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Diabetic Article Archives

July 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #13

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

May 2014

8 Heath Tests That Are a Must

As diabetics, it's easy for all of us to get caught up in the day-to-day management of our disease. After all, the regular monitoring of blood sugar, the injection or pumping of insulin, and the management of diet takes serious time and effort. So no wonder why you may feel overwhelmed when it comes to taking regular tests.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2014

April 2014

Adults with Diabetes and the Risk of Seasonal Influenza

If you have diabetes, the flu can be particularly risky.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2014

Dollars & Feet

A study published by the American Diabetes Association says Medicare pays an average of $11,170 for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers while private insurance doles out $16,883 for the same procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2014

June 2013

12th Q&A With Dr. Bernstein

Can Januvia Trigger Cancer Symptoms?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2013

New CVS Smartphone App Helps Manage Diabetes on the Go

The CVS Mobile app from CVS/pharmacy is a unique new interactive smartphone app that provides users with numerous personalized ways to both manage their healthcare and handle drugstore needs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2013

11th Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Why is your goal for A1c so much lower than the ADA's 7% and AACE's (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists) 6.5%?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2013

Fire Up the Grill for a Memorable Summer

This past Memorial day, the first holiday of the summer season, was a chance to shake off cabin fever and fire up the grill-a perfect cooking method for people with diabetes because it requires no added fat but still provides that big punch of flavor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2013

The Scariest Thing About Diabetes

Of course there are a million things that scare me about diabetes, but the one that tops the charts is the idea of losing the battle against my diabetes in my sleep. An article about the overnight passing of a beautiful and healthy young woman with type 1 diabetes is buzzing on many of my friends' Facebook walls and the mood is unavoidably somber in the diabetes online community tonight.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2013

Looking for Mr. Good Pain

Whether because of age, weight, or lack of athletic chops, most type 2s-and I'm one of them-have settled on walking as their main form of exercise. It's the simplest, easiest exercise you can do: Put one foot in front of the other, rinse and repeat.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 2, 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Diabetes Is Certainly a Journey.

Diabetes is certainly a journey. The more I learn about it, the more I want to step off this path and onto a new one. So, how do you change the course of such an expensive and frustrating chronic illness?

comments 2 comments - Posted May 31, 2013

Juggling More Than Three Pins

I've been type 1 diabetic for 15 years. It hasn't been easy and I'm still grasping to keep my feet on the ground medically. Every time I think I've got this disease figured out, something new gets thrown at me and I stumble over and over again.  From insulin resistance to pump failures to carbohydrate/insulin sensitivity changes to exercise regimens to health insurance issues to medical bill payments to a seemingly innocent cut on the sole of my foot, etc., I'm getting worn out.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 29, 2013

You’ve Just Been Diagnosed With Type 2: Five Things to Keep in Mind

You've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2013

Giving Thanks to the Diabetes Online Community

Sometimes I forget just how amazing the diabetes online community is. I mean, I know I adore the people I’ve met over the almost 19 years I have lived with diabetes, but the things they have done for me go way beyond a kind word or virtual hug when I needed it. I believe they’ve literally helped save my life.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 26, 2013

5 Tips for Not Dreading Teeth Cleaning

Despite incredible advances in dental technology over the past 50 years, many people still dread visits to the dentist-enough to put off going even when their teeth are throbbing with pain and their gums are oozing blood.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 24, 2013

Type 1 Glucose Production Pill on the Horizon

According to research out of a lab in North Carolina, there's more to worry about for type 1 diabetes than a lack of insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 23, 2013

10th Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Are there supplements that help to decrease insulin resistance? Are there supplements that can increase insulin resistance?

comments 1 comment - Posted May 22, 2013

Americans Slightly Better at Managing Diabetes

Americans are getting better at managing their type 2 diabetes, according to a new study appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine. But that's not to say we still don't have a long way to go.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 21, 2013

Preparing for Your Endocrinologist Appointment

We have all been there: the clammy hands, nervous stomach, constant anxiety, racing thoughts  about eating choices we should or shouldn't have made-all caused by the anticipation of seeing our endocrinologist.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 20, 2013

Two New Promising Type 2 Drugs in the Pipeline

Two new drugs originally developed by Eli Lilly are showing promise when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2013

Lemony Angel Hair Toss

Recipe of the Week

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2013

Sleep Apnea Is No laughing Matter

Snoring is one of the great clichés. In cartoons, you just know that a blissfully snoring dog, cat, or human is about to be startled by an explosion or some scaringly loud noise.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 17, 2013

Alcohol Use May Boost Food Intake

If you're trying to drop a few pounds, skipping that before-dinner cocktail or glass of red wine with dinner might be a great first step.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2013

What are your thoughts on insulin pumps?

I spent a month in a major insulin pump center and saw several things. Many of the female patients seemed to have wings on their sides where the pump tubing was inserted and they got lipohypertrophy from localized injections, but that was the least of it. None of them actually had remotely normal blood sugars. 

comments 21 comments - Posted May 15, 2013

Why Sticking to Treatments Is Such a Challenge

Diabetes educator Constance Brown-Riggs has heard all of the excuses. Her patients aren't taking their medication, or they aren't sticking to their treatment plans.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 14, 2013

Western Diet Linked to Less Graceful Aging

Looking to age gracefully? Then you might want to think twice about that cheeseburger with a side of fries you were planning for lunch.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2013

Community’s Positive Effect on Diabetes Management

People today have an incredible array of methods for finding the latest news and information about diabetes: the Internet, social media, and print publications. But perhaps the most powerful is the strong relationships they develop within the tight-knit diabetes community.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2013

The Holly Hopwood Insulin Pump Challenge

One of the surest ways to imprint a product on consumers' minds is to put it through an impressive test to show its ruggedness.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 9, 2013

8th Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Diabetics with dental infection should have a longer course of antibiotics, up to a year. Is there an optimal timing of antibiotic that should be used?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2013

Eating Well (or at Least Not Terribly) at Fast Food Restaurants

Here's a little secret for those of you looking to eat right: Fast food restaurants don't have to be your enemy. That's right, those brightly lit temples paying tributes to burgers, and fries, and nuggets can provide decent meals if you're in a rush. The key, as always, is to be careful and informed about the choices you make.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 7, 2013

At the Crossroads, I Choose Insulin

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 10 years ago. My response to the news, very typical, was to begin a routine of vigorous exercise and dieting. With a beginner's enthusiasm, I lost almost 30 pounds (down from 220) and drove my A1c three months after my diagnosis down to 5.6%.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 6, 2013

A New Health Concern—And a Reason to Be Grateful

A short while ago my middle finger on my left hand started acting weird. It was sticking in a bent position, for lack of a better term. If you've ever seen Jim Carrey in the comedy movie Liar, Liar doing his version of "The Claw," where his hand suddenly has a mind of its own, that's a somewhat accurate account of how my hand was behaving. Unfortunately though, this was no comedy, this was beginning to be an extremely painful problem.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 5, 2013

Reduced Insulin May Prevent Exercise-Related Hypoglycemia

People with type 1 diabetes who exercise may need to reduce their insulin to counteract the effects of their workouts, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2013

Diabetes and Your Eyes: Commit to Routine Vision Care 

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect many parts of the body-the heart, kidneys, blood circulation, and eyes. In fact, according to the National Eye Institute, diabetic eye disease increased in prevalence by 89 percent between 2000 and 2010, and is a leading cause of blindness among American adults. Despite this, people with diabetes often overlook vision care as they work to manage the many other health problems the disease can cause.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 3, 2013

New Website Aims at Type 1 Teens

When Tommy Kelley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago, while he was in eighth grade, he had a hard time finding information that related to him.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2013

If someone needs to restrict their protein intake because of kidney damage, is it safe to do a low carb diet?

The restriction of protein intake is an outdated thought. It was born of a study by Barry Brenner, at Harvard, back in the 1980s. He did a survey of the diabetologists in Boston asking, "At what blood sugars do you like to keep your diabetics?"  The collective answer ultimately was 250 mg/dl.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2013

April 2013

How Do You Determine Training Intensity?

