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General Article Archives

November 2002

October 2002

Novo Nordisk Suspends Development of Insulin Sensitizer

Novo Nordisk has suspended development of ragaglitazar—a drug that has potential for regulating both blood-glucose and lipid levels—after finding urine bladder tumors in one mouse and several rats tested with the drug during preclinical trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

People With Diabetes More Prone to Acute Liver Failure

Add another complication to the list of diabetes-related diseases: acute liver failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

‘Health Literacy’ Linked to Diabetes Complications

Researchers are discussing yet another risk factor for diabetes-related complications: health literacy, defined as the measure of a person's "ability to read, comprehend and act on medical instructions."

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Emergency!

Anti-diabetes drugs are on the list of medications that cause as many as 28 percent of visits to hospital emergency rooms. Other drug classes frequently linked to ER visits include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (N-SAIDS), anti-convulsants, antibiotics, respiratory drugs, hormones, central nervous system drugs and cardiovascular drugs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

August 2002

Morning Highs

If you have type 2 diabetes and don't take insulin, it's possible your mid-morning blood-glucose levels are high.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Got Milk?

Mama told you to drink your milk. Now there is evidence that she might have been inadvertently protecting you from developing insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) during your young adult years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

July 2002

A Glimpse Into the Future

Twenty-four-hour continuous glucose monitoring can provide extremely useful information about an individual's blood-glucose pattern and fluctuations during the day and night.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

Is the Damage Done?

Officials from the United States and Vietnam agreed on March 10 to launch a joint study to determine the links between Agent Orange—a herbicide sprayed as a jungle defoliant during the Vietnam War—and a range of health problems including diabetes and cancer, according to the Associated Press (AP).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

June 2002

Watch This! 13 Months After Its Approval, Noninvasive Glucose Monitor is Now Available

If patience is a virtue, then millions of people with diabetes who have been anxiously awaiting the arrival of the GlucoWatch Biographer can now enjoy their just deserts.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2002

Time Tells All

Medical Alert Corporation of London, Kentucky, is now offering a new product, its Medical Alert Watch, which displays a red medical alert symbol and your medical condition on the face of the watch.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

Heroic Proteins

Many studies have shown that type 1 diabetes may be triggered by exposure to viral infections. Now researchers believe that interferons, a family of small proteins that can stimulate viral resistance in cells, can help protect beta cells in the pancreas from being destroyed by a common virus called coxsackie virus B4 (CVB4). Findings were reported in the April 2002 issue of Nature Immunology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

Study Says People With Diabetes More Likely to Stop Working Outside the Home

People with diabetes are 3 percent more likely to stop working outside the home than people without diabetes, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Labor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

May 2002

Questions and Answers

Do Root Vegetables Lead to Type 1 Diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Keeping Track

Carb Cards, of Montrose, Colorado, is offering four new products designed to help you count carbohydrates during mealtimes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Set ‘Em Up

SpectRx, Inc., added another tool to the insulin delivery arsenal when it received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on February 4 for its minimally invasive insulin patch infusion set for use with insulin pumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

A Berrie Good Idea

Russ Berrie and Company, Inc., of Oakland, New Jersey, is now making its diabetes bears available for retail purchase and plans to give a portion of its proceeds to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Ruby and Rufus are beanbag bears with heart appliques that indicate areas to test blood glucose and inject insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Breaking the News

People with type 1 diabetes feel the impact of their diabetes diagnosis more severely than people with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the December 2001 issue of the Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Set 'Em Up: New Insulin Pump Infusion Set Approved

SpectRx, Inc., added another tool to the insulin delivery arsenal when it received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on February 4 for its minimally invasive insulin patch infusion set for use with insulin pumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

April 2002

24-Hour Monitoring Detects Normal Blood Pressure in Some Believed to Have Hypertension

Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is the best way to determine whether someone has resistant hypertension (high blood pressure that apparently is uncontrolled with the maximum level of treatment), according to researchers in Australia. In addition, the researchers found that patients are less likely to suffer from "white-coat hypertension" (elevated blood pressure in the doctor's office) when their blood pressure is taken by a nurse instead of a doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

What Are Your Chances?

The parents and siblings of people who were diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 5 are at higher risk to develop the disease, according to the results of a new study published in the January 2002 issue of Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

A Doctor’s Influence

Focusing on the patient's perspective when it comes to intensive diabetes treatment can help the patient achieve better glycemic control and prevent diabetes complications, according to researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

March 2002

Be a Planner Too

Kraft Diabetic Choices, of Rye Brook, New York, has launched its interactive meal planner for people with diabetes. Available free of charge on the Web site www.kraftdiabeticchoices.com, the planner creates a customized weeklong plan for meals and snacks based on a person's nutritional and calorie requirements. Recipes, preparation time, a list of ingredients and nutritional information are provided for each meal or snack. The program generates a personalized grocery list. It also develops an individualized fitness plan and offers a log to track medication doses and blood-glucose readings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

Where Can I Dispose of My Sharps

Q: Do you know how I can find places that accept sharps containers in my area? I have been unsuccessful in finding them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

Warning For Women

Women with long or irregular menstrual cycles are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a recent study. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health published their findings in the November 21, 2001, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

The Environmental Platform

North Carolina researchers are suggesting that the surging increases in type 1 and 2 diabetes in the United States may be attributed less to genetics than to environmental factors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

That Personal Touch

Providing goals and support to doctors can result in better outcomes for their patients with type 2 diabetes, say Danish researchers. Doctors who were helped to set guidelines and who received regular follow-ups and continuing medical education were most likely to have healthier patients. Results of the study were published in the October 27, 2001, issue of the British Medical Journal.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

Letters from Readers

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

February 2002

Testing in the Future

Who says the people who invent computers, cell phones and other devices that make our life easier should have all the fun?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

On the Road to Paying for Organ Donations?

The American Medical Association (AMA) is debating a topic scorned by many: providing financial incentives for organ donations. As it stands, giving money to people for donating organs is illegal, banned by Congress in 1984. But the fact remains that 6,000 people in the United States die every year waiting for those desperately needed organs, according to the AMA.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

One-Dose Treatment

KV Pharmaceuticals Co., of St. Louis, Missouri, is offering a new vaginal cream for the treatment of yeast infections, a condition common among women with diabetes. Gynazole-1, which is available by prescription only, contains 2 percent of the active ingredient butoconazole nitrate and requires only one dose. It is packaged in a prefilled applicator that employs the company's patented VagiSite delivery technology. The cream has been shown in clinical trials to be bioadhesive, lasting for approximately four days without leaking, according to KV Pharmaceuticals. Because it is nonleaking, the cream can be applied at any time of the day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

Chance to Brush Up

Diabetes Educational Services of Chico, California, is offering a two-day diabetes educator review course that provides a comprehensive survey of approaches and tools for diabetes management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

A Question of Length

Having shorter legs may increase a man's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, researchers in the United Kingdom suggest. Publishing their findings in the December 2001 issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, researchers from England, Wales and Ireland found a link to diabetes and heart disease in middle-aged men with shorter legs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

Not Enough Potassium

People in Western countries don't ingest enough potassium, claim researchers from the United Kingdom. Increasing potassium intake by eating more fruits and vegetables may have a range of health benefits, including lowering blood pressure; reducing the risk of stroke, heart disease and kidney damage; and helping to prevent calcium deficiency and glucose intolerance, these researchers say.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

Testing in the Future -Technology Meeting Showcases Noninvasive Blood-Glucose Monitoring

Who says the people who invent computers, cell phones and other devices that make our life easier should have all the fun?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

Editorial-

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

January 2002

Whose Diabetes Is It?

How do couples in which one partner has diabetes and the other doesn't deal with the question of whose diabetes it is? Answers to this question, often overlooked by many healthcare professionals, can be critical to the successful long-term management of diabetes and its integration into daily life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Novo Teams Up for Worldly Cause

On November 13, 2001, Novo Nordisk announced a decision to establish an international foundation called the World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) with the purpose of supporting projects that will improve diabetes care in developing countries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

More Diabetes = More Money for Drug Makers

The increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes and the demand for drugs that treat microvascular complications are going hand in hand, it seems. This is the conclusion of an October 25, 2001, study conducted by Decision Resources, Inc., a company that prepares pharmaceutical research publications and offers advisory services and consulting designed to help clients shape strategy, allocate resources and master their chosen markets.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Closure

On November 6, 2001, a settlement was reached in a $175 million lawsuit filed against the makers of the diabetes drug Rezulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Man’s Best Friend

Approximately 1.2 million people with diabetes in the United States suffer from retinopathy or macular edema, complications of diabetes that involve bleeding in the eye, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As a result, people with diabetes are 25 times more at risk for blindness than the general population, says the CDC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

A Dense Topic

Bone density is likely to be lower than normal in adults newly diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes, according to researchers in Spain. Osteoporosis could appear upon diagnosis of type 1 diabetes rather than as a late consequence of the disease, they say.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Blood Pressure Medicine Does It Again: Study Shows ACE Inhibitors Help Reverse Diabetic Kidney Disease

Nearly one-quarter of research subjects with type 1 diabetes who had diabetic kidney disease showed signs of remission of their kidney disorder after beginning treatment with angiotensin-converter enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, say researchers at the Steno Diabetes Center in Gentofte, Denmark.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

Christmas Jingles

Blues artist B.B. King released a holiday album entitled "A Christmas Celebration of Hope" on November 6. Proceeds from album sales will be donated to City of Hope, a Los Angeles medical center dedicated to the treatment and research of fatal diseases such as cancer, AIDS and diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Rock the World

A positive outlook may just be critical to keeping teens with diabetes happy. That's why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is sponsoring "Rock the World," a one-day confidence-building and training program for teens with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Never Forget Again

Forgetting to take your medications can now be eliminated with a specialized alarm clock designed to keep you on your pills—uh, toes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Questions About Effectiveness of Insulin Resistance Medications

There is no scientific evidence proving that glitazones, oral medications that reduce insulin resistance, should be used more, say researchers in the September issue of Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Help for Persistent Cough

Taking iron supplements may help prevent a cough associated with taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, say researchers in Korea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Wine and Dine

Tossing back a couple of brews while watching the big game could be protecting you from getting type 2 diabetes, according to researchers in the United States and Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Wine and Dine: Drinking Alcohol Associated With Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Men

Tossing back a couple of brews while watching the big game could be protecting you from getting type 2 diabetes, according to researchers in the United States and Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Letters from Readers

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

November 2001

A Walking Benefit

Over 400,000 people are expected to participate in the Walk to Cure Diabetes 2001-2002, hosted by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The JDRF anticipates raising a minimum of $78 million to fund research on finding a cure for diabetes and related complications. The event involves series of walks taking place at different times around the U.S.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

Coming Right Up

Roche Diagnostics recently rolled out its Accu-Chek Active blood-glucose monitor and will introduce its Accu-Chek Compact monitor this fall.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

