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Diabetes Diets Article Archives

January 2013

Type 2 Comedian Drew Carey Sheds 80 Pounds, Says No-Carb Diet Did It

Keep a close eye on this story. It has two elements necessary for creating a lot of buzz: a celebrity and his unconventional "cure" for a disease. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2013

October 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

April 2012

The Best Ingredient to Diet Success: Diet Management!

Food plays an important role in our lives. For most of us, it is more than just a means of sustenance. For some, it is a source of great pleasure. For others, it is a source of painful consequences. And for many, it is both.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2012

Kale Chip Recipe

INGREDIENTS
1 large bunch (about 1 1/4 pounds) kale, stems and center ribs discarded, leaves roughly torn
2 sheets nori, cut into 1-by-2-inch strips
1/4 cup Roasted Garlic Oil* (see below)
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Grated zest of 1 lemon

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 6, 2012

February 2012

Gluten-Free Diet Doesn’t Lower Diabetes Risk

A gluten-free diet in the first 12 months of life does not lower the risk of later developing type 1 diabetes in children who have a family history of the disease, says a German study. Previous studies had suggested that babies whose diets included gluten in their first months of life might be more likely to develop type 1 than youngsters whose diets did not.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 22, 2012

January 2012

Cutting Carbs Two Days Each Week May Lead to Weight Loss

If you, like many people with diabetes, are trying to lose weight, you might be more successful if you cut back on carbohydrates for just two days a week instead of undertaking an unrelenting low-calorie diet. A recent report found that women who banished carbohydrates for two days a week and ate normally the rest of the time lost about nine pounds in four months, compared to the five pounds lost by women who cut back to roughly 1,500 calories every day.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2012

November 2011

New Diabetes-Friendly Sugar Reduces Absorption of Real Sugar

A new diabetes-friendly sugar, proven to help reduce sugar absorption, will soon be added to popular breads and cereals. "Sugir" is real sugar that contains an all-natural, tasteless additive called Emulin. Emulin, a patented formulation of compounds found in fruits, prevents the body from absorbing about a third of ingested sugar. A previous study showed that Emulin blocks the absorption of sugar by more than 30 percent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2011

October 2011

GlucoLift: An All Natural Glucose Tab for People With Diabetes

Wrongly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 30 years old, Chris Angell spent several frustrating weeks trying to make sense of his condition and not understanding why he wasn't getting any better. His diagnosis was eventually changed to type 1 diabetes, but Chris never received the necessary education to get his blood sugars in control. "I didn't know what I was supposed to be eating or how to count carbs, and I really felt isolated," he says.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 25, 2011

August 2011

Sex and Diabetes

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2011

July 2011

Too Much TV Could Be Deadly

Spending too many hours watching TV can also substantially increase your odds of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or dying early. That's the conclusion of a Harvard School of Public Health study that looked at the effects of heavy TV watching.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2011

NYT Article Says Older Diabetes Drugs Are Often the Best

A recent article in the New York Times says that such old prescription diabetes drugs as metformin and generics such as glimepiride are often as effective as or even more effective than newer, more expensive drugs.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2011

“Good” Brown Fat Might Help People Lose Weight

Body fat is like two twins: one evil and one good.  In this case, white fat-the kind that likes to cluster around the abdomen and hang on to calories-is the bad stuff. The "good" fat is brown, and it has been found to assist the body in burning calories, thus helping keep weight down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 48 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

June 2011

Flavonoid Rutin May Help Obesity and Diabetes

An Australian researcher who deliberately fed his lab rats a high-sugar/high-fat diet says that a flavonoid called rutin helped block the growth of fat cells in their abdomens and kept them from putting on weight despite their bad diet. Flavonoids are plant pigments that researchers are finding have beneficial metabolic effects because of their antioxidant capabilities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2011

May 2011

Maple Syrup-A Sweet Surprise

Meet the latest superfood: maple syrup.  Wait a minute...maple syrup? The super-sugary stuff poured on pancakes and waffles and used to glaze hams? That maple syrup?

comments 9 comments - Posted May 24, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

Prediabetes Sweet Tooth Doesn’t Always Lead to Weight Gain

A new study says that people who consume a "moderate" amount of candy per day have a slightly lower body mass index than people who don't eat candy.  They also run a 15 percent lower risk than the general population of developing metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

How High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Made

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is, as the name implies, corn syrup whose sugar, glucose, has been partially changed into another type of sugar, fructose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Can Beta Blockers Encourage Weight Gain? Aussie Study Says Yes

Beta blockers, which many people with diabetes take to control high blood pressure, may be one of the reasons why type 2s often tend to gain and keep weight. That's the conclusion of a study from St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2011

March 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

STEVIA: Can Nature’s Sweetener Help Your Blood Sugar?

You know that awful feeling when a sugar low is coming. I break out into a cold sweat, feel panicky, get nauseated, and have trouble answering extremely simple questions like "Do you need to eat?" Well, I was feeling it again, and again, and I didn't know why. That's what I hate the most: When things go wrong, but I think I've been doing everything right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2011

Dr. Jane Delgado, Author of The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life

Hispanics are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have type 2 diabetes, and more than a third of working adult Hispanics do not have health insurance. For this audience, Jane Delgado, PhD, has written The Buena Salud Guide to Diabetes and Your Life. Available in both Spanish and English, it's a culturally sensitive and reassuring book that dispels myths and presents detailed science while gently guiding readers toward the right path in caring for their diabetes. The tone is conversational, as Dr. Delgado speaks to her readers like a family member who knows them well and has their best interests at heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 2, 2011

Diabetes Drug Prompts Charges, Calls for Reform in France

Scandal swirling around a former diabetes drug has upended medical regulation in France, with the country's health minister promising tough new reforms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2011

February 2011

Diabetes Superfoods

Ever see the top 10 lists for foods everyone should eat to superpower your diet? Ever wonder which will mesh with your diabetes meal plan? Wonder no more. Your list of the top 10 diabetes superfoods has arrived.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2011

November 2010

At a Loss?

A friend of mine recently remarked that she wants her family to eat healthier, but she just doesn't know that much about nutrition. Though I can sympathize with her in some ways (nutritional education is a daunting and never-ending process), I do feel that the overall American attitude toward food is that ignorance is bliss. It reminds me of the preteen character in the movie Son-In-Law, who puts his sister's bra cups over his ears and tells his parents in a taunting voice, "I can't hear you!"  Unfortunately, what you don't know CAN hurt you, and not just you, but also your family. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2010

October 2010

Trapped Underground for 70 Days with Diabetes

Imagine that you're a miner. Imagine you have diabetes (that, at least, shouldn't be too hard). Now, imagine that you have to spend two months trapped underground with other miners. How would you do?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

September 2010

Fantastic Fall Foods and Fun: A Guide to Healthfully Enjoying Fall

Fall is a welcome season, full of bounty and beauty.  The heat of summer gives way to calmer days and crisper evenings.  We trade our shorts and swimsuits for jackets and jeans and enjoy campfires, hayrides, and holiday celebrations.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2010

August 2010

Lower-Carb Diet Better Than Low-Fat for Obese Insulin-Resistant Women

Insulin-resistant obese women lost more weight after 12 weeks on a low-carbohydrate diet than they did on a low-fat diet, according to a study conducted by the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno. (The study was funded by Jenny Craig, a company that sells diet foods.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2010

Red Wine Ingredient Increases Insulin Sensitivity, Works Against Retinal Disease

Two recent research studies on humans indicate that resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine and peanuts, increases insulin sensitivity in older and obese people. A third study, done on mice, shows that resveratrol may someday become a powerful tool in therapies directed at macular degeneration and other retinal maladies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

July 2010

Orange-Ginger Glazed Salmon

Salmon is one of the world’s healthiest foods. Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, vitamins D and B12, and protein, it’s an absolute powerhouse of good nutrition. Better yet, it tastes great! Perfect for the hot days of summer the sweet orange-ginger glaze is tinged with just a tinge of heat. If you prefer, an indoor grill or sauté pan can be used to cook the salmon.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Vitamin D Deficiency Common in People With Poor Diabetes Control

In a recent study of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and glucose intolerance in people with type 2 diabetes, more than 90 percent of the type 2 diabetes patients were found to be deficient in vitamin D, with their control over the disease worsening as their deficiency increased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 4, 2010

June 2010

Harvard Study Says Brown Rice Twice Weekly Can Reduce Diabetes Risk by 10 Percent

White rice and brown rice are reminiscent of those old dramas about identical twins, wherein one turns out to be angelic and the other turns out to be bad news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2010

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Meat Preservatives, Not Meats Themselves, May Increase the Risk for Diabetes

Over the past few decades, some medical researchers have pointed the finger at meat consumption as a major factor in the development of heart disease and diabetes. However, a meta-analysis conducted by the Harvard School of Medical Health has concluded that it may be the salt and chemical preservatives used in processed meats that lead to health problems, not the meats themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

May 2010

Attending Weight Watchers® Meetings Helps Reduce the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

The 57 million Americans currently living with "pre-diabetes" could benefit from a group weight loss program, like Weight Watchers, according to a new study published in this month's American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. Researchers found that after a 6-month Weight Watchers group program, overweight or obese adults who attended at least two thirds of the weekly sessions, not only lost weight, but also significantly reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels - important indicators of diabetes risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Cherry Berry Pie Cups

Nobody will believe you created these perfect cherry "pies" in under 30 minutes. (And of course you don't have to tell). Fresh raspberries complement the cherry pie filling perfectly and add a fresh homemade quality while refrigerated piecrust makes them as easy as, well, pie!

comments 2 comments - Posted May 11, 2010

Everyday Chicken Caesar Salad

Chicken Caesar Salad is undoubtedly one of the most popular (if not the most popular) entrée salad featured on restaurant menus. But what most people don't realize is that most recipes for Chicken Caesar Salads contain more fat and calories than a loaded Big Mac-that's a big problem, especially if you are watching out for your health.  Here's an easy way to create a delicious and healthful restaurant-quality Chicken Caesar right at home. To enjoy it as a side salad, simply leave out the chicken.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 3, 2010

Cutting Fats While Upping High Glycemic Index Carbs Does Your Heart No Favors, Says Danish Study

A Danish analysis of data from 21 research studies on the effects of saturated fat intake has concluded that swapping refined carbohydrates, such as pasta and white bread, for fat causes spikes in blood sugar that are harmful to the heart. However, cutting down on saturated fats while increasing consumption of whole-grain breads and vegetables-low glycemic index* foods-had a discernible positive impact on heart health.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2010

February 2010

Embracing a New Diet: Vegetarianism

For as long as I can remember, I have disliked meat.  I believe it started with my sensitive gag reflex as a child.  I could hardly chew and swallow pork chops, pineapple, or anything else that didn't go down easily. In high school I became best friends with a girl who didn't eat meat.  It seemed like a really cool lifestyle, so I joined ranks with her.  Instead of eating meat, we consumed french fries, fruit punch, and snack cakes.  This became our definition of vegetarianism. Then, during my junior year of high school, my doctor informed me that my chronic low blood sugars might be improved by more protein consumption, so I forced myself back into the life of a carnivore, not knowing then that protein consumption didn't have to equal a slab of meat at every meal. 