What is cardio? To some it may mean swinging back and forth on an Arc Trainer with zero resistance while reading a book, and for others, gut-wrenching hill sprints followed by kettle bell swings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2013

Kids’ Meals Low on Nutrients

If you and your family eat a lot of meals out, you may not be getting enough nutrients. That's especially true when it comes to the kids, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2013

How Crunch Time Affects Kids’ Health

Although there are small hints that the American obesity epidemic may be slowing a little, one in every three American kids is overweight or obese. To find out why, National Public Radio, together with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, looked at what goes on in American households between school and bedtime-a period they call "crunch time."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2013

An Interview With My Husband, Rick

I wanted to interview my husband about my diabetes. He played a huge part in helping me accept my type 1 diabetes and he has never made me feel inferior for having it. Rick and I just celebrated the 15th anniversary since our first date, and since I've only had diabetes for 18 years, he's been there for most of it.  He was there during the times I was out of control and in denial, and he's been there while I work on treating myself right and trying to take good care of myself. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2013

Quick and Easy Does It With New Web-Based App

Now people with diabetes can display data from their insulin pumps and supported blood glucose maters thanks to the t:connect diabetes management application from Tandem Diabetes that received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in February.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2013

Teens’ Negative Body Images Play Role in Later Adult Obesity

If you're concerned about your teen's extra pounds, it might be a good idea to keep those concerns to yourself and enforce some healthier eating habits instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2013

Altering Gut Bacteria Could Rival Bypass Surgery Effects

Obese patients hoping to slim down with bariatric surgery may soon be able to get the weight-loss effects of gastric bypass without going under the knife, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2013

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin, shots, meter, blood 
Emotions are about to flood
DKA - Hospital stay
I just don't know what to say

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2013

Smaller, Lighter OmniPod Earns FDA Approval

The FDA recently approved the next-generation OmniPod from Insulet, giving people with insulin-dependent diabetes an even less invasive way to manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2013

Fatigue Causes Healthcare Errors

So what do those long hours on nursing duty mean when it comes to the quality of healthcare we receive? When it comes to overworked nurses, it leads to a higher risk of mistakes, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2013

Is it dangerous to continually have low-grade ketone levels in your blood?

Low-grade ketones are not a problem; it's part of the survival system that humans have for getting through famines. We don't have many famines nowadays, but if they're not eating overnight, a large percent of the population is going to have ketones in their blood in the morning.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2013

Hank’s Healthy Habits: 13 Steps to a Joyful, Happy Life

He is 89 years old and the picture of health. Yet looking at the robust, healthy, laughing gentleman sitting across the desk from me on this Saturday morning, one would never guess his age. Hank has been married 50 years, is active in his church, and hosts a prayer breakfast most Saturday mornings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2013

My Hopes for You

Through hard work of many volunteers, and certainly God's grace

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2013

Pot Smoking Has Little Lasting Metabolic Effect

While marijuana use may spark an increased appetite for everything from chips to dubious leftover takeout, it has little effect on overall metabolism, according to a new study that appeared recently in the American Diabetes Association journal Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2013

Diabetes Camp—It’s Magic! (Online Version)

Hikes to the beach, overnight camping, swimming, playing sports, an exhilarating run on the zip line, songs and skits by the campfire. Friends for life. This is the magic of camp, and diabetes camp is no exception.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2013

What meds do you recommend to control elevated cholesterol?

In my experience the most common cause of elevated cholesterol is low thyroid. High blood sugars also have an effect on LDL that can be very dramatic. If someone has elevated cholesterol, diabetic or not, the very first thing you do is check their free and total T3, and free and total T4. When you give them adequate thyroid replacement, the LDL usually normalizes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2013

Rebates Spur Healthier Eating

The key to encouraging people to choose healthier foods is to make good-for-you items more affordable, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2013

Insulin Linked to Type 2 Weight Gains

Using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes could lead to weight gain, according to a new study from Tulane University.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2013

The Back Up Plan (Level 2)

In February I posted my original back up plan for last-minute workouts from home or the office.  If you've been consistent, you should be ready for some new exercises.  If not, you can always refer back to the original article for guidance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2013

Americans Want Healthy Food in Schools

At a time when more and more Americans are protesting big government, it turns out that a majority of us support new laws setting higher nutrition standards in school, a new survey says.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2013

E-Prescriptions, E-Records Saving Money, Says Study

Doctors are getting behind such tech-savvy healthcare approaches as electronic prescriptions and medical records, and their efforts are helping them ultimately save their patients money, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2013

Why We Don't Keep Our Dietary Resolutions

Every year millions of people with type 2 diabetes vow to change their diets, lose weight, exercise more, and lower their A1c's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 6, 2013

Metanx Medicinal Food for Neuropathy Shows Promise

A new study on the treatment of symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy has shown promising results, according to one of the lead doctors on the study.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 5, 2013

Five Simple Ways to Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There's talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2013

We’re Not Bad, We’re Human

I've had type 1 diabetes for 18 years and whenever I hear bad news about someone with diabetes it hits me hard.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2013

How do you evaluate the studies that show that strict control of A1c does not have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular events?

This person is referring to the ACCORD study, which in its initial unsophisticated scoring supposedly showed that a large group of elderly diabetics who had existing heart disease, died sooner when their A1cs were brought down.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2013

Diabetes Health Magazine’s 10 Commandments

1. Thou shalt not judge people with diabetes

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2013

March 2013

At-Home Workouts Fine for Good Health

Seniors don't have to face off against buff muscleheads at the gym in order to stay healthy, according to a new University of Illinois study that shows a DVD workout can be just as effective for older adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2013

Be Proud of Yourself, You Are So Much Stronger Than You Know

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault.' You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 29, 2013

Are very low-carb diets safe for children? Is it something you recommend?

The effect of carbohydrate on blood sugar will be multiplied in inverse proportion to childrens' weight. This means that the smaller they are, the greater effect a little bit of carbohydrate will have on them. It's been shown that children with elevated blood sugars (usually due in part to high carbohydrate intake) have diminished brain volume and lower IQs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2013

LifeScan Recall of all OneTouch Verio IQ Blood Glucose Meters in US

As of March 25, 2013, LifeScan has begun a voluntary recall and replacement of all of its OneTouch® Verio®IQ blood glucose meters in the United States. The meters are being recalled and replaced because of a technical problem that fails to deliver important information about extremely high blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2013

Adult Stem Cells Could Help Thwart Amputations

New stem cell research may take a step toward preventing amputations in people with diabetes, according to a new study out of Ireland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2013

The Penalty of Not Being Able to Afford Care Is Too Expensive

Diabetes is insanely expensive. I often wonder how much it has cost me over the 18 years I've been funding it. Sometimes I had enough money to purchase all my supplies, sometimes I didn't.  I felt like a loser every time I had to leave supplies at the pharmacy. You'd think I'd have gotten used to it at some point, but no, I cried every single time.  

comments 12 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2013

Can you please explain the dawn phenomenon, and how best to manage it?

Dawn phenomenon is the situation where the liver removes insulin from the blood in the morning hours, which causes morning blood sugars to go up, even if breakfast is skipped.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2013

Diabetes Is No Slam Dunk

Monica Joyce had an idea. It wasn't original, but a good idea inspired by another.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2013

Idol’s Randy Jackson: “It Always Happens to Somebody Else, Right?”

Twelve years after it began as a summer placeholder designed to keep Fox TV viewers hanging around until the fall season, "American Idol" has become one of this young century's most renowned cultural phenomena. From the show's modest beginning, record producer and musician Randy Jackson has been at its heart, the memorable judge who has popularized such greetings as "Dawg!" and such praises as "I believe she's in it to win it!"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2013

Lack of Sleep Affects Portion Size and Food Choices in Young Men

Don't get enough sleep? According to a small, new study, this may make you eat larger portions of high-calorie foods and, accordingly, increase your risk of gaining weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2013

California Forum Calls for Healthcare Revamp

As California addresses record high health care costs-the average state resident currently spends $23 a day on healthcare-a new report reveals ways that could curb those costs considerably.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 16, 2013

Lilly Diabetes Supports Summer Camp for Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Summer camp for kids with diabetes enables them to enjoy traditional camp activities with special staff and medical professionals who have experience with the condition. For many youngsters, camp is the first time they connect with another child who has the same medical issue, which offers both a bond and a step towards living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2013

Physicians Seem Skeptical Over ACOs, Survey Shows

Accountable Care Organizations, it seems, haven't won over 100 percent of all physicians.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 14, 2013

Can you please explain the dawn phenomenon, and how best to manage it?

Dawn phenomenon is the situation where the liver removes insulin from the blood in the morning hours, which causes morning blood sugars to go up, even if breakfast is skipped.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2013

Good Doctor-Patient Communication Improves Health Outcomes

Although some Continuing Medical Education (CME) is aimed at helping doctors improve communication skills, more doctors should get involved.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2013

Study Says ACCU-CHEK Meters Score Highest Satisfaction

A study by J.D. Power and Associates recently published online examined customer satisfaction with blood glucose meters among 2,681 adult meter users who have either type 1 or 2 diabetes. Survey results found the highest level of satisfaction among users of Roche Diabetes Care's ACCU-CHEK products compared with other blood glucose meter brands.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2013

Bevs In the ‘Hood: The Beverage Debate Disparity in NYC Neighborhoods

While walking through my mother's New York City neighborhood, El Barrio, or Spanish Harlem recently, I came across an eye-catching series of Warhol-esque signs prominently displayed outside of many bodegas in the neighborhood. The signs read, "I  Big Cans" and may have been produced by beverage manufacturers in response to the recent large beverage ban passed in New York City.  Double-entendres aside on the campaign tag line, I had an issue with these signs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2013

TIR-199: Potential New Heavy Weapon Against Kidney Cancer

Researchers in California may have taken a big step in the fight to end renal cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2013

Could Pig Worms Lead to the Cure for Type 1?

Research into a cure for type 1 diabetes proceeds on several fronts. One interesting approach is seeking ways to manipulate the autoimmune system to prevent the body's mistaken destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Another tack is the transplantation of pancreatic tissue, either from human cadavers or carefully isolated "clean" pigs that have been specially raised for the purpose. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2013

Introducing Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Can over-hydration or dehydration affect blood sugar level?