Heres Glucose In Your Eye

The September issue of Technology Review reported that a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based company called Sentek Group "has come up with a new, non-invasive way of monitoring diabetes that doesn't require any pricey machinery."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

Be a Pepper

Researchers in Jamaica say the compound capsaicin, which makes peppers hot, also lowers blood sugar in dogs. They add that some day it might be used to treat diabetes in humans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

Aspirin Shown to Lower Blood Sugar

One of the most commonly used over-the-counter drugs may lead to a new treatment for type 2 diabetes, say researchers. Aspirin, used for decades to treat headaches and minor aches and pains, has been shown to reverse high blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity when taken in high doses, according a study published in the August 2001 issue of Science.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

October 2001

AADE Conference Sets Record Number of Attendees: 28th Annual Conference Drew Unprecedented Numbers

The American Association of Diabetes Educators' 28th Annual Conference was held this year in Louisville, Kentucky, from August 16 to 19. It drew quite a crowd—3,200 attendees, a record number for the association. A total of 215 companies made appearances, displaying both new and tried-and-true products. The AADE announced its educator of the year, Gail Lorenzi, RN, CDE, and Diabetes Health conducted its yearly raffle—$1,500 to the first prize winner! Connie Gilbert, RD, MS, CDE, of the Methodist Medical Group in Indianapolis, Indiana, walked away with the check.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Influenza and Diabetes

What does the flu mean to people with diabetes? Better known as "influenza" in medical circles, the flu is a highly contagious virus that infects the respiratory tract. Most people recover from the flu in a week or two, but for some it is a more serious threat. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cites that more than 20,000 deaths occur nationwide and more than 100,000 people are hospitalized annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Talk To Me

Of all the advances in technology out there, now there's a talking machine to help you remember to take your medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

A Walk Away From FDA Approval

A new portable foot device used to treat blood clots and swelling feet has received approval in Europe, according to Medical Dynamics, the product's manufacturer. An over-the-counter version called WalkCare received approval earlier this year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

New Diabetes Drug Not Approved by FDA Advisory Committee

On July 25, the Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted to not recommend approval of Symlin (pramlintide acetate), a new drug for controlling blood-sugar levels in type 1 and insulin-using type 2 people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Wake Up Call

Testing at night and after meals may give you the most accurate A1c reading, according to the result of recent research. Doctors from California and Washington, D.C., tested blood-glucose levels continuously on patients for three days to identify the times when the readings most closely reflected A1c levels. They found that glucose levels tested at night and after meals matched the patients' actual A1c levels. Glucose levels taken in the morning did not match their A1c levels as closely.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Standards Not So Hot

"Currently, diabetes guidelines in the United States are not consistent with world-wide standards,'' said Rhoda Cobin, MD, FACE, president of the American College of Endocrinology (ACE), in its press release. "We need more aggressive, complete and cohesive standards."

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

September 2001

Missing Your Zzzs Could Lead to Diabetes

You've probably been warned about the downsides of not getting enough sleep: fatigue, irritability and weakening of your immune system. Now, researchers have discovered an effect that poses a much more serious risk to your health: lack of sleep can lead to diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

All The Help You Need

Imagine it if you will: having a source at your fingertips to receive unlimited amounts of information about managing your diabetes. Well, Dr. Joe, the Diabetes Doctor, a daily newsletter sent by e-mail, is now offering that very source for a monthly fee of $29.95.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

New Test Strips Receive FDA Approval

Abbott Labratories S/B, MediSense Products announced that its new test strips have received marketing approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

Discovering Life in Death

Brains cells taken from human corpses could become a source of stem cells used for research, say doctors in California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

Harm May Do Good

Being exposed to infections at an early age may help prevent children from developing diabetes, say researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

Survey Says "Re-Evaluate"

Doctors think that the current approach to diabetes treatment and the established goal for glycemic control should be reconsidered. According to the results of a recent survey of endocrinologists, the goal for achieving blood sugar control should be lower and achieved by better planning of when to take insulin. The Council for the Advancement of Diabetes Research and Education (CADRE), which commissioned the survey, announced the results in a press release on June 26. The purpose of the survey was to determine why, according to CADRE, less than half of type 2s have good blood sugar control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

Letters from Readers

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

August 2001

DCCT Participants Less Likely to Develop Microalbuminuria

Participants in the intensive treatment sector of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial are continuing to see lower microalbumin rates six years after the study ended, despite the fact that their average HbA1cs have increased. The DCCT proved, among other things, that the chances of progressing to microalbuminuria was reduced by 39 percent with intensive treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Cod Protein May Help Reduce Insulin Resistance

Cod protein has been proven to be a natural insulin sensitizer in rats fed a high-fat diet, say researchers in Canada, who presented their findings at the American Diabetes Association's scientific sessions in June.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Sip to Your Health

Want to decrease your chances of developing diabetic cataracts? Drink your tea, say researchers in Pennsylvania, who submitted a paper for the American Diabetes Association's scientific sessions in June.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Special Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome for People with Diabetes

Normal diagnostic methods for carpal tunnel syndrome don't work for people with diabetes who have nerve damage, say researchers in Massachusetts, whose findings were published at the American Diabetes Association's scientific sessions in June.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Diabetes Ignored in the News

Diabetes could use a little more public relations activity, based on an analysis of health coverage on national newscasts that ran between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 2000 on ABC, CBS and NBC. During that period, there were 1,695 reports related to cancer and 2,151 heart-disease-related reports, compared with only 68 reports on diabetes. None of the diabetes-related reports said that minorities, particularly African-Americans and Hispanics, are at higher risk for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

C-peptide Put in a Positive Light

For a number of years, it was believed that C-peptide, which links the alpha and beta chains of active insulin before they break apart, was merely a waste product. Research is showing, however, that C-peptide could be beneficial in helping prevent diabetes complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Happiness is a Natural Drug

If you don't want to get type 2 diabetes, lighten up! People who measure high on the Cook-Medley hostility scale are more likely to have abnormal glucose metabolism and a higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Nutritional Catalog Available for People With Diabetes

Hi-Tech Pharmacal Co. Inc. of Amityville, New York, announced the launch of a nutritional catalog for people with diabetes. The Diabetic Health catalog, which allows readers to order products for home delivery by mail, features a series of unique formulas such as Multivitamin Formula, Eye Care Formula and Neuropathy Formula to help treat different type of diabetes complications. The treatments have many well-known nutritional supplements including chromium, vitamin E, alpha-lipoic acid, vanadyl sulfate, bilberry extract and coenzyme Q10. Also found in the catalog are pharmaceutical products sold by Hi-Tech, including the Diabetic Tussin line of products for cough and colds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

What’s Up Doc?

Nine out of 10 primary-care doctors in this country could not correctly name the top three tests that a person with diabetes requires on a regular basis to stay alive—tests that could save patients' lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Web Not Up To Par

Millions of people turn to the Web daily as a source of information on health topics ranging from the latest trends in diets to treatments for serious diagnoses. Is what you’re searching for accurate and accessible? For the most part it is not, say researchers in Southern California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

An Added Benefit

Results of a study show that valsartan (Diovan), a common drug used to treat hypertension, had a significant secondary benefit—it helps to reduce microalbuminuria, high level of protein in the urine that can be a sign of kidney disease. The results of the Microalbuminuria Reduction with Valsartan (MARVAL) trial were presented at the 16th annual Scientific Session of the American Society of Hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

Letters from Readers

Elders Story Sent Wrong Message on How to Eat

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

Johnson & Johnson Purchases Diabetes-Products Company

On May 23, Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) of New Brunswick, New Jersey, announced it has entered into an agreement where it would acquire Inverness Medical Technology (IMA), in a deal valued at $1.3 billion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

First Things First - Elevated Protein in Urine and High Blood Pressure Not a Correlation in Type 1 Kids

Don't look for rising blood pressure as a first indicator of impending kidney disease if the subject is a child.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

Serious Fanfare - Soccer Fan's Blood Sugar Spikes During Soccer Game

"The thrill of victory-the agony of defeat" can play havoc with your blood-glucose levels-even if you're merely cheering for your favorite teamItalian researchers M.G. Cavallo, S. Romeo, G. Coppolino and P. Pozzilli examined a 25-year-old Italian man with type 1 diabetes who was wearing a MiniMed Continuous Glucose Monitoring System both the day before and the day of the semi-final soccer match between Italy and Holland during the European Soccer Championship on June 29, 2000. The research was published in the February issue of Diabetologia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

Drug Company Reprimanded for False Advertising

Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals of Denmark violated federal regulations for inaccurately representing the type 2 drug Prandin (repaglinide) in promotional materials, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

June 2001

It’s All in the Genes

Researchers at Harvard are making some progress with the development of a gene they hope can help promote pancreatic development and create replacement stem cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

Charting It

When you're caught up in the daily routine of eating well, exercising, testing your sugar levels and taking medications, it may seem impossible to track the patterns in your diabetes management. With the help of a new product, the WeeklyTrack Diabetes Management Kit, you just may get the guidance you need.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

May 2001

An Elemental Threat

Bicarbonate, a common treatment used on children with type 1 diabetes who suffer from ketoacidosis, has been shown to increase the risk of cerebral edema, or swelling of the brain, according to a study published in the January 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

Technology Conference in the Works

On November 2 and 3, 2001, the Dorothy L. and James E. Frank Diabetes Research Institute of Mills-Peninsula Health Services in San Mateo, California, will be presenting The Diabetes Technology Meeting, a conference to learn about the latest diabetes-management technology.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

Injecting Made Easy

On March 19, Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its Innovo "dial-a-dose" insulin-delivery device. The device is expected to be available for people with diabetes later this year.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

April 2001

Questions and Answers

I am 72 years old and have been a type 2 for 21 years. I keep my blood sugar under control and get lab work done every three months. My A1c remains at 6%. Despite these measures, every year I get neuropathy on a different part of my body that lasts from winter until spring. Currently, I have it in my right buttocks and the back of my thigh. It is very painful. My doctor doesn't know what to do other than to prescribe painkillers that irritate my stomach.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Right on Target— Detecting Bad Cells Could Mean Fighting and Preventing Autoimmune Diseases

If only medical technology found a way to target and kill off the bad cells responsible for autoimmine diseases without destroying the good ones, then it would be in business. It would mean being able to more effectively treat type 1 diabetes, as well as a host of other autoimmune diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

A Threat for Menopausal Women

New evidence suggests that diabetes can lead to breast disease in menopausal women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Pycnogenol—Great for Diabetic Retinopathy, But How Do You Find it in the United States?

