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand-based biotechnology company focused on developing cell based therapeutics, in a Phase II clinical trial to study the safety and effectiveness of transplanting encapsulated insulin-producing cells from pigs as a treatment for type 1 diabetes with significant hypoglycemia unawareness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2010

FDA Launches Initiative to Reduce Infusion Pump Risks

Last week the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced an initiative to evaluate safety problems that may occur with external infusion pumps.  These devices are used to deliver fluids or medications to patients in a controlled manner. Insulin pumps, for example, release insulin into the body at a controlled rate to compensate for a lack of insulin production in people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2010

Sex and Diabetes: Diabetes for Couples

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 60 year old married woman who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago.  In the last two years, I have lost interest in sex. I just don't feel like it, although I still like hugs.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Bayer Diabetes Care Introduces DIDGET

Bayer Diabetes Care today announced the introduction of the DIDGETTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.  The DIDGET meter is unique because it is the only blood glucose meter that connects directly to Nintendo DSTM and DS Lite gaming systems to help kids manage a lifelong disease by rewarding them for building consistent testing habits and meeting personalized blood glucose target ranges. Bayer's DIDGET meter is now available for purchase in the U.S. through CVS.com, Drugstore.com and Walgreens.com.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Emergency Checklist

In the early hours of Saturday, February 27th, an 8.8-magnitude earthquake hit Chile, eventually leaving 1.5 million displaced from their homes. At 6 a.m. that same morning, Hawaiians awoke to the news that a tsunami was barreling towards them and evacuation was necessary. Within minutes, many had left their homes for safe ground.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

What People with Type 1 Diabetes can Learn from Type 2s

Admit it, Type 1s. In weaker moments, you look down your noses at the Type 2 diabetics. You know that their disease can result from poor lifestyle choices. You know that their treatment regimen, compared with yours, is simple.

comments 36 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2010

Artificial Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Works in Clinical Trials

The first human trials of the latest design of an artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes found the device worked without causing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2010

Tell Your Friends Who May Have Pre-Diabetes to Take This Simple Online Test

If you're a regular visitor to the Diabetes Health website, chances are you've been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for some time. Your experience with the disease has taught you a lot about its warning signs and the lifestyle habits that can make it worse.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2010

Soy Supplements Show No Diabetes Benefit in Study

(Reuters Health) - Adding soy supplements to the diet may not improve blood sugar control in older women who are at high risk of or in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2010

Flowers and Cards and Faux Pas... Oh My!

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, someone said brightly to me, "Well, at least you don't have cancer!" Others told me with naïve confidence, "You can beat this thing!"  Another person remarked to my mother, "If anyone could do a good job with diabetes, it's Rachel!  I'm too scared of needles."  Not one of these comments, nor about ninety percent of the others I received, was helpful, encouraging, or beneficial. 

comments 18 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2010

March 2010

"I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream!"

I do not conceal the fact that I love dessert. I believe that it is something that I deserve, a reward for working out that morning, keeping my blood sugar in check, monitoring my carbohydrate intake, going to work, and taking care of household duties. 

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

FDA Hedges Approval of Long-Acting Byetta, Asks Amylin for More Information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has withheld approval of Bydureon, the once-weekly version of the popular type 2 diabetes drug Byetta.  The agency has asked its manufacturer, Amylin, for more information regarding Bydureon's manufacture, labeling, and risk management plan. It did not, however, request further information on tests of the drug itself-an indication that the agency probably intends to grant marketing permission once it has dotted all the i's and crossed all the t's involved in the approval process.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2010

If You Can Taste the Fat, You Don't Eat So Much of It

Common knowledge says that humans have the ability to perceive five tastes:  sweet, salt, sour, bitter, and umami (protein-richness). But now, researchers have discovered that humans can detect a sixth taste as well: fat. And apparently, people with higher sensitivity to the taste of fat are less likely to eat fatty foods and become overweight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2010

Texas Researcher Poised to Test Leptin as a Replacement for Insulin Among Type 1s

A University of Texas researcher who genetically modified mice with type 1 diabetes to control their disease with leptin instead of insulin is now ready to extend his experiment to human test subjects. Dr. Roger Unger, a researcher at the UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, will begin the tests as soon as leptin manufacturers can assure him of a steady supply of the hormone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2010

Medtronic Receives FDA Approval for Industry's Most Advanced Integrated System for Diabetes Management

MINNEAPOLIS - March 17, 2010 - Medtronic, Inc. today announced it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, the next generation of the industry's only integrated diabetes management system (insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and diabetes therapy management software). The system incorporates new innovative CGM features including predictive alerts that can give early warning to people with diabetes so they can take action to prevent dangerous high or low glucose events.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2010

Valsartan (Diovan) Delayed Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Cardiovascular Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Results from a landmark study involving more than 9,000 people showed that the high blood pressure medicine valsartan (Diovan) delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a common pre-diabetic condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Mutation That Affects Response to Smell and Taste Could Lead to Type 2 Diabetes

According to Duke University researchers, a mutation that causes the lack of an insulin-controlling molecule may be a factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The molecule, ankyrin B, is activated in response to the smell and taste of food and leads to the production of insulin in preparation for food intake.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2010

FDA eyes improvements for diabetics' glucose devices

At a two-day meeting (March 16 and 17, 2010) to review blood glucose meters, Food and Drug Administration officials and staff pointed to a number of issues that can prevent people from getting proper treatment and sought input from medical experts and industry on ways to improve test results with the widely used devices.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Depression or Sex?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 55-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago, and I think it made me depressed. The depression eventually got so bad that I didn't want to get out of bed in the morning. My doctor referred me to the psych clinic, where they put me on Paxil (paroxetine). The medication is helping my depression, but ruining my sex life.  Basically, I can't get an erection, but I don't really care because I'm not interested anyway. I have no desire. My wife is still interested, however, and she is really upset about my lack of desire for sex.  I don't like hurting her, and I don't want us to break up over this, but the depression was awful. I don't want to go back to that. What can I do? 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2010

Calcium May Help You Live Longer

A group of Swedish researchers has found that men who consume more than the recommended daily amount of calcium are less likely to die than their counterparts who consume little calcium. Their study, titled "Dietary Calcium and Magnesium Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Men," appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2010

Mom Says 'Just a Phone Call Away', Just Not Good Enough

Allen, Texas - When Pam Henry's daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, she never even thought she would be part of something that could revolutionize health care. "When Sarah was diagnosed, my only goal was to do all I could to keep her as healthy as possible.  What I created was something just to help keep her that way." 

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Dolphins' Ability to Switch Diabetes On and Off Could Point to a Similar Knack in Humans

A scientist's discovery that dolphins have a genetic ability to turn diabetes on and off, depending on the availability of food, could lead to research into whether humans might have a similar-although dormant-gene.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Women Who Drink Moderately Appear to Gain Less Weight than Non-Drinkers

The study started out with nearly 20,000 trim middle-aged and older women. Over time, women who drank alcohol in moderation put on less weight and were less apt to become overweight compared to non-drinkers. This was true even after taking into account various lifestyle and dietary factors that might influence a woman's weight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2010

Northern California's Biggest County Sues Glaxo Over Avandia

Santa Clara County, the largest county in Northern California (nearly 1.9 million people), has filed a federal lawsuit against pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, alleging that Glaxo knowingly sold its type 2 diabetes drug Avandia for several years despite indications the drug causes heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2010

Mind, Body, and. . . Spirit?