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2013

Life Without Limits: Expedition Travel Vacations With Graham Jackson

Adventure travel is a dream for many, but for Graham Jackson it's the sort of thing he's been doing all his life. Born in the country of Lesotho in southern Africa (pronounced "Leh-zoo-too"), he grew up motocross racing and building off-road buggies with his father. When he was 10 years old, he and his family took a safari in a Range Rover across the expansive Kalahari Desert where zebras, lions, and giraffes are known to roam, and summer temperatures range from 68-113 degrees F-and occasionally reach as much as 122 degrees. It was a journey that influenced the course of Jackson's life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2013

Novo Nordisk Still Accepting Community Star Entries

Share Your NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) Community Star Story for the Chance to Win a Donation to the Charity of Your Choice!

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2013

My Life Partner Has Diabetes

Chris Barnes in't only the husband of a famous woman with diabetes, Brandy Barnes. He's also the leader of the "Partners Perspective Program," a new segment of the DiabetesSisters Conference Brandy founded several years ago.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2013

Fiscal Cliff Disaster Looms for Diabetes Testing Supplies

The short-term legislation enacted to avoid the "fiscal cliff" at the start of 2013 has long-term consequences for Medicare beneficiaries' access to diabetes testing supplies (DTS). The legislation drastically cuts independent community pharmacy reimbursement for DTS and will likely decrease beneficiary access. Decreased beneficiary access to DTS could result in less patient adherence and increased long-term costs due to avoidable complications in the management of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2013

February 2013

Guard Your Kidney Health!

If you are a diabetic, you’ve likely been cautioned by your physician about the consequences of allowing your blood sugar to run high. You may have shrugged off the horror stories about how unchecked high blood sugar can damage your eyes, your heart, and circulation to your extremities. You probably have thought, “I’m young (or relatively so), and it’s not going to be as bad as all that."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 28, 2013

Type 2 Insulin Users: No Need to Wait to Eat After Injecting?

For people who take insulin, one of the hardest parts of their routine is injecting themselves before a meal, then having to wait 20 or 30 minutes before eating. For anybody who's hungry and raring to dine, the wait can be frustrating.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2013

Sisterhood Is Powerful (and Redesigned)

I interviewed Brandy Barnes in late 2011 ("Support on the Diabetes Journey," article 7400 on the Diabetes Health website) about the inspiration for her 2008 launch of DiabetesSisters (www.diabetessisters.org). The rapidly growing organization of women with diabetes has struck a chord with its optimistic message of sisterhood and loving mutual support. As Brandy prepares for two major conferences this year, I got her to hold still long enough to give us an update.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2013

Oscar to the Rescue

(Editor's Note: Although Becki Lang lives in the United Kingdom, we thought her story is one that would resonate with American readers. Unfortunately, in the United States there is no national organization that does what Medical Detection Dogs does. One organization that comes close is Northern California-based Dogs for Diabetics, which is limited by the sheer vastness of the state and the country from serving a larger area. Our hope is that Becki's story might inspire other people with diabetes to start similar detection dog programs across America.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2013

You Are Not Alone

If you feel alone in your diabetes and wished you had a support group, DiabetesSisters has a free program on how to get a local PODS (Part of DiabetesSisters) group started. To see how it's done, I interviewed Lori Veliquette and Wende Jorgensen, two Northern California women who, thanks to PODS, developed a close relationship as DiabetesSisters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2013

The Back Up Plan

(Editor’s Note: Check with your physician before undertaking any exercise routine.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 21, 2013

Going for Your Goal

To reach your long-term goals for managing diabetes, I think it’s helpful to stop and write down what short-term steps you can take that will help you reach your objectives. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2013

Robot Transforms Team-Based Healthcare

While this robot doesn't do housework, the technological advancements of the space-age cartoon "The Jetsons" might not be as far away as we think.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2013

My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I heart carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2013

Tandem Announces Two Partnerships

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. has teamed with Dexcom to expand an existing partnership to include development of Dexcom’s latest continuous glucose monitoring system, the G4 Platinum. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new CGM in October.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2013

Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself as a Newly Diagnosed Teen

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault." You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2013

Tips for Keeping Your Smart Phone Data Safe

Like Boy Scouts everywhere, smart phone users will always be prepared in an emergency, since their devices have the ability to ensure that all of their health information can be accessed in an instant.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2013

Lilly Diabetes Supports Scholarship Fund With $100,000 Donation in 2013

Students with type 1 diabetes will have more opportunity for higher education thanks to a donation from Lilly Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2013

Short Exercise Bursts May Be as Good as Traditional Workouts

Here's a bit of news that, if conclusively proven, could gladden the hearts of everybody who struggles to get into a regular exercise habit: British researchers say that short 30-second bursts of intense activity, adding up to only 3 minutes per week, duplicate the effects of much longer gym workout or track running routines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2013

Am I the Only One Who Panics About Having Blood Drawn?

My previous boss once said to me as I freaked out about having to get some blood work drawn, "They should do a study on you."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2013

Pre-Diabetes: Exercise and Diet Are Your Keys to Freedom

If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you have to start looking seriously at how you live your life. Talk to any persons who are insulin-dependent and they will tell you how much they wish they could be in your situation: a point where you can make changes to avoid getting to their stage of the illness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2013

Choosing an Insulin Pump: My Personal Debate

I have decided to start using an insulin pump.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2013

High Blood Sugar Can Cause Dental Problems, Too

It comes as no surprise to a person with diabetes that having high blood sugar can have a huge impact on your entire body and how you feel. But did you know it can also cause many problems in your mouth? Your teeth and gums are heavily affected by the excess glucose in your system, and without proper preventative care, people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can experience serious long-term damage to their mouths.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2013

Exenatide Bests Insulin Detemir in Head-to-Head Test

Sooner or later most type 2s face the choice of whether they should begin using insulin. As the effectiveness of metformin or sulfonylureas fades, physicians often look to insulin as the safest, most effective means of asserting control over blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2013

Type 2: FDA OKs Canagliflozin But Has Concerns About Heart Risk

In a 10-5 vote, an FDA panel has recommended that the agency approve the marketing of Johnson & Johnson's InvokanaTM (canagliflozin), an oral once-daily drug for treating type 2 diabetes in adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2013

January 2013

“Molecular Handshake” Key to Insulin’s Interaction With Cells

Scientists have known for almost 100 years that insulin is the key to achieving both the control of blood sugar and its metabolization by the body. But what they have not figured out is exactly how insulin interacts with the body's cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2013

Reminding Myself How Serious Those Low Blood Sugars Really Are

I was having my second low of the day at work recently when I got "the headache." If you have type 1 diabetes you probably know the one. It doesn't ever go away quickly and never without having to pop a couple pain relievers. I was popping more than a couple peppermint-flavored chocolates and glucose tabs and waiting for the low to go away before I could even reach for the Advil to help ease the pounding in my head.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2013

SENSUS Pain Management System Now Shipping

NeuroMetrix, Inc. has begun shipping its SENSUS Pain Management System to the U.S. market, just weeks after receiving FDA clearance to do in late November.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2013

The Back Up Plan

(Editor's Note: Check with your physician before undertaking any exercise routine.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2013

Diabetes and Cancer Together: Which Disease to Address First?

You're a person with diabetes who has just learned that you've been diagnosed with cancer. Which disease should take precedence in your life?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2013

Wasting Steps

In our busy lives, saving time-and precious energy-is an important value. Saving steps is a method we often use to preserve our energy, exert less effort, and combine tasks to promote efficiency. But an equally, and perhaps even more, important value than efficiency is promoting good health. As a diabetic, I know that one way I can do this is by using my body to get at least a minimum of exercise each day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2013

The Hidden Gift of a Diabetes Diagnosis

Michelle Gaylord has lived more than 30 years with type 2 diabetes, but the diagnosis is one that she now sees a bit like a gift.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 22, 2013

Novo Nordisk and Two-Time Super Bowl Champion Kendall Simmons Kick-Off Search for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Who Give Back to Their Communities

Share Your NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) Community Star Story for the Chance to Win a Donation to the Charity of Your Choice!