Editor's Note: DIABETES HEALTH encourages every person with diabetes to see an eye doctor at least once per year. A treatment like the one featured here should never replace professional care, and you should always notify your doctors when you take a non-prescription treatment. Only a professional has the tools to assess the health of your eyes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Man Says His Retinopathy Went Into Remission After Taking Pycnogenol

Editor's Note: DIABETES HEALTH encourages every person with diabetes to see an eye doctor at least once per year. A treatment like the one featured here should never replace professional care, and you should always notify your doctors when you take a non-prescription treatment. Only a professional has the tools to assess the health of your eyes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

NIDDK-Supported Research Has Made a Difference

NIDDK-supported research, including basic discoveries in immunology and cell and transplant biology, laid the groundwork for the Edmonton advance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

How the NIDDK Chooses Which Grants to Fund

To ensure the highest scientific standards among funded projects, applications for grant funding undergo a two-step peer review by scientific experts from outside NIH.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Just How Much Money is Needed for Diabetes Research and Treatment?

The Diabetes Research Working Group (DRWG) is an independent panel of 12 scientific experts in diabetes and four representatives from the lay diabetes community. The DRWG was appointed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at the demand of Congress to spend a year determining what needed to be done for diabetes research and treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

Diabetes Gets Green—Congress Puts Additional Diabetes Funding Toward Native Americans and Research

In one of the final decisions made at the end of its term, Congress and the White House awarded $240 million in funding over the next three years for diabetes research and treatment of the disease for Native Americans. The money is an addition to the $150 million grant that was awarded in 1997 as part of the Balance Budget Act to both Native American health care programs and type 1 research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2001

March 2001

Risky Business—Women with Diabetes More Likely to Suffer From Bone Fractures

Diabetes has never before been considered a risk factor for hip and shoulder fractures among older women. It has now been proven, according to data from the largest study ever of fracture risks among diabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

A Laugh or Two Gets the Message Out

On February 5, the American Diabetes Association announced the release of an educational video that uses comic relief to communicate the importance of diabetes awareness to the male demographic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

February 2001

All in Real Time

Kivalo, Inc., of Charlotte, North Carolina, has developed a prototype of a device that could, in the near future, allow parents and physicians of children with type 1 diabetes to access and monitor a child's glucose measurements in real time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

Questions and Answers

Can you point me to any data on whether people with diabetes are prone to canker sores or other mouth sores?

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 2001

It’s All in the Genes

Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, say they have identified a gene linked to type 1 diabetes. The gene, called JM2, causes type 1 diabetes when it is mutated. It can also cause a host of other problems, including chronic diarrhea, eczema and food allergies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

Smokers Get More Diabetes

The results of a prospective study involving 21,000 physicians indicate smoking is associated with a substantial increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

Have Genes, Will Travel

Researchers have discovered that injecting a specialized gene into diabetic rats and mice can put type 1 diabetes into remission, according to a November 22, 2000 press release from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

Outgoing Congress and President Approve 60 Percent Increase in Diabetes Funding

On December 15, 2000 the U.S Congress and White House approved House Resolution 4577, which will increase federal spending for type 1 diabetes research at the National Institutes of Health. The 60 percent increase is the largest boost ever for type 1, increasing the estimated $134 million for fiscal year 2000 to $220 million for fiscal year 2001.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

Search for a Cure Gets a Booster Shot—JDRF and Wellcome Trust Award $34 Million for a New Immunology Center

On November 28, 2000, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) announced it and Wellcome Trust are providing a joint $34 million award over five years, to set up a new Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory at the University of Cambridge in England.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

FDA Gives Starlix Thumbs-Up—Novartis's Drug Works on Its Own, in Pairs

On December 22, 2000, Novartis Pharmaceuticals received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its type 2 drug nateglinide (Starlix) as a therapy on its own and in combination with Glucophage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

January 2001

Pediatric Bone-marrow Recipients Have High Long-term Risk for Diabetes

Finnish researchers are saying children who undergo bone-marrow transplantation are at risk for impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia in adulthood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

Diabetes Education in Short Supply

A recent survey shows the United States is far from alone in its high numbers of people with diabetes with a deficit in self-management education. The survey, conducted by the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF), found that people with diabetes in five European countries said they had received little to no formal training on how to manage the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

Researcher Blames ‘Nintendo Generation’ for Huge Obesity Upswing in Canada

In an alarming new study, Canadian researchers say obesity nearly tripled for boys and more than doubled for girls over a 15-year span.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

Huge Gap in Diabetes Knowledge

In a November 13, 2000 press release, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International reported that a new survey shows a huge gap in the public's knowledge of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

Don't Call Me JDF!

Since 1970, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International (JDF) has been one of the more prominent organizations dedicated to finding a cure for diabetes. While its mission will remain the same, its name and logo will not.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

FDA Fesses Up to its Mishandling of Rezulin

In a November 15, 2000 internal report, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acknowledged it has learned from its mistakes following the March 2000 withdrawal of the type 2 drug Rezulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2001

December 2000

Questions and Answers

I've Started Taking Avandia. What Changes Do I Need to Make to My Diet?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Measuring Glucose with Light-Tongue Tested in Study

A new study by chemists at Ohio University and the University of Iowa suggests that people with diabetes can use light to measure blood glucose values. The scientists involved in the study feel they have edged one step closer to the development of a glucose-measuring device that uses light instead of a blood sample.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Niacin Safe for People with Diabetes

Marshall B. Elam, MD, and a multi-center team at the University of Tennessee, Memphis, are saying patients with type 2 diabetes who receive lipid-modifying doses of niacin show a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein (HDL or "good") cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Diabetes and its ‘Radical’ Side

Excess sugar in the blood may boost the production of free radicals, which are byproducts of normal metabolism that have been linked to aging and heart disease. In turn, this could lead to arterial damage and blocked arteries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Fighting Blood Pressure with Combination Punches

In a study of people with diabetes who suffered from high blood pressure, researchers found that no class of anti-hypertensive drugs appears to be more effective than any other.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind—Blood Pressure Drugs May Reduce Dementia Risk in Older Adults

Doctors at the Indiana University School of Medicine say blood pressure drugs used to treat diabetes may also reduce the risk of dementia in older adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Cold and Flu Meds

If you do get a cold or flu, you will need more than anti-viral medication to feel better. You will probably need some over-the-counter drugs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Diaport Gets European Approval—Permanent Catheter System Would Be One Component of Artificial Pancreas

On September 18, Disetronic announced it had obtained European market approval for the DiaPort, an implantable system for continuous insulin administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

New Legislation Creates Autoimmune Diseases Committee at NIH

On September 28, Congress signed legislation that for the first time recognizes autoimmunity as a major disease category that demands significant research attention. The legislation establishes a permanent Autoimmune Disease Coordinating Committee within the Director's Office of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The legislation, spearheaded by Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-Delaware) and Representative Henry A. Waxman (D-California), is included in the Children's Health Act. The autoimmune process results in diseases as diverse as type 1 diabetes, lupus and multiple sclerosis,'' said Senator Biden in a press release for the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA). "This new legislation will ensure that researchers working on one of these diseases will be able to fully benefit from knowledge gained from research on all other autoimmune diseases, with an eye toward eradication of all these devastating illnesses." Autoimmunity is the process whereby the immune system mistakenly recognizes the body's own proteins as foreign invaders and begins producing antibodies that attack healthy cells and tissues, causing a variety of diseases. According to AARDA, approximately 50 million Americans suffer from some 80 or so autoimmune diseases. The NIH Initiative on Autoimmune Diseases creates a coordinating committee within the NIH director's office that will oversee all the autoimmune research activities throughout the national research institutes. It will also promote cooperation and coordination among the institutes and other federal agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration, involved in ongoing research into autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases. "Most significantly, the coordinating committee will develop a plan for research and education on autoimmune diseases," said Representative Waxman. "The strategic plan will create crucial new funding opportunities for autoimmune research and provide an objective, scientifically sound roadmap for Congress and NIH to follow in pursuit of new treatments and cures.'' In addition, the strategic plan, which must reflect input from a broad range of scientists, patients and advocacy groups, will provide for: basic research to determine causes of the diseases (etiology). epidemiological studies to address the frequency and national history of the diseases, including by gender and race. clinical research for the development and evaluation of new treatments. educational programming for both health care professionals and the public. For more information, visit AARDA's web site at http://www.aarda.org or call (888) 856-9433.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

Pharmacal and Dudley Double-team Diabetes-Basketball Star to Create Awareness in Products for People with Diabetes

Hi-Tech Pharmacal of Amityville, New York, announced on September 27 it had signed an agreement with Chris Dudley to be a spokesperson for its Health Care Products Division. Dudley will help develop a line of products designed to enhance the quality of life of people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2000

October 2000

Therapeutic Massage and Diabetes

How does massage therapy come into the picture of diabetes treatment? What are its benefits? What does a person with diabetes need to know about massage?

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2000

A Dramatic Increase!—Diabetes Up at an ‘Alarming Rate’ Among All Ages and Races in the 1990s

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say that along with a rapid increase in obesity during the 1990s, the prevalence of diabetes has also increased-by 33 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

Beta-cell Dysfunction Can Lead to Obesity

Traditionally, it has been assumed that if you eat too much, the increased demand for insulin causes beta-cell dysfunction and results in obesity, insulin resistance and, finally, type 2 diabetes. Consequently, doctors have told obese persons to lose weight so they won't develop diabetes, placing the blame squarely on the patient.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

ADA Gave $18 Million to Research in ‘99—Former ADA Head Calls for More Donations

Dr. Mayer B. Davidson, past president of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published a letter in the August issue of Diabetes. The letter reminded ADA members that the current five-year plan of the ADA contained a goal of allotting one out of every three dollars of total public support to research awards and grants.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

Advocate Meets with VP Candidate—Connecticut Girl Doing Her Part for the Diabetes Cure

Catherine Agonis is a 13-year-old from Greenwhich, Connecticut, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of six. Since then, the 8th grader has been on a crusade to help raise awareness and money for a diabetes cure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

Gore Assures Teenager He’ll Fight for Diabetes Dollars

At a campaign stop in Portland, Oregon on August 30, Vice President Al Gore was confronted by American Diabetes Association national youth advocate Clare Rosenfeld on whether he will press Congress to support the Diabetes Research Working Group (DRWG)'s recommendations for the government's diabetes research budget.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

September 2000

Questions and Answers

What Therapy Should I Use for Nail Fungus?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

Men and Women with Diabetes Have Different Predictors of Mortality—Actual Cause of Death Unaffected by Gender

A recent Israeli study is showing that men and women with diabetes may need to watch out for very different things to find out if they are at increased risk of death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

Kicking Your Butts! Helpful Hints to Help People With Diabetes Quit Smoking

Ted Martin of Iselin, New Jersey, started smoking when he was 14. When he was 33, he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, but continued smoking into his early 40s. Quitting was not easy, but he finally succeeded through the technique of gradual withdrawal.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

August 2000

Questions and Answers

Can someone tell me what causes muscle spasms?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