When I was undiagnosed and sick, I was very angry with God.  I didn't understand why I was weak, fatigued, constantly thirsty and hungry, scarily thin, and mentally foggy.  I prayed and prayed for an answer.  I cried, I cursed, and I yelled.  Nothing.  For a year and a half.  When I received my diagnosis in a local emergency room, I felt instant relief.  Finally, I had an answer, a name, and some hope.  But soon after, the anger reappeared, this time because God had failed to pass over me.  I had done nothing to earn this fate. Why me? 

comments 18 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2010

Bowtie Chicken and Broccoli Alfredo

This is a terrific family favorite. The thick and velvety Parmesan cream sauce that adorns this dish mimics rich Alfredo sauce (only without the requisite butter and cream). If you don't have bowtie pasta on hand, feel free to substitute any pasta.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2010

February 2010

FDA Gives Novo the Go-Ahead to Market Victoza® in the U.S.

Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has received Food and Drug Administration permission to begin marketing its type 2 drug Victoza® in the United States.
Victoza, the brand name for liraglutide, is a GLP-1* analog that is taken one a day by injection to help control blood sugar-and in some cases, help with weight loss-in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2010

JDRF Launches Program to Support Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

As part of an extensive program to support the needs of adults with type 1 diabetes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International announced the introduction of a key support program, the JDRF Adult Type 1 Toolkit, to meet an immediate need for resources and community for adults more recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes - a chronic autoimmune disease often first diagnosed in children.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2010

U.S. Senate Report Says Glaxo Knew that Avandia Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

A U.S. Senate Finance Committee report released on February 20 says that Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline's drug for type 2 diabetes, may have caused as many as 83,000 heart attacks between 1999, when the drug was introduced, and 2007. The Senate report, culminating a two-year inquiry into the drug, also says that Glaxo knew about the drug's potential risks years before suspicions began to form regarding a connection between Avandia and heart problems.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

Embracing a New Diet: Vegetarianism

For as long as I can remember, I have disliked meat.  I believe it started with my sensitive gag reflex as a child.  I could hardly chew and swallow pork chops, pineapple, or anything else that didn't go down easily. In high school I became best friends with a girl who didn't eat meat.  It seemed like a really cool lifestyle, so I joined ranks with her.  Instead of eating meat, we consumed french fries, fruit punch, and snack cakes.  This became our definition of vegetarianism. Then, during my junior year of high school, my doctor informed me that my chronic low blood sugars might be improved by more protein consumption, so I forced myself back into the life of a carnivore, not knowing then that protein consumption didn't have to equal a slab of meat at every meal. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2010

Handing down the Genes. Part 3 (of 3)

This is the third - and final - installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part III: "Nutrition and Exercise Tips"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 19, 2010

Bayer's A1CNow® SELFCHECK At-Home A1C System Now Available In Local Pharmacies

Bayer's A1CNow SELFCHECK, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration last year, is the first and only system of its kind with at-home results in five minutes. It enables patients to more closely watch their A1C level in between doctor visits so they may have a more informed discussion with their healthcare provider to ensure their diabetes plan is working.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

Eating Low-Carb Meals After Exercise Increases Insulin Sensitivity

A university study says that aerobic exercise, a known means of increasing insulin sensitivity, is most effective if the meals following it are low in carbohydrates. The study also revealed that consuming a low-calorie meal after exercising does not increase insulin sensitivity any better than eating a low-carb meal after a workout. In addition, it found that the beneficial effects of exercise are immediate and do not build up over time or last very long. Improvements in metabolism, including insulin sensitivity and lowered blood pressure, occur directly as a result of the latest exercise session, but taper off within hours or days. There is no "storing up" the benefits of exercise.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 2 (of 3)

This is the second installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part II: "Preventing Type 2 in Children"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 13, 2010

Sweet!

Foods that are sugar free, no sugar added, or low carb, typically have the sugar replaced with sugar alcohol. Sugar alcohols have a significantly diminished impact on blood sugar levels as compared to regular sugar because they are incompletely absorbed into the blood stream from the small intestine. They also have fewer calories than sugar, and are not as sweet as sugar. Some common sugar alcohols are: glycol, sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol, and lactitol. The simplest sugar alcohol, ethylene glycol, is the sweet but notoriously toxic chemical used in antifreeze. Sugar alcohol is typically derived from fruits and vegetables.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2010

Red Velvet Valentine's Day Cupcakes with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting

I can't think of a better way to say " I love you," than a perfect Red Velvet Cupcake. These easy-to-make one-bowl cupcakes take the cake with just 180 calories and a mere teaspoon of added sugar. (For comparison, a typical cupcake bakery Red Velvet Cupcake with Cream Cheese Frosting has over 500 royal calories and a whopping 15 teaspoons of sugar).

comments 9 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2010

Obamas Take On Problem of Obese Children

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -  Alarmed that nearly a third of U.S. children are obese or overweight -- and likely to stay that way all their lives -- President Barack Obama launched an initiative on Tuesday to roll back the numbers and put his wife in charge of promoting it.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

What’s the Deal with Steel-Cut Oats?

Steel-cut oats are whole grains, made when the groats (the inner portion of the oat kernel) are cut into pieces by steel. Also known as coarse-cut oats or Irish oats, they are golden and look a little like small pieces of rice. They gain part of their distinctive flavor from the roasting process after being harvested and cleaned. Although the oats are then hulled, this process does not strip away their bran and germ, allowing them to retain a concentrated source of their fiber and nutrients.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

Cutting Off the Blood Supply to Fat Cells Could Become a New Obesity Therapy

White fat is the "bad" gut fat associated with obesity and enlarged abdomens. When a pound of new white fat forms in the body, it requires a full mile of new blood vessels to nourish and sustain it. That's because white fat is much like a tumor in requiring a steady blood supply. To build the new blood vessels, it depends on a process called angiogenesis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2010

Dreamfields Pasta Wants to Know: Who's Your 'DFF'?

Many of us have a "BFF" (Best Friend Forever), but people with diabetes or pre-diabetes need a BFF who understands the importance of maintaining a healthy diabetic lifestyle -- a "DFF" (Diabetes Friend Forever). To honor these unsung heroes, Dreamfields Pasta is launching a first-of-its-kind contest to pay tribute to the special people who help make living with diabetes a manageable experience.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 1 (of 3)

This is the beginning of our three part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part I: "When to Worry-and When Not to-About Your Child's Increased Risk for Diabetes."

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Scared of Lows

Dear Diabetes Health, I'm 26 years old and engaged to a woman I've known since college.  We live together, love each other, and have good sex, but now I'm having doubts. A year ago, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She started taking insulin, and it has been rough. Four times now she has started sweating and shaking and saying strange things. Twice this happened during sex. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2010

UK Study Says Bisphenol A (BPA) Is Connected to Increased Risks for Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease

A study by researchers at the universities of Exeter and Plymouth in the United Kingdom says that Bisphenol A-BPA-a chemical commonly used in plastic packaging and products, is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and coronary heart disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 2, 2010

Novo, Upping the Ante in the Race for an Oral GLP-1 Drug, Tests a Pill Version of Victoza

Denmark-based Novo Nordisk has begun a Phase 1 trial of a pill form of a GLP-1 drug very similar to its Victoza product. The trial will involve  155 British patients with type 2 diabetes. The test on human subjects, although very early-stage,  puts the company in the lead to develop an oral form of a GLP-1 drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2010

January 2010

Kris Freeman Skis for Gold at the Vancouver Olympics

Thousands of elite athletes from around the world are making their final preparations for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Every snowboarder, short track speed skater, ski jumper and hockey player shares a dream of standing on the medium wearing an Olympic gold medal.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Ten Tips For Baking Wisely

I have a long-standing obsession with baking. The art of creating cookies, bars, pies, and cakes got me through some of the most stressful times in my life, including holidays, college final exams, and a new job.  After I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of twenty-four, however, I learned that my traditional ingredients, including white flour, sugar, and excessive amounts of chocolate, lead to high blood sugars and of course, fatigue, fogginess, and other undesirable side effects. 