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2013

Metformin Bests Glipizide in Reducing Cardio Events

A Chinese research study of diabetes patients with coronary heart disease concludes that metformin is more effective than glipizide in reducing the risk of major cardiovascular events, such as stroke and heart attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2013

Canadian Study Puts Annual Diabetes Cost at $5,000+

A Canadian study of almost 140,000 diabetes patients concludes that the five-year cost of managing diabetes, excluding the cost of drugs, averages $26,978 (Canadian dollars).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2013

Type 2: Oramed Sends Oral Insulin Test Request to FDA

Israel-based Oramed announced that it has sent an application to the Food and Drug Administration for permission to enter Phase 2 trials of its oral insulin product. The company has been working on developing a means of delivering insulin orally, which would allow people with diabetes to avoid having to inject themselves with the hormone.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2013

Festive Lasagna Roll-Ups with Salsa Rosa Sauce

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 60 minutes
Standing Time: 10 minutes

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2013

Prefab or Custom, Insoles Good at Reducing Pressure on Feet

Good news for people with diabetes who worry about protecting themselves against the plantar pressure and risks of ulcerous foot injuries that come with diabetic neuropathy: A recent British study shows that ready-made insoles you can buy at the store perform almost as well as more expensive custom-made insoles at achieving those foot protection goals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2013

Calcium Score Predicts Cardiovascular Death Risk in Type 2

It's well known that diabetes, an inflammatory disease, increases the risk of developing heart disease and related complications-also the result of inflammation. Now there's a way of predicting which type 2s may be at the highest risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2013

Islet Transplants May Decrease Type 1 Atherosclerosis Risk

Narrowed and hardened arteries-atherosclerosis-are a common risk associated with type 1 diabetes. Fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up to create plaque, which narrows the arteries and makes blood flow more difficult. The increased risk of blood clots often leads to heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2013

December 2012

New ADA Guidelines Revise Blood Pressure Goals, Testing Frequencies

The American Diabetes Association’s newly released 2013 edition of its annual “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” recommends two notable changes:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2012

The Dreaded Cold and Flu Season is Back in Full Swing

Having type 1 diabetes causes me to worry excessively about getting sick. Admittedly I sometimes go overboard in my attempt to avoid these seasonal germs. I find myself avoiding people showing symptoms as though they are infected with the plague, skipping goodies in the staff kitchen at work, and dodging shared office equipment with potential sickies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2012

Brown, White and Beige: Not in Fashion But in Fat

To help stem the obesity epidemic, researchers are looking at how certain hormones act on fat cells. Scientists know that "white" fat cells store fat while "brown" fat cells not only store fat but also turn it into energy, a process that goes awry in obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2012

Meal Time: Where to Begin?

As we people with diabetes know all too well, diabetes presents some of its greatest daily around the dinner table. This is an area where I still find one of my biggest struggles: the ability to create tasty low-carb meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2012

No Flu for You This Year!

According to the Centers for Disease Control, an early flu season is underway in 2012. If youwant to spend the upcoming holidays enjoying family, friends, and seasonal activities rather than being sick, here are several simple steps to protect yourself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2012

Halle Berry Says She's Worked Her Way Up From Type 1 to Type 2 Diabetes

No less an authority than the New York Times wrote in May 2006 that Halle Berry has type 1 diabetes, listing her as one of several "stars who have type 1 - Gary Hall, the Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer; Adam Morrison, the Gonzaga University basketball star; [and] Halle Berry."

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2012

Metformin May Boost Cancer Survival, Curb Depression

Like aspirin, metformin is one of those drugs that over the years keeps proving itself beneficial in ways it wasn't originally intended to be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2012

Study Says Bypass Surgery Is Not a Cure for Diabetes

A 14-year study that tracked 4,434 obese type 2 patients shows that despite much talk about gastric bypass surgery as a "cure" for diabetes, a majority of the patients who underwent the procedure had no long-lasting remission of their symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2012

10 Weather and Lifestyle Tips for the Holidays

As the winter holidays approach, with their cold weather and abundant food temptations, Minnesota-based UnitedHealth Group is offering 10 simple tips people with diabetes and prediabetes should follow to help stay healthy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2012

Governors Weigh Options On Health Insurance Exchanges

To partner with the federal government or not. That is the question facing many of the nation's governors as crunch time approaches to carry out the 2010 health care law.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2012

Incorporating Exercise Into a Busy Life

I would exercise if I had more time... if I had a health club membership... if it didn't hurt so much... if I knew what exercises to do... if I could do it with my family... if I could control my blood sugar...

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 10, 2012

Study Shows DAFNE Helps Type 1s Manage Their Diabetes

Education as part of routine care is the key to successful treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2012

Taking Linagliptin May Protect Kidney Function

Taking linagliptin seems to help protect the kidneys in people with type 2 diabetes. The drug, usually used along with diet, exercise, and sometimes other medications, lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2012

Five To-Do’s for People Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

There are ways to live with diabetes that allow for optimal health and relative freedom from complications. But to obtain them requires knowledge and know-how.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2012

Paying Attention to Eating Pays Off

Mindful eating may help control weight as well as blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 5, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

The study, conducted by Pei-Chun Chen, Ph.D., of the National Taiwan University College of Public Health in Taipei, and colleagues, followed two groups: one consisting of an equal number of people with and without diabetes, and the other consisting of equal numbers of people with and without clinical depression.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

New research reveals that those suffering from depression might be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

EU OKs Insulin Delivery Device for Type 2s

CeQur SA, a Swiss company that develops insulin delivery devices, has received approval to market its PaQ® insulin delivery device in Europe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2012

My Tricks for Great Holiday Eating

While daily meal planning can be tricky when someone in the family is living with diabetes, the holidays can be especially challenging.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2012

November 2012

Type 1 Onset Linked to Low Vitamin D?

A report in the December issue of the journal Diabetologia says that a study of 1,000 active-duty military personnel who later developed type 1 diabetes showed that low levels of vitamin D significantly increased the chances of developing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2012

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam.'

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 29, 2012

Study Says Iron May Contribute to Type 2 Onset

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 28, 2012

A CDE’s Tips for Surviving the Holidays if You Have Diabetes

Are you ready to celebrate the holidays? How many festivities are on your calendar this season? It’s time to navigate the minefield of situations that can throw your diabetes off course and send a joyous occasion into the dumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2012

Israeli Study Says Whey Protein Helpful Against Type 2

Scientists at Tel Aviv University in Israel report that taking whey protein isolates or concentrates may help treat type 2 diabetes and prevent obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2012

Child and Teen Deaths from Diabetes Plummet Over 41-Year Period

Gratifying news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: The overall death rate from diabetes among children 19 years and younger plummeted 61 percent over the years 1968 through 2009.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 23, 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In this new column, "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" readers send in observations and questions, and, in response, other readers share similar and not-so-similar experiences by posting in the "Comments" section.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2012

Don’t be a Turkey on Thanksgiving, Plan Ahead!

I really look forward to Thanksgiving. For me, it’s a great time to spend with family and friends, watch some ballgames on TV and eat. All those wonderful traditional dishes that taste so good are ready for my undivided attention. But for a diabetic, Thanksgiving dinner can be a bit tricky when it comes to controlling your blood glucose levels.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 21, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms Three Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2012

Fighting For Test Strips

Recently while I was out shopping with my sister, I tested my blood sugar and found that I had a high reading of 217. Because I had just downed a non-fat pumpkin spice latte and still had active insulin in my bloodstream, I skipped correcting it with an insulin shot and went on trying on clothing and chatting with my sister. When I got to my car afterward, I realized that I felt a little like I was drunk, so I figured that I'd better test my blood sugar again. It was 58.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2012

Gut Bacteria Can Indicate Who Has Type 2

A Chinese study of 345 patients divided between non-diabetics and people with type 2 diabetes concludes that gut bacteria between the two groups differs substantially-so much so that the bacteria can be used to accurately determine who has or doesn't have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In this new column, "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" readers send in observations and questions, and, in response, other readers share similar and not-so-similar experiences by posting in the "Comments" section.

comments 13 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2012

FDA Approves Dexcom’s G4

The FDA has approved U.S. sales of Dexcom's G4TM PLATINUM continuous glucose monitor. The San Diego-based manufacturer said it is taking orders and plans to begin shipping the device to patients within the next few weeks.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2012

Deborah Grona: Dancing Back to Life

Deborah Grona hadn't danced with her husband in more than four years. "We fell in love on the dance floor," says Grona, who had been unable to dance, or even stand for short periods of time, since developing the chronic pain that comes with diabetic neuropathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2012

It's World Diabetes Day!

What are you doing today to mark the occasion? I have an idea for something you might enjoy!

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2012

Super-Tight Control of Blood Sugar After Kidney Transplant May Be Counterproductive

To see if tightly controlling blood sugar provides improved results in patients who received a kidney transplant, a group of diabetic post-transplant patients were followed for three days. A subset of the randomly assigned group had their blood glucose kept in tight range with IV insulin, while a control group received insulin as they ordinarily would, via injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

Gum Treatments Can Lower Diabetes-Related Medical Costs

People with diabetes who receive treatment for gum disease can enjoy substantial reductions in hospitalizations, doctor visits, and annual medical expenses according to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and dental insurer United Concordia Dental.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2012

A Rocky Path to Better Blood Sugar

When my doctor said, “You have diabetes.  You’ll have to watch your sugar, change your lifestyle, and lose some weight,” I was dismayed. For one, I was addicted to sugar. Second, I had been trying for years to lose weight, and I knew it just wasn’t possible. Third, I was not adept in the kitchen--toasting bread maxxed out my repertoire.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 11, 2012

TSA Full-Body Scans Can Cause Insulin Pump, CGM Malfunctions

A report in the October 2012 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics says that airport full-body scans can cause malfunctions in insulin pumps or continuous glucose monitors.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2012

Type 1 For a Day

I recently learned of a JDRF campaign to increase type 1 diabetes awareness, in which people without diabetes can sign up to experience “virtual diabetes” for a day. During that day, they receive up to 24 texts prompting actions that simulate the frequent blood sugar testing, insulin injections, and dietary choices that people with type 1 diabetes must endure. JDRF thoughtfully notes on its website that “while no virtual campaign can re-create the many needles required or the physical and financial tolls of this serious disease, T1D for a Day seeks to deepen understanding of the many heroic steps our friends and loved ones with T1D take each day.”

