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type 2 diabetes Article Archives

October 2014

Blood Pressure Control

A new study suggests that type 2 diabetics who want to avoid heart attacks or strokes should rigorously control their blood pressure. Doing so for an extended period of time seems to pay off years later.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2014

CDC Finds Increase In Physician Visits

Younger people with diabetes are spending more time in their physician’s office, highlighting that not only is type 2 no longer a disease specific to older people, neither are the complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2014

You're Blood Pressure

Blood pressure control may be more important than glycemic control in preventing diabetes-related deaths, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2014

Task Force Calls For Everyone Over 45 To Get A Screening

In response to the escalating number of type 2 diabetes cases. Which along with prediabetes now impact about one-third of the population. According Task force calls to estimates - a U.S. task force recommends that every American 45 and older should be screened for the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2014

Researchers Identify Molecules That Restore Wound Healing

A new study from researchers at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans have identified a molecule that could counteract the impact of impaired macrophages, speeding wound healing for diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2014

Study Finds Not All Diabetes Patients Know Enough About Sodium

While sodium intake is a concern for those with diabetes and can lead to high blood pressure and stroke, among other complications, a new study finds that most diabetics have no idea how much salt they should be eating – and many are taking in too much.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2014

Study debunks link between low vitamin D and type 2

While previous research has linked low levels of vitamin D to the onset of type 2 diabetes, new research finds no evidence that high levels of vitamin D prevent the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2014

College Students Do Gain Weight

Students do tend to pack on a few extra pounds during the college years, experts say, but the so-called “freshmen 15” might be a bit of an overstatement.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2014

Blood Vessel Damage May Occur Even Before Prediabetes Stage

A long-term British research study shows that even before people reach a prediabetes stage of elevated blood sugar levels, damage to their blood vessels may have already occurred.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 3, 2014

In Reality, We Do Not See Fewer Diabetic Foot Infections

While statistics seems to suggest that fewer diabetics are developing foot infections in the U.S. – the numbers show that infections have dropped by half over the last 15 years – the statistics are skewed because more people are now classified as diabetic, one researcher says.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2014

September 2014

Duodenum Resurfacing Procedure Improves Type 2 Diabetes Markers

A procedure designed to change how the body absorbs and processes glucose could help improve A1C numbers for those with type 2 diabetes, according to recent research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2014

Weight Loss Can Reduce The Risk Of Kidney Disease

With kidney disease one of the most devastating complications of type 2 diabetes – and a risk for about 35 percent of those with the disease - a new study suggests that losing weight can help significantly lower the risk of nephropathy in overweight or obese adults with type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2014

Ethnic Stereotypes May Contribute To Obesity

The negative impact of ethnic stereotypes may also contribute to obesity – and related illnesses - among minorities, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2014

Bollywood Dancing- An Effective Weapon Against Type 2 Diabetes

CURE-D is the first Bollywood dance research and intervention study designed for South Asian immigrants in the United States. Success with Zumba and Latin hip-hop to manage diabetes in other populations contributed to this study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2014

Life With Type 2: Mr. Taubes Upsets The Carbo Cart

Gary Taubes has fascinated me from the moment I first learned about him shortly after I was diagnosed with type 2 in 2003. I soon realized that in some quarters he was seen as a sort of anti-Christ, a menacing liar whose goal was to unravel years of hard work and expert advice from professionals in the field of nutrition and inflammatory diseases.

comments 8 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2014

Study Ties Earlier Onset Of Type 2 To More Complications

A study from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation shows that the age when a person is diagnosed with type 2 may have an effect on the complications that person later experiences. Interestingly, the study suggests a reason for the likelihood of more complications despite being younger is tied into the use of statins.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2014

CDC Predicts 40% of American Adults Will Develop Diabetes

Based on a statistical analysis of almost 600,000 American Adults in three studies, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 40 percent of all U.S. adults 20 years or older will develop type 2 diabetes in their lives. (The risk for men was estimated at 40.2 percent and for women, 39.6 percent.)For Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women, the statistical risk is higher: more than 50 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2014

Study Shows New Wound Care Technology

A new wound-care dressing developed by a California firm has been shown to not only reduce the cost of treating wounds, but also to improve the outcomes of those treatments.

That’s good news for diabetics. According to statistics, about 15 percent of those with the disease develop chronic wounds – most often foot ulcers – that can result in amputation.