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2010

Newly identified genes influence insulin and glucose regulation

An international research consortium has found 13 new genetic variants that influence blood glucose regulation, insulin resistance, and the function of insulin-secreting beta cells in populations of European descent. Five of the newly discovered variants increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2010

JDRF and BD Collaborate to Improve Insulin Pump Delivery

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) announced today an innovative program aimed at improving the treatment of type 1 diabetes by developing novel insulin delivery products to enhance the use of insulin pumps. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2010

Meditation Medication

Living with a chronic condition like diabetes can be a challenging and stressful experience. Unfortunately, all the worry about blood glucose and the constant effort to balance insulin against food intake and exercise can itself raise blood glucose levels. But stress management can help control the stress hormones that affect blood glucose levels. Yoga practice, for example, can have a calming effect and play a major role in stress management.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 21, 2010

Skillet Chicken Parmesan

Although my boys love to order Chicken Parmesan when we dine out, the health content is always a concern - especially because it usually arrives thickly breaded, deeply fried, smothered in cheese, and served on a mountain of spaghetti. Here's a terrific and easy stove-top recipe that's filled with all of the same great flavors, but none of the excess fat and carbs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2010

A Tasty Look into Marlene’s Delicious Life

Bestselling cookbook author and nutritionist Marlene Koch (pronounced, serendipitously, "cook") has been dubbed a "magician in the kitchen" when it comes to creating great-tasting, healthy recipes that everyone can enjoy, including those with diabetes!  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 20, 2010

JDRF Forms Partnership with Animas to Develop First-Generation Automated System for Managing Type 1 Diabetes

NEW YORK, January 13, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation today announced an innovative partnership with Animas Corporation to develop an automated system to help people with type 1 diabetes better control their disease - the first step on the path to what would be among the most revolutionary advancements in treating type 1 diabetes: the development of an artificial pancreas, a fully automated system to dispense insulin to patients based on real-time changes in blood sugar levels. 

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2010

Do sugary drinks really fuel weight gain?

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Studies reporting a link between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain have garnered a lot of attention, but actual research on the issue has yielded mixed results, researchers note in a new report.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2010

The Doctor says,

"You have diabetes."  Have you just heard these words?  Or maybe you recently heard it about your son or daughter.  The oxygen rushes out of your body.  A knot forms in your stomach.  "What now?"

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

December 2009

Tasty Tips and Tricks from Marlene

According to Marlene, finding the perfect mix of ingredients is key when creating healthier versions of your favorite foods. From composing a healthier sandwich to perfecting pasta dishes and creating delightful desserts, Marlene reveals some of her tastiest ingredient tips:

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Resolutions vs. Changes: Make 2010 Count!

I have never been one to make New Year's resolutions.  This probably stems from my life experiences.  Every year at my fitness club, the place is flooded with new faces from January until late February.  Then, as the days tick by, the club becomes less and less crowded. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2009

Amylin Shares Drop after FDA Requests New Studies

BOSTON/NEW YORK, Dec 23 (Reuters) - The shares of Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc (AMLN.O) fell nearly 10 percent on Wednesday after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that the company conduct additional safety studies on its diabetes drug, Byetta.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 28, 2009

Artificial Sweeteners May Help Control Blood Sugar

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Combining artificial sweeteners with the real thing boosts the stomach's secretion of a hormone that makes people feel full and helps control blood sugar, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2009

Good Fat, Bad Fat

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks tend to carry around less of a particularly unhealthy type of abdominal fat than whites, even though they suffer more from obesity-linked illness, researchers report.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2009

Joy and Jolly: Making Your Holiday Less Stressful

‘Tis the season to be jolly? The most wonderful time of the year? Joy to the world? Between Black Friday, meal preparations, decorating, dealing with clashing family members, and party after party, the holiday season can be one of the most stressful times of the year. The joy and jolly that we sing about in Christmas carols hardly resonates in our lives as we prepare for and then attempt to survive the stress of the holidays.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2009

Sugar Plum Dreams

The dictionary defines a sugar plum as a small round or oval piece of sugary candy. But for most of us, visions of sugar plums dancing in our heads conjures up a far vaster array of sweet holiday treats. From cakes, cookies, and pies, to sugar-laced seasonal beverages, and yes, plenty of sweet confections, the holiday season is arguably the sweetest time of the year - and the most difficult when one is trying to keep carbohydrates and calories in check.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2009

Coffee, Tea, or Type 2 Diabetes?

CHICAGO - Individuals who drink more coffee (regular or decaffeinated) or tea appear to have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis of previous studies reported in the December 14/28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. A previously published meta-analysis suggested drinking more coffee may be linked with a reduced risk, but the amount of available information has more than doubled since.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2009

Etiquette for People Without Diabetes

Dr. Bill Polonsky, PhD, CDE, knows diabetes. Among other things, he has served as Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, as a Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is the founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute (BDI) in San Diego, California, and a member of Diabetes Health's Advisory Board.

comments 18 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2009

One in Five Type 2s Is Morbidly Obese - 100 or More Pounds Overweight

Researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago report that 20.7 percent of all American adults who have type 2 diabetes are "morbidly obese," a description that applies to people who are 100 or more pounds overweight. The researchers said that the figure for African Americans is even higher, with one out of three type 2s in that group falling under the definition of morbidly obese.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

Sink or Swim?

The road to my diabetes diagnosis was anything but easy.  Over Thanksgiving break during my first semester of graduate school, I fell ill with a horrific stomach virus. I was too busy to be sick, swamped with student essays to grade and papers to write for my own classes. But as the following year and half progressed, I felt worse and worse.  I suffered from chronic sinus infections, drastic weight loss, extreme thirst, and constant fatigue.   As I bounced from doctor to doctor, I grew increasingly discouraged.  No one could figure out what was wrong with me.

comments 16 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

IBsolvMIR®, a Drug That Prevents Islet Transplantation Rejection, Receives FDA -Orphan Drug- Status

A Swedish biotechnology company, TikoMed AB, has received notice that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is granting orphan drug designation to its IBsolvMIR® drug for preventing the rejection of transplanted pancreatic islet cells in type 1 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

Diabetes Surgery Summit Issues Call to Use Bariatric Surgery as a Type 2 Treatment

Fifty science and medical diabetes experts, representing 22 international organizations*, have issued a consensus statement that calls for bariatric surgery to be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. The statement, published online November 23 in the Annals of Surgery, is seen by attendees at the recent Diabetes Surgery Summit in Rome as the precursor to the establishment of a new medical discipline, "diabetes surgery."