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2012

President's Win Is Reprieve For 'Obamacare'

President Barack Obama’s victory cements the Affordable Care Act, expanding coverage to millions but leaving weighty questions about how to pay for it and other care to be delivered to an increasingly unhealthy, aging population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2012

Study Reports That “Fat but Fit” Is Not an Oxymoron

While there is an almost constant media drumbeat about the dangers of obesity and overweight, it's a pleasure to learn that not everyone who is overweight is in bad health or runs the risk of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2012

Penny Hildreth: Finally Facing Diabetes

It was more than two decades ago, and Penny Hildreth was already feeling overwhelmed by life when she learned that she had type 1 diabetes. She was pregnant with her second child and worried about the baby’s safety after a car accident that had left Hildreth with a broken collarbone, a broken rib, and a punctured spleen. It was the spleen injury that ultimately led to her diagnosis of diabetes, but she was more concerned about the baby, a little girl who was born healthy despite the automobile accident. “I always say that she’s my miracle,” says the 46-year-old Portland resident.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 6, 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

Stan Bush: Managing Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs

Stan Bush wasn't really surprised to find out he had type 2 diabetes. An unhealthy diet that regularly featured containers of ice cream before bed had left him primed for the disease. But how he handled the news was a surprise, at least to his doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2012

High Blood Sugar Associated With Brain Shrinkage

Do people on the high end of the normal range of blood sugar levels develop the same brain shrinkage and tendency toward dementia that has been found in those with type 2 diabetes? According to an Australian study, the answer appears to be yes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2012

October 2012

Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?

In response to a post that I wrote on October 19, 2012, asking readers to contribute their opinions, John M wrote to me asking for more information. After exchanging a few emails, we came up with an idea that we think you will like: a new column by readers who write in about experiences they have had with diabetes and who are curious to know if anybody else has experienced the same thing. The new column will be called "Have You Noticed This About Your Diabetes?" The idea is for you to send in your question, in response to which other readers will share similar and not-so-similar experiences through our "Comments" section. (Take note that comments take one to two days to post because they all need to be read and approved.)

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2012

High Levels of Transferrin Linked to the Onset of Diabetes

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2012

Settlement To Deliver Victory For Tens Of Thousands Of Older And Disabled Adults Served By Medicare

Burlington, Vt. - The Center for Medicare Advocacy and co-counsel from Vermont Legal Aid today announced that plaintiffs and Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius filed a Settlement Agreement in the landmark case of Jimmo v. Sebelius, bringing an end to Medicare's long-practiced but illegal application of an "Improvement Standard." The settlement of the case [Jimmo v. Sebelius, No. 5:11-cv-00017 (D.Vt.)] will improve access for tens of thousands of Americans, especially older adults and people with disabilities, whose Medicare coverage is denied or terminated because these beneficiaries are considered "not improving" or "stable." Resolution of this legal challenge effectively ends this harmful practice and ensures fair coverage rules for those who live with chronic conditions and rely on Medicare to cover basic, necessary health care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2012

My Glucagon Security Blanket

As a little girl, I was scared at night that something evil might be under the bed. If I had to get up to go to the bathroom, I made sure to leap as far away from the bed as possible. As an adult, I'm still afraid that something will get me at night, but it's no longer a monster: It's the life-saving insulin that I take.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 28, 2012

Many Supplements Are Illegally Labeled

According to a report by the inspector general of the US Department of Health and Human Services, dozens of purported weight-loss and immune-system supplements are illegally labeled and do not have appropriate scientific evidence to support their claims.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2012

Special Diabetes Coupon Savings from Diabetes Health and CVS Pharmacy

I’m very happy to announce Diabetes Health’s partnership with CVS/pharmacy and welcome you to ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes® from CVS/pharmacy®. If you have diabetes and already have a CVS/pharmacy ExtraCare® card, ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes offers even more benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2012

Bobotie

Introduced to South Africa by the Cape Malays, this Indonesian curried meat loaf is to South Africa what Moussaka is to Greece and Lasagne is to Italy.  Traditionally, Bobotie is served with yellow rice (add turmeric), chutney and banana slices dipped in

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2012

Why Is My Health Insurance Coverage Getting Worse Instead of Better?

I’m not sure how everyone else is feeling about health insurance in the United States of America right now, but I know I’m worried. Ever since my type 1 diabetes diagnosis at 18 years old, I’ve been concerned about the possibility of losing my health insurance. But now, I’m even more worried by the fact that, despite my health insurance, my healthcare costs seem to be rising by the minute. It strikes me as colossally unfair that you can faithfully stick with your employer and still end up with health insurance that’s much worse than what you started with.  I feel overwhelmed by the new costs I’m seeing, and I’m sure I’m not the only one.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 22, 2012

Oral Agents for Lowering Blood Sugar in Type 2 Diabetes

Author’s note: Throughout this series, I will inject my own opinion, which frequently differs from that of the medical establishment in this field. Having had diabetes for more than 66 years, I place my emphasis on the well-being of fellow patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2012

Here Today, Gone When the Job is Done

Are you annoyed by how quickly your electronic devices become obsolete? Now, deliberate obsolescence appears likely to have great medical value.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2012

Diabetes Health Magazine Wants your Opinion

If you are among the readers who commented on this article (“Why Care Under the Affordable Care Act Will Be Unaffordable”), thank you very much for your response. The politics of healthcare can be a volatile issue. As the publisher and editor-in-chief of Diabetes Health, I don’t always agree with my writers, but I believe that it’s my duty to show the full spectrum of thought. Exposing a particular point of view does not mean that we are compromising our values. Instead, I see it as offering valuable information as to how we are different. Please remember as you read our articles that publishing an opinion does not equate to endorsing that opinion. Diabetes Health is well respected for offering all contributors an opportunity to discuss their perspective, even at the cost of frustrating our readers at times.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2012

Spreading Diabetes Awareness Isn’t as Easy as It Looks

You might not realize this, but I'm actually pretty shy. I often find myself wishing that I had my husband's confidence. He doesn't worry about drawing attention to himself at parties or work. He embraces the mindset that if you don't like him, it's your problem, not his, and he shows himself to everyone just as he is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2012

Are There Benefits to Light Exercise After Eating?

Based on a recent study, the answer appears to be yes, both for those who have diabetes and those who do not.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2012

Under Physical Stress, Insulin-Producing Cells Regress

Scientists generally think that decreased insulin production by the pancreas, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is due to the death of the organ's beta cells. However, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center report that the beta cells do not die, but instead revert to a more basic cell type.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2012

Thinking Positively About Diabetes

When people with diabetes are successful and happy, their situation is often viewed as having been achieved despite the obstacle of diabetes. I am advocating for a shift in that perception. What if instead of seeing all the good in our lives as existing despite our disease, we begin to see everything that we are—the challenges and the achievements—as a direct product of all that we are made up of, diabetes included?

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2012

Type 2: Finnish Study Says Statins Users Run Higher Diabetes Risk

Recently, a Finnish study evaluated nearly 2,800 nondiabetic individuals, close to 500 of whom were using statins, after they had participated in a year of lifestyle interventions intended to improve their glucose metabolism. (Statins are lipid-lowering drugs that inhibit an enzyme crucial to the production of serum cholesterol; high cholesterol is associated with hardening of the arteries and cardiovascular problems.) The study was conducted by Dr. Nina Rautio and colleagues at Pirkanmaa Hospital in Tampere, Finland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2012

Cinnamon May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Like the taste of cinnamon? If you do and you have type 2 diabetes, a daily cinnamon supplement may help control your condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2012

Lemon Sole with Lemon and Basil Stuffing

Let's be honest: it's quite hard to find indigenous American cuisine, because it's usually been influenced by one country or another. This, however, is a dish I had in Boston, albeit made with another fish. It has wonderful flavors and can be prepared in advance and cooked just before serving.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2012

ACCU-CHEK Combo Insulin Pump Now Available in U.S.