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2010

December 2009

Tasty Tips and Tricks from Marlene

According to Marlene, finding the perfect mix of ingredients is key when creating healthier versions of your favorite foods. From composing a healthier sandwich to perfecting pasta dishes and creating delightful desserts, Marlene reveals some of her tastiest ingredient tips:

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2009

November 2009

Portion Distortion: Take Charge!

We hear it all the time, from the diet ads on television to the lectures from our doctors and dietitians.  What matters is not only what you eat, but also how much you eat.   But how can you control your portions?  Is it possible to have a healthy relationship with food?  How can you make sure you are full, but not stuffed? Can you keep your blood sugars under control?  The answer to all these questions is yes! 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2009

October 2009

Nutritional Help at Your Fingertips

While Googling recently, I found a link to Soul-Food-Advisor, a website devoted to "African American cuisine and soul food, mostly known as Southern or comfort food." It sounded, frankly, delicious. But as someone with pre-diabetes, I am trying to eat fewer carbs, avoid anything fried, and turn the other cheek when I see macaroni and cheese-my favorite comfort food since I was a little kid. So instead of looking at Soul Food Advisor, I turned my attention to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) MyFoodAdvisor online tool.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2009

September 2009

Using the Medicine Wheel to Control Type 2 Diabetes

The way information is presented to us makes a big difference in whether we are able to integrate that information into our daily lives. Although graphs and numbers may sway some people, putting educational materials into a culturally relevant context can be more effective. A recent study, for example, has found that a dietary program based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition can change eating patterns among Native Americans, who have the highest rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease of all ethnic groups. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2009

High Fat Hangover

Those of you who are familiar with the South know what kudzu is. An Asian vine that can grow a foot taller every day, it was brought to the American Southeast in the 1930s in a sadly boneheaded attempt to control erosion. Unfortunately, the little green visitor liked it here so much that in the decades since, it has colonized 10 million acres of farms and woods, becoming a massive and costly nuisance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2009

Most Type 2s Consume Too Much Sodium and Fat, Says Wake Forest Study

You might think that people with type 2 diabetes would know better than most what they should put into and leave out of their diets. At least, that was the expectation of researchers at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, when they set out to learn why people with type 2 are often overweight. What they found, however, surprised them. Their study of 2,757 type 2s showed that:

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2009

Mediterranean Diet May Help Type 2s Avert Medication, Weight Gain, and Heart Risks

An Italian study of people with type 2 diabetes has found that 70 percent of those who followed a low-fat diet eventually needed diabetes drugs, as opposed to only 44 percent of those who ate a Mediterranean diet.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2009

DASH, a Diet Designed for Hypertension, May Stave Off Type 2 in Whites

A South Carolina study has found that the DASH diet, originally designed to treat hypertension, is linked to a lower rate of type 2 diabetes in whites, but not in blacks or Hispanics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

Learning Self-Control is the Key for Kids to Remain Healthy

According to a recent  Pennsylvania study, kids need to learn to control themselves when it comes to food. Obviously, self-control is important for us all, kids and adults alike, when it comes to weight management. It’s equally apparent that children need to be taught by their parents to make healthy food choices. But parents who strictly forbid their children to eat many foods might be contributing to a lack of self-control in their offspring, thereby creating the very chubbiness that they were trying to avert.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

August 2009

High Fat Hangover

Everyone knows that eating only high fat food is unhealthy way down the road, but we don't really worry that eating a burger will hurt us by next week. Unfortunately, however, it turns out that a high fat diet damages our health (and our brain functioning) a lot sooner than we would like to think. In fact, new research shows that the effects are felt within only ten days. As far as I'm concerned, this was already shown conclusively in the film "Super Size Me," in which director Morgan Spurlock personally examined the effects of fast food on the human body. For one month, he ate only at McDonald's, ordering everything on the menu and "super-sizing" his order whenever asked. Right before our eyes, Spurlock began looking sicker and sicker.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

Leading Weight Loss Center is Enrolling Participants for Prediabetes Research Study

The PreDx Diabetes Risk Score determines risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2009

ADA Says Sugar Consumption Levels Can Be Linked to Race, Family Income and Education

A study of the sugar consumption habits of 30,000 Americans by the American Dietetic Association concludes that race/ethnicity, family income and education levels are important factors in how much sugar a person eats.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2009

Knowledge Is Not Only Power: It’s Also Powerful Medicine

It's very likely that you, like most people, believe many myths about diabetes. If you do, you might actually be doing yourself harm. Learning the truth can empower you (as it did me) to make choices and take actions that increase the quality and length of your life.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Thoughtful Consumption: People with Diabetes Have Been Leading the Pack All Along

Never underestimate the power of people with diabetes and their families. When we as a consumer group purchase more fruits and vegetables, walk or bicycle instead of taking the car, and educate ourselves about a healthy lifestyle, we are addressing global issues as well as personal ones and can have a strong, positive effect on the future.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2009

Path to Good Health Includes Breastfeeding Your Baby, Avoiding Pesticides, and Eating a Mediterranean Diet

The Organic Center (TOC), a leading research institute focused on the science of organic food and farming, announced that a balanced, organic diet-both before and during pregnancy-can significantly reduce a child's likelihood of becoming overweight or obese or developing diabetes.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 17, 2009

Type 2 Diabetes, Triglycerides, and the Good Kind of Fat

This article was submitted by GlaxoSmithKline, makers of LOVAZA, a medication to lower very high triglycerides, made from omega-3 fish oil.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2009

Nitrates May Be a Major Culprit in Diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson's

Rhode Island researchers say they have found strong evidence that links the level of nitrates in the environment and food supply to increases in deaths from such diseases as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's-all insulin-resistant ailments.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2009

May 2009

Too Much Food Is Responsible for Most of the U.S. Rise in Obesity Since 1970, Says Study

Sometimes complex problems have simple answers. Take the alarming rise in obesity in the United States since 1970. Researchers have speculated in the past that the cause might be a combination of factors, perhaps a lack of exercise working in concert with the spread of cheap high-calorie junk food.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 23, 2009

ADA Touts Its New List of Diabetes “Superfoods”

The American Diabetes Association has released a list of "superfoods" it says "have necessary nutrients for good diabetes management, including fiber, potassium, healthy fats, magnesium and antioxidants."

comments 22 comments - Posted May 5, 2009

Attention Healthcare Professionals: Grants Available for Integrating Patient-Recorded Observations into Clinical Care Processes

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has issued a call for proposals through its national program, Project HealthDesign: Rethinking the Power and Potential of Personal Health Records. Grant recipients will work to assess and test the potential of "observations of daily living" (ODLs) to help patients and physicians better manage chronic illnesses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2009

April 2009

Eating Like an Ironman

What do you eat in a 140 mile Ironman triathlon?  I get that question a lot. It's been said that the Ironman race is 10% fitness, and 90% nutrition. That's a bit of an exaggeration, but for those of us with diabetes, that's our daily life.  Nutrition affects everything we do. Exercise, sleep, driving a car, all of those activities require a person with diabetes to think about the carbohydrates they have consumed and when they will eat or drink them again

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2009

50 Reasons Why Diabesity Wasn’t Prevalent 50 Years Ago

The following list shows 50 of the ways we have "convenienced" ourselves into diabesity. Before the technology boom, most Americans were active at work, at home, and at play. Much of what we did was manual, so we burned off the calories that we took in. When you consider that we did many of these activities on a regular basis, it is easy to see how we were able to remain trim. Obviously, no single one of these activities burns a large amount of calories by itself, but taken together, it is easy to see that the number of calories burned really begins to add up. (By the way, if you remember any of the things on this list, you don't have to tell anyone.) 

comments 12 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2009

Joy Pape’s New Book: Living with Diabetes Day-to-Day

Long before Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN, served a stint as the clinical editor and contributing columnist for Diabetes Health Professional, she was a seasoned diabetes expert who knew her way around almost every aspect of the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2009

Moderately Protein-Rich Diet Better for Long-Term Weight Loss, Says University Study

A 12-month university study of 130 persons who ate either a USDA food pyramid-inspired high-carb diet or a diet moderately high in protein showed that members of the higher protein group lost 23 percent more weight and 38 percent more body fat than their high carb counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2009

Emory Researchers Tell Why Excess Fat Increases Risk for Type 2

Being overweight is something all doctors and most laypeople know significantly increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) says that more than 90 percent of people who are newly diagnosed with type 2 are overweight.  But why does excess fat increase the risk of diabetes? Isn't the disease, after all, one that involves the body's inability to metabolize glucose?

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2009

March 2009

Many Factors Make Type 2 Diabetes a Challenge

There's a perception out there that people with type 2 could control their disease if they just tried hard enough. But self-control and will power are not the whole story. A new study published in this month's Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness includes "eating out, lack of social support and high-risk lifestyles" as just a few of the roadblocks that stop patients with type 2 diabetes from controlling their condition. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2009

Treatment of Homes for Termites Decades Ago May Cause Diabetes Today

Obesity has long been accepted as a risk factor for diabetes. The results of four recently published studies, however, have revealed that the real risk factor may be the insecticides present in that fat. The initial investigations showed that the expected association between obesity and diabetes/insulin resistance was absent in people who had low levels of organochlorine insecticides in their blood (1, 2). However, the expected association between obesity and diabetes/insulin resistance increased with levels of these insecticides. In the last year, two additional studies have linked these insecticides with diabetes (3, 4).  

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2009

Who Woulda Thought? Eat Fewer Calories, Lose Weight

The old joke has a man going to the doctor and saying, "It hurts when I do this. What should I do to make it go away?" 