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

Pharmacists, Drug Wholesalers Offer Solutions to Avoid Disruption for Medicare Beneficiaries

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (Dec. 1, 2009) - Seniors may find that many common prescription drugs that Medicare Part D has covered for years may suddenly be denied due to a new policy being implemented by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2009

It's All in the Cooking: Omega-3 Fatty Acids are Good for Your Heart When Cooked Properly

It's been known for some time that omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of heart disease, but no one has really known if one dietary source is better than another. For that reason, Lixin Meng, MS, a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, designed a study to compare sources, types, amounts, and frequencies of omega-3 in diets, while taking into account gender and ethnic groups. The study was presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

Consensus Statement Recognizes the Legitimacy of Surgery as a Dedicated Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Carefully Selected Patients

NEW YORK (Nov. 23, 2009) - A first-of-its-kind consensus statement on diabetes surgery is published online today in the Annals of Surgery. The report illustrates the findings of the first international consensus conference - Diabetes Surgery Summit (DSS) - where an international group of more than 50 scientific and medical experts agreed on a set of evidence-based guidelines and definitions that are meant to guide the use and study of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes. The document is considered to be the foundation of diabetes surgery as a medical discipline of its own.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2009

Food Insulin Index Predicts Insulin Demand of Mixed Meals

Dr. Jennie C. Brand-Miller, from the University of Sydney stated that, "The food insulin index (FII) may provide a better way to adjust insulin dose in Type 1 diabetes.... In time, it may also enable us to design diets to prevent diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

Portion Distortion: Take Charge!

We hear it all the time, from the diet ads on television to the lectures from our doctors and dietitians.  What matters is not only what you eat, but also how much you eat.   But how can you control your portions?  Is it possible to have a healthy relationship with food?  How can you make sure you are full, but not stuffed? Can you keep your blood sugars under control?  The answer to all these questions is yes! 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2009

The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years, diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. A Greek by the name of Aretaeus described its destructive nature in the first century AD, naming the affliction "diabetes," the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold, in his text "Aretaeus the Cappodacian," described Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain, and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body, while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2009

Cranberry Sauce Alternatives: Ditch the Can (and the Sugar)!

CRANBERRY CHUTNEY       Every year during the holidays, I make cranberry chutney to serve with turkey. Chutneys combine vinegar with sugar for a balance of sweet and sour flavors, but this one also has a touch of heat from red pepper flakes, along with a lovely hint of orange.  Make another batch or use leftover chutney as a great spread for cold turkey sandwiches. This chutney also really dresses up pork tenderloin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 23, 2009

Q & A: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have  type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

New GoMeals

Bridgewater, NJ, November 19, 2009 - Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today that GoMealsTM, a new iPhone application (app) designed to help people living with diabetes make healthy food choices, is now available for download at the iTunes App store.  GoMealsTM is a food tracking tool which allows users to search thousands of foods and dishes from popular restaurants and grocery stores to easily see the nutritional content of meals and snacks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

FDA Gives the Nod to New BGM System From ARKRAY

The Food and Drug Administration has given ARKRAY, Inc., a 510(k)* clearance to begin marketing its new GLUCOCARD® VitalTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2009

Pesticides in Your Food: How To Avoid the Worst Culprits

Do you ever stand in the fruit and vegetable section of your food store and wonder if it's really worth it to buy organic produce? Or do you wonder which conventionally grown items you can buy to save money and which items you should absolutely buy organic? I sure do. And I always resent standing there at the market, having to choose between a piece of fruit that has been exposed to chemicals and one that hasn't. Who should have to make a choice like that? Especially if you are taking that food home to your children. No one wants to eat poison.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2009

World Diabetes Day Is This Saturday, November 14, 2009

World Diabetes Day is a global awareness campaign that's celebrated every year on November 14. The goal is to encourage action to further the prevention, treatment, and care of diabetes, as well as to support the United Nations Resolution on Diabetes. Landmarks and monuments across the world are lit in blue to create a united voice for diabetes awareness, and diabetes events are held around the globe. As of Monday evening, November 9, the World Diabetes Day website reports that 366 registered diabetes events are scheduled for November 14th, in countries ranging from Saudi Arabia to Argentina to Morocco. In addition, 623 monuments are being lit in blue around the globe. More are sure to be added to the list as the day draws closer and closer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 12, 2009

Dear Medical Health Professional,

When I was a child, my mother always said, "Think before you speak." Have you heard of this before? If not, please digest my words. If you have heard of this simple yet beneficial policy, please reconsider its merit and then implement it into your practice.

comments 34 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

October 2009

Sex and Diabetes: Lubes and Libido

Dear Diabetes Health, Hello!  I am 60 years old and have had type one for about 24 years. It has been quite some time since I had a relationship, and now I have one coming at me.  The problem is, I am very dry. The commercially sold products don't seem to help,  and Intercourse isn't comfortable. What do you recommend that I try?  And what about a libido enhancer?  I need this relationship to work because living alone is tough, and my partner likes his intimacy.  Please!!!

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2009

Qualitest Pharmaceuticals Issues a Voluntary Nationwide Recall of All Accusure® Insulin Syringes

October 27, 2009 - Huntsville AL-Qualitest Pharmaceuticals today issued a voluntary nationwide recall of all Accusure® Insulin Syringes. The distributed syringes are of the following descriptions and NDC numbers: 28G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-6995-21;28G 1cc, NDC 0603-6996-21; 29G 1/2cc NDC 0603-6997-21, 29G 1cc, NDC 0603-6998-21, 30G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-999-21, 30G 1cc, NDC 0603-7000-21, 31G 1/2cc, NDC 0603-7001-21; and 31G 1cc, NDC 0603-7002-21. All Accusure® Insulin Syringes regardless of lot number are subject to this recall. These syringes were distributed between January 2002 and October 2009 to wholesale and retail pharmacies nationwide (including Puerto Rico). The syringes in these lots may have needles which detach from the syringe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

Nutritional Help at Your Fingertips

While Googling recently, I found a link to Soul-Food-Advisor, a website devoted to "African American cuisine and soul food, mostly known as Southern or comfort food." It sounded, frankly, delicious. But as someone with pre-diabetes, I am trying to eat fewer carbs, avoid anything fried, and turn the other cheek when I see macaroni and cheese-my favorite comfort food since I was a little kid. So instead of looking at Soul Food Advisor, I turned my attention to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) MyFoodAdvisor online tool.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2009

A Big Bone of Contention: Should Bariatric Surgery Become a Standard Type 2 Diabetes Therapy?

A recent and contentious meeting of diabetes experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Vienna, Austria, has continued the intense international debate over whether bariatric surgery should become a treatment for type 2 diabetes or continue to be reserved only for the extremely obese.

comments 13 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2009

Chinese herbs show promise for diabetes prevention

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A number of traditional Chinese herbs may help control blood sugar levels in people at high risk of diabetes, a new research review suggests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2009

A New Tool for Type 2 Diabetics

Fort Worth, Texas - Trey Weir, founder of Trey Weir Media, LLC, announces the launch of Type2Friendly, a digital restaurant guide for Type 2 Diabetics.  Weir, a former professional arena football player and veteran mobile and Internet technology entrepreneur, was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in 2008. After his diagnosis, he struggled to find information on restaurants that served "Diabetic friendly" food.  As a result, he became frustrated with the limited options he had for dining out.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 22, 2009

Should You Get a Seasonal Flu Shot and an H1N1 Flu Shot? Yes!