Roche Diagnostics says that its ACCU-CHEK Combo insulin pump system is now available in the US market. The system uses Bluetooth wireless technology to allow a glucose meter/insulin pump combination exchange data.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2012

Women with Diabetes Flock to Divabetic for Beauty and Health Advice

Divabetic, a national program that helps women with diabetes feel more beautiful inside and out, will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on October 13, in Jefferson Alumni Hall at 10th and Locust streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The free event will include beauty and fashion services, music, and educational opportunities. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss their diabetes with certified diabetes educators and other healthcare providers, talk about diet with registered dietitians, get advice on makeup from professional makeup artists, and learn how to choose flattering styles of dress.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

Q&A: How to Lower your Blood Sugar when it's Over 200 mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2012

The Scoop on Fiber

Does consuming fiber really lower blood sugar? How many grams of fiber do you need each day? What’s the difference between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 4, 2012

No Bake Chocolate Cookie

A healthy, candy-like cookie that young children and teens will enjoy making. These cookies are high in fiber (1.5 g). therefore, remember to exercise portion control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2012

Poll: Younger Americans More Receptive Than Seniors To GOP Medicare Plan

The Republican proposal to change Medicare that has been championed by GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan remains unpopular with Americans, although younger people are more receptive to it than older ones, according to a new poll.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2012

September 2012

New Wound Healing Process Speeds Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

A new technique using amniotic tissue harvested from a discarded placenta can heal wounds, burns and scars twice as fast as previous treatments. The tissue is extracted from the placenta, with the woman's consent, during Caesarian sections and then sent to Georgia-based MiMedX, the company that processes the material so it can then be applied to the injured area to jump-start healing. The process, known as EpiFix, demonstrated significant success in a clinical trial involving patients with diabetic foot ulcers. 92% of patients who received the treatment were completely healed in six weeks compared with only 8 percent who healed in the same time frame without the addition of the processed amniotic membrane material. The trial was so successful it was terminated earlier than anticipated. Study findings are expected to be submitted for peer reviewed journal publication shortly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2012

Paula Deen and Type 2: The Real Story

Celebrity chef Paula Deen was subjected to some withering criticism recently when the public learned that she has type 2 diabetes. How could she push butter and sugar-loaded recipes at TV viewers when she has diabetes, her critics demanded.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 29, 2012

Why Care Under The Affordable Care Act Will be Unaffordable

Several recent articles should dispel any remaining notion that care provided under the so-called Affordable Care Act will in fact be affordable. Just the opposite is true.

comments 10 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2012

Your Experience With Symlin

The following letter to the editor asks Diabetes Health subscribers to share their experiences with Symlin. If you use Symlin, please tell us about it in the “Comments” section. Have you had more success in managing your diabetes with Symlin?  How has your insurance company treated you regarding your prescription cost?

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2012

Needle-Free CGM Could Be Available in 2013

Philadelphia-based Echo Therapeutics plans to introduce a needle-free continuous glucose monitoring system to the US market in 2013, pending FDA approval. The Symphony® tCGM is a two-part device that monitors blood glucose by taking readings through a user’s skin rather than via finger pricks. It is intended for use by anyone with diabetes, not just insulin pump users.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2012

Seize the Day, But Don’t Forget About Tomorrow

I was recently talking with my mom about my retirement plan: to be specific, about my worrisome lack of preparation for retirement.  She consoled me by saying that I am still young and have a lot of time left to plan and save.  It was then that I had a moment of total panic, as I realized that this is true only if my body continues to work. What if I develop complications from my type 1 diabetes?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 25, 2012

After Twenty-one Years With Type 2 Diabetes, Bonny Damocles Feels Better Than Ever

Bonny Damocles, a longtime fan of TV shows like “Wild Kingdom,” looked at his type 2 diabetes diagnosis as his opportunity to take a walk on the wild side. When the Michigan resident learned that he had diabetes more than two decades ago, he immediately began thinking about how lions survive in the wild as inspiration for his own diet plan.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2012

Lilly Launches Glucagon Mobile App

Lilly Diabetes recently launched the free Lilly Glucagon Mobile App to educate those who support people living with type 1 diabetes. The interactive app, available on the iTunes store for iPhone and iPad devices, provides caregivers, diabetes educators, and school nurses with visual and audio emergency instructions, as well as tools to track locations of glucagon kits and alerts for expiration dates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2012

Boehringer and Lilly Introduce Online Program for Adult Type 2s

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Eli Lilly and Company have introduced My Well Planner, a new online program offering customized educational content to help adults with type 2 diabetes make simple lifestyle changes to improve their health. Sample topics include general information about type 2 diabetes, better eating habits, building physical activity into daily life, taking medication, and communication strategies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2012

Reminding Myself That My Life Is More Than Diabetes

Time after time, people without diabetes ask me how my diabetes is going. I always get a little tongue-tied because "Wow, great!" isn't really accurate, and the alternatives are complicated. Usually, something like "Uh, good, fine, hard sometimes, but um, thanks for asking" awkwardly tumbles out of my mouth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2012

Gestational Diabetes, Low Income May Increase Child’s Risk of ADHD

German scientists report that gestational diabetes and/or low income may increase a child’s risk of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the study indicates, breastfed children born under those conditions may gain some protection against ADHD.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2012

Sharing a Struggle With Type 2 Diabetes

In 2009, when Bruce Share started drinking five glasses of iced tea before dinner and dropped 15 pounds from his already lean frame, he immediately knew that he had diabetes. In the preceding four years, he had learned a great deal about the disease as a member of the board of Defeat Diabetes. Now, he knew that it was his personal battle as well. A visit to his physician proved his intuition right. His A1C was 13%, and his blood sugar registered at 390. Eight months earlier, it had been perfect.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 19, 2012

UK Study Casts Doubt on Testosterone Therapy for Depressed Type 2s

A British study of type 2 men reports that although testosterone therapy had a beneficial effect on blood glucose levels and other metabolic indicators for non-depressed men, those suffering from depression experienced no benefit. In fact, reports Geoffrey Hackett, MD, at Good Hope Hospital in Sutton Coldfield, depressed men actually experienced a worsening of symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2012

Sam’s Club Offers Healthy Living Publication and Free Health Screenings

I’m Impressed. I have a business membership at Sam’s Club for the shop I manage and was doing some supply shopping the other day. As I walked into my local Sam’s Club I found myself staring at Bret Michaels. Okay, it was a picture of Bret on a Sam’s Club Healthy Living Made Simple magazine on a table at the front door. I can’t resist Mr. Michaels so I figured I’d pick up a free copy of the magazine and read it later at home. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2012

Federal Trade Commission Charges Children’s Vitamin Manufacturers with Misleading Advertising

If you bought Disney or Marvel children’s vitamins, you may be eligible for a refund.  The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, charged NBTY, the company formerly known as Nature’s Bounty, with making false claims about certain multivitamins.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2012

Miserable? 7 Behaviors You Need to Stop

Diabetes self-care is much more fun when I'm happy. It's so much easier when I have a smile on my face. For a long time I thought negative emotions could be controlled or denied. I thought I could just put on a smile and they would go away. But they didn't.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 15, 2012

Bayer’s New Blood Glucose Meter Now Available

Bayer ‘s new blood glucose meter, the Contour® Next Link, which works with Medtronic's diabetes management system, is now available in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2012

When They Mean Well

Sometimes it isn’t a stranger or acquaintance giving you a hard time about your diabetes.  Sometimes it’s a family member or close friend that says something hurtful about your diabetes management. And that is far more difficult to hear than the guy at the table next to you in a restaurant or some lady sharing an office with you at work.

comments 14 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2012

Breakthrough Blood Test Predicts Need for ICDs

A new blood test can predict which patients with heart failure are likely to need an internal implantable defibrillator that can treat abnormal heartbeat and prevent sudden death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2012

FDA Approves New Neuropathy Pain Drug

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved US sales of NUCYNTA® ER (tapentadol), a twice-daily extended-release oral analgesic for the treatment of pain from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The drug, produced by New Jersey-based Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., provides around-the-clock management for moderate to severe chronic neuropathic pain. Janssen says that it is currently the only opioid on the US market that has been approved for treating the condition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2012

Israeli Scientists Develop Promising Beta Cell Transplant Technique

Israeli researchers believe that they have found a way to increase the survival and effectiveness of insulin-producing pancreatic cells transplanted into diabetic mice. The technique, developed by scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, involves surrounding the transplanted beta cells with a three-dimensional latticework of nurturing blood vessels called "engineered tissue."

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 10, 2012

Peanut Butter Cups

 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2012

Could Skewed Biorhythms Cause Obesity?

According to a Scottish study recently published in Bioessays, the confusing signals created by modern technology's ability to turn night into day may be contributing to the global epidemic of obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2012

Need We Fear Exercise-induced Cardiac Arrest?

The media abounds with stories about the sudden collapse and death of athletes whom we assumed were in the best of health.  When such cases occur, we may become concerned about exercising ourselves.  A recent presentation describing people who had been exercising during or within one hour of a cardiac arrest may assuage these concerns to a degree.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 7, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  In this second part of our interview, I asked him about his motivations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2012

Rich and Poor Need Tailored Strategies to Stay Healthy

Well-to-do people eat more healthy fruits, vegetables, proteins, and unsaturated fats than poorer people, who eat more carbohydrates, according to the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study reported at the European Society of Cardiology in Munich, Germany.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2012

Skillet Chicken Parmesan

Note:
Recipe courtesy of "Eat What You Love: More Than 300 Incredible Recipes Low in Sugar, Fat and Calories" (Running Press 2010)
Although my boys love to order Chicken Parmesan when we dine out, the health content is always a concern -especially since it usually arrives thickly breaded, deeply fried, smothered in cheese, and served on a mountain of spaghetti! Here's a terrific easy stove-top recipe that's filled with all of the same great flavors but none of the excess fat and carbs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  When I caught up with Steve on a rare day when he happened to be at sea level, I asked him about his mission.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

Type 2: Intense Control May Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Older type 2s who exercise tight control over their blood sugar may run an increased risk of hip fracture, says a study from Changi General Hospital in Singapore. The researchers studied 558 elderly people with diabetes who had been treated for hip fracture between 2005 and 2010. They found that those patients had a significantly lower median A1C, 6.8%, than the control group median of 7.4%. In 59.2 percent of the hip fracture cases, the patient's A1C was less than 7%, and slightly more than three-quarters of the patients were taking sulfonylureas.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2012

Getting Sufficient Shut-eye Counts!