Test Alerts People with Diabetes to Problems

Patients who measure their glucose levels from one to four times per day and their fructosamine levels once per week can significantly improve their BG control and lower HbA1c. Called the IN CHARGE, LXN Corporation of San Diego, has a GlucoProtein test which can provide both tests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

Study Says Patient Self-management Counseling Not High on Doctor’s List

The importance of physician self-management counseling for patients with diabetes is stressed time and time again. A new study, however, published in the July issue of American Journal of Preventative Medicine, says primary care is falling on its face in the area of helping people with diabetes to help themselves. The researchers argue more doctor-patient collaborative activities are needed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

Marital Stress May Increase Chances of Developing Diabetes

Pundits across the world have always claimed that marriage is about compromise, and now science may be backing them up.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

People with Diabetes More Likely to Quit Smoking

People with diabetes have been thought to have slightly healthier diets and exercise habits than the general population for some time, and a recent study suggests that quitting smoking can be added to that list.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

What Lies Behind the High Cost of Diabetes

To the dismay of many Americans with diabetes, the cost of diabetes medications has soared in recent years. This has occurred in large part because relatively new medications such as Avandia, Glucophage and Actos cost a lot more than older diabetes drugs-sometimes up to 10 times more.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

New Board Game Challenges People to Learn about Diabetes Management

Learning About Diabetes: A Game for Healthy Living is a new board game developed by Tracey Associates of Bridgewater, New Jersey. The game was introduced at the ADA Scientific Sessions in San Antonio, Texas.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

Cygnus Assembling a Team of Experts for GlucoWatch Launch

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and PacifiCare Health Systems have announced the formation of a $1.5 million partnership to educate seniors with diabetes and their caregivers who treat them. According to the ADA and PacifiCare Health Systems, the prevalence of diabetes increases with age with "approximately one out of five people over the age of 65 having diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

$1.5 Million Partnership Will Focus on Educating Seniors with Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and PacifiCare Health Systems have announced the formation of a $1.5 million partnership to educate seniors with diabetes and their caregivers who treat them. According to the ADA and PacifiCare Health Systems, the prevalence of diabetes increases with age with "approximately one out of five people over the age of 65 having diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

Accu-Check Voicemate Now Available in Spanish-Speaking Version

On June 12, at the ADA Scientific Sessions in San Antonio, Texas, Roche Diagnostics introduced a Spanish version of the Accu-Check Voicemate monitoring system. The system includes a BG monitor, testing strips with a curved edge for tactile confirmation and an insulin vial identification feature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

New Strips for FastTake Require 40 Percent Less Blood—FDA Cleared for Arm Testing

LifeScan introduced the new One Touch FastTake test strips with FastDraw design at the ADA Scientific Session in San Antonio, Texas. The new test strip requires only 1.5 microliters of blood. The original One Touch FastTake strip required 2.5 microliters of blood. The new test strip also come equipped with a capillary-action feature that provides results in 15 seconds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2000

July 2000

Healthful Tips for Dining Out

Years ago, restaurant eating was reserved for special occasions. It was a time for celebration and overindulging in foods not typical of our normal fare. Today, eating out has become second nature for many, a by-product of our fast-paced life on the run.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2000

Questions and Answers

How to Curb Post-Exercise Lows

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2000

Diabetes and Obesity Research Reaches an Important Milestone—Twelve Genetic Regions Identified

After a two-year research effort, the Eli Lilly and Company Consortium for Diabetes and Obesity identified 12 genetic regions as keys to unlocking what makes individuals susceptible to type 2 diabetes and obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2000

June 2000

Operational Errors Cause Inaccurate Glucose Results

The department of pathology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions decided to launch an investigation into BG monitors and test strips used at one of its intensive care units after receiving reports that the meters were giving inaccurate readings. In an experiment, test strips were deliberately contaminated by exposure either to liquids or to air. When the strips were used with the meters, they gave false readings instead of an error message. The researchers conclude that medical professionals, as well as patients, need to be educated on the importance of keeping test strips dry and free from contaminants.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Flu Vaccines Recommended

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that people with diabetes be immunized against influenza and pneumonia, because they are considered a moderate- to-high-risk group. The numerous complications that often accompany diabetes also make people with diabetes particularly susceptible to infections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

New Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors Have Improved Longevity, Range and Stability of Calibration

Short of finding a cure for diabetes, the next best thing is probably perfecting a "closed-loop" insulin delivery system with an implanted glucose sensor capable of continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels. This would reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia, a risk faced by people who are on intensive insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Correlation Between BG Control and Menstruation in Diabetic Adolescents

A review of the charts of diabetic girls aged 10 to 18 revealed that better BG control can help regulate their menstruation. Of 47 girls studied, those who had menstrual problems had a higher mean HbA1c (11.4%) than those who had regular menstruation (9.7%).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Thyroid Disease and Diabetes Connected

Thyroid dysfunction may affect as many as 30 percent of type 1 females. Type 2s are more often affected by hypothyroidism. Since thyroid disorders and diabetes manifest similar symptoms, this makes it hard to diagnose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

California Gives Better Care in Effort to Save Money

When officials at MediCal realized how much diabetic patients were costing the program, they came up with a team management plan to reduce the number of complications associated with diabetes. By doing so, they hoped to cut down on hospitalizations, amputations and other medical costs associated with diabetes. The California program is based on the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Bayer to Help Develop Kumetrix BG Technology—Silicon Micro-needle Said to Mimic the Painless Bite of a Mosquito

Kumetrix Inc. of Union City, California, has entered into an agreement with Bayer Diagnostics to further develop Kumetrix's silicon micro-needle device for diabetic blood glucose monitoring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Meet and Greet the Stars and Help Diabetes Research

In June, the Hollywood community is uniting to make a difference for the diabetes community by donating items which will be sold through the Hollywood Garage Sale.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

May 2000

Other Discoveries From the Diabetes Lab

Chew Gum and Lose Weight

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Use of Platelet Blocker Helps People After Angioplasty

People with diabetes who took abciximab (also available as ReoPro) during angioplasty could significantly improve their chances of survival, according to research published in the March 15 issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Alpha Lipoic Acid Reduces Nerve Pain

Taking 1,800 mg of oral alpha-lipoic acid daily for 19 days helped reduce nerve pain for type 2 patients, according to a Berlin study reported in the December 1999 issue of Diabetic Medicine. At the start of the trial, the patients all had multiple neuropathic symptoms such as burning and numbness. The double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was funded by German drug company ASTA Medica AG, which supplied the alpha-lipoic acid for the research.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Intensive Diabetes Therapy Cuts Risk of Complications

In a follow-up study of the 10-year DCCT (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial), it was found that people who intensively managed their blood sugar significantly reduced their risk of developing retinopathy and kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Agent Orange Linked to Diabetes in Vietnam War Vets—Finding Could Lead to Additional Health Benefits

On March 29, Robert Burns, an Associated Press military writer, reported that a 47 percent increase in diabetes was detected in Vietnam War veterans exposed to the dioxin-laced chemical Agent Orange.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Will the Real Project Cure Please Stand Up?

For the purposes of this article, we have chosen a sampling from the many solicitations that come into DIABETES HEALTH. Many of them are reputable organizations, but one of them, National Diabetes Fund, proved to have a negative PAS (Philanthropic Advisory Service) report. PAS reports are issued by the Council of Better Business Bureaus (CBBB), and a negative report means that a particular organization does not meet the CBBB's standards for nonprofits.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

FDA to Discuss its Rationale for Pulling Rezulin

The FDA announced that it plans to make a public presentation of the data underlying, and the rationale for, its decision to request the withdrawal of Rezulin. This presentation will be made to the next meeting of the Endocrine and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee, tentatively scheduled for May 18 and 19. According to the FDA, that date could change based on availability of committee members.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

SmithKline Beecham Encouraging Rezulin Users to Switch to Avandia

SmithKline Beecham, maker of the glitazone Avandia, is working with doctors to help the transition of patients taking Rezulin to safer alternatives. SmithKline Beecham will be offering special services for type 2 diabetes patients to get more information about glitazones.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

Over 1,500 Rally For a Diabetes Cure

On March 21, people with diabetes, and their families and friends, converged on Washington, D.C. at the Rally for a Cure. The 1,500-strong crowd lobbied Congress and President Clinton to fully implement the recommendations of the Diabetes Research Working Group (DRWG).

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

April 2000

Questions and Answers

I thought Daniel Trecroci's foot care feature in the February issue ("Does the Shoe Fit? Important New Products for the Diabetic Foot") was very well written and organized. It is always good to express opinions from a variety of specialties.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

Drug Reduces Cardiovascular Deaths by 37%

The results of the MICRO-HOPE (Microalbuminuria, Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes) ramipril drug trial were so promising that it was concluded six months early. Tested on 3,500 middle-aged and elderly people with diabetes, ramipril (Altace) was shown to significantly reduce the combined and individual risks of heart attacks (22 percent), and stroke and cardiovascular death (37 percent), regardless of whether the subjects were insulin-dependent or had a previous heart history. Altace belongs to a group of drugs called angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors which are commonly used to treat high blood pressure and kidney problems. The findings were published in the January 2000 issues of The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

President Bradley, Bush, Gore or McCain?—How Do They Feel About Increased Diabetes Research Dollars?

The 2000 presidential election is only seven months away and people with diabetes are curious to know where their candidates stand on allocating money for diabetes research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

What They’re Talking About Around the Water Cooler

FDA Official Wants Rezulin Pulled

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

LifeMasters Giving Diabetes Care Over the Internet

Established in 1994, LifeMasters Supported HealthCare provides health-management services that improve patient outcome and reduce medical costs. Services include education, vital-sign monitoring, longitudinal health records, behavior modification and virtual nurse coaching.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

DiabetiGest for the Diabetic Tummy

Health Care Products of Amityville, New York, has introduced an antacid tablet specifically designed for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

Sweet Success Express Educates Moms-to-Be on Diabetes Control

Through the partnership of M. Joann Henry, RNC, MSHS, CDE and Patricia Payne-Zajac, MSW, RD, CDE, Sweet Success Express promotes diabetes and pregnancy guidelines across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

Helping People with Diabetes Get Their Fiber Fix

Spectrum Essentials of Petaluma, California, recently introduced Daily Essential Fiber, a formula which contains 700 mg of omega-3 essential fatty acids per serving, and provides 12 percent of the recommended daily allowance of insoluble and soluble fiber.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2000

March 2000

Office Visit Guidelines

Kidney disease, retinopathy, angiopathy, neuropathy and delayed wound healing are the more commonly known complications of diabetes. Consider periodontitis, or gum disease, to be the sixth complication of diabetes, an important risk factor that needs to be controlled in order to improve your overall dental health. The more diabetes-related complications you may have, the more likely you are to develop others. Periodontitis has been linked with complications such as retinopathy, angiopathy and kidney disease. Periodontal disease can be monitored and controlled with careful attention to your at-home oral hygiene and regular visits to the dentist.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Questions and Answers