The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health (CDC) recommends that everyone, especially people with diabetes and other diseases, get both a seasonal flu vaccination and an H1N1 flu ("swine flu") vaccination this year.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2009

Study Shows a Little Money Buys a Lot of Calories at City Corner Stores

October 12, 2009. Philadelphia, Pa. - Children in Philadelphia who attended public schools and shopped at corner stores before or after school purchased almost 360 calories of foods and beverages per visit, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics. Chips, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages were the most frequently purchased items. This is the first study to document both what foods and beverages children purchased in local corner stores on their way to and from school, and the nutritional content of those items.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2009

Circadian Rhythm and Blood Sugar Control

The human body is an amazing machine. The biological clock that ticks inside us to keep the machine running efficiently not only prompts us to sleep and eat on regular basis, but also apparently regulates blood sugar.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 15, 2009

Never a

"Self-monitoring blood glucose" (SMBG), a staple in the lives of most people with diabetes who take insulin, involves consistently monitoring and recording blood glucose levels before and after specific activities, such as eating, exercising, sleeping, and taking insulin. By observing the effects of certain foods and activities on their blood glucose levels, patients can learn exactly what works to raise or lower them. Thus, SMBG affords a kind of "fine tuning" approach to diabetes that empowers patients to adjust their medicine, modify their behavior, and manage their disease without always needing expert intervention. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 13, 2009

Afresa: Waiting to Inhale

So close, and yet so far.  It looks like there will be no marketing partnership for MannKind's ultra rapid-acting insulin product Afresa anytime soon.  The company had planned to enter into a deal with a large pharmaceutical company by the end of this year, but now approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for their inhaled insulin won't be until January 2010, at the earliest.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2009

Phentermine the Phoenix Rises Again

The demise of Fen-phen dealt a body blow to hopes for an obesity pill that is actually effective. Unfortunately, the fen in Fen-phen, fenfluramine, caused grave pulmonary hypertension and heart valve problems. The phen part of the drug, though, was apparently just an innocent bystander. And now phen (phentermine) has resurfaced in a new pill that has posted some amazing results in Phase III clinical trials. Patients who were treated for 56 weeks with the new drug, Qnexa, lost an average of 14.7 percent of their weight, or 37 pounds.

comments 8 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2009

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Aisha and David - I am a 22-year-old woman with type 1, on a pump.  I've only had one real boyfriend, and we broke up two months ago.  He said that my diabetes didn't have anything to do with it, but I'm not sure. I think that the lows scared him. Sex with him was good, but I don't have much to compare it with.  

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2009

September 2009

Using the Medicine Wheel to Control Type 2 Diabetes

The way information is presented to us makes a big difference in whether we are able to integrate that information into our daily lives. Although graphs and numbers may sway some people, putting educational materials into a culturally relevant context can be more effective. A recent study, for example, has found that a dietary program based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition can change eating patterns among Native Americans, who have the highest rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease of all ethnic groups. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2009

Watching the Brain Reveals Willpower in Action

For most of us, the biggest problem with losing lots of weight is the demoralizing process of watching ourselves gain it all back. But some people who lose weight manage to keep it off for good. How do they do it? Researchers from the Miriam Hospital recently examined their brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging and actually saw their restraint in action.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 25, 2009

New Understanding of Leptin's Role in Appetite and Bone Mass Could Lead to Treatment for Obesity

Scientists have noted for a long time that the hormone leptin suppresses appetite. That's why they have been puzzled by the high levels of leptin found in obese people-shouldn't leptin decrease their appetites and act as a curb on their weight? Leptin also suppresses bone mass accrual, yet obese people do not suffer from loss or weakening of bone mass, despite their high leptin levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 25, 2009

New Research Shows Direct Link Between Soda and Obesity

DAVIS, CA, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009 - While health officials have long suspected the link between obesity and soda consumption, research released today provides the first scientific evidence of the potent role soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages play in fueling California's expanding girth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2009

A Healthy Tax on Soft Drinks Could Fund Programs and Lower Consumption

We're drinking so much sugar-sweetened soda that it's become a taxing problem, according to a Health Policy Report published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. Between 1977 and 2002, Americans doubled their intake of sugary beverages. Unfortunately, that's not good news for anyone but the beverage companies. Although high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and fruit juice concentrates are naturally derived sweeteners (as opposed to artificial low- or no-calorie sweeteners), this added sugar has been linked to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

comments 24 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2009

High Fat Hangover

Those of you who are familiar with the South know what kudzu is. An Asian vine that can grow a foot taller every day, it was brought to the American Southeast in the 1930s in a sadly boneheaded attempt to control erosion. Unfortunately, the little green visitor liked it here so much that in the decades since, it has colonized 10 million acres of farms and woods, becoming a massive and costly nuisance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2009

Most Type 2s Consume Too Much Sodium and Fat, Says Wake Forest Study

You might think that people with type 2 diabetes would know better than most what they should put into and leave out of their diets. At least, that was the expectation of researchers at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, when they set out to learn why people with type 2 are often overweight. What they found, however, surprised them. Their study of 2,757 type 2s showed that:

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2009

Mediterranean Diet May Help Type 2s Avert Medication, Weight Gain, and Heart Risks

An Italian study of people with type 2 diabetes has found that 70 percent of those who followed a low-fat diet eventually needed diabetes drugs, as opposed to only 44 percent of those who ate a Mediterranean diet.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2009

Forming a Partnership with Your Healthcare Team: Tips From a Type 1 Pharmacist

I remember it like it was yesterday. It was the night before Thanksgiving, and my family and I were driving to my parents' house for the holiday weekend. I am usually the one who drives, but this time my wife insisted on taking the wheel because I was so dizzy and light-headed that I could hardly stand upright. Over the course of the previous week, I had not been feeling well. I had been getting up frequently at night to use the bathroom, was insatiably thirsty, and had been so dizzy that I had actually fallen down several times.

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2009

AHA's Call for Reduced Sugar Consumption Provides Some Sour Statistics

The American Heart Association, noting a direct link between sugar consumption and the development of such conditions as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, has called upon Americans to drastically reduce their consumption of "added sugar." Added sugar is defined, reasonably enough, as sugar added to foods during processing, cooking, or at meals.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2009

Biotransformed Blueberry Juice Fights Fat and Diabetes

Juice extracted from North American lowbush blueberries, biotransformed with bacteria from the skin of the fruit, holds great promise as an anti-obesity and anti-diabetic agent. The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, was conducted by researchers from the Université de Montréal, the Institut Armand-Frappier and the Université de Moncton who tested the effects of biotransformed juices compared to regular blueberry drinks on mice.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2009

Why Low Vitamin D Raises Risk of Heart Disease in People with Diabetes

Scientists and healthcare professionals have known for some time that low levels of vitamin D almost double the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. But until now, they haven't known why.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 8, 2009

Welcome News on the Beverage Front: Non-Sugar Sweeteners Help With Long-Term Weight Control

Here's a sweet bit of news: Drinking sugar-free beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners increases "dietary restraint," the ability of people to maintain long-term weight loss.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2009

DASH, a Diet Designed for Hypertension, May Stave Off Type 2 in Whites

A South Carolina study has found that the DASH diet, originally designed to treat hypertension, is linked to a lower rate of type 2 diabetes in whites, but not in blacks or Hispanics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

Learning Self-Control is the Key for Kids to Remain Healthy

According to a recent  Pennsylvania study, kids need to learn to control themselves when it comes to food. Obviously, self-control is important for us all, kids and adults alike, when it comes to weight management. It’s equally apparent that children need to be taught by their parents to make healthy food choices. But parents who strictly forbid their children to eat many foods might be contributing to a lack of self-control in their offspring, thereby creating the very chubbiness that they were trying to avert.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 2, 2009

August 2009

Abnormal Response to Wheat Protein May Provide Clue To Cause of Type 1 Diabetes

In a Canadian study involving 42 patients with type 1 diabetes, nearly half of the subjects had an abnormal response to wheat proteins. Scientists at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the University of Ottawa, who conducted the study, found that the patients' over-reaction to wheat is linked to genes that are associated with type 1 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Aug 31, 2009

High Fat Hangover

Everyone knows that eating only high fat food is unhealthy way down the road, but we don't really worry that eating a burger will hurt us by next week. Unfortunately, however, it turns out that a high fat diet damages our health (and our brain functioning) a lot sooner than we would like to think. In fact, new research shows that the effects are felt within only ten days. As far as I'm concerned, this was already shown conclusively in the film "Super Size Me," in which director Morgan Spurlock personally examined the effects of fast food on the human body. For one month, he ate only at McDonald's, ordering everything on the menu and "super-sizing" his order whenever asked. Right before our eyes, Spurlock began looking sicker and sicker.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

Leading Weight Loss Center is Enrolling Participants for Prediabetes Research Study

The PreDx Diabetes Risk Score determines risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2009

FDA Issues Warning About Test Strips That Can Give False Readings, Lead to Insulin Overdoses

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against the use of GDH-PQQ blood glucose test strips by people with diabetes who are taking medications that contain non-glucose sugars. [Note: GDH-PQQ is the abbreviation of "glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone," a chemical that reacts with the non-glucose sugars maltose, galactose, and xylose, which are contained in some therapeutic products.]