Can’t focus well after a poor night’s sleep? You are not alone. A small study at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital looked at 12 people during a one-month study in a sleep lab. Their sleep was cut dramatically, to a mere six hours instead of their customary ten to twelve hours.  Later, when searching for pictures on a computer, their performance was slower.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2012

Marinated Rainbow Salad Antipasto

The two best ways to increase your family’s consumption of vegetables is to make them taste really good and have them readily available.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 26, 2012

Playing God

Recently, while scrolling through discussions posted on an online diabetes forum, I came across one from a man in his thirties who wrote about how paramedics had found his twin brother face down in a sauna, in an insulin shock coma.  How did he end up in such a state?  The appalling answer is, he didn't have enough glucose strips to test before he got into the hot tub.  A few weeks before the sauna incident, his insurance company had limited his glucose strips to just four per day.

comments 26 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2012

A Dramatic Life Expectancy Increase for Type 1s

A 30-year study of life expectancy among people with type 1 diabetes showed a dramatic increase during the second half of the study, say researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Type 1s diagnosed between 1965 and 1980 have a life expectancy of 68.8 years—15 years more than type 1s diagnosed between 1950 and 1964. In the same period, general life expectancy for US residents increased by less than one year.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2012

Am I Taking Too Much Insulin?

The other day, I read a post in which someone wrote that he had to take a "ton of insulin" to cover some carbs in his meal, and he disclosed the exact dose. The funny thing is, I have often taken that amount to cover my meals. Admittedly, they were higher carb meals, but I never really thought of it as being a "ton" of insulin. When you read something like this, you can't help but wonder if you are doing something wrong on a regular basis. I suddenly felt that maybe I was out of line in taking that particular dose at a normal meal.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 23, 2012

An Amazon Adventure with Bugs, Drugs, and Diabetes

Students in the healthcare field have probably attended a "bugs and drugs" lecture about bacteria and the various antibiotics used in response. Put that on a whole new level, where the "bugs and drugs" are hordes of mosquitoes and peculiar plants, and you would be envisioning my pharmacy rotation in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest. The purpose of the trip was to study medicinal plants and natural medicine, but our group definitely braved the elements as well. A few of the pleasures we got to experience included extreme heat, daily paddling of canoes down the Amazon River, tightly rationed drinking water, bathing with piranhas, stepping in quicksand, eating guinea pig, and almost sinking our canoe in a torrential downpour. Now mix in my diabetes, and you would seemingly have the recipe for the perfect storm.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2012

Quick and Easy Huevos Rancheros

Ingredients & Methods

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2012

The 2012 Diabetes Health Pharmacist/AADE Scholarship Winner

Amy Powell, the first recipient of the Diabetes Health Pharmacist and American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) scholarship, was honored at the 2012 AADE conference in Indianapolis. As the winner, her conference fees and accommodation costs were paid, and she received a one-year AADE membership.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2012

Type 2 Trudges Across America to Defeat Diabetes

Right from the start, Andy Mandell thought of walking the perimeter of the US to raise awareness for diabetes as a military objective, a special ops mission to draw attention to the dangers of the disease. As someone who has lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 20 years, Mandell saw his role as that of an educator, and he took it seriously, wanting to help others avoid the mistakes he had made after his diagnosis. An active guy who loved running, he followed his doctor's orders--to a degree. He checked food labels to make sure that he wasn't consuming too much sugar, and he continued his vigorous lifestyle. He felt good, so he saw no reason to worry.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 17, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2012

Sharps Disposal: Will Pharmacies End Up Footing the Bill?

As CEO of a company that manufactures insulin syringes and pen needles for the US and Canadian markets, I have been closely monitoring the regulations and trends pertaining to the safe disposal of the products we produce. Surveys indicate that less than five percent of the over three billion sharps devices sold in the US annually are disposed of in some type of closed container. Most of the remaining 95 percent are deposited, unprotected, in the household trash. Significant changes may be pending with regard to the disposal of used sharps devices, and it's likely that pharmacists will be affected by these changes.

comments 13 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2012

An Interview With Robert Cuddihy, MD, of Sanofi US

Endocrinologist Robert Cuddihy, MD, joined Sanofi US over a year ago to be the company’s Vice President and Medical Diabetes Head in the United States. He is responsible for developing and executing the US strategy for Sanofi’s Diabetes Division, including pharmaceuticals, devices, and other technologies. He previously served as the medical director for several organizations, including the International Diabetes Center-Park Nicollet in Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2012

Quick And Easy Fiesta Salad

To turn this side dish into a satisfying entrée, top with some chicken or fish, cheese or tofu. Beans add flavor, protein and loads of fiber along with more carbohydrate. You can also add tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, olive oil, salt, pepper, cumin or cayenne pepper, jalapeno or other hot peppers, lime or lemon juice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2012

BD Introduces Ultra-thin 27-gauge Needle

Jersey-based BD Medical, a division of  Becton, Dickinson and Company, has introduced the Hyflow™ needle, a 27-gauge thin-wall needle designed for use with the company’s prefillable syringe systems.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 11, 2012

Sometimes I Feel Like a Total Slacker

I don't sleep till noon, wait for other people to clean up my messes, or put off doing the laundry until I'm down to my last clean shirt. Still, when it comes to my diabetes, sometimes I can't help but feel like a total slacker.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2012

Women With Diabetes Less Satisfied With Sex Life, Says Study

A University of California San Francisco study says that middle-aged and older women who have diabetes are less satisfied with their sex life than women who do not have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2012

Lovers of Cheddar and Gouda May Have Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

If you like cheese, there may be cause for celebration. According to a new study, eating cheese may lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2012

Biological Clock Molecule Could Become New Type 2 Treatment

UC San Diego scientists have discovered a molecule involved in regulating the biological clock that could open a new path for treating type 2 diabetes. The molecule, dubbed KL001, controls a key protein, cryptochrome, that regulates the biological clock (circadian rhythm) in plants, animals, and humans. In doing so, cryptochrome indirectly affects the liver's production of glucose. KL001 can be manipulated to induce cryptochrome to slow the liver's glucose production, thus creating a possible new therapeutic approach to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2012

Study Shows Turmeric Is Helpful to Adults With Prediabetes

A study has found that taking curcumin extract, the main ingredient of the popular Indian spice turmeric, may help ward off type 2 in those with prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2012

Biking Away From Diabetes

Martie Neugent's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is one of those moments that he looks back on thankfully. He learned that he had the condition in 2000, at age 32, during what he assumed would be a routine trip to the doctor. Instead, it turned out to be a pivotal opportunity to make one of two choices.  He could go on exactly as he had, adding a cocktail of medications to control his blood sugar levels, or he could make some noteworthy changes and map out a new life. For him, the choice was an easy one. "All my mother's uncles died at a young age," Neugent said about the ravages of diabetes in his extended family. "And my great-grandmother lost her leg. My first thought was that I was probably going to die if I didn't get it fixed."

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 3, 2012

A Reckless Summer

As teenagers, most of us did some reckless and irresponsible things. It's part of growing up, right? But if you're a teenager with type 1 diabetes, acting reckless becomes a bit more tricky. I had a reckless summer of my own ten years ago, right after high school graduation, when I traveled down south to spend a month with my mom. I hadn't lived with her since the age of 16, so I wanted to get to know her and my younger brother again. Unfortunately, I also used that time to take a break from my diabetes regimen. It had been only four years since my diagnosis, and I wanted to feel that even though I had a disease, I was still a normal teenager who was capable of an adventure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2012

Country Star Looks Up to Children With Diabetes

Country music star George Canyon recently teamed up with Animas to do a five-day, five-city tour across Canada to reach out to people with type 1 diabetes. The "George Canyon and Friends Diabetes Heroes Tour" started on May 14 in St. John's, Newfoundland, and ended on May 18 in Prince George, British Columbia, 3,000 miles west.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2012

July 2012

My Pump Almost Killed Me... Twice

One of the greatest technological advancements in diabetes care has been the insulin pump.  For one, it gives you the illusion of being "normal" because you no longer have to inject insulin throughout the day. Instead, you "bolus" by pushing a button on the pump itself or using a remote control. It allows better glucose management because you can adjust your basal rate (the "background" insulin dose) by increments of one thousandth of a unit every hour.  Especially when you're moving from the peaks and valleys of NPH or the restraints and hazards of Lantus, the freedom of living with an insulin pump is incredible.  But pumps do not come without their kinks.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

Meet A New Breed Of Medical Professional: The Health Coach

This story is part of a reporting partnership that includes APRN,  and Kaiser Health News.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 27, 2012

Workers Who Take Their Medicine Are More Productive

Editor's Note: Portions of this report were taken from a press release from CVS-Caremark.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2012

Peanut Butter Cups

Note: Recipe from "Splendid Low-Carbing for Life, Vol. 2" by Jennifer Eloff (www.low-carb.us)

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Improves Nighttime Control in Young Type 1s

In a small study of 10 type 1 children under the age of seven years, closed-loop insulin delivery improved their nighttime glycemic control. The therapy, delivered at Children's Hospital Boston, used an algorithm-controlled pump and continuous glucose monitor to deliver insulin on an as-needed basis as the children slept.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2012

Can’t Miss Red Snapper in a new light

Let's face it; seafood is a way of life for us here in the South. We find excuses to eat it for any meal of the day, and this red snapper is no different.  I managed to shed some of the sodium by cutting back on the salt, and switching out the butter for some delicious olive oil.  Your whole family will love these healthier, succulent fillets of fish. The name says it all, this is a recipe that you won't want to miss!