The was study, conducted at the Southwest Regional Wound Care Center in Lubbock, Texas. They found, Enluxtra Any Wound dressing developed by OSNovative Systems, Inc., reduced medical costs of chronic wound care by 30 percent. In part because it replaces many different products. Including primary foam, the gelling agent alginate, hydrogel dressings, hydro-conductive fiber, super-absorbent collagen, opaque dressing, hydrocolloid, gauze and combination dressings.

Any Wound dressing, crafted of FDA-approved polymers, is designed to sense and accommodate the different parts of the wound that need hydration or absorption, and a single dressing can remain in place for up to seven days.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 6, 2014

Alzheimer's New Name: Type 3 Diabetes

When news about a startling new insight into the cause of Alzheimer's disease first emerged in 2005, it was highly speculative. But now the evidence for it has become very strong: Alzheimer's is a form of diabetes, and the name being given to it is type 3.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2014

Eylea Earns FDA Approval To Treat Diabetic Macular Edema

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the eye drug Eylea for the treatment of diabetic macular edema, according to the drug makers Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2014

August 2014

Genteel: A Pain Free Lancing Instrument

All Dr. Christopher Jacobs’ friend wanted a lancing device that didn’t cause pain.  And after hearing the longtime type 1 diabetic lament the discomfort he felt from the many finger pricks required to test his blood glucose levels, Jacobs was intrigued by the challenge.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2014

Dompé Earns Orphan Drug

An Italian-based pharmaceutical company with subsidiaries in New York has been granted orphan drug status for a new drug to treat neurotrophic keratitis, a rare degenerative corneal disease that impacts less than 1 in 5,000 people worldwide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2014

Researching the Cure Beyond The Mouse

For most of us with diabetes, diabetes cure research can feel like it's moving at a glacial pace. If you're a mouse, it's probably pretty exciting, considering researchers are discovering new ways to cure you almost every day. But what progress is being made in curing this disease? Is anyone moving beyond the lab rats and into people living with diabetes? The good news is yes, and there are a lot of people working on finding a cure, and many of them have started or will be starting clinical research in humans soon.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 19, 2014

Newly Discovered Virus Linked To Obesity

If you thought your obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnoses were genetic “gifts” from your family, it could be a virus instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Carrying a Pancreas Outside My Body

One of the pluses of having a working pancreas is that you do not often lose it. The organ just comes along for the ride, as it were, safe inside your abdomen.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2014

Florida Nutrition Experts Seeing Higher Numbers of Type 2 in Children

Three decades ago, type 2 diabetes wasn’t associated with children, but with middle-aged adults. In the 30 years that have passed since the advent of the Wendy’s “Where’s the Beef” ad campaign, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Apple’s Mac computer, however, a lot has changed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2014

FDA Lifts Restrictions on Patient Access to Avandia

The type 2-diabetes drug Avandia will again be available through retail pharmacies after a May ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The drug - a rosiglitazone-based medicine that controls blood glucose by increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin, so cells and muscles are able to use more for energy, reducing levels in the blood - was off the market in Europe and restricted in the United States for several years due to studies showing the drug raised the risk of heart disease. The FDA in 2013 reversed its earlier opinion and lifted restrictions on the drug, opening the doors for Avandia’s return to market.

Initially released in 1999, Avandia had been one of Glaxo's top-selling medicines, with sales of $3.2 billion in 2006. Sales tanked in 2010 after a review of clinical trials showed an increased risk of heart attack related to the drug – those taking the drug in the United States dropped from 120,000 to 3,000 – but last year, new trials showed no elevated risk of heart attack or death in patients being treated with Avandia compared to other diabetes drugs, causing the FDA to reverse its opinion.

“GSK welcomes the decision of the FDA and appreciates the agency’s robust review of the science about Avandia,” Glaxo said in a statement last year. “GSK maintains its view that Avandia is a safe and effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes when used appropriately.”

While the drug had previously been available only through specialty pharmacies and the patients already taking the drug or whose symptoms were not adequately controlled by other drugs, the new FDA ruling allows all patient's access to Avandia, Avandamet and Avandaryl. All of these medications contain rosiglitazone.

“Our actions reflect the most current scientific knowledge about the risks and benefits of this drug,” Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement last year. “Given these new results, our level of concern is considerably reduced; thus, we require the removal of certain prescribing restrictions.”

While the drug’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, has a marketing hurdle to overcome given the bad press the drug has received over the last few years, the British drug maker has no plans to promote Avandia in the United States, in part because its U.S. patent protection lapsed in 2011.
The drug will be available by prescription.