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2009

ADA Launches My Health Advisor, a Website Aimed at Helping America's Increase in Prediabetes

Concerned by the huge number of Americans - 57 million - who are now considered to have prediabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has launched "My Health Advisor." 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2009

Olympia Dukakis and Her Husband Tackle Type 2 Together

Three days after a routine physical last November, 84-year-old Louis Zorich was called by his doctor and told that he had type 2 diabetes. The first words out of the seasoned actor's mouth were "There's been a mistake." Louis, who's been married to Academy Award-winning actress Olympia Dukakis for 47 years, proceeded to explain (incorrectly) to his doctor, "Men don't get diabetes. My three brothers don't have it, but my mother had it....It may be genetic, but only the female side of my family can have diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2009

FDA Approves Onglyza for Type 2 Diabetes

Onglyza (saxagliptin), a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor produced by AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

Exciting Things Seen at the Recent AADE Conference

This year the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) went deep south for its annual conference, hosting the event in Atlanta, Georgia, from August 3rd through August 9thDiabetes Health was there, hobnobbing with thousands of attendees and hundreds of companies, and it was an amazing experience. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

Lack of Sleep Could Increase Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Endocrinologists at the University of Chicago say that lack of sufficient sleep may contribute to insulin resistance and decreased glucose tolerance, two conditions that up the long-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2009

WaveSense Diabetes App for iPhone and iPod Touch: Now Available on iTunes

Now there's an iPhone and iPod Touch app for diabetes. AgaMatrix, Inc., the makers of the WaveSense line of blood glucose monitoring products, has announced the launch of the WaveSense Diabetes Manager, an electronic diabetes logbook software application that runs on the two Apple products.
The WaveSense Diabetes Manager, in development and testing for over a year, lays the foundation for a series of upcoming products that will take advantage of the iPhone and other mobile platforms to help people with diabetes manage  the disease. AgaMatrix reports that the WaveSense app provides users with the following features:

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2009

An Insulin Primer

Until the twentieth century, type 1 diabetes was a fatal disease. Once we came to understand how insulin works in the body, however, everything changed. The discovery of the role of insulin was a group effort by people who didn't know each other, but built on each others' work. In 1869, a German medical student named Paul Langerhans figured out the regulatory role of insulin in the mammal body. In honor of his efforts, his name was given to the islets of Langerhans, where insulin is synthesized within the beta cells of the pancreas. Other Europeans and North Americans made important advancements right up until January 23, 1922, when a 14-year-old boy who was dying of diabetes at Toronto General Hospital was given the first successful injection of cow insulin.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2009

ADA Says Sugar Consumption Levels Can Be Linked to Race, Family Income and Education

A study of the sugar consumption habits of 30,000 Americans by the American Dietetic Association concludes that race/ethnicity, family income and education levels are important factors in how much sugar a person eats.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2009

Surfing with Type 1

Initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Rob subsequently discovered that he had type 1. Knowing that he needed to exercise more, he returned to professional surfing. Today, he is a sponsored professional athlete who uses a CGM.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2009

Nine months on the Protégé teplizumab clinical trial: How it started, how we are doing...

In April of 2008, our healthy nine-year-old son, Gaspar, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After his two days in the ICU and a week in the hospital, a new life began for all of us. Although we couldn't immediately grasp all its implications and were simultaneously dealing with our shaken world, we gave the situation a "think outside the box" approach. When the endocrinologist told us, "That's the way it is. Just focus on the controls and all will be fine," we asked whether the condition might be cured or attenuated if we acted quickly at the beginning. We were met with the usual answer:  "There's nothing you can do. Just focus on the controls."

comments 8 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2009

Oil Lowers Body Fat, But Don't Rub It In

Eating fat is usually not very helpful when it comes to losing weight. According to a researcher at Ohio State University, however, two natural oils that contain "good fats" can melt away pounds in postmenopausal obese women with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2009

Knowledge Is Not Only Power: It’s Also Powerful Medicine

It's very likely that you, like most people, believe many myths about diabetes. If you do, you might actually be doing yourself harm. Learning the truth can empower you (as it did me) to make choices and take actions that increase the quality and length of your life.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

A Chat with Kelli Kuehne on Life, Golf, and Diabetes

In 1994, Kelli Kuehne was on a roll. That year, she won the United States Girls Junior Amateur Golf Championship and a year later, she won the U.S. Women's Amateur Golf Championship, repeating that win in 1996 while also taking the British Ladies Amateur Golf Championship. The roll continues. Today, Kelli Kuehne is still playing matches in the LPGA and, through it all, has never allowed type 1 diabetes to beat her on the golf course or in her life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Change the Way You View Smoking

In an era when tobacco cessation programs are being cut from tight budgets, we need to be intentional and creative with tobacco cessation opportunities. According to Dr. Steven Schroeder of the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center at the UCSF School of Medicine, changing the way we view tobacco dependence is necessary to reduce tobacco use and save lives. If we all work together to increase the cessation rate from 2.5 percent to 10 percent, we can save 1.2 million additional lives!

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 31, 2009

Why Does Insulin Cost More Than Ever? It's All In The Way It's Made

Banting Gives It Away - Insulin was discovered in 1921 by Fred Banting and Charles Best. In a generous gesture that unfortunately didn't start a trend, they sold the patent for a dollar so that cheap insulin would quickly become available. It worked like a charm: within two years, Eli Lilly had sold 60 million units of its purified extract of pig and cow pancreas.

comments 23 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2009

Yale Enzyme Discovery Offers Hope for a Therapy That Reduces Appetite and Ups Energy

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, have found a brain enzyme that, when blocked, curbs appetite and increases energy levels-both crucial factors in controlling and losing weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2009

Thoughtful Consumption: People with Diabetes Have Been Leading the Pack All Along

Never underestimate the power of people with diabetes and their families. When we as a consumer group purchase more fruits and vegetables, walk or bicycle instead of taking the car, and educate ourselves about a healthy lifestyle, we are addressing global issues as well as personal ones and can have a strong, positive effect on the future.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2009

Dealing With Your Newly Diagnosed Diabetes: First, Look for Patterns

A man who has been married for 15 years suddenly begins losing weight and buying new clothes. He starts staying late at work and taking weekend business trips, unusual behaviors for him. His wife thinks he is having an affair. Why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2009

Medtronic Recalls Its Quick-set Infusion Sets

Minneapolis-based Medtronic Inc. is recalling some lots of its Quick-set infusion sets over concerns that they may cause insulin pumps to deliver too much or too little insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 21, 2009

Path to Good Health Includes Breastfeeding Your Baby, Avoiding Pesticides, and Eating a Mediterranean Diet

The Organic Center (TOC), a leading research institute focused on the science of organic food and farming, announced that a balanced, organic diet-both before and during pregnancy-can significantly reduce a child's likelihood of becoming overweight or obese or developing diabetes.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 17, 2009