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2009

Gene Discovery May Tell Why Some Gain Weight and Others Don’t on High-Fat Diets

Chances are that you know somebody who can pack away the highest-fat foods-marbled steak, cheese, butter, and ice cream-and never gain weight. If you've always shrugged it off and said, "It must be genetic," it turns out that you may be right.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2009

Diabulimia: What It Is and How To Treat It

A few years ago a young man named Jeff came into my office seeking help to lose weight.  He was 5'10" tall and weighed 130 pounds. Jeff denied starving himself, denied making himself throw up, and denied over-exercising. I tried to convince him that he was actually 30 pounds underweight. As I looked for the most effective ways of motivating him to restore his health, he brought up the fact that he had type 1 diabetes.  Jeff said that he rarely gave himself insulin and that he had "diabulimia." I had never heard of diabulimia and had no idea what I was dealing with. I gave him a list of clinicians and asked him to call me back after he made appointments with an endocrinologist and a psychotherapist.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2009

February 2009

Here’s a One-Two Punch for Lowering Blood Pressure: As You Reduce Your Sodium, Increase Your Potassium

Doctors often tell people with high blood pressure to decrease their consumption of sodium. Now researchers at the Loyola University Health System in suburban Chicago have found that it is probably wise to increase potassium intake at the same time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2009

January 2009

It’s Not Too Late to Follow Your New Year’s Resolution

Remember that New Year's resolution that you made a few weeks ago?  Oh yeah, that one.  How's that going?  If you're like most people, you may have started to slack off just a little bit.  Or even worse, maybe it's already a distant memory.  No worries, I won't tell.  Let's get you going again.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 27, 2009

Antioxidants Relieve Pain of Chronic Pancreatitis

For patients who suffer frequent sharp abdominal pain from chronic pancreatitis, antioxidants may offer effective pain relief, according to a study recently published in Gastroenterology, the journal of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2009

Physical Activity Doesn’t Reduce Obesity On Its Own

Current thinking has it that obese people are obese because they engage in less physical activity and burn fewer calories than their thinner counterparts. But suppose you could show that obese women burn just as many calories as their thinner, supposedly fitter counterparts?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2009

Extremely Low-Carb “Ketogenic Diet” Leads to Dramatic Reductions in Type 2 BG Levels, Medications

Two diets - one severely restricting carbohydrate intake but with no limit on calories, and the other emphasizing low-glycemic carbohydrates and low calories - allowed high percentages of obese type 2 patients in a university study to reduce or even eliminate their diabetes medications (95.2 percent of the patients on the extreme low-carb diet and 62.1 percent of the patients on the low-glycemic diet).

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2009

Unhealthy Weight Loss Methods Tempt Teens With Diabetes

About half of young people who have diabetes report having tried to lose weight at one time or another, says a Kaiser Permanente Southern California study reported in the December 2008 issue of Diabetes Care

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

“Nutrigenomics” Could Lead to Disease-Preventing Custom Diets Based on Individual Genetic Profiles
“Nutrigenomics” Could Lead to Disease-Preventing Custom Diets Based on Individual Genetic Profiles

As science peers deeper into the genetic make-up of humans, a new branch of study, nutrigenomics, seeks to explore the correlation between people's "gene expressions" and the diets best suited to them.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2009

December 2008

ADA 2009 Recommendations Reaffirm Acceptance of Low Carb Diet

Every year the American Diabetes Associations revises and updates its Clinical Practice Recommendations, a publication upon which many doctors and medical caregivers depend as a primary source of diabetes treatment information.

comments 12 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Study Suggests That Losing Weight, Not a Low-Fat Diet, Reduces Post-Menopausal Women’s Risk of Type 2

Post-menopausal women hoping to avert type 2 diabetes stand a better chance of success if they rely on losing weight rather than on a low-fat diet, according to results of a 12-year study conducted by the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center in Seattle. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Woman Loses 134 Pounds in One Year

About a year ago, Cheryl Tooke found herself in the last place she ever wanted to be. She weighed 268 pounds, and her doctor had just diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes.

comments 85 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?
The "Fat-Free Fallacy:" Is It Obesity's Great Enabler?

Obesity in the United States is increasing in epidemic proportions. This is true in children as well as adults. It's estimated that the healthcare costs associated with obesity and its related complications will exceed $130 billion this year.

comments 52 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Spanish Study Claims Mediterranean Diet Reduces Type 2 Risk by 83 Percent

A Spanish university study has found that a traditional Mediterranean diet consisting of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, olive oil, and fish may reduce the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes by 83 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Hope for Healthy Hearts, Women Have the Power to Lessen Risk

Many people think of heart disease as something that mostly afflicts men. But heart disease actually kills more women in the United States than anything else, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. And diabetes plays a stronger role in risk for heart disease in women than it does in men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 15, 2008

A CDE’s Tips for Surviving the Holidays if You Have Diabetes
A CDE’s Tips for Surviving the Holidays if You Have Diabetes

Are you ready to celebrate the holidays? How many festivities are on your calendar this season? It’s time to navigate the minefield of situations that can throw your diabetes off course and send a joyous occasion into the dumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2008

Rethinking the Treatment of Diabetes

The first time I presented medical research findings, I was not yet a physician. The year was about 1975. I was in my early forties and a mid-career engineer. The forum was a scientific symposium on diabetes. At the time, I felt that I had discovered the holy grail of diabetes care and was eager to share what I had learned.

comments 22 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

Incidence of Diabetes in Postmenopausal Women Not Reduced By a Low-fat Diet

Next week we'll publish a great article written by Dr. Richard Bernstein. MD. Dr. Bernstein is a long-term proponent of paying more attention to carbs rather than fats (though he certainly doesn't advocate that you can have all the fats you want!) While Dr. Bernstein has been telling us about the benefits of low carb for over 30 years, there is still much skepticism about his (and many other's-Gary Taubes, anyone?) low carb results. The establishment has been slow to be convinced, despite the many research trials that back up their findings.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

Newly Diagnosed People With Diabetes See a $4,200 Increase in Their Annual Medical Expenses
Newly Diagnosed People With Diabetes See a $4,200 Increase in Their Annual Medical Expenses

People who have been newly diagnosed with diabetes will spend substantially more in the first year on medical costs than their non-diabetic counterparts-an average of $4,174 for a 50-year-old-according to RTI International, a non-profit research institute in North Carolina.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

Things I’ve Learned Along the Way: Notes From a Type 2 Diagnosed in 2003

Once you're diagnosed with type 2, you begin a long, often trial-and-error journey toward creating a daily routine that accommodates your disease without making you feel like an invalid.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!
Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!

Diabetes Health board member Sheri Colberg, PhD, has published a completely revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg, a diabetic athlete herself, has a PhD in exercise physiology. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Facing the (Food and Fitness) Facts: 11 Myth-Busters to Help You Take Charge of the One Thing You Can Control These Days

No doubt about it: Most of us have never felt less in control of our destinies. The stock market is bottoming out and no one knows what to do about it. Jobs are down, food prices are up, and who knows what's going on with gas. To make things even more expensive, the holidays are upon us. Mix all these factors together, and you have a recipe for runaway stress and anxiety. But there is one thing you can control: your body weight. That's right. Now is the time to get fit, lose any extra pounds that might be hanging around, and develop the habits that will keep your weight at a healthful level over the long term. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 24, 2008

How Do I Know When I Should See a Registered Dietitian?
How Do I Know When I Should See a Registered Dietitian?

The ADA has a new book out, called What to Expect When You Have Diabetes: 170 Tips for Living Well With Diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 10, 2008

October 2008

Investigational Weight Loss Drug Discussed at Obesity Society Annual Meeting

Orexigen Therapeutics has announced that the investigational weight loss drug Contrave (naltrexone SR/bupropion SR) reduced the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease, by 50 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 13, 2008

September 2008

Doctors Say Avandia Warning Label Should Tout Vegan Diet

A professional doctors' group has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to require that Avandia's warning label include a statement that a low-fat vegan diet is a safer, more effective approach to lowering blood sugar levels than the drug itself.

comments 20 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Making Time for Breakfast
Making Time for Breakfast

Many people know that it is beneficial to eat your morning meal, but it can be challenging for many reasons. Breakfast is not the meal to miss, especially when you feel stressed, since it can set the mood for the entire day. The truth is that what you eat for breakfast may be more important than if you eat breakfast at all.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

The Latest ‘Scoop’  on Ice Cream
The Latest ‘Scoop’ on Ice Cream

Originally ice cream consisted of milk, cream, sugar, flavoring and lots of air. But modern brands adhering to this original recipe are few and far between.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 22, 2008

When Diabetes Leads to a Lazy Stomach: The Goods on Gastroparesis
When Diabetes Leads to a Lazy Stomach: The Goods on Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn't sound good, and it isn't. Literally "stomach paralysis," it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature.

comments 27 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Shedding Habits and Pounds: No Brand-Name Diets, No Gym Memberships

I remember the call from the doctor's office two weeks after a long overdue annual physical. I sat in the examining room expecting to hear the usual "lose weight" diagnosis. I had been feeling tired and had been making more than a few daily trips to the bathroom. But in spite of the fact that my grandmother, father, cousin, and brother all suffered from type 2 diabetes, I was not prepared for my doctor's stern warning: My sugar had been totally out of control for several months. I needed to adjust my diet and lifestyle immediately. I was a 40-year-old chocoholic and totally calorie clueless. I also weighed 255 pounds. The doctor prescribed an oral medication and told me that monthly visits for testing would now be required. I thought, OK, I can do this.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 18, 2008

The Road Paved with Good Intentions

People asked to choose between a "good" snack and a "bad" snack may not make the choice they said they would when the snacks finally arrive. In an article in the September/October 2008 issue of The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior*, researchers in Holland found a substantial inconsistency between healthful snack choice intentions and actual behavior.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 18, 2008

Interesting Tangential Research on High Cholesterol Levels in Children
Interesting Tangential Research on High Cholesterol Levels in Children

Elevated cholesterol levels return to normal or near normal levels over time in four out of ten children with uncontrollable epilepsy treated with a high-fat ketogenic diet, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study reported in the Journal of Child Neurology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2008

As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes
As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes

With 21 million U.S. residents now officially diagnosed as having diabetes, healthcare professionals are looking at another statistic that is causing them many a sleepless night: The Centers for Disease Control estimate that there are 57 million people with pre-diabetes in the United States. (Pre-diabetes is defined as impaired fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl, impaired glucose tolerance of 140 to 199 mg/dl, or both.)

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

Vitamin C May Lower Diabetes Risk, While Gum Disease May Indicate It

Abundant dietary vitamin C may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, say researchers from the Institute of Metabolic Science at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, England.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

August 2008

Aussie University’s Not-So-Surprising Finding That Our Appetite-Control Cells Head South As We Age
Aussie University’s Not-So-Surprising Finding That Our Appetite-Control Cells Head South As We Age

Time to tack on another strong argument against the consumption of carbohydrates: A scientist at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, says that appetite control cells in the brain degenerate as we age, leading to a sense of increased hunger and potential weight gain.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 28, 2008

The Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup
The Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup

You know how important it is to control the sugar and carbohydrates in your diet. So you read food labels and listen to your body cues to make sure you’re getting what you need to stay healthy.

comments 52 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think
Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think

Do you want to lose weight and improve your blood glucose levels? Do you want to do it without having to weigh your portions and count your calories? Try a low-fat vegan diet. A vegan diet is one with no animal products: no fish, no eggs, no dairy, and, of course, no meat.

comments 22 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

July 2008

When It Came to Eating Right, Did Hunter Gatherers Have the Right Stuff?
When It Came to Eating Right, Did Hunter Gatherers Have the Right Stuff?