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2012

Academic Performance and Behavior of Children Are Influenced by Metabolic Health

It's time for the parent-teacher conferences at a school in an African American community.  For one child who has shown behavior problems and poor academic performance, the teacher and parents are discussing working together to improve the child's performance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2012

Standing Together

If I were asked to talk about diabetes to a group of newly diagnosed people, I think I'd start by telling them that there is actually some good that comes from a life with diabetes.  While they were deciding whether I had lost my mind, I'd explain that I'm not crazy, but that there really is a saving grace when it comes to having diabetes.  It's called the diabetes online community, or DOC.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2012

Green Chili Corn Muffins in a new light

Lookin' for bread with a little bite to it? Then you're going to fall in love with these chili corn muffins in a new light. I was able to reduce the fat and sodium by using egg whites and reduced-fat cheese and fat-free buttermilk. They're great for a grilling night!

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 19, 2012

Type 2: Early Therapy Helps Retain Beta Cell Function

Immediately starting intense therapy for newly diagnosed type 2s preserved their beta cell functioning for 3.5 years, according to a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2012

Fire In My Veins: A Story of Ketoacidosis

I've had type 1 diabetes for 14 long years. During that time, I have had five episodes of ketoacidosis, two of which were brought on by emotional stress.  The one that happened eight years ago, shortly after the meltdown of a serious relationship, lives vividly in my memory.

comments 12 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2012

Flavorful Soft Tacos

Hearty winter meals such as stews, soups and chili are easy to make in large quantities and later re-heat for another meal. Although cooks love the time-saving quality of leftovers, many people dislike eating the same meal two days in a row.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 13, 2012

A Food for Thought Issue

Over the years, Diabetes Health has covered a vast array of diabetes-related topics, from recipes and sex to celebrity interviews and scientific research. This issue is no exception-I think you'll find a lot to "chew on" here, especially in the three diet-related articles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2012

Diabetes: Hospital Bills Cost U.S. $83 Billion A Year

Diabetes affects nearly 25 million Americans, and that number is expected to grow substantially every year. It's the fifth leading cause of death in America, more than breast cancer and AIDs combined. And according to a report released last week from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), it's a disease that’s costing Americans $83 billion a year in hospital fees — 23 percent of total hospital spending.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2012

June 2012

Things I Can't Stand About My Insulin Pump

As I said in my previous article on this subject, my insulin pump has changed my life. My A1C has improved, I've felt more energetic, and I've controlled my diabetes more effectively overall. It has been the biggest and best change in my diabetes treatment since I started on insulin a quarter-century ago.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2012

Patient Injection Adherence Improves Under Pharmacist Guidance

A Walgreens study during which pharmacists counseled patients about taking injectable diabetes medications improved the patients' adherence by 24 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2012

The Way I Am

My 16-year-old son and I spent the day together recently and decided to head out for burgers at lunchtime.  Sitting in a rather exposed booth at a restaurant, we chatted and began eating.  I wasn't really thinking about anything, just enjoying the rare moment of hanging out with my sweet son, when he remarked, "I'd feel so awkward if I had to do that." I asked him what he meant and actually looked around to see what he was talking about.  Then it hit me, as he mimed taking an injection and said, "Having to take shots in front of random people all the time." Moments before, I had taken a shot in my hip, capped my syringe, and popped it back into my handbag without even thinking about it.  After 18 years of shots, it's practically instinct for me.  

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2012

Entrances and Exits

The Year
What a year I've had. From the spring of 2011 to the spring of 2012, my life changed utterly. There have been few years in my life more eventful, and few years that mixed joy and pain in such bracing amounts. With the year now done, I'm hesitant to draw any lessons--I just look back in amazement.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

9 Tips To Make Testing Pain Free

Did you know there are 9 simple steps that you can take to make testing your blood glucose a lot less painful?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Israeli Biotech Company Takes Novel Approach to Diabetic Ulcer Treatment

An Israeli biotech company's cell therapy, designed to treat hard-to-heal diabetic ulcers, is now in phase 3 testing in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

Medicare To Expand Use Of Competitive Bidding

A year-long experiment found that the competitive bidding approach saved money without harming beneficiaries. It also made inroads against waste and fraud.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 5, 2012

April 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Low Glycemic Bread From Alvarado Street Bakery

Many people with diabetes have had to eliminate traditional flour breads and refined starches from their diets because of the way they spike blood sugar. "Diabetic Lifestyles Bread" from Alvarado Street Bakery is a nutritious alternative to traditional flour breads and causes a much slower rise in blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2012

January 2012

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2012

October 2011

Mark the Season With Inspiration

Winter might be on its way, but there's plenty of fall color to celebrate in the meantime. You can find fresh inspiration with the Divabetic Octoberfest, a series of events sponsored by the nonprofit wellness group for diabetic women.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2011

September 2011

A “Broken Pancreas” Doesn’t Stop This Photographer on a Mission

When Ken Kotch was young, he used to tell his friends that he had a "broken pancreas" to explain his type 1 diabetes. Diagnosed in 1988 at eight years old, initially Kotch had no idea what it all meant. Describing his pancreas as "broken" just made sense to him at the time

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2011

Reproductive Cells May Eventually Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Imagine if there were a cure for diabetes that could be found inside your own body? Wouldn't it be nice if instead of depending on durable medical equipment, we could one day heal ourselves?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 24, 2011

Allie and Me

When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I was eighteen years old, scared, and confused.  Although bone thin, I was older than the usual juvenile diabetic, so the doctor didn't know if I had type 1 or type 2 diabetes.  At first, the doctor gave me pills to lower my blood sugar.  I avoided carbohydrates and threw myself into exercise, then watched helplessly as the numbers on my blood sugar meter continued to rise.

comments 10 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2011

August 2011

Diabetes Philosophies: Mine and Yours

I recently finished reading Amy Stockwell Mercer's book, The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes.  In Chapter 1, the author discusses a topic that I find critical to the well-being of people with diabetes: Developing a personal diabetes philosophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2011

July 2011

FDA Approves Foot Ulcer Treatment Device

The ArterioFlow 7500 is a pump that exerts pressure on an affected part of the body to force blood to flow more freely and widely. Increased blood flow is often the key to speeding up the healing of diabetic ulcers and preventing them from turning into infected wounds that can lead to gangrene and amputation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 29, 2011

Too Much TV Could Be Deadly

Spending too many hours watching TV can also substantially increase your odds of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or dying early. That's the conclusion of a Harvard School of Public Health study that looked at the effects of heavy TV watching.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 23, 2011

Once a Spokesperson for Juvenile Diabetes, Erin Now Suffers From Diabulimia

Erin lay on a bed in the emergency room, finally serious about getting help. Her second episode of diabetic ketoacidosis in a single year had sent her to the hospital shaking and vomiting. For the past seven years, she had been driven by one desire: to lose forty pounds. She refused to give herself her full dose of insulin, fearing weight gain. She hadn't seen her endocrinologist or checked her blood sugar for a year or two.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2011

NeuroMetrix and Nipro Team Up to Market Neuropathy Test

Nipro Diagnostics, Inc., and NeuroMetrix, Inc., have announced that they will seek opportunities to sell their soon-to-be-introduced NC-stat® DPNCheckTM neuropathy test in retail medical clinics nationwide. The test, conducted onsite, evaluates neuropathies, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN).

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 48 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

June 2011

Father's Day Reflections

With Father's Day just around the corner, I thought it would be nice to stop for a moment and reflect on what dads do for us, especially dads who have diabetic children. The pressure and emotional aspects of diabetes can be overwhelming, not to mention the stress it can put on a family. For every needle prick, shot, and counted carb my father (and mother) helped me with, I want to say thanks.

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2011

May 2011

Overweight Diabetics Earn Less

A Dallas-based marketing research firm survey of 9,265 respondents indicates that people with diabetes earn less and weigh more than their non-diabetic counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 28, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

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