Type 2 Diabetes, Triglycerides, and the Good Kind of Fat

This article was submitted by GlaxoSmithKline, makers of LOVAZA, a medication to lower very high triglycerides, made from omega-3 fish oil.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2009

Nitrates May Be a Major Culprit in Diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson's

Rhode Island researchers say they have found strong evidence that links the level of nitrates in the environment and food supply to increases in deaths from such diseases as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's-all insulin-resistant ailments.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2009

Diabetes and the iPhone

People often ask me, "Why limit diabetes-related services to the iPhone when there are so many other cell phones out there?" I always answer them by asking, "How many applications have you downloaded onto your cell phone?" 

comments 15 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2009

Islet Transplant Recipient Shares Her Experiences with the Edmonton Protocol

April 2009 was an exciting month at the University of Alberta. It marked the tenth anniversary of an unprecedented approach to islet transplantation, recognized globally as the "Edmonton Protocol." Each year since that milestone has produced evidence of progress in the art of islet isolation and the science of the transplant process. I know this because I lived it. I am patient number thirty-three, one of the many who have witnessed the evolution of this continuing innovation.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2009

An Old Asian Standby, Red Yeast Rice, May Lower Cholesterol in People Who Are Statin-Intolerant

A 24-week study of the effects of red yeast rice on the cholesterol levels of people who cannot take statins shows that the ancient Asian food could be a viable statin alternative.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2009

Celebrating the 4th of July: Tips for Parents of Kids with Diabetes

Patriotism, parades, parties, and pyrotechnics - July Fourth is a high intensity day of celebrations and national pride. In many towns, families move from one exciting event to the next, and the day can be very unpredictable. Still, parents of children with diabetes want carefree time with their families, and children don't want to think about diabetes details. A bit of advanced planning and packing can make this festive day much easier.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2009

June 2009

Parenting with Diabetes

Rachel and her husband adopted a beautiful baby girl in November of 2008. Their daughter is now seven months old. You can read Rachel's article about diabetes and adoption here.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2009

A Call to Allow More People to Undergo Bariatric Surgery

A surgeon who has been at the forefront of exploring bariatric surgery as a potentially curative treatment for type 2 diabetes is calling for it to be made accessible to more people.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2009

FDA Issues Public Health Advisory Regarding Levemir Insulin

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has learned that some stolen vials of the long-acting insulin Levemir made by Novo Nordisk Inc. have reappeared and are being sold in the U.S. market. Three lots or a total of 129,000 vials of this product were stolen in all. These stolen insulin vials may not have been stored and handled properly and may be dangerous for patients to use.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 22, 2009

Research Disputes FDA Claim that Exenatide Increase Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

In 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration published strong warnings that the type 2 diabetes drug exenatide (trade name Byetta) might increase risk of acute pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas. The FDA's action came in the wake of reports that 30 exenatide users had come down with pancreatitis and that six of them had died from the condition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2009

Broccoli Salad Recipe

This is a nice salad to serve with a summer barbecue. It also makes a wonderful addition to a summer picnic.  Double the recipe to serve more people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2009

AACE Conference Wrap-Up

I attended the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), held from May 14th to 18th, 2009.  Here's a re-cap of the buzz about ICU glycemic control, prediabetes, and vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2009

Bobotie (Meat Loaf) recipe

Introduced to South Africa by the Cape Malays, this Indonesian curried meat loaf is to South Africa what Moussaka is to Greece and Lasagne is to Italy.  Traditionally, Bobotie is served with yellow rice (add turmeric), chutney and banana slices dipped in milk.  This is a tasty meat loaf to pack in the cooler for a summer picnic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2009

Joslin 50-Year Medal Winner Triumphs over Diabetes

Gale Fullerton is a 65-year-old Californian who has the distinction of being a Joslin 50-Year medal winner. Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., knew that good self-management was the key to minimizing long-term diabetes complications, and the medal program was designed as an incentive for those committed to good diabetes care. In 1970, Joslin Diabetes Center expanded the program and began awarding a 50-year bronze medal. They presented the first 75-year medal in 1996.

comments 24 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2009

Duodenal Switch Surgery Better Against Type 2 Diabetes Than Gastric Bypass

Over the years, gastric bypass surgery has proven an effective means of controlling-and even reversing-type 2 diabetes in
"super-obese" patients (those with a body mass index of 50 or above; usually more than 200 pounds above ideal body weight).

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2009

If I Can Quit, So Can You

As the article in this issue discusses, smoking and diabetes is a dangerous combination. Smoking is bad enough on its own. I am writing to you as a former smoker of eight years. I started smoking in France in the 1970’s in a Parisian café. I thought smoking Gauloises at the age of 15 made me sophisticated and in vogue. I imagined I looked stylish and mature like the adults I knew who smoked. Their smoking seemed to justify my habit. It never occurred to me that I was risking my health or that I was starting something that would take me years to quit.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2009

Diabetes: A Catalyst for Positive Change

Never underestimate the power of people with diabetes and their families. When we as a consumer group purchase more fruits and vegetables, walk or bicycle instead of taking the car, and educate ourselves about a healthy lifestyle, we are addressing global issues as well as personal ones and can have a strong, positive effect on the future.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2009

May 2009

Antioxidants Take a Hit: Vitamins C and E May Work Against Your Attempts to Stave Off or Deal With Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, you know that regular sustained exercise is one of the best and easiest ways to manage the disease. At the same time, proper nutrition-eating low glycemic foods, avoiding carbohydrates, and taking supplements, such as vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids-is the other key to non-medicinal control of blood sugar levels.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 26, 2009

Too Much Food Is Responsible for Most of the U.S. Rise in Obesity Since 1970, Says Study

Sometimes complex problems have simple answers. Take the alarming rise in obesity in the United States since 1970. Researchers have speculated in the past that the cause might be a combination of factors, perhaps a lack of exercise working in concert with the spread of cheap high-calorie junk food.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 23, 2009

Managing Type 2 Abroad: Tips for Taking Diabetes on the Road in a Foreign Country

My husband, Simon, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in October 2004. It was managed via oral medication at first, but his blood sugar levels were hard to control, and his doctor prescribed insulin to stabilize his condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2009

FDA Approves Cycloset, a Type 2 Treatment That Works on the Brain

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just approved the marketing of Cycloset, a type 2 diabetes drug that works by affecting a brain chemical that helps govern metabolism. In doing so, it helps reduce the rise in blood sugar levels that typically occurs after meals. Cycloset will be offered as a monotherapy or in conjunction with sulfonylureas, metformin, or other combination type 2 drug therapies.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

Type 2 Drugs: EU Approves “Victoza,” FDA Extends Review of “Onglyza”

The European Union's drug regulation agency has recommended that the EU approve the marketing of "Victoza" (liraglutide), a type 2 drug developed by Novo Nordisk.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 6, 2009

ADA Touts Its New List of Diabetes “Superfoods”

The American Diabetes Association has released a list of "superfoods" it says "have necessary nutrients for good diabetes management, including fiber, potassium, healthy fats, magnesium and antioxidants."

comments 22 comments - Posted May 5, 2009

Attention Healthcare Professionals: Grants Available for Integrating Patient-Recorded Observations into Clinical Care Processes

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has issued a call for proposals through its national program, Project HealthDesign: Rethinking the Power and Potential of Personal Health Records. Grant recipients will work to assess and test the potential of "observations of daily living" (ODLs) to help patients and physicians better manage chronic illnesses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