Yes, they lacked indoor plumbing, permanent settlements and elevated manners when it came to eating, but our hunter-gatherer ancestors may have eaten a diet that can help modern people combat metabolic syndrome and even type 2 diabetes.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2008

June 2008

EatSmart Scale Lives Up to Its Name
EatSmart Scale Lives Up to Its Name

When you have diabetes, you make the acquaintance of a lot of high-tech tools to help you manage it: monitors, meters and pumps. One very handy tool that sometimes gets overlooked is a digital scale for weighing and analyzing the nutritional content of food.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2008

May 2008

Diabetes and Eating Disorders Come Together as Diabulimia

The desire to be thin can be overwhelming. Few people know that better than Kelie Gardner, who started inexplicably losing a lot of weight during high school. She thought it was great until she discovered the reason—she has type 1 diabetes and her body can’t absorb the nutrients it should. After she was diagnosed and started taking insulin, Gardner returned to a healthy weight. Unfortunately, she wasn’t happy with this sign of improvement. “When I was on insulin, my body was able to start functioning normally,” says Gardner, now 26. “I went up to a normal body weight, but I was used to being skinny. I had the fear of, ‘Oh gosh, I’m going to be fat.’”

comments 21 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Dr. Bernstein Urges Look at a Spanish Study That Bolsters the Case for Low-Carb Diets
Dr. Bernstein Urges Look at a Spanish Study That Bolsters the Case for Low-Carb Diets

Our Advisory Board Member Dr. Richard K. Bernstein has courageously championed the low carb diet for 20 years despite the fact that many people thought he was “out to lunch.” Although his patients loved him for helping them control their high BGs and reverse their complications, other medical professionals often criticized his low carb methods.

comments 9 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

When It Comes to Diabetes, Erectile Dysfunction Is the Canary in the Coal Mine
When It Comes to Diabetes, Erectile Dysfunction Is the Canary in the Coal Mine

Two new studies say that erectile dysfunction (ED) may be a warning sign of diabetes, as well as a warning of approaching cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission
Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission

Dear Diabetes Health,

I appreciated Jamie Bailes’ (April/May 2008) article on helping overweight kids. To me, it illustrated the complexity of weight regulation and the folly of linking it to one factor (fat).

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Diabetes Is Woven Into the Fabric of My Family
Diabetes Is Woven Into the Fabric of My Family

Let me start with my maternal grandmother, Helen. Helen had diabetes and lived to the age of 73. We all assumed that she didn’t do a good job with it, as we would often find candy wrappers under her bed. When it came to taking care of herself, Helen was my mother’s role model.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 15, 2008

Sweeter (and Better) Than Sugar? Two doctors take a close look at artificial sweeteners
Sweeter (and Better) Than Sugar? Two doctors take a close look at artificial sweeteners

Most people are aware of the health hazards that come with sugar consumption. Still, sugar restriction is difficult for our generation, which has developed a strong sweet tooth. However, for those who want to or must limit sugar, there is an extensive variety of sugar substitutes on the market.

comments 21 comments - Posted May 1, 2008

April 2008

Readers Exchange Opinions on Whether Low-Carb Diets Can Hurt Children
Readers Exchange Opinions on Whether Low-Carb Diets Can Hurt Children

Does Low-Carb Cheat Young Children of Their Needs?

KheurserRD wrote us to say, “From a dietitian's perspective, 30 grams of carbs doesn't allow for much. It would not allow for the recommended amounts of milk/milk equivalents or fruit a child needs. Not to mention the lack of fiber. Whatever happened to balance, portion control, physical activity, and eating within your calorie needs? ...If such extreme restrictions are being made, how can very young children meet their requirements for calcium and other vitamins and minerals present in milk or fruit and some carbohydrate-containing vegetables?  Were these children monitored for nutritional deficiencies, or have the long-term effects of such a diet been studied when the diet was started at such a young age? Even if there are no recommendations for fiber, diets rich in fiber are associated with the prevention of many diseases.”

comments 6 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

Looking to Save on Food Expenses? ADA's Advisory Offers Helpful Tips
Looking to Save on Food Expenses? ADA's Advisory Offers Helpful Tips

As food costs rise and more and more “diabetic” foods appear on grocery shelves, the American Diabetic Association has published 13 commonsense tips on how to eat more cheaply and still manage diabetes.

comments 7 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2008

March 2008

The ADA and Low Carb Diets

For the first time, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) came out in support of low-carbohydrate diets for people with diabetes who want to manage their weight. The ADA announced this landmark decision in December 2007 with its 2008 clinical practice recommendations. The latest recommendation is in sharp contrast to decades of promoting only low-fat/high-carb diets.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2008

A New Paradigm for Eating Foods With a Low Glycemic Impact

What is the secret of effective weight management? When a person develops type 2 diabetes, this is a critical question. Losing weight is one of the most successful ways of dealing with this disorder. This is the challenge that I faced when I diagnosed as diabetic about 15 years ago. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2008

Current Highlights in Diabetes Research
Current Highlights in Diabetes Research

Don’t make a run on the tea section of your neighborhood supermarket just yet, but keep this in mind: Scientists at the Neurosciences Institute of the University of Dundee in Scotland say that drinking black tea could help combat diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2008

The Link Between Alcohol and Blood Pressure Is Greater Than Previously Thought, Says U.K. University Study

Previous observational studies have reported that heavy alcohol intake is a risk factor for hypertension. But such studies may be confounded by factors such as diet, smoking, exercise levels and socio-economic position. Clinical trials exploring the link are difficult to implement and have limited follow-up time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2008

Chocolate Is Not Good for Hypoglycemia!

One of the cartoons you recently published, where a character eats chocolate because his sugar is too low, gave the wrong message. Chocolate should not be used for treating hypoglycemia. There is too much fat in it for it to be effective.

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2008

January 2008

Chew on This (But Not Too Much): Sorbitol Can Cause Dangerous Weight Loss
Chew on This (But Not Too Much): Sorbitol Can Cause Dangerous Weight Loss

German doctors solved two mysterious cases of rapid - and dangerous - weight loss from diarrhea once they determined that the cause was chewing too much sugar-free gum containing the artificial sweetener sorbitol.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2008

Insulin, Leptin, Diabetes, and Aging: Not So Strange Bedfellows

To successfully treat any disease, one must know what disease to treat. Treating only a symptom of the disease will leave the underlying disease unchecked and possibly worse. For example, we evolved the "runny" nose to help us clean out upper respiratory infections. So taking a decongestant to eradicate the symptom of a "runny" nose is actually counterproductive for the underlying disease.

comments 23 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2008

ADA Now Supports Low-Carb Diets
ADA Now Supports Low-Carb Diets

The powerful - but cautious - American Diabetes Association has announced that it now supports low-carbohydrate diets for people with diabetes who want to lose weight.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2008

December 2007

High-Glycemic Index Carbs May Pose Greater Type 2 Risk to Chinese and African-American Women
High-Glycemic Index Carbs May Pose Greater Type 2 Risk to Chinese and African-American Women

African-American and Chinese women who eat foods that are high on the glycemic index may carry a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to two recent university studies.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 30, 2007

Dark Chocolate Makes Your Heart's Blood Flow

It's really true: dark chocolate makes your coronary arteries open up and increases heart blood flow. In a two-week trial, 39 adults ate either 550 milligrams per day of dark chocolate (with a cocoa content of 70 percent or greater), which is full of flavonoids, or the same amount of white chocolate, which has no flavonoids.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 9, 2007

Diabetes Is Not A Disease Of Blood Sugar

Diabetes is not a disease of blood sugar. It is a disease of insulin and, perhaps more importantly, leptin signaling. Until that truth is accepted, we will continue to see epidemic growth in type 2 diabetes and obesity, growth that underscores the inadequacy of current conventional medical treatment and the falsity of prevailing nutritional advice.

comments 27 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2007

November 2007

Study Explains Why I'm Fat and You're Not: Over-Eating Linked to Low Dopamine

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter; that is, a molecule that carries messages between neurons in your brain. It's a feel-good neurotransmitter that makes you think "I want that! I'm going to get it! And wow, that was great!"

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2007

Insulin on the Brain Makes For A Shorter Life?

Fact One: Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is a protein that sits on cell surfaces; its job is to allow those cells to respond to insulin.
Fact Two:
Starved mice, which have low blood levels of insulin and heightened insulin sensitivity, live longer than well-fed mice.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2007

Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults
Doctors Fail to Diagnose Most Obese Adults

A study of 2543 obese Mayo Clinic patients has revealed that only 505 of them were formally diagnosed as obese. If they were diagnosed, it was more likely to be done by a resident than by a staff physician.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2007

It Looks Like Our Society Actually Wants All Our Kids to be Fat!
It Looks Like Our Society Actually Wants All Our Kids to be Fat!

Right now, nearly one in six children is overweight. Given the findings of a group of studies recently published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, however, it's a wonder that they all aren't fat. Their environment is certainly working against them.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2007

October 2007

Low Glycemic Diet Fights Pimples
Low Glycemic Diet Fights Pimples

A low glycemic diet is sometimes advised for people with diabetes because it raises blood sugar slowly and reduces blood sugar spikes. Well, now Australian dermatologists have found that it clears up your skin as well.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2007

Is the Glycemic Index Really Reliable?

When calculating glycemic index (GI) values, glucose is arbitrarily given the highest GI value: 100. To assign a GI value to another type of carb, a complex process is used to compare the blood sugar response elicited by the test carb to the blood sugar response provoked by glucose.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research
A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research

The take-home message from the Tufts study is that the GI value of white bread is 70. That's nothing new: The same value has been found in dozens of other studies around the world (1).