Q: My father is a 62-year-old man and he has had diabetes for a little over 10 years. He has showed an allergic reaction to the 70/30 insulin. When he first started using this insulin, after injecting the proper dose he would start to itch all over his body and he would feel hot inside and sweaty and his face would turn red. He couldn't understand why this was happening and his family doctor could not provide him any answers regarding this reaction. My father kept using the same insulin for months after that and he always had that reaction.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Researchers Prove that Non-invasive Meter Works

For the first time, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has demonstrated a capability to accurately measure glucose levels. The device uses fiber optics to illuminate vascular tissue. A tungsten-halogen light is connected to the fiber optic bundle; this is directed at the subject's thumb. Glucose has its own special "spectral signature" which can be differentiated from other molecules in the tissue. The device then processes this information (which is both reflected and absorbed by the fiber optic light) using a mathematical algorithm to come up with an accurate plasma glucose level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Good Post-Surgery Glycemic Control Reduces Infections

While rigorous glycemic control is important for all diabetic patients, it's especially important after surgery. Better glycemic control after surgery reduces the rate of bacterial infections; and high post-surgery BGs often lead to more infections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Declining Cognitive Function More Likely in Diabetic Elderly

In a study involving almost 10,000 elderly women, Edward W. Gregg, MD, and researchers from the Centers for Disease Control found that long-time sufferers of diabetes were more susceptible to failing memory and other cognitive problems. Those who had diabetes for more than 15 years were 57% to 114% more likely to suffer a decline in cognitive function and mental faculties than women without diabetes. The findings were reported in the January issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Antigen is Culprit in Blood Clots

Yet another study seems to confirm the link between type 2 diabetes and an increased risk of heart disease. In the 5-year Framingham Offspring Study involving 3,000 people, James B. Meigs, MD, MPH, and fellow researchers found that those with elevated levels of insulin also had high levels of the PAI-1 antigen, a chemical that inhibits the body's ability to dissolve blood clots. The findings were reported in the January 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, and may help explain why heart attacks and stroke currently account for two-thirds of all deaths among the type 2 diabetic population in the U.S.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Surprising Findings for Moderate Drinkers

Moderate drinkers may be less at risk for developing type 2 diabetes than nondrinkers and heavy drinkers, according to research by Ming Wei, MD, and his colleagues at the Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas. The research was published in the January 2000 issue of Diabetes Care. Wei's team examined the effect of alcohol consumption and the rates of type 2 diabetes in 8,663 men in the state of Texas. Over 6 years, 149 subjects developed diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Manic-Depressives are More Likely to Have Diabetes

People hospitalized for bipolar disorder may be three times more likely than the general population to have diabetes, according to a study by researchers at Duke University which was reported in the September 1999 issue of the Journal of Psychiatry. Fred Goodwin, MD, the Director of the Center on Neuroscience, Medicine, Progress and Society at George Washington University, cites recent studies showing a connection between diabetes and depression. "Often," he says, "we make the mistake of treating depression with anti-depressants in the absence of mood stabilizers*; which can make the depression cycle more rapidly and convert simple depression into a bipolar disorder."

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Infections

It is accepted medical knowledge that people with diabetes have an increased susceptibility to infection. A recent review in December 16, 1999 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine shows the most common infections associated with diabetes; and in which instances the jury is still out. Many specific infections appear more frequently in diabetic patients, and others occur almost exclusively in them. Diabetes has been implicated as a risk factor for salmonella, staph and candida infections. There is evidence that more closely controlled glycemic levels will improve immune function. Diabetic patients do experience some alteration of their immune function, such as depressed leucocyte levels or a reduced ability by the body to combat bacteria (phagocytosis). But it would be best to look at some of these conditions individually, rather than draw the more general assumption.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

SpectRX Says Its Device Holds Its Own Against the GlucoWatch

On the heels of the GlucoWatch monitor receiving a unanimous recommendation for approval from an advisory panel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), another company, SpectRx Inc., is saying that they are developing a similar continuous glucose monitoring device. Despite being almost two years behind the GlucoWatch monitor, spokespersons at SpectRx are saying that their product will be better.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

The Latest Step on the Evolutionary Ladder of BG Testing?

Twenty years ago, the first blood glucose meters used 30 microliters of blood. When the One Touch came out 10 years ago, it only required 10 microliters of blood. Today, the FastTake, Advantage, Elite and Precision QID only use 2 or 3 microliters of blood. As Bayer claims in its "Size Matters" print ad for the Elite and Elite XL, "less blood means fewer errors, fewer punctures, less pain" resulting in "...reduced wastage and reduced cost."

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

What They’re Talking About Around the Water Cooler

Peter Van Etten, former president and chief executive officer of the University of California at San Francisco Stanford Health Care, recently became the new president and chief executive officer of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation (JDF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

People Encouraged to Rally for More Diabetes Research Dollars

On Tuesday, March 21, people with diabetes are invited to a Rally for a Cure at the capitol in Washington, D.C. According to Joe LaMountain, national director of advocacy at the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the rally will begin at 11:00 a.m. EST, and anybody can attend.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Blood Ketone Test Gets FDA Clearance

Polymer Technology Systems, Inc., of Indianapolis, announced that they have received FDA clearance to market their blood ketone test to the consumer market. The test runs on the company's BioScanner 2000 analyzer, which also measures glucose and total cholesterol. It is designed for both home and physician office use.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

Taking Control of Your Diabetes

Ann Doherty, CDE, RN, has designed a one-week vacation for people who want to improve their diabetes or heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

LogPad Allows Patients With Neuropathy to Record Pain Symptoms

Patients with neuropathy can participate in a clinical trial in San Diego that will test a non-narcotic treatment for the debilitating pain caused by diabetic neuropathy. According to a Diabetes and Endocrine Associates news release, a hand-held device, known as the PlexxNet Patient LogPad, will enable researchers to monitor a patient's safety and response to experimental therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2000

February 2000

Calling for a Different Approach

Healthcare providers are urged to move beyond the conventional concepts of compliance and adherence when it comes to caring for their patients with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Shortened Lifespan of Red Blood Cells May Affect Test Readings

Many people with diabetes assume that there is a strong correlation between their mean blood sugar level and their glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Some researchers, however, are sounding a warning: some people with identical glycosylated hemoglobin levels have been shown to have very different average blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Grammy Sensation Working to Raise Diabetes Awareness in Hispanic Community

Six-time Grammy winner Jose Feliciano is the spokesperson for a new type 2 diabetes education initiative supported by an educational grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb, the maker of Glucophage. This new program is intended to promote health and well-being in the Hispanic community. Recent studies have indicated that as many as one in six Hispanic adults has diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Painless Shots Possible With Ethyl Chloride Spray

In a recent study, 93 percent of people who were given Gebauer Company's Ethyl Chloride, a topical anesthetic applied before injections, reported feeling no pain when receiving the injection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

Companies to Co-develop Gene Expression Database

Gene Logic Inc., of Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., of Osaka, Japan, will co-develop a custom gene expression database to aid in the development of drugs to help counter the progression of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2000

January 2000

Can Self-hypnosis Help Smokers to Quit for Good?

How have tens of thousands of people managed to successfully quit smoking, many without any withdrawal symptoms? Would you believe self-hypnosis?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2000

Molecular Trigger of Complications Discovered

An international team of researchers announced its discovery of the root cause of all serious diabetes complications the April 13 issue of the journal Nature reported.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Survey Shows Health Care Professionals with Diabetes Manage Themselves Better Than Their Patients Do

A recent survey published in the May/June issue of The Diabetes Educator found that most health care professionals with diabetes manage their own care more intensively than most of their patients do.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Eating More Fiber Drops BGs by 8.9 Percent—But Will It Catch On?

The May 11 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine reports that fiber may be one step closer to becoming a vital part of the diabetes diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Good News for Coffee Drinkers—Caffeine Increases Hypoglycemic Awareness

A British study published in the April issue of Diabetes Care has put caffeine under the microscope again. After a two-year study, researchers conclude that caffeine can intensify the warning symptoms of hypoglycemia without affecting a patient's glycemic control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Maple Syrup Now Available with Splenda

Maple Grove Farms of St. Johnsbury, Vermont, has introduced Cozy Cottage sugar-free, maple-flavored syrup, now sweetened with Splenda and fortified with six vitamins and minerals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

New England Health Center Teams with Joslin—Will Provide Exercise Program for People with Diabetes

The world's most famous diabetes clinic has now teamed up with a local health club to promote good diabetes control through exercise.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

FDA Approves New Uses for Humalog—Children Over 3 and Adults Over 65 Can Now Use

In 1996, Humalog was given FDA approval for patients, aged 12 to 65, for injection within 15 minutes of a meal. On May 2, that approval was expanded to include children over age 3 and adults over age 65.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Consumer Protection Agency Claims Drug Firms Fail to Conduct Post-Marketing Studies

Dr. Sidney Wolfe, head of Public Citizen's Health Research Group, said the FDA should ask Congress for authority to impose large civil fines on companies that do not complete their required studies. In April, Wolfe told Reuters Health the apparent neglect of the drug studies might mean that side effects go undetected.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2000

Questions and Answers

Is There Such a Thing as a Diabetic Seizure?