To assist in the transition, a toll-free telephone number has been established for patients, healthcare professionals and pharmacies - 1-800-282-6342 – which will be staffed from 8;30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Eastern Time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2014

Death Risk Higher in Polytrauma Cases for People With Diabetes

Having diabetes increases the risk of complications or death in cases where patients have suffered polytrauma compared with patients who don't have any history of medical comorbidities. (Comorbidities are defined as the simultaneous presence of two chronic diseases in a patient.) Polytrauma is defined as multiple injuries to the body or organs where at least one is life-threatening and exacerbated by the trauma of the other injuries. Such injuries usually occur in situations where the likelihood of substantial injury is high---falls, auto accidents, violent crimes, industrial accidents.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 5, 2014

Insulin pumps lead to lower A1C levels for insulin-dependent type 2s

Insulin pumps can be as beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes that require insulin as they have become for those with type 1, according to a new trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2014

July 2014

Those with diabetes are more likely to develop head and neck cancers, research shows

While experts have long noted that those with diabetes have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular issues, a new study shows the risk of head and neck cancers is also higher for diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2014

USDA Announces $78 Million Available for Local Food Enterprises

The local food movement was given a big boost earlier this month with the announcement that the USDA has plans to invest $78 million into local and regional food enterprises.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #13

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Insulin Device to U.S. Market

Novo Nordisk has introduced the Levemir® FlexTouch® prefilled insulin delivery device to the U.S. market. The device, filled with insulin detemir [rDNA origin], the first of its kind that does not use a pushbutton extension. In a conventional insulin delivery device, a pushbutton extends out from the device. If the called-for dose is large, an extension may cause problems for the user.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2014

How Do You Stay So Positive?

My class was discussing why we cannot just do pancreas transplants so we can cure diabetes,” said a dear friend that volunteers for me at work. It is a lot more complicated than that, sadly. I was touched that he and his college classmates were discussing ways to cure us. As we chatted about the challenges of diabetes and our wishes for a cure, a few other volunteers gathered. When they heard me mention that I have had Type 1 diabetes for twenty years and that I take 5 – 7 injections a day to stay alive and healthy, they all looked shocked and a silence fell over the group. My volunteer said “Wow, how do you stay so positive”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2014

A Primer on Gluten for Celiac Awareness Month

Many people first became aware of how dangerous a slice of bread could be for those with celiac disease when “The View” co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck shared her personal experiences with the genetic autoimmune disorder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2014

Type 2 Drug Slashes Dementia Risk

A new study has surprising implications for a generic diabetes drug. Pioglitazone, which is often prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes, also appears to reduce the risk of developing dementia. The drug was not studied specifically to see if cut the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Instead, researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases combed through a giant database of German health care records. They looked at information from 2004 to 2010, with a gigantic group of subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2014

Actress S. Epatha Merkerson Brings Order to Her Diabetes

Award winning S. Epatha Merkerson, Television, film and stage actress, brings a new order to her diabetes management: Get to Your Goals Program, which encourages people with type 2 diabetes to know their A1C, set a goal and take action.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2014

Mixed Martial Arts Reveals Hidden Strengths After Type 1 Diagnosis

Rob Cooper isn’t one to shy away from a challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2014

U.S. News & World Report Lists Best U.S. Hospitals for Diabetes

News magazine U.S. News & World Report has published a list of the top 10 American hospitals for treating diabetes and delivering endocrinological care.


comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2014

Key Steps in Diabetes Care

Living with diabetes means you need to take extra care to stay healthy. The good news is that even small changes in your lifestyle and habits can make a big difference in managing your blood sugar, staying healthy, and preventing complications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 18, 2014

The Invisible Elephant in the Room

Diabetes is the invisible elephant in my room on a regular basis. As a type 1 diabetic, I think about it frequently even if my friends, family, doctors, and the people I encounter daily don’t see it. While diabetes truly is an invisible illness, my blood sugars affect everything I do or even think about doing. My diabetes elephant is there all the time. That elephant does not take days off or breaks. So when such an important medical issue goes unnoticed by a doctor after a lengthy visit, I see a red flag.

comments 18 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2014

Life With Type 2: Lab Rat

Since my diagnosis as a type 2 in 2003, I've participated in three Phase 3 drug studies. I am fortunate to live two miles away from one of the San Francisco Bay Area's premier endocrinologists, Dr. Richard Bernstein (who has the same name as the famous low-carb advocate based on Long Island, New York). Over the years, Dr. Bernstein has established his office as a go-to testing facility for drugs in late-stage development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2014

Innovative Program: Offers People with Diabetes the Power to Improve Their Own Health