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

A Low-GI Diet Better for Avoiding Age-Related Macular Degeneration

A study of 4,099 non-diabetic elderly patients has found that a low-glycemic index diet reduces the incidence and severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of irreversible blindness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2007

September 2007

Fat: Pronounced Guilty in Death of Transplanted Beta Cells

When islet cells are transplanted into a person, they don't go into their usual home in the pancreas. Instead, they're injected into the portal vein, the large vein that feeds the liver with rich fats and sugars from the digestive system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2007

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Another Link in the Chain to Type 2 Diabetes
High Fructose Corn Syrup: Another Link in the Chain to Type 2 Diabetes

In a recent chemical analysis of eleven carbonated soft drinks sweetened with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), researchers from Rutgers University found very high levels of reactive carbonyls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2007

Junk Food is Replacing Potatoes and Leading to Type 2 Diabetes in Peru
Junk Food is Replacing Potatoes and Leading to Type 2 Diabetes in Peru

For at least 12,000 years, Peru has been inhabited by descendants of the Inca civilization. For countless generations, the farmers of the Peruvian Andes have lived on potatoes, cornmeal cakes, and alpacha, or goat meat.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 8, 2007

People on Low Glycemic Diets Lose More Weight

An Australian review of six short clinical trials has found that low glycemic diets (which involve eating foods that raise blood sugar slowly instead of quickly) cause about two pounds more weight loss than calorie-restricted diets.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2007

August 2007

Taste Cues May Be Distorted By Diet Foods

Researchers from Alberta have found that when they fed baby rats diet foods and drinks, the little rats' ability to assess how much energy is in foods was thrown out of whack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2007

Milk Lowers Men's Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Milk Lowers Men's Metabolic Syndrome Risk

A study of 2,375 middle-aged British men reports that those who drank at least a pint of milk a day were 62 percent less likely than non-milk-drinkers to have metabolic syndrome (defined as raised levels of two or more of the following: blood glucose, insulin, blood fats, body fat, and blood pressure).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2007

Got Type 2 Diabetes? Eat Like a Hunter-Gatherer Instead of a Farmer

Between two million and ten thousand years ago, during the Paleolithic era in which we evolved, there was no agriculture, no farmed grains, no refined fat or sugar, little salt, and no dairy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2007

July 2007

Your Plate Can Help You Lose Weight
Your Plate Can Help You Lose Weight

Dishware is destiny, according to new research just published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. There exists a plate that has just been scientifically proven to cause weight loss. And it's a mighty cute little piece of pottery to boot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2007

June 2007

Symlin Curtails Fast Food Binges in Weight Loss Study
Symlin Curtails Fast Food Binges in Weight Loss Study

As many of us know to our dismay, the desire to chow down fatty, sugary food can be very strong indeed. In a recent six-week study of 88 obese, non-diabetic men and women, Symlin, a synthetic hormone currently used to dampen diabetic blood sugar swings, was found to dampen those very desires.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 27, 2007

After Forty Years on Insulin, Operating Room Nurse Still Goes Motorcycle Camping
After Forty Years on Insulin, Operating Room Nurse Still Goes Motorcycle Camping

Anne Williamson has had type 1 diabetes for forty years, since the age of seven. But because of the Easter basket incident, she still vividly remembers her time in the hospital. Anne was alone in her hospital room when a volunteer insisted on leaving a candy-filled Easter basket by her bed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2007

Low-Glycemic Diet Works Better Than Low-Fat Diet for People With High Insulin Secretion

Which diet works best for you may depend on whether or not you are secreting high levels of insulin. From September 2004 to December 2006, researchers monitored 73 obese young adults who ate either a low-fat diet (55 percent carbs and 20 percent fat) or a low-glycemic diet (40 percent carbs and 35 percent fat).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2007

How I Lost Twenty Pounds Eating a Freakish Diet
How I Lost Twenty Pounds Eating a Freakish Diet

Everybody knows that to lose weight, you're supposed to practice portion control, cut down on carbs and fat, and exercise to beat the band. Lifestyle change is the ticket, that's a general given. But what about those of us who can't turn away from a portion no matter how humongous it is?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 16, 2007

Creating a Family Culture of  Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time
Creating a Family Culture of Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time

Several years ago, my husband Brian and my son Danny were eating at the Food Court of a local mall. "Dad, when someone gets three wishes from the genie in the lamp, why don't they just wish for more wishes?" Danny asked. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2007

April 2007

JAMA Study Compares the Big Four in Diets
JAMA Study Compares the Big Four in Diets

Constant controversy swirls about which kind of weight-loss diet works best, but there is precious little scientific evidence comparing one diet to another. To provide some real diet data, a recent Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) study pitted the Atkins, Zone, LEARN, and Ornish diets against each other in a year-long head-to-head study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2007

Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.
Carb Controversy: Tackled From Both Sides.

If food groups were sporting leagues, carbs would be the NFL. You've got your low carb teams, your high carb vegan teams, and your middling carb teams—and each team believes that truth is on its side.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat
Why Eating Too Many Carbs Makes You Fat

Carbs and carbs alone, not fat, increase body weight. It doesn't matter whether the carbs are from sugar, bread, fruit, or vegetables: They’re all rapidly digested and quickly converted to blood glucose.  A short time after a carb-rich meal, the glucose in your bloodstream rises rapidly, and your pancreas produces a large amount of insulin to take the excess glucose out.

comments 26 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Vegan Diet is Best
Why the Vegan Diet is Best

Remember the big picture: Populations that stick to traditional high-carbohydrate diets (for example, Asian rice-based diets) typically have low rates of obesity and diabetes. When they abandon traditional rice-based diets in favor of meatier Western fare, carbohydrate intake falls, but weight problems and diabetes increase.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Low Carb Diet is Best
Why the Low Carb Diet is Best

When I developed diabetes in 1946, physicians thought that the high illness and death rate of diabetics was due to dietary fat and the supposedly resultant elevation of serum cholesterol. Since the DCCT trial, the scientific literature overwhelmingly supports the role of elevated blood sugar in all long-term diabetic complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan
Why You Don't Want to Go Low Carb or Vegan

Let’s be realistic and take a long-term perspective in this “which diet is best” debate, rather than wasting time quibbling over extremes—from low-carb to vegan. You’ll have type 2 diabetes for the rest of your life, and you’ll likely struggle with weight management throughout your life as well. The major challenge in weight loss, and even more so in weight maintenance, is long-term adherence.

comments 13 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

February 2007

Why One Woman Stopped Cooking: The Raw Story
Why One Woman Stopped Cooking: The Raw Story

As a type 1 interested in nature’s ability to heal, I ask, What is causing this so-called diabetes epidemic? Why is it expanding from Western countries to developing countries at the same rate that fast food and junk food are spreading?

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

October 2006

Vegan Diet Lowers BGs and Lipids in Type 2s
Vegan Diet Lowers BGs and Lipids in Type 2s

A low-fat vegan diet was found to improve blood glucose and lipid control in type 2 diabetics, according to researchers at George Washington University School of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

Ray Finds the ‘Tools’ to Control His Diabetes
Ray Finds the ‘Tools’ to Control His Diabetes

‘You wouldn’t believe how much I ate. Every night, besides dinner, I ate one of those big poppers full of popcorn with lots of butter and salt on it.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

July 2006

Can a Pill or Injection Help Us Eat Less and Burn More Calories?

The mantra of healthcare professionals when talking about weight loss is plain and simple: Eat less and exercise more. The dream of many people who are overweight or obese would be to simply inject something that would help them to do just that.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2006

June 2006

Type 2 Diabetes: Not Just for Adults Anymore

It used to be called late- or adult-onset diabetes; now it is called type 2. Instead of occurring primarily in people in their 60s or 70s, it is now found in people of all ages—even youngsters in grade school.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2006

Americans Need to Learn More About Whole Grains

According to a survey conducted by the Whole Grains Council and a manufacturer of whole grain products, it was found that 68 percent of adults are unaware that they should consume at least three daily servings of whole grains. In addition, more than one-fifth of the public (22 percent) was unable to name any of the benefits of eating whole grains.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2006

April 2006

Less Carbs, More Protein and 'Healthy' Fats Improve Heart Profile

Partially substituting carbohydrate with either protein or monounsaturated fat can lower blood pressure, improve lipid levels and reduce estimated cardiovascular risk, according to a study that appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

March 2006

Low Fat, Low Carb or Low Cal?
Low Fat, Low Carb or Low Cal?

People are constantly being told that the only way to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight is to control calorie intake. It does not matter so much where the calories come from as long as one is eating less and burning more. Is this true? It is to some extent, but not completely.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 1, 2006

February 2006

Sugar-Free Chocolates for Your Valentine:
Sugar-Free Chocolates for Your Valentine:

Valentine’s Day is the single biggest day for chocolate sales. Among the many kinds of chocolate now available for gift giving are sugar-free as well as dairy-free varieties. Today, sugar-free chocolates may also be labeled “lower carb.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

January 2006

Researchers Argue the Case for Low-Carb Diets in Diabetes Management

In a review paper published in the July 2005 issue of Nutrition and Metabolism, researchers at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at the State University of New York say that a high-carbohydrate diet raises postprandial plasma glucose and insulin secretion, thereby increasing risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

Recipe for Disaster
Recipe for Disaster

When Daisy Herrera of Orlando, Florida, was 13 years old, she breakfasted on two bowls of Lucky Charms cereal or three chocolate glazed Dunkin Donuts. She drank two 2-liter bottles of Pepsi every couple of days and cartons of chocolate milk. She binged on candy and potato chips while hiding under the bed. She ate an average of four McDonalds or Burger King meals each week. She stood 4’8” tall and weighed 130 pounds. Her mother, Maria, called her a “little round ball.” Daisy’s blood glucose level often topped 400 mg/dl. Even though she was still a child, Daisy was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes—a condition formerly known as “adult-onset diabetes.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

October 2005

‘Good Carbs, Bad Carbs’
‘Good Carbs, Bad Carbs’

“Good Carbs, Bad Carbs” by Johanna Burani, MS, RD, CDE, is a thorough look at nutrition, food and the role of the glycemic index.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

September 2005

Low-Carb Improvements

By following a low-carbohydrate diet for two weeks, obese patients were able to reduce calorie intake, lose weight and improve their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

August 2005

Biting Off Less Than You Can Chew
Biting Off Less Than You Can Chew

Louisiana researchers say that controlling the size of your food bites significantly reduces food and caloric intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

How to Safely Make Fish a Part of Your Diet
How to Safely Make Fish a Part of Your Diet

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people consume omega-3 fatty acids, found in the flesh of oily fish, for their heart-protective benefits. However, some types of fish contain high levels of contaminants, including mercury.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

July 2005

Corn Refiners Sweet on HFCS

The article "High Fructose Corn Syrup: Is This Disguised Sugar Affecting Your Diabetes?"(May 2005) unfortunately suggests that food manufacturers are misusing high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a natural, home-grown sweetener from Midwest corn fields.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

New Pyramid Unveiled
New Pyramid Unveiled

On April 19, 2005, the USDA Food Guide Pyramid was given a facelift for the first time in 13 years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

Decoding the Food Label
Decoding the Food Label

Have you ever wondered how to count the carbohydrates on a food label? Does it really matter how many grams of sugar are in a food? Do “sugar free” and “calorie free” mean the same thing? Do you need to count the fiber in your breakfast cereal as carbohydrate?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

May 2005

New Book Explores What Must Be Done to Stop Obesity and Type 2 Epidemic
New Book Explores What Must Be Done to Stop Obesity and Type 2 Epidemic

Legendary endocrinologist Francine R. Kaufman, MD, has written a new book entitled “Diabesity: The Obesity-Diabetes Epidemic That Threatens America—And What We Must Do To Stop It” (Bantam Books, 2005).

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

What's Your Portion IQ?
What's Your Portion IQ?