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

How Muslims with Diabetes Deal With Annual Month-Long Fast

Ramadan is an annual month of fasting observed by as many as 1 billion Muslims globally. During Ramadan, which takes place this year from December 9, 1999 to January 8, 2000, Muslims fast from dawn until sunset. Although Islamic leaders allow exemptions on medical grounds, many devout Muslims with diabetes prefer to fast during Ramadan. As a result, they must make adjustments to their insulin dosages to avoid hypo- or hyperglycemia. Previously, doctors had reservations about allowing people with diabetes to fast but recent research indicates that fasting can be done safely as long as proper self-monitoring and close professional supervision are guaranteed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

Esophagus Function Slower in People With Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes are susceptible to delayed digestive transit through the esophagus and abnormal esophageal motility as a result of intestinal problems.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

$28 Million Diabetes Institute Opens—One of the Largest Centers in the Nation for Diabetes Care

The $28 million Texas Diabetes Institute (TDI) was built in response to the alarming prevalence of diabetes in San Antonio and South Texas. The 153,000 square-foot comprehensive and community-based center aims to become the national model for diabetes treatment, education and research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

Supply of Transplant Organs Not Expected to Meet Demand in Near Future

While the demand for animal and artificial donor transplants continues to grow, the supply is not keeping pace.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

Sugar-free Cough Syrup Does Not Raise Blood Sugars

People with diabetes should know that they have the option of treating their seasonal cold and flu symptoms with a sugar-free cough syrup.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

NetGrocer.com Launches Site for People with Diabetes

NetGrocer.com (www.netgrocer.com), the leading nationwide online grocery and drug store supercenter, has announced the opening of its virtual Diabetic Solution store.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

December 1999

Lack of Sleep May Raise Blood Sugars

Even one week of not getting eight hours of sleep can alter a person's capacity to metabolize carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

GlucoWatch to Be Reviewed on December 6—Watches BGs While You Sleep

According to Cygnus Inc., the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has scheduled December 6 as the date for an advisory committee review of the GlucoWatch monitor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

Did You Get Your Flu Shot?—Study Reveals Many People with Diabetes Don't

The flu season is among us and it is likely that many people with diabetes will not get their flu or pneumonia vaccination this year. Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that all people with diabetes be vaccinated against flu and pneumonia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

Sorbitol’s Laxative Effect Might Cause Abdominal Problems

The laxative effect from sorbitol, a sugar substitute, is more than a discomfort, says the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). According to studies, sorbitol can lead to severe diarrhea, and the CSPI wants its label to say so.

comments 30 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

Bristol-Myers Squibb About to Lose Patent Exclusivity on Glucophage

With its patent exclusivity on metformin (Glucophage) about to end, Bristol-Myers Squibb is looking at a new pill to help keep its strong position in the type 2 drug market. In 2000, other companies will be able to manufacture generic forms of Glucophage, the best-selling diabetes pill in the United States. With generic medicines being less expensive, the company is bound to lose sales.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1999

November 1999

Newly Diagnosed Does Not Mean New Onset

I am a 25-year-old female with type 2 diabetes. My father passed away at 56 and was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only four months before his death. Tests showed that he had damage to his eyes as a result of diabetes. Is it possible he had this for many years before his diagnosis?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Most People With Diabetes Getting Educated From More Than One Source

More than 97 percent of people with diabetes use more than one educational resource for their information.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Facts About Diabetes in America

Who Has Diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Information Update on Accu-Chek Advantage and Complete

Roche Diagnostics wrote to us with an update on the operating temperatures for its Accu-Chek Advantage and Complete meters and test strips. These two meters will function in temperatures ranging from 57 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Boils and Carbuncles and Diabetes, Oh My!

When I was 3, I had small boils on the webs of my left forefinger and thumb. Shortly thereafter I suffered a severe carbuncle on my bottom and could not sleep because the blankets hurt so much. For the next eight years I had boils, carbuncles and styes almost continuously. At one point I had five boils on one leg. These boils went untreated.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Should a Person With Diabetes Take Extra Antibiotics?

I have had diabetes for 24 years and my HbA1cs run below 6.4%. When I am ill, I tend to need stronger antibiotics and need them longer than the average nondiabetic. My doctor, however, tells me that I should only need the same amount of antibiotics as anyone else. I usually have a relapse and need additional antibiotics to clear an infection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

How Can I Cure My Nighttime Blues?—No Matter what I Try, I Wake Up High

I am a 39-year-old type 1. What is a good strategy for controlling BGs during the night?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Hypnosis—More Than Watch Waving

Hypnosis. For many, the word conjures up images that make a person uncomfortable. Many fear hypnosis because they fear a loss of control, yet a person is actually more in control while in a state of trance. This fact should interest people with diabetes, because control is exactly the issue that concerns them: controlling blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

New Internet Contact System Finds Loved Ones in Emergencies

A few months ago, Ron Pruiksma of Roswell, Georgia, was driving to pick up his 3-year-old daughter from school, when a thought popped in his head.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

We Care Expands to the Web with SupplyPlanet.com

Mail-order medical supplier We Care Corporation will sell diabetes and other medical products on its new Web site, www.supplyPlanet.com. The site cannot handle insurance claims, so all transactions must be paid up front, either by personal check or credit card. We Care promises its customers security in their orders, vowing never to share customer information to outside organizations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Nation's Largest Medicaid Program to Carry Avandia

Medicaid recipients in California can now be prescribed new type 2 drug Avandia. Called Medi-Cal, it is the nation's largest Medicaid program, which should further boost Avandia's booming sales. Avandia is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a solo treatment or in combination with Glucophage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

October 1999

Angioplasties Less Successful in People With Diabetes

A person with diabetes who receives an angioplasty to reopen a narrowed blood vessel is more likely to experience artery reclosure after the operation than a nondiabetic person who undergoes the same procedure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

Too Much Iron Can Cause Diabetes—Doctors Say to Get Tested

Hemochromatosis, a genetic metabolic disorder where a person absorbs too much iron in the digestive tract, can result in diabetes, according to researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

How The Sweeteners Compare

Adults and Halloween

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

New Lancet, Pentip Hit Market

Owen Mumford is offering two new products. The Unilet GP 28 lancet joins the Owen Mumford lancet line. Called "ultra-thin," it fits most lancing devices on the market. For insulin injections, Owen Mumford introduces Unifine Pentips, designed for use with the Autopen insulin pen, plus all other major insulin pens.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

StatSite System Performs Multiple Tests

A cholesterol screening has been approved as the newest test offered by the StatSite Point-of-Care Analyzer. Used by health care professionals, the system measures patients' glucose levels, ketones, total hemoglobin, bilirubin and acetaminophen levels, all in one device.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

Diabetes Camping Association Hosts Conference for Camp Staff Education

Diabetes summer camps help children develop healthy habits, and the Diabetes Camping Association (DCA) helps camps to enrich their curricula. To help prepare for the summer of 2000, the DCA will host its third annual Diabetes International Camping Conference February 16-20, 2000, near Orlando, Florida.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1999

September 1999

Questions and Answers

Should I Start ACE Inhibitors?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

Catching Up with Miss America—Nicole Johnson Ends Her Reign as Miss America

This month, Nicole Johnson will end her reign as Miss America, but certainly her influence on the diabetes world is not over. DIABETES HEALTH wishes to thank Nicole for sharing her thoughts and the latest information with us throughout her reign. We hope we can continue working together to inform people with diabetes, and to increase diabetes awareness throughout the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

Diabetes and Martial Arts—Exercising Mind, Body and Spirit

Looking over my application, the martial arts instructor asked, "Do you suffer from any health problems I should know about?" I answered promptly, "I have diabetes." He paused for a few seconds, then nervously asked, "Are you sure this is the right sport for you?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

D-Care Adds Herbal Combination Tablets to Line of Diabetes Care Products

The D-Care line of products now offers several herbal combination tablets specifically designed for diabetes care. All contain gymnema sylvestre, an herb often linked to improved glucose control, plus other herbs to aid in specific areas of wellness.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

Personal Lasette On the Way

The Personal Lasette, the only home-use alternative to the stainless steel lancet, was displayed at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting in San Diego from June 19-21.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1999

August 1999

Drinkers Report Varied Effects of Alcohol—BGs Raised in Some, Lowered in Others

Researchers at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital in Dorset, United Kingdom, discovered that alcohol consumption in people with type 1 diabetes is less than average, and that at least half of them experience some form of acute blood glucose change when drinking.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

A DNA Test May Show Who Will Get Diabetic Complications

Type 2 patients with the ACE gene could be at risk for developing diabetic kidney disease and retinopathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

Letters from Readers

Twenty-five percent of all people with diabetes feel that alternative therapies are beneficial in their diabetes treatment, but consider conventional diabetes medications and therapies to be superior.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

Only 20 Percent of People With Diabetes Take Daily Aspirin Therapy

Deborah B. Rolka of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, reports that fewer than 1 in 5 diabetic patients who would benefit from aspirin therapy actually take aspirin. She presented here findings at the American Diabetes Association (ADA)'s scientific sessions in June.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

My Medical Adventure

In 1995, I was diagnosed with an advanced case of type 2 diabetes. At the time, I hardly knew what the disease was, but I was sure that a few pills would fix it. Still, I wanted to do some research, which started me on a medical journey. It dawned on me that I had a real problem, not just a minor interference with my work schedule.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

New Diabetes Care Products Available At Wal-Mart

Large retailer Wal-Mart has introduced a line of diabetes care products called ReliOn, including lancets, glucose tablets and alcohol swabs. It will also offer many skin care products, including skin sanitizer, two types of skin cream, sunscreen and body wash. With nearly 2,500 stores, Wal-Mart promises to keep its prices low.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

KMart Campaign Targets Seniors with Diabetes

KMart and The Senior Network, a marketing company which helps companies target senior citizens, will join forces in a campaign to educate seniors about diabetes and sell them diabetes products.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1999

July 1999

Questions and Answers

Sucrose Versus Fructose?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

New Study Says Women With Diabetes at Greater Risk for Colorectal Cancer

Women with diabetes may be at a greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, according to results from the 18-year Nurses' Health Study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Diabetes Vaccine May be 10 to 15 Years Away

A vaccine to prevent childhood diabetes could be 10 to 15 years away, according to researchers at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Diabetes Linked to Patients with Sleep Apnea

Almost a third of people with sleep apnea also have diabetes, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Glucose Products Can Bring You Out Of a Low

If your glucose level drops below 70, it's time to act quickly. You may have an old tried-and-true (and cheap) solution like cake frosting, orange juice or candy, but many diabetes experts recommend glucose tablets. Tablets and gels are predictable, easy to carry and don't tempt you to snack on them when you don't need them, like a delicious chocolate bar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Where Is Splenda?—New Sweetener Available to People with Diabetes on the Internet

Splenda, the new sweetener approved over a year ago, is promised to be safe, very sweet, stable when heated and harmless to your blood sugars. People have been wondering why they can't find it in the supermarket, or anywhere else, until now.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Non-Chalky Calcium Chew is Chocolatey

You know you need a calcium supplement, but that awful, chalky taste just makes it unbearable. A new, chocolate-flavored calcium chew might make it more tempting. It's called Viactiv, and it comes from Mead Johnson Nutritionals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Rezulin Rival Avandia Arrives—Claimed To Be Easier On Liver

Type 2 medication Avandia, said to work like Rezulin but not affect liver function, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in late May. Manufacturer SmithKline Beecham says it will cost from 10 to 20 percent less than Rezulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

June 1999

Questions and Answers

My Girlfriend Has Problems

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

School’s Out—and Diabetes Control is Down—For the Summer

It was discovered that HbA1c measurements in adolescents went up during the summer months by .73% and declined by .75% in the fall.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

Teen Athlete Tackles Control Dilemma—Persistence Pays Off

Gary was excited to make the junior varsity crew team. The team usually met at 5:30 a.m., rowed until 6:30, showered, dressed, grabbed some breakfast and got to school by 8. Gary wasn't sure how to swing insulin and breakfast, but he thought his blood glucose levels would be okay. Gary also told his coach that he didn't want special favors or attention because of his diabetes. He and his parents had been well educated about adjusting insulin, and were encouraged by their medical team to see what worked best. Unfortunately, things didn't work out as he planned.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

Click On to the Diabetes Hall of Fame

“We decided to start the Web site because we wanted to encourage others to reach for the stars, to show that dreams can come true no matter what obstacles get in the way. We want others to know that they are not alone.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

May 1999

Questions and Answers

Q: If an individual with diabetes has numbers that are all within normal when compared to a healthy nondiabetic, are there adjustments that must be made in terms of diet? By normal numbers, I mean fasting blood glucose less than 100, HbA1c less than 5.3%, body mass index less than 23 percent, and a lipid panel within normal.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

Catching Up with Miss America

DIABETES HEALTH: What have you been up to as America's first lady of diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

JDF Speaks Loudly with Small Voices

The Juvenile Diabetes Foundation (JDF) spoke through a small voice to help push the $827 million NIH funding through Congress.