April 2009

Eating Like an Ironman

What do you eat in a 140 mile Ironman triathlon?  I get that question a lot. It's been said that the Ironman race is 10% fitness, and 90% nutrition. That's a bit of an exaggeration, but for those of us with diabetes, that's our daily life.  Nutrition affects everything we do. Exercise, sleep, driving a car, all of those activities require a person with diabetes to think about the carbohydrates they have consumed and when they will eat or drink them again

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2009

50 Reasons Why Diabesity Wasn’t Prevalent 50 Years Ago

The following list shows 50 of the ways we have "convenienced" ourselves into diabesity. Before the technology boom, most Americans were active at work, at home, and at play. Much of what we did was manual, so we burned off the calories that we took in. When you consider that we did many of these activities on a regular basis, it is easy to see how we were able to remain trim. Obviously, no single one of these activities burns a large amount of calories by itself, but taken together, it is easy to see that the number of calories burned really begins to add up. (By the way, if you remember any of the things on this list, you don't have to tell anyone.) 

comments 12 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2009

Joy Pape’s New Book: Living with Diabetes Day-to-Day

Long before Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN, served a stint as the clinical editor and contributing columnist for Diabetes Health Professional, she was a seasoned diabetes expert who knew her way around almost every aspect of the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2009

Really Great Diabetes Information, From Medicare of All Places

Well, this is a surprise. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 contains a little known section, Section 1013, that has actually led to something really useful: Up-to-date information about diabetes culled from real research and presented in language that we all can understand. Section 1013 authorizes the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to compare the effectiveness of different approaches to difficult health problems and to make that information accessible and understandable to "decisionmakers": that is, you, me, and our doctors. And diabetes is one of the difficult health problems to which the AHRQ is directing its attention.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2009

China Develops Low-Sugar Veggie Drink with Aid of Bacteria

Scientists at Jilin University in Changchun, China, have used an ancient trick, employing sugar-loving bacteria, to produce a low-sugar, low-calorie vegetable juice aimed at people with diabetes and pre-diabetes who have abnormally high blood sugar.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2009

Adjustable Gastric Banding and Diabetes

Diane Helms has spent most of her life struggling with her weight.  She's tried just about every diet you can name and, despite them all, has watched the pounds pile on year after year. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2009

Is the FDA Helping or Hurting Us When It Comes to New Medicines?

A new research report by the Pacific Research Institute (PRI) reviews three decades of the Food and Drug Administration's performance and concludes that the agency is over-funded, over-staffed, and denies hundreds of thousands of Americans timely access to new medicines. Leviathan's Drug Problem: The Federal Monopoly of Pharmaceutical Regulation and Its Deadly Cost was authored by John R. Graham, Director of Health Care Studies at PRI. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2009

Moderately Protein-Rich Diet Better for Long-Term Weight Loss, Says University Study

A 12-month university study of 130 persons who ate either a USDA food pyramid-inspired high-carb diet or a diet moderately high in protein showed that members of the higher protein group lost 23 percent more weight and 38 percent more body fat than their high carb counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

OneTouch Teams up with Consumer Advocate to Offers Tips on Maintaining Your Health in Tough Economic Times

The majority of U.S. adults are worried about being able to afford medical care and prescription medications.1  In addition, a recent study reveals that one in seven children and working-age Americans went without needed prescription medications in 2007 due to cost concerns, up from one in 10 in 2003.  Experts predict these statistics are likely to get worse in 2009, and this could present even greater hardships for those Americans with chronic conditions such as diabetes.2

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

Emory Researchers Tell Why Excess Fat Increases Risk for Type 2

Being overweight is something all doctors and most laypeople know significantly increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) says that more than 90 percent of people who are newly diagnosed with type 2 are overweight.  But why does excess fat increase the risk of diabetes? Isn't the disease, after all, one that involves the body's inability to metabolize glucose?

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2009

Living with Diabetes: Diabetes Doesn't Define Me

My whole childhood, I was a bit of a pudgy girl.  At the age of eight, I weighed over 110 pounds, wore a woman's size 8, and stood a mere five feet tall.  I wasn't grossly obese, by any means, but it was enough to keep me off the cheerleading squad and out of the popular crowd at school.  I didn't really have any health issues besides the weight.  

comments 27 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

March 2009

Living Well Program in Vermont Promotes Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2s

The following is a Q&A with Judith Waldrop, who participated in Living Well, a week-long residential program designed for women with type 2 diabetes. The program is a joint effort of the healthy weight loss pioneers at Green Mountain at Fox Run and the Joslin Diabetes Center. This year, Living Well will take place April 19-25, 2009. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews Finds He Needs to Make Time for Type 2 Diabetes

The first time Chris Matthews heard the words "high blood sugar" was in 2002 at a doctor's office in Washington, DC, where he was being treated for malaria after a trip to Zimbabwe. He didn't pay a lot of attention to the warning about his glucose levels after a blood test. The malaria was subsequently cured, and he continued at his usual rapid-fire pace, traveling the country giving speeches about his best-selling books ("Life is a Campaign" is his latest;  "Hardball" is his best known) and his work both inside the White House, where he was a speechwriter for President Carter, and outside, where he was administrative assistant to House Speaker Tip O'Neill on Capitol Hill. Then there's his work on television, where he is host of Hardball on MSNBC and the Chris Matthew Show, which airs on Sundays just before Meet the Press on NBC. He stayed busy, and his schedule remained overbooked. He let the warning about high blood sugar go into the background-so far back it was out of sight and definitely out of mind. Besides, there just wasn't any room in his life to deal with it. 

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2009

Many Factors Make Type 2 Diabetes a Challenge

There's a perception out there that people with type 2 could control their disease if they just tried hard enough. But self-control and will power are not the whole story. A new study published in this month's Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness includes "eating out, lack of social support and high-risk lifestyles" as just a few of the roadblocks that stop patients with type 2 diabetes from controlling their condition. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2009

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes: Who, When, And Why?

Physicians who treat people with type 2 diabetes face difficult choices when selecting the best medical therapy for each patient. The decision process is further complicated by the fact that because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, therapeutic agents that were initially successful may fail five or ten years later.

comments 151 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2009

Amy’s Kitchen Scores with Natural Frozen Entrees and More

Amy's Kitchen is a remarkable natural frozen food company located in Petaluma, California, just 30 miles north of the Diabetes Health offices. The company was founded in 1987 by Rachel and Andy Berliner, who named it after their young daughter Amy. They started on the proverbial "shoestring" budget, working out of their house and using their barn as headquarters. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 20, 2009

Living With Diabetes: New Hope for Health

New cases of adult type 2 diabetes have increased by more than 90 percent in the past 10 years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease and Prevention.(1) Equally troubling is the dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes among children. Recent reports reveal a 200 percent increase in hospitalizations for children with type 2 diabetes, a condition that was rarely diagnosed in children decades ago.(2) In the words of the CDC, "Diabetes is common, disabling, and deadly."(3)

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2009

Treatment of Homes for Termites Decades Ago May Cause Diabetes Today

Obesity has long been accepted as a risk factor for diabetes. The results of four recently published studies, however, have revealed that the real risk factor may be the insecticides present in that fat. The initial investigations showed that the expected association between obesity and diabetes/insulin resistance was absent in people who had low levels of organochlorine insecticides in their blood (1, 2). However, the expected association between obesity and diabetes/insulin resistance increased with levels of these insecticides. In the last year, two additional studies have linked these insecticides with diabetes (3, 4).  

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2009

Who Woulda Thought? Eat Fewer Calories, Lose Weight

The old joke has a man going to the doctor and saying, "It hurts when I do this. What should I do to make it go away?" 

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2009