Do you know if the last bagel or muffin you ate was a single serving or four portions disguised as one large serving? With supersizing being the norm, accurately estimating portions can be challenging.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

April 2005

Cholesterol: It’s Only Part of the Story
Cholesterol: It’s Only Part of the Story

Caution: Consult with your diabetes care team before starting a lower-carbohydrate meal plan. Diabetes medications such as insulin or oral drugs that stimulate insulin production (sulfonylureas or meglitinides) will need adjustment to prevent hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when carbohydrate intake is decreased. In addition, blood glucose levels need to be checked more often.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

Get Off Your Diet!
Get Off Your Diet!

Carbohydrate counting and new sugar substitutes, food products and medications have given people with diabetes an array of strategies and resources to help them manage their blood glucose. However, for some people, following a structured diabetes meal plan may not work.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

March 2005

Why Every Type 2 Should See ‘Super Size Me’
Why Every Type 2 Should See ‘Super Size Me’

Have you seen the movie “Super Size Me”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

The Glycemic Index—A Little Bit of History
The Glycemic Index—A Little Bit of History

Before 1981, all patients diagnosed with diabetes were given dietary exchanges to follow when planning their meals or snacks. While exchanges were formulated for all food groups, the main focus for glycemic control was on carbohydrates. At the time these guidelines were established, focusing on portions seemed appropriate since the Nutrition Facts Label was not available.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Diet Type Versus Diet Adherence
Diet Type Versus Diet Adherence

Weight Watchers. Atkins. South Beach. Ornish. The Zone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Government Issues Latest Dietary Guidelines

On January 12, 2005, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) published their new Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Low-Carb Lifestyle’s Effect on Diabetes Control
Low-Carb Lifestyle’s Effect on Diabetes Control

Caution: Consult your diabetes care team before starting a lower-carbohydrate meal plan. Diabetes medications such as insulin or oral drugs that stimulate insulin production (sulfonylureas or meglitinides) will need adjustment to prevent hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when carbohydrate intake is decreased. In addition, blood glucose levels need to be checked more often.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Is Dieting Bad for You?
Is Dieting Bad for You?

Last year, Stacey Martin, a 41-year-old real estate agent from East Hampton, New York, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. At 270 pounds, the medical community considered her “morbidly obese.”

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

January 2005

The Biggest Diabetes Busts of All Time
The Biggest Diabetes Busts of All Time

It seemed that every time we gave something a try and it didn’t quite work out, Mom and Dad always had a cliché at the ready to cushion the blow.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

December 2004

Holiday Season Suggestions for Managing the Munchies
Holiday Season Suggestions for Managing the Munchies

Eat at regular mealtimes.Grab a snack or quick meal before going shopping or to a party if it’s later than your usual dining time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Nicole’s Tips for Staying Healthy During the Holidays

This time of year presents extra challenges. It’s not easy to live with and manage diabetes during the holidays, but it can be done. Here are some tips for staying focused, fit and in control during this season:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

What Foods Do You Recommend for My Granddaughter Who Takes Insulin?

Q: My 6-year-old granddaughter is receiving insulin injections. Are there any booklets I can get that have sample menus for a child that young? She is coming to visit me, and I would like to have the proper foods available.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

July 2004

Hefty High-Calcium Dieters Biggest Losers

Obese adults who increase their dietary calcium while adhering to a diet lose more weight than those on a similar diet who don’t take additional calcium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Are Large Restaurant Portions Making Us Fat?

“In a restaurant setting, increasing the size of an entrée results in increased energy intake,” say Pennsylvania State University researchers. “These results support the suggestion large restaurant portions may be contributing to the obesity epidemic.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Smaller Meals Lead to Weight Loss

Consumption of portion-controlled food results in weight and fat loss, according to University of Illinois researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

April 2004

One Year Later and The Lower-Carb Lifestyle is Hotter than Ever

Who would have ever dreamed it? A year ago this column debuted when Diabetes Health asked me to write a feature article about some of the research related to lower-carbohydrate diets.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Great Danes Nix Trans Fat Sales

Do you want your food purchases to be trans fat free in 2004? If so, you’d better get your passport ready and head to Denmark.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

March 2004

Are You Nuts to Eat Nuts?

A low-calorie diet that includes almonds may have a “potential role” in fighting the obesity epidemic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

One More Reason to Consider a High-Protein Diet

The mainstream medical community is starting to take notice: High-protein diets work! Researchers at the University of Minnesota say a high-protein diet lowers after-meal blood glucose 40 percent in type 2s and improves overall glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Eat Chips and Lose Weight?

Eating a low-fat diet that includes the controversial fat substitute olestra (Olean) produced improvement in cardiovascular risk factors in a recent study—an effect largely explained by the participants’ weight loss.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Low-Carb Guru Weighs In On Controversy

I struggle to understand why you are publishing information recommending low-or no-carb meals for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Diabetic Chef Teaches America Reality Cooking
Diabetic Chef Teaches America Reality Cooking

Nearly 10 years ago when Chris Smith was 27, he got bad news in the form of a type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Now known as the Diabetic Chef, Smith is making the most of having diabetes by “re-teaching America to cook.”

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 1, 2004

February 2004

How to Win the Weight Loss War

So you want to lose weight. Prepare for war!

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Researchers Analyze Teenage Diets and the Risk of Type 1

Icelandic researchers who investigated the relation of food to the incidence of type 1 diabetes among adolescents from 11 European countries report some unexpected findings…

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Drop 13 Pounds in 14 Days

I’m not a diet doctor, but I can help you lose weight. A lot of it. In less time than you’d ever think was possible. The secret is a revolutionary new diet I developed while working with overweight men and women who visited my cardiology practice in Miami.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Sugar-Free Sugar Replacers and Diabetes

Suddenly it seems that sugar-free products are everywhere.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Obesity Conference Yields Important Research

In October 2003, the North American Association for the Study of Obesity held its conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Here we provide summaries of some of the more interesting research presented at the conference.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Gluten in Infants’ Diet Linked to Type 1 Antibodies

If your child is younger than 3 months, you might want to be cautious about adding any foods that contain gluten to the baby’s diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Can Early Cereal Feeding Cause Type 1 Diabetes?

Scientists have often speculated about the role various foods in the infant diet might play in the development of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

January 2004

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

In 1978, after prolonged hospitalization, my father died from consequences of diabetes associated with abnormal lipids and high blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

November 2003

Chocolate

Chocolate! Although millions love it, chocolate has always gotten a bad rap in the diabetes community.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2003

April 2003

Low-GI Diet Does Not Limit Variety or Food Quality

Children with type 1 diabetes who followed a low glycemic index (low-GI) diet for one year ate approximately the same amount of macronutrients and variety of foods as a group that followed the traditional carbohydrate-exchange diet, say researchers in Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Americans Consume Food in Greater Portion Sizes

The portion sizes of food consumed in the United States have grown significantly in the past 25 years—with the greatest increases measured for food eaten at fast-food establishments and in the home.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Exploring Lower-Carbohydrate Options

We have all heard great success stories about people who follow a diet low in carbohydrates. Many report weight loss, more energy and normal glucose levels. Maybe you are curious, but you're scared to try it. It goes against everything you've been taught about a healthy diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

The Exchange System

"We don't use them anymore," said my certified diabetes educator when I asked for a copy of the exchange lists used for meal planning.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2003

McLawsuit Tossed

"Nobody is forced to eat at McDonald's," a federal judge said as he threw out a class-action lawsuit that blamed McDonald's food for causing obesity, diabetes and other health problems in children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

New Book Explores Diet Concepts

With the concepts of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) influencing the way many people with diabetes eat, four leading researchers on the glycemic index have written a book to help people better understand this approach.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

The Exchange System: Is It Still Useful?

We don't use them anymore," said my certified diabetes educator (CDE) when I asked for a copy of the exchange lists used for meal planning.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

March 2003

New Year Comes With Bad News About Obesity Epidemic

On January 1, 2003, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report on the state of America's waistlines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Quick & Easy Meals

In today's busy world, it's difficult enough for most of us to get a meal on the table at all—let alone follow a healthy meal plan every day.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Eating Nuts May Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Women

Go ahead—have that peanut butter sandwich. Findings from the Harvard University Nurses' Health Study suggest that women who eat several servings of nuts or peanut butter a week can lower their risk of getting type 2 diabetes by as much as 27 percent. The Nurses' Health Study followed nearly 84,000 female nurses for 16 years beginning in 1980.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

December 2002

Wheat Fiber May Offer No Protective Value for Type 2s

Although increasing cereal fiber in the diet appears to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, increased consumption of cereal fiber doesn't seem to offer beneficial value to people with existing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Naturally Occurring Hormone Suppresses Appetite

Identifying foods that cause the release of a naturally occurring gut hormone known as PYY3-36—or creating a pill that contains the hormone—may help in obesity control, say researchers who studied the effects of PYY3-36 in both rodents and human volunteers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Coming to a Nutrition Facts Panel Near You?
Coming to a Nutrition Facts Panel Near You?

A food ingredient long regarded as a "silent killer" may be brought to justice next spring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Whole Grains Help Stave Off Type 2 Diabetes

Trash the Wonder Bread and white rice and replace them with whole grains and brown rice if you want to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Toeing the Line or Taking a Holiday?

Guilty pleasures are certainly in abundance between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. However, if you are a person with diabetes, too much guilty pleasure may make your A1C resemble something less pleasant than a picture print by Currier and Ives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

FDA Issues Warning About Chinese Diet Pills

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers not to take the Chinese weight loss products Chaso (Jianfei) Diet Capsules and Chaso Genpi. The FDA reports that several people in Japan have become ill, and some have died, after taking the diet products.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Popular Diet Might Damage Kidneys

Cutting your carbs and increasing your protein intake? You could be damaging your kidneys, according to researchers who studied the effects of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet on 10 people who did not have diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

‘Guide to Healthy Restaurant Eating,’ 2nd Edition

Do your favorite restaurants and fast-food eateries fit comfortably into your diabetes meal plan?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

The Sweetest Thing

Most people associate sweetness with happiness, good times and good food. In fact, the average American goes so far as to consume an estimated 20 teaspoons of sugar each day.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Staying Honest During the Holidays - Effective Exercise Strategies

The holiday season presents many challenges for people with diabetes. Because we tend to eat more (at office parties and family outings) and exercise less during these months, weight gain could typically be as much as five to 10 pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

The Sweetest Thing - Artificial Sweeteners an Option for People With Diabetes

Most people associate sweetness with happiness, good times and good food. In fact, the average American goes so far as to consume an estimated 20 teaspoons of sugar each day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

Animal or Vegetable?