JDF volunteer Philip Burgin, a 9-year-old from Burlington, Vermont, wrote to his state's representatives in Congress. One of them, Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., was so impressed he presented it to the Congressional Record on March 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

Biggest Diabetes Rally Ever in Washington

Both the JDF and the ADA continue to pressure Congress to give diabetes research the entire $827 million that was recommended by the Diabetes Research Working Group, a group of researchers that recently gave this figure as the amount needed for diabetes funding.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

Rezulin Clears its Latest FDA Hurdle

Rezulin cleared its most recent FDA hurdle, but the question looms as to whether there are any more in the future.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

April 1999

Group Advises Government to Double Spending on Diabetes Research

Over a year ago, the United States Congress gave the Diabetes Research Working Group (DRWG) this task: tell us what we need to do, and what we need to spend, to cure diabetes. On February 25, the group answered the question, recommending a strategic plan for the next five years of diabetes research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Questions and Answers

Q: Is the Dr. Atkins low-carbohydrate diet bad for me? I was around 200 pounds last year. I went on a diet and lost 20 pounds by eating a lot of meat, vegetables and eggs, and drinking a lot of diet soda. When I reached 180 pounds, I quit the diet and lost another 20 pounds. Soon thereafter, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Diabetes Becoming an Epidemic Among Mexican Population

According to a report in the January 25, 1999, issue of Nurseweek, diabetes is rising at an "epidemic" rate.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Catching Up with Miss America—Nicole Johnson's Crusade for Diabetes Awareness

Nicole Johnson: Congratulations. I saw Scott King's letter in Ann Landers. How wonderful that it was published.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Meals Fit For a Queen

Last month, Nicole Johnson told us her special tips for eating on the road, saying she has a few different meals from which she chooses. Here's what she told us are her usual meals:

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Fabulous Fiber—Why You Need It and Where to Get It

If you eat more fiber, you will lose weight, says the Journal of Nutrition. A person who goes from 18 grams of fiber per day to 36 grams will absorb 130 fewer calories per day, translating to a 10-pound weight loss over one year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Measurements

Avoiding overdoses of a supplement requires knowing just how much you are taking. Do you know the difference between a microgram and a milligram? And, have you heard of an IU?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

Roche Adds New Member to Accu-Chek Family

Roche Diagnostics introduces a new member of the Accu-Chek family, the Simplicity glucose meter, this month.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1999

March 1999

Catching Up with Miss America—Nicole Johnson’s Crusade for Diabetes Awareness

Miss America 1999, type 1 Nicole Johnson, is devoting her year to diabetes awareness. She will check in with DIABETES HEALTH every month, to describe her lobbying and fund raising efforts. She'll also discuss the personal side of being Miss America, including her conversations with others who have diabetes and her own self-care during this hectic year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

The Up-and Coming-Technology

Joan Harmon, PhD, senior advisor for diabetes at the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, sees MiniMed's FDA submission as the "most interesting news," however, she stresses that much more is still going on. For instance, the NIDDK's most recent funding awarded $4 million in grants to a variety of promising and innovative research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

The Web Brings Back Sweetener Debate

Two of Beth Schatzman's patients called her in a panic. Schatzman, RD, CDE, is a diabetes educator in the Eureka, California, area. Both patients got word on the Internet that aspartame (NutraSweet), their favorite artificial sweetener, was harmful.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

Exercise Charts

I. Topics Most Commonly Recommended by Educators

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

Pycnogenol Proven to Protect Against Blood Vessel Clogging

Although Pycnogenol has been proven to be a powerful antioxidant and a weapon against clogging of the blood vessels, American doctors generally do not recommend it for people with diabetes. Here are four of many studies linking Pycnogenol to fighting oxidation in the blood vessels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

Public Invited to Hear Diabetes Experts

Three important diabetes experts, plus Miss America 1999, Nicole Johnson, will speak at "A Day of Hope" at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, California, on March 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

Athletes with Diabetes Can Win $5,000

The International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA) and LifeScan want to reward athletes who have diabetes with $5,000.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

FDA Holds Special Meeting on Rezulin—Agency Will Look at Making it Safer for Livers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will again address the safety of Rezulin (troglitazone), the controversial type 2 medication, on March 26 at a scientific advisory panel meeting. In the wake of two recent deaths, the FDA will look at steps to make Rezulin safer for people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

Monster Mountain Climb for the Millennium—Climbers with Diabetes to Tackle Highest Peak in Western Hemisphere

Fourteen people with diabetes are certain to put their equipment to the test when they climb the highest mountain in the Western hemisphere, Argentina's Mount Aconcagua, in January 2000.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

NIH Substantially Increases Diabetes Funding

Washington gave diabetes research a big raise, increasing diabetes money by 20 percent for 1999. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) diabetes budget has grown nearly as much in 1998 and 1999 as it did in the entire decade from 1987 to 1997.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

February 1999

Questions and Answers

Q: I cannot find any information on the effect of short-term spikes in blood sugar (i.e., 115 before breakfast, 170 one hour after breakfast). How dangerous are swings? Currently, I am not on any medication and I am simply trying to control my blood sugar through diet and exercise. I am not overweight (6 feet tall, 175 pounds), and I walk four miles about four to five times a week. Even with all of this, I still cannot control my blood sugar into the nondiabetic range. Any suggestions?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

Pravastatin Reduced Bypass Operations by 32 Percent

Over five years, patients taking pravastatin showed a 25 percent reduction in risk for coronary events compared to patients taking a placebo. Furthermore, patients taking pravastatin showed a 32 percent decrease in coronary bypass operations compared to the placebo group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

Study Shows Only 33 Percent in Good Control

Recent studies indicate that glycemic control is not up to standards.

According to the December 1998 issue of Diabetes Care, HbA1c values of 2,579 French people with type 1 diabetes registered at an average of 8.9%. Approximately 33 percent of the research subjects registered HbA1cs less than 8%.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

NIH Spends $318 Million on Diabetes Research—Where Did Your Tax Dollars Go?

In a speech delivered at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Diabetes Association in Chicago last June, Mayer B. Davidson, MD, of King-Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles outlined the current state of diabetes research and diabetes care in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

We, The People With Diabetes—Your Bill of Rights to Get the Care You Need

The "Bill of Rights for People with Diabetes," published by Diabetes Advocates, can help you in communicating with your health care team to get the tests every person with diabetes needs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

The Lasette Finger Lancing Device Goes Home

Two thousand dollars can now buy "nearly painless" finger lancing, according to Chronimed, distributor of the Lasette laser finger perforator. People with diabetes can now use this laser beam technology at home.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

JDF, ADA Criticize Each Other’s Lobbying Tactics

The JDF and the ADA fight against diabetes all across the United States, but when they hit Capitol Hill they go in different directions. So says The Washington Post in a December 1998 story.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1999

January 1999

Questions and Answers

Q: I am interested in knowing what the current recommendations are for rotating insulin sites. I recently received a request to research this topic from a nurse developing diabetes protocol, and I am learning that many of my heavier, older, insulin-using clients are injecting into adipose (abdomen) tissue. Are there any professional resources you could recommend?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

Results of New Retinopathy Drug Seem Promising
Results of New Retinopathy Drug Seem Promising

Retinopathy, a degenerative eye disease, has long been associated with diabetes complications. According to news wire reports, however, there is now a drug being tested that can help normalize some of the characteristics of diabetic retinopathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

Doctors Still Blame Patients for Poor Control
Doctors Still Blame Patients for Poor Control

According to a survey of 335 family physicians, more than half (51.7 percent) of patients with diabetes do not follow their doctor's advice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

Diabetes Market Set for Huge Growth in Drug Sales

According to recent findings from a Decision Resource (DR) report, it was revealed that cases of type 2 diabetes will dramatically increase by 2005.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

ADA Pressures Politicians to Keep Promises on Diabetes Funding

They can't agree about much, but they do agree on one thing: a cure for diabetes. But will they put their money where their mouths are?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

Device Allows Needle Disposal with Regular Trash
Device Allows Needle Disposal with Regular Trash

A new needle disposal kit, called SafeSharps, surrounds needles in a disinfecting gel which can then be thrown away with the regular, household trash.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

The Sales Pitch Behind Your Prescription

People with diabetes and the clinicians who treat them represent a major chunk of the medical industry. Corporations know this. People with diabetes see and hear many sales pitches but generally count on their health care professionals to help them weed out the safest, most effective products.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

December 1998

Questions and Answers

Q: I would appreciate any information you can provide me concerning whether people with diabetes can qualify for fire fighter positions. Any information concerning the medical requirements, training, etc., would be appreciated. This is for insulin-dependent people with diabetes. Can they qualify for appointment as firefighters for municipal or private fire departments? Are there any special requirements? If you can put me in contact with anyone who is currently a fire fighter with diabetes, it would be most appreciated.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

New Drug Lowers Blood Sugar and Pressure

As early as next year, there could be a new drug on the market that is considered revolutionary in the treatment of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

Diabetes Health’s Chat with Miss America 1999, Nicole Johnson

DIABETES HEALTH: Thank you for speaking with Diabetes Health, Nicole, and congratulations. In preparation for this conversation, I asked our Diabetes Health email group which questions they would ask you if they could, so some of my questions will be from our readers with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

Sweeten Your Holidays with Brown's Sugarless Baked Goods

As people with diabetes head into the manic holiday pace and try to stick to their diet plans, Brown's Sugarless Bakery offers a bit of sanity with its line of sugarless desserts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1998

November 1998

Questions and Answers

Q: My daughter was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 2. She is now 7. I have read Dr. Bernstein's book, Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1997) several times, and would like to put my daughter on the program. What do you think about it? I don't remember you ever talking about it in DIABETES HEALTH.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Diabetes Forecasted to Skyrocket in 21st Century

Developing countries will see a 170 percent rise in diabetes cases in the 21st century. According to this recent prediction from the United Nations health agency, India and China will be the hardest hit. The World Health Organization named obesity, bad eating habits and lack of exercise as the causes of this increase in developing countries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Cocaine Usage Contributes to Ketoacidosis

In a report that was published in the September 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, it was revealed that people with diabetes who use cocaine increase their risk of developing ketoacidosis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 1998

People with Diabetes Urged to Get Flu Shots

Flu season is upon us, and officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta are recommending that people with diabetes get their inoculations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Teens Taught Coping Skills - Lowers Blood Sugar

A team of researchers from Yale University was recently awarded the Applied Nursing Research Award for its study on teaching coping skills to adolescents with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Not Just for Bacon Anymore

There is an old refrain that says "dog is a man's best friend." Individuals with diabetes might beg to differ.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Choosing the Right Clinical Treatment is Important for People with Diabetes

Strategic Diabetes Management (SDM) is a program concept that can guide professionals through diabetes treatment, ensuring that patients receive the most thorough and specific guidelines on how to manage their blood sugar. Recent research has indicated that this new treatment strategy really works.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Diabetes Educators Raise $5,000 in Walk/Jog-a-Thon

During the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting in Minneapolis this August, Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals held its 17th annual "Walk/Jog-A-Thon" for diabetes awareness. At the early hour of 6 a.m. on a Saturday morning, more than 800 diabetes educators raced for the company's pledge of $5,000 to the AADE Foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Company Donates 50 Percent of It's Profits to JDF

You are indeed if you are buying from Fifty 50. That's Fifty percent for profit, and 50 percent for diabetes research, because half of their profits go to the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. In seven years of business, they have sent $4.65 million dollars to JDF. Fifty 50 chose JDF because "they are organized with a sole mission of funding diabetes research."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Just Eat and Click!