For most people with type 2 diabetes, successful outcomes of the disease usually rely more on living a healthy lifestyle, rather than a medicine chest of prescription drugs. Because it is such a self-managed disease, several high-profile groups are collaborating to create a new kind of the support group to help people stay on track and better manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2014

After 50 years, type 1 Suzi Vietti Has Mastered Her Disease

One thing most people know about 63-year-old Suzi Vietti is never to say “never” to her. It might be one of her most detested words; given the number of times she has heard it.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2014

Fewer Hypoglycemic Episodes With One Insulin in Head-to-Head Comparison

A recently completed study that compared two types of insulin for treating inadequately controlled type 2 patients showed that insulin degludec/insulin aspart produced fewer instances of hypoglycemia than biphasic insulin aspart 30.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2014

June 2014

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins: Has A Slam Dunk Formula for Diabetes

NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins, affectionately known as “The Human Highlight Film” has a few coaching tips for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2014

Embryonic Cloning Takes Step Toward Treating Diabetes

For more than 100 years, scientists have been exploring the possibilities of cloning, which led to the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996 along with a wealth of other developments in the treatment of disease, including the recent embryonic cloning of a woman with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2014

Belly Fat Linked to Metabolic Diseases in Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2014

High Birth Weights Could Put Babies at Risk Later On

Weight matters. Through all the research and studies, diseases and treatments, those two words possess a simple truth. The heavier people are, the more challenges they face in remaining healthy. The thinner we are, the more options we have to stay active and engaged in the world around us.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2014

911 - What's Your Emergency?

Recently I was working at the store I manage when a volunteer came into the backroom where my assistant and I were working. She informed us that something was wrong with her fellow cashier. I didn’t know what to expect, and wasn’t prepared for what I discovered.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2014

Low-carb, Vegan Diet Offers Benefits

The public perception of low-carbohydrate diets often involves mounds of bacon, piles of steaks and rivers of cheese. After all, when the Atkins Diet swept the country more than a decade ago, that was one of the ways people described it to their friends -- and one of the ways that critics tried to define it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 23, 2014

A New Definition for Obesity?

Two groups are proposing a new definition of obesity that considers factors beyond body mass index.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2014

Diabetes Complications Worsen Outcomes in Foot, Ankle Surgery

Complications from diabetes increase the risk of infection after foot or ankle surgery, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2014

May 2014

A Spoonful of Splenda

What color is sugar? For most people with diabetes, the colors pink, blue and yellow might come to mind. Many people often rely on the little colored packets of artificial sweeteners when managing their blood sugar or their weight. It might seem like the best alternative compared to the calories and blood sugar spikes that come with regular sugar, but now research suggests that artificial sweeteners, along with some regular sweeteners, aren't as safe as we thought.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 26, 2014

FDA Delays Decision on Inhaled Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has delayed until July 15th making a decision on whether to allow the inhaled insulin Afrezza entry into the American market.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 24, 2014

Belly Fat Linked To Metabolic Diseases In Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2014

CDC Reports Decline of Diabetes-Related Complications

While new cases of type 2 diabetes are rising rapidly, recent research shows that complications from the disease are on the decline.
Research compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that over a 20-year period, rates of the five major complications associated with diabetes - heart attack, stroke, end-stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation and deaths from hyperglycemia - all saw drastic declines.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 9, 2014

Who Are You Modeling Your Health Habits After?

My mother was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 53. Unfortunately, she passed away from diabetes complications at 65. Of course this was because she did not take care of her blood sugars. Her A1C hovered around 10. It was so frustrating trying to help her. I remember traveling the full emotional scale as her caretaker, desperately trying to show her how to experience normal blood sugars.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 7, 2014

Life with Type 2: Napoleon Conquers My Heel

After the initial shock when we are first told we have type 2 diabetes, most of us set out determined to manage our disease in an exemplary way. I know that for me, at the back of my mind was the thought that I would be the great exception: I would hurl back my diabetes just like the Russians hurled Napoleon's troops back at the gates of Moscow two centuries ago.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 3, 2014

April 2014

Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: How Serious Is It?

While three decades ago it was rare for a child or teen to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, today, the American Medical Association (AMA) estimates that there are about 3,700 new cases a year among youth in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2014

Postpartum Weight Gain Boosts Risk of Diabetes and Heart Disease

Moms who fail to lose the pounds they gain during pregnancy - or those who gain a few extra pounds in the year that follows birth - may boost the risk of developing both type 2 diabetes and heart disease later on, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2014

Adults with Diabetes and the Risk of Seasonal Influenza

If you have diabetes, the flu can be particularly risky.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2014

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