Should you skip eating animal protein in favor of vegetable protein if you have type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria (a sign of kidney disease)?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

July 2002

Company Launches Line of Meal-Replacement Foods for People With Diabetes

Medifast, Inc., of Owing Mills, Maryland, is launching a new line of meal-replacement products designed for people with diabetes. The Medifast Plus for Diabetics line features soy-based foods and includes products such as shakes, bars, soups, oatmeal, chili and ready-to-drink beverages that are low in sugar, fat, calories and carbohydrates and are also low on the glycemic index, according to a Medifast news release.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

June 2002

Concerns About Diet Drug Meridia

The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen has petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the diet drug Meridia (sibutramine). A news release from Public Citizen cites more than two dozen deaths and 397 adverse reactions reported to the FDA since the drug's introduction in 1998.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

May 2002

To Snack or Not to Snack

It is not uncommon to read an article about physical activity that advises you to eat a snack before you exercise. Sometimes the article also advises you to perform the exercise after a meal or to avoid activity while insulin is peaking.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Processed Meats and Excess Weight Shown to Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men

Eating processed meats such as hot dogs and bacon may increase a man's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from the United States and Holland. On the other hand, eating polyunsaturated fat may decrease a person's risk for type 2 diabetes, the researchers state in the March 2002 issue of Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

April 2002

The Joy of Soy

According to the latest research, people with diabetes should include soybeans and foods containing soy in their meal plans. Because soy foods are high in fiber and have a low glycemic index, they offer many health benefits for people with diabetes, such as lowering blood-glucose levels after meals and helping to control weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

March 2002

More on the Diet Debate

A low-calorie diet, particularly one that includes meal-replacement foods, can lead to long-term weight loss, according to researchers at the University of Kentucky. In addition, they say, more exercise helps to keep the weight off. Researchers examined data from 29 studies of weight-loss programs for their report, which was published in the November 2001 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

January 2002

Seniors in the Kitchen

Seniors with diabetes may need to make changes to their diet to remain healthy, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). In addition, people may have more difficulty preparing food as they get older.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 2, 2002

Warning to Dieters

High-protein diets that cut back on fruits, vegetables and carbohydrates put you at risk for multiple diseases and won't help you lose weight, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

Tracking Carbohydrate Content of Meals Using a Handheld Computer

One would think that with all the technological advances in handheld computers, there would be a plethora of software products available for every need. In fact, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of software products on the market today. However, finding the specific type of software you need can be quite challenging.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Tasty Test

Diabetes food! Just the words can conjure up past images of long treks down the pharmacy aisle—past the orthopedic shoe supports, and toward the sparse, deserted shelf of "sugar-free products."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Cookbooks for the Holidays... and All Year Long

Food and gifts! What would the holidays be without them? From the traditional dishes we prepare every year to the unusual and exotic specialty, from the highly frivolous gift to the perfect one matched exactly to the needs of the recipient, we strive to make the holidays wonderful by providing food and gifts for the people we love.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Glycemic Index On the Rise

Not everyone agrees that the Glycemic Index (GI) is the way to go when planning your carbohydrate intake. Despite that fact, nutrition expert Patti Geil, MS, RD, FADA, CDE, writes about the importance of the GI in the article "From Jelly Beans to Kidney Beans: What Diabetes Educators Should Know About the Glycemic Index."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Dining Guide Gives Tips for Healthful Restaurant Eating

The National Kidney Foundation has issued a dining guide that will help people with kidney problems maneuver their way through restaurant menus and make healthy eating choices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

October 2001

The Glycemic Index In-depth

Which of the following statements do you think are true?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Proof Is in the Numbers

Eat a low-fat diet, take a brisk walk or ride a bike for 30 minutes a day five days a week and your risk of getting type 2 diabetes will be reduced by 58 percent. Also, taking the type 2 drug Glucophage can also cut the risk of developing type 2 by 31 percent, say researchers in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

More Flexible Insulin Therapy Does Not Encourage Poor Diet

Adjusting insulin regimens does not cause people to adopt a poor diet, according to researchers in the United Kingdom. Researchers from Bournemouth, Dorset, studied the change in patients' diets when they were allowed to adjust the amount of insulin therapy to the total carbohydrate content. They questioned whether or not the change in the insulin regimen would cause patients to consume more fat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Some Low-GI Eating Tips / GI of Various Foods

If you are trying to develop a diet consisting of low-GI foods, consider the following:

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

September 2001

The Many Benefits of the Glycemic Index

The glycemic index (GI) may not be a leading economic indicator, but it is a leading diabetes indicator. Knowing whether the GI of a food is high or low can be a great aid in the quest for control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

A Longer Shelf Life vs. A Longer Human Life

Choosing a diet that does not contain foods heavy in trans fats could reduce a woman's risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 40 percent, say Harvard researchers. Also called hydrogenated oil, trans fats can be found in margarine, shortening, cookies, cakes and other processed foods. Hydrogenated oils are manipulated by science to stay hard at room temperature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

Stick With Your Veggies

Eating less animal protein and sugar may improve HbA1c levels in your body, say researchers from the University of South Florida in Tampa.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

August 2001

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Like many people with diabetes, Gayle Hoover Thorne of Sacramento, California, was led to her type 2 diagnosis by water—or rather, the feeling that she couldn't get enough of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

High Time For Fiber

The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes incorporate 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber into their diets on a daily basis in order to control their blood sugars. To help people with diabetes meet this goal, the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston has published a new high-fiber cookbook entitled "The Joslin Diabetes Healthy Carbohydrate Cookbook."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

When Fishy is Good

According to researchers in Sweden, eating fish protein reduces the risk of developing microalbuminuria, a condition marked by protein in the urine that is associated with kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

June 2001

More Reason to Eat Your Fruit and Veggies

Eating fruits and vegetables may help reduce the risk of diabetes, especially among women and people with higher education levels, according to a recent study published in the January issue of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2001

Diagnosis: Control

Carla Elliot liked to keep busy. A bright and outgoing 14-year-old girl, Carla involved herself in as many activities as she could. Whether it was swimming, cheerleading, softball, 4-H club meetings or simply running around the neighborhood, Carla was there.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

May 2001

Body Mass Index (BMI): What It’s For and How It’s Calculated

According to the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP), BMI—a measurement of height and weight—is the gold standard for measuring obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

Diet and Drugs Not 100% Effective in Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

For many people with type 2 diabetes, diet and medication alone are not successfully treating the disease, researchers announced on March 16 at the Diabetes Health Expo in Miami.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

April 2001

Children of Type 1s Susceptible to Celiac Disease

If someone in your family has type 1 diabetes, you should be screened for celiac disease, a chronic condition in which the wall of the small intestine is damaged by a toxic reaction to gluten, a substance found in some grains. Untreated celiac disease can lead to a number of nutritional deficiencies, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

March 2001

It All Comes Down to Fiber

When your mother tells you to eat your broccoli, you should listen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

February 2001

Using Caffeine and Creatine in Your Workout

As a physically active individual in today's world, you are likely to be bombarded with all sorts of claims about nutritional supplements that will enhance your athletic performance. In reality, very few have been scientifically proven to have any effect on athletic performance.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

January 2001

Salt-restricted Diets Advised Before High Blood Pressure Arises

Japanese researchers are saying it is important for people with diabetes with normal blood-pressure levels to be on a salt-restricted diet long before the occurrence of any type of high blood pressure. In an August 24, 2000, interview with Reuters Health, M. Imanishi, MD, of Osaka City General Hospital, said, "Before hypertension, salt-sensitivity appears, especially in diabetic patients, because of the renal damage caused by the diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

Packing a Metabolic Punch — Protein May Have Long-term Effects on Body's Insulin Secretion

The long-term effects of a high-protein diet remain a hotly debated mystery, but a German team says such eating regimens may hold a lot of promise. According to a study published in the October 2000 issue of Diabetologia, meals high in protein stimulate glucagon secretion and increase insulin release.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

October 2000

Back to School Foods and Snacks

Whether you're off to work or school, portable foods have become increasingly popular. Who needs the long waits and high prices of restaurants when your own kitchen can provide better food at better prices?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

Popular Dietary Supplement Helps to Keep Fat Off

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are saying a popular dietary supplement has been proven to reduce the amount of fat many dieters regain after losing weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

September 2000

Low-Carbohydrate Diets Can Work for Diabetes

Barbara Nelson, CDE, of Boise, Idaho, recently noticed that many of her patients were using the book "Sugarbusters!" for their dietary guidelines, usually at the recommendation of their health care providers. She wrote in asking for our thoughts on this book, and we got the following answer from Joy Pape, RN, CDE:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

Low-Carbohydrate Diets Unsafe

Carl S. Lau of Los Angeles, California wrote in response to our July article on the Food Guide Pyramid, wanting to know what scientific evidence there was showing low-carbohydrate diets to be unsafe. Elizabeth Rhodes, RD, LD, author of our July piece, had this to say in reply:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

Ice Cream Based on Best-selling Diet Now Available

Sugar Busters Ice Cream, manufactured by Marigold Foods of Minneapolis, Minnesota, has been introduced nationally as a new dessert option for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

Exercise Without Calorie Counting Helps Weight Loss

A new study published in the July 18 Annals of Internal Medicine says exercising without dieting is as effective for modest weight loss as dieting without exercising.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

August 2000

Eating Chicken May Help Control Diabetic Kidney Disease

Beef may be what's for dinner, but eating a mostly chicken diet can greatly reduce one's chances of developing kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

July 2000

Eating According to the Food Guide Pyramid

The Food Guide Pyramid does not prescribe a universal diet, but needs to be interpreted differently according to individual needs. Here are two people of very different backgrounds, and a sample menu of what they might consume to stay within the boundaries of the Pyramid. In all cases, the need for snacks should be dictated by blood glucose levels and physical activity:

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2000

June 2000

A Fiber Diet Helps Older Women Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Older women with higher intakes of whole-grain foods and dietary fiber have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to findings published in the April issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

November 1999

Free Foods: Still Cost Money but Not Carbs

Question: What are the “free foods,” foods that have no carbohydrates? From: Anonymous, Montana.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

September 1999

A Healthy Habitat — Pritikin Longevity Center Teaches Special Diet to Type 2s

Most vacations in Southern California include trips to Disneyland, hours of lying on the beach and fat-filled restaurant dinners. However, a small subset of vacationers go there to lose weight. These people visit the Pritikin Longevity Center, located inside the Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

August 1999

Diabetes Educator Says “Diabetic Diet’ Is a Myth

Instead of a sugar-free diet, people with diabetes might do better on a hang-up-free diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

The Skinny on Fat in the Diabetic Diet

For some years, we've heard that saturated fats are bad for us. Now, many people are pointing their fingers at trans fats.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

July 1999

Regular Walking Lowered BGs 20 Points—Even Without Diet Changes, Older Type 2 Women Still Lost Weight

Walking could be the easiest, least expensive exercise, and it is proven to help shed pounds and improve glucose levels. An Australian study looks at post-menopausal type 2 women, and how walking changed their health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Five Helps You Stay Alive - Advice on Getting At Least Five Fruits and Vegetables Per Day

You need more than an apple a day. Nearly every health expert agrees that you need at least five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. This is the way to better general health, normal weight and a good supply of antioxidants. But, unless you're one of the few who actually get five a day, it may require some effort on your part. To help make it easier, here are some tips from experts in diabetes and nutrition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Type 1 Diabetes Associated With Celiac Disease

Type 1 diabetes develops in 5 to 10 percent of all people with celiac disease, which affects approximately 1 in 250 Americans.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

June 1999

Alarming Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Children

Researchers are saying that diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children under the age of 18 has increased tenfold in the past five years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

May 1999

Optimizing Your Workout—Insulin and Carb Adjustments Can Keep a Type 1’s Blood Sugars In Check

For people with type 2 diabetes, exercise is an imperative companion piece to managing blood sugars. For people with type 1 diabetes, however, it is a more difficult proposition.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 1999

April 1999

ADA Says Fruits and Vegetables Should be “Core” of American Diet

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and other national health care groups are requesting that the United States government stress fruits and vegetables more strongly in its health care guidelines for Americans. They want the government to bring fruits and vegetables to the "core" of the American diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

March 1999

Dueling Studies: For Every Study Saying Aspartame is Harmful, Another Says it is Not

For every study saying aspartame is harmful, another says it is not. Hundreds of studies throughout the world have been performed with aspartame. Here's just a tiny sample of contradictory studies, with a summary of their conclusions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

January 1999

Popular Books Get Face Lift

Authors Biermann and Toohey strike again. This prolific diabetes duo has updated their supremely popular book, The Diabetic's Book: All Your Questions Answered. Praise for previous editions says that it is a down-to-earth, practical and upbeat guide anyone can understand.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

December 1998

Strawberries and Chicken Legs Dancing Across Your Computer Screen?

Meals 'n Carbs is a new CD-ROM designed by two diabetes educators to help people plan their meals with diabetes management in mind. The CD-ROM begins with basic information about digestion, diabetes and carbohydrate counting for people recently diagnosed with diabetes. It then progresses to a meal planner, in which you use your mouse to add foods to a meal and print out your nutritional information.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

September 1998

High-tech Control: Computer Tools for Diabetes Management

Helping space aliens and controlling blood glucose may sound like an odd mix, but in a new educational software program produced by the Starbright Foundation, a non-profit organization, the two work together to help teach kids about diabetes. The program, funded by Eli Lilly & Company, is just one example of the computer software products available to help people of all ages manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

A Fat that Prevents Diabetes?

According to research funded by the National Cattleman's Beef Association, a common fat found in red meats and cheeses might help prevent type 2 diabetes. In their study, the fatty acid, known as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) provided short-term prevention of the onset of diabetes in lab animals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Sugar Busters! - A New Book About Diet

It was over a business meal in a fancy Buffalo, New York, restaurant that the hottest new weight-loss and insulin-control program was born. The program is called Sugar Busters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

May 1998

A Satisfying Way To Lose Weight

How full did that meal you just ate make you feel? Did it satisfy your hunger, or did it make you feel like you'll need a snack later?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

Diet Centers Chart

Canyon Ranch Health Resort. Established in Tucson, Arizona, in 1979, Canyon Ranch Health Resort has two other locations in Lenox, Mass., and a soon-to-be-opened resort in Bali, Indonesia.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 1998

December 1997

What's New? Food for You: Sweetners, Bars and Other New Treats

Imagine this. You enter a grocery store and on the directory directly above "Diapers" is "Diabetes". This aisle contains every food made for people with diabetes. And thankfully, a number of choices exist in this land of sugar-free sweets, sweeteners and snacks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

June 1997

Exercising Control—How to Balance Exercise with Food and Medications

You exercise. You do this because it's good for your health, can help stabilize your blood sugars and makes you look and feel better. It provides you with exhilarating, character-building challenges whether you run in the Boston Marathon or increase your walking distance from two to three miles per day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

April 1997

Fiber Fights Diabetes

A recent study by Harvard scientists gives us one more good reason to eat our Wheaties.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

February 1997

Greater Dietary Flexibility for Some Type 2s Possible

New findings on the consumption of certain sugars may lead to greater dietary flexibility, at least for a small subset of people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

October 1996

Satisfy Your Diet Craving

There's a war going on: The War of the Diabetic Diets. The generals are amassing their loyal troops and building up their ammunition storehouses of research and evidence (both scientific and anecdotal). All the generals are convinced that the better diet-their diet-will prevail and rule the Land of Diabetes forever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

Diet Book Bite

In the current controversy between advocates of high-carbohydrates versus those who insist upon low-carbohydrates, doctors have taken to making broad, sweeping statements concerning the human race. Each side seems to have a completely different idea of what causes disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

September 1996

Diet Debacle — Low Carb Diet Helps

There came a point in Evelyn Narad's life when she knew it was time to get serious about losing weight. She was 75 years old and had been diagnosed with type II diabetes 22 years ago. A broken shoulder and hand in the summer of 1995 kept her from exercising, and every inactive day she spent inside her house seemed like another pound gained.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1996

Letters to the Editor

High-Protein Diets-Hype or Help?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1996

August 1996

What Exactly Will Happen If I Eat This Bran Muffin? The Glycemix Index Can Tell You

A new book which may revolutionize the way people with diabetes analyze food is being published out of Australia and Canada. The book, The G.I. Factor: The Glycaemic Index Solution, is a definitive look at an underutilized tool.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

Snack Bars Keep Blood Sugars Up All Night Long

For ages, people with diabetes have made sure to eat something before bed to keep their blood sugars up during the night. The trick has been to eat just enough to sustain blood sugar while not overeating. A nutritionist may recommend a half sandwich before bed, but the patient might fix himself a sixteen-layer sandwich like Dagwood Bumstead does in the comic strip. Overeating can lead to high blood sugars during the night and weight gain over an extended period.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 1996

June 1996

European Union Debates Regulating “Diabetic Foods”

The European Parliament continues to debate whether diabetic foods should be regulated by the government, according to recent Reuters reports. All countries in the European Union (EU) oppose such regulation, except Germany.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1996

April 1996

Who Needs Richard Simmons? DietMate Can Help You Cut The Weight

The new year is just a few months old, but how many of us have kept our New Year's resolutions to lose weight? For many people, that promise went into the dumpster with the Christmas fruitcake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1996

March 1996

Fiber Gets You Going

Fiber-we've heard it's good for us, but what exactly does that mean? What do people with diabetes need to do to make sure they're getting the right type of fiber in the right amounts? Don't worry-help is on the way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

The Fickle Finger Of Food Facts

Go to any bookstore and look at the diet and cookbook section. You'll find book after book of lowfat diet plans and cookbooks. Go to any market and you'll see shelf after shelf of lowfat products. You'd think the lowfat lifestyle was the only way to go. The Fickle Finger of food facts can't abide by this. It just has to swivel in the opposite direction. And strangely enough, that swivel is starting right here in Diabetesland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

February 1996

Educator of the Month:  Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE
Educator of the Month: Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE

Forget the uptight approach to diabetes management. When patients come to Rhonda Howard, RD, CDE, at the Humphreys Diabetes Center in Boise, Idaho, they are taught to trust their bodies instead of fight them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

January 1996

Free Food Facts

Q: Where can I get a list of "free" foods that people with diabetes can eat, and what types of snacks are available? It would be nice to be able to eat something and feel confident about what it will do to my BGs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

August 1995

Alaskan Diet Beneficial

Researchers tested Alaskan Eskimos and Indians in 15 different villages to determine whether their diet of seal oil and salmon influenced their risk of developing diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

May 1994

Should You Add Fructose To Your Diet?

A recent report from the University of Kuopio in Finland has found that fructose may be an acceptable alternative to sugar in the diet of people with diabetes who are liable to high after meal glucose concentrations (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 1994). In patients with mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, fructose may contribute lower after meal glucose and insulin responses than most other carbohydrate sources.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1994

Using The Glycemic Index

Researchers at the University of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia, are calling for a reassessment of the value of the glycemic index in the treatment of diabetes (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 1994). They cite 11 medium to long-term studies that have specifically used the glycemic index (GI) approach to determine clinical gains in diabetes or lipid management. All but one study produced positive findings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1994

The Effects Of Low Glycemic Index Foods

A study from the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada, indicates that slower rates of carbohydrate absorption might have advantages in reducing after-meal high blood sugars.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1994

November 1993

Fish, Heart Disease, and Diabetes

In past studies, fish oil has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of heart disease, but a new study from the Netherlands indicates that for people with diabetes, this may not be the case. The study, published in the July 1993 issue of Diabetes Care, took place over a 16 year period and included 272 people from the town of Rotterdam, 27 of whom had diabetes and 56 with glucose intolerance. Fish intake was the equivalent of 1 meal of fish per week.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1993

August 1993

Should You Eat Margarine?

What's healthy?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1993

July 1993

Exercise Recommendations for People with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

Long considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, exercise has been underemphasized as a therapeutic treatment. This is not without reason, as the effects of exercise on blood glucose levels in people with Insulin Dependent Diabetes (IDDM) is physiologically complex, and requires individual tailoring rather than a rigid, uniform prescription. As always, the most effective way to integrate exercise is by being adequately informed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 1993

January 1993

Exercise Answers Can Come from Trial and Error

Last October, the International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA-USA) met in Phoenix, Arizona, for its annual meeting. At the conference, 60 active men and women shared information on methods of integrating a vigorous lifestyle with diabetes. Most of the speakers were athletes and health professionals who spoke of diabetes and exercise from personal experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1993

December 1992

Don’t Gobble Till You Wobble!

Did you know that the average American gains approximately 7 pounds between the Thanksgiving and New Year's holiday?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 1992

Can Fat in Your Diet Affect Blood Sugar?

A study conducted by a joint research group from the University of Melbourne and Deakin University in Australia has found that low-carbohydrate diets that are high in fat content can have a negative effect on blood glucose control in people with Type I diabetes. The report on the study was published in the November 1992 issue of Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1992

September 1991

Ask Dr. Young

Can diabetes cause absent-mindedness?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

The Exchange System Doesn't Work!

For the past 10 years, I have been telling people with diabetes to drink fruit juice only if they are having a hypoglycemic reaction. My feelings on this issue have now been backed up in a recent study published in the Diabetes Educator (volume 17, number 4). Marilyn Sullivan, MS, RD, CDE and Robert Scott, MD found that both fruit juice and decaffeinated cola raised patients blood sugar at a similar rate. They concluded by stating: "When it comes time to revise the Diabetic Exchange Lists for Meal Planning, the authors may want to reconsider listing fruit juices as acceptable choices from the fruit list to be used in routine meal planning."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

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