A new device called the Diabetes Exchange Kit helps people keep track of their daily food intake, in order to adhere to the American Diabetes Association food exchange recommendations. Each morning, users start off with the total exchanges of each food group that they should eat that day. As they eat throughout the day, they "click off" their exchanges on the hand-held device. People can then be sure that they eat the proper amounts of food, as well as stay away from foods that are not recommended, like those high in fat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

Chronimed Named as a Top 100 Fastest Growing Company

Fortune magazine 's "Top 100 Fastest-Growing Companies" list includes a top diabetes player, Chronimed Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

October 1998

Questions and Answers

Q: The subject of treating diabetes with a low carbohydrate diet is virtually untouched by other publications. I would like to see a series of articles about it. Of course, a quicker way would be to read Dr. Richard K. Bernstein's book Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1997).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Fasting Glucose Test Could Hurt Elderly Women Through Failure to Detect Diabetes

Two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes are experiencing high blood sugar after eating, but not after fasting. Thus, a fasting glucose test fails to identify this type of diabetes, known as IPH, or Isolated Postchallenge Hyperglycemia. Because IPH diabetes prevalence increases with age, a fasting glucose test will miss a diabetes diagnosis among the elderly population, particularly elderly women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

New Test on Diabetes Hearing Loss

Researchers at the Catholic University in Rome, Italy, are further exploring the effect that diabetes might have on hearing loss. The study, which was conducted by Walter Dinardo, MD, and fellow researchers, was aimed at exploring hearing loss in patients with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Epidemic Diabetes Rate Among African-American Teens

African-American teenagers in Allegheny County, Penn., are experiencing an epidemic-level onset of type 1 diabetes, and researchers are fighting to find the cause. Some even suspect that a new type of diabetes has surfaced.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Japanese Doctors Warn of Dangers of Blood Sampling from Fingers

In a letter to Diabetes Care (August 1998), three Japanese doctors endorsed blood sampling from body sites other than the fingers, and recommended a new lancing device which makes this possible.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Options You Have with the Government

If you wish to complain about the shortage of beef-pork insulin, file a shortage complaint using the Medwatch Form 3500 discussed below. You may also wish to appeal to Congress (the FDA's boss).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Do It Yourself Remedies

Move It or Lose It

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Uncharted Territory - A Friend's Hike at Yosemite

When peering over the edge of Half Dome, one of the signature peaks of Yosemite National Park, it is hard not to worry about falling. When Paul Wiersma reached this precipice, he had other falls to worry about as well. In the Sierra heat of this past summer, Paul, who has type 1 diabetes, had to worry that a combination of exertion and insulin would cause his blood glucose levels to fall too low. Overdosing on insulin and exertion can be dangerous anywhere, but it is especially unforgiving on a mountain trail with perilous drops only a misstep away.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

Minimed Inc. Seeking FDA Clearance on Glucose Sensor

Minimed Inc. has been informed by the Food and Drug Administration that its application for marketing clearance of a continous glucose system is being actively reviewed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

AADE Celebrates Silver Anniversary

The American Association of Diabetes Educators held its 25th annual meeting in Minneapolis from August 19 to 23, 1998. This silver year celebration brought the largest group ever to the gathering, with over 5,000 people attending.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

New Comfort Curve Strip Makes Testing Easier than Ever

Roche Diagnostics of Indianapolis has manufactured a new strip which should make blood testing easier than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

September 1998

Questions and Answers

Blood Glucose Monitor for the Elderly?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Losing Weight with Leptin

An early phase 1 clinical trial presented at the American Diabetes Association's 58th Annual Scientific Sessions showed that the hormone leptin promotes weight loss and may also help lower blood sugars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Can Rodents Cause Diabetes?

The cause of type 1 diabetes has been studied for many years and several possible explanations have been presented. Research recently published in Emerging Infectious Disease claims that rodents carrying infectious agents may be responsible for a number of diseases including type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Where East Meets West - Traditional Chinese Medicine in Diabetes Treatment

Darryl Rawlinson, a 47-year-old middle manager for a Silicon Valley semiconductor plant, was a little hesitant to have needles stuck in his body. Although Rawlinson had diabetes, the needles he was concerned about would not be delivering insulin but would help to stimulate his flow of qi (pronounced CHEE).

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

The TCM Viewpoint on Diabetes

Traditional Chinese medicine recognizes three types of diabetes, corresponding to problems with organs in three key energy centers of the body. Those include: 1) superior or lung diabetes, a condition of heat and dryness of the fluids around the lungs, and characterized by a normal appetite but dry mouth and throat, copious and frequent urination and constant thirst; 2) middle or stomach diabetes, noted by excess heat in the stomach and constipation, constant hunger, along with extreme thirst, dryness and frequent urination; and 3) inferior or kidney diabetes, which usually is characterized by extreme urinary symptoms, a damaged liver function, as well as the thirst and hunger seen in the other types.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Finding an Acupuncturist

For more information contact the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, (301) 608-9680; the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, (703) 548-9004, fax: (703) 548-9079; the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, (800) 521-2262; or the American Association of Oriental Medicine, (610) 266-1433.3. Relevant web sites include www.acupuncture.com or www.healthy.net.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Anatomy of a Sweetener Approval

How does a new sweetener get approved for use in foods and beverages in the United States? The most common way taken is the food additive petition route. If the information and data provided to the FDA are satisfactory, the agency will indicate that the petition has been "accepted for filing."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Camping Conference to be Held this Month

The Diabetes Camping Association will hold its Second Annual International Camping Conference in the Happy Hollow Camp in Nashville, Indiana from September 23rd through the 27th. The conference will focus on administrative, program and medical issues related to operating a diabetes camp. Specific session topics include "Alternative Ways of Running a Camp," "Keeping Connected with Teens," "New Insulins and Pumps in Camp" and others. For more information contact the DCA at (765) 348-1762.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

Rezulin Sales Soar Amid Warnings

Sales of Rezulin (troglitazone) by Parke-Davis pharmaceutical corporation soared recently, reaching $226 million during the second quarter of 1998-a three-fold increase. Rezulin is used by individuals with type 2 diabetes and helps muscle cells respond to insulin and metabolize glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1998

August 1998

Questions and Answers

Is it the Stress?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Chicago Brings Hope

Sifting through the research findings from Chicago, we found many exciting new developments. Some of the results, which we have reviewed below, offer new insights into the complications and associated conditions that come with diabetes. Some of these discoveries offer the possibility of radical new therapies that can help mitigate, if not eliminate, certain damaging effects. Here is a sample of the more interesting reports we found.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Speaking Up for Diabetes in Washington

When I first became involved last November in what was originally to be a march on Washington, I had no idea it would turn out like this. It was May and I was sitting on a soft chair in the office of Senator Connie Mack of Florida, waiting for my appointment. Around me were two large groups of people: about 15 portly, older men in dark suits-Presidents and CEOs from Florida's electric companies-and 10 well-dressed women-librarians carrying bulging briefcases. My daughter Kathryn and I were clearly by ourselves, dressed casually and obviously nervous. Neither of us had ever been in a senator's office before, and it was apparent that we were out gunned.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Voyage of the S.S. Diabetes - Who's at the Wheel?

After only two weeks with Diabetes Health as managing editor, I was in Chicago covering the 58th American Diabetes Association's conference. Even before I arrived in the windy city, it was obvious from the phone book-sized conference program that there would be much to learn.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Changing Roles

In addition to the physical transformations that occur with age, there are also several social changes that can have a profound impact on general health and diabetes control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Prevention Study Needs Seniors

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is seeking individuals age 65 and older to participate in the three-year study. The investigation will examine whether medication (glucophage) or diet and exercise can help to prevent type 2 diabetes in people at risk for the disease. Individuals eligible to participate must have high blood glucose levels-fasting glucose levels should be between 95 and 125 mg/dl-but not yet have diabetes. Twenty-seven medical centers across the United States are involved in the study. To find out if you can participate, call (888) DPP-JOIN (377-5646) or visit the web site at www.preventdiabetes.com.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

Prandin Helps Smooth Glucose Swings

A series of new studies has shown that Prandin (repaglinide), a new oral antidiabetic drug, is effective in providing 24-hour control of blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Prandin stimulates beta cells within the pancreas to produce insulin and is taken just before each meal, when insulin is needed. The drug reduces risk of hyperinsulinemia (excess insulin) or severe hypoglycemia (low glucose levels) by allowing insulin levels to return toward baseline between meals and at night.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1998

July 1998

Questions and Answers

Does Insulin Have Side Effects?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

Yo Soy Healthy

Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center have recently shown that soy products have the power to lower total and LDL cholesterol levels, especially in individuals with mildly elevated cholesterol. It is believed that compounds called isoflavones which naturally occur in soy products are responsible for this cholesterol lowering property.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

When Almost Is Good Enough

According to Monica Ramirez Basco, PhD, perfectionism should take a back seat when diabetes management is involved. She notes that, "while it could be argued that perfect control is a great goal, most people with diabetes find it impossible to consistently achieve." For a perfectionist, inability to achieve perfect control can lead to great frustration which may in turn cause even greater problems.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

An Antioxidant a Day...

Researchers from Duke University Medical Center have found that a depletion of antioxidants may increase the risk of several diabetic complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

On the Fast Track with FastTake

The new FastTake blood glucose meter from LifeScan promises to make blood glucose readings less time consuming. The novel egg-shaped meter delivers readings within 15 seconds and requires the smallest blood drop of any meter currently on the market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

Rezulin Dropped from the DPP

The National Institutes of Health recently discontinued the use of the drug troglitazone from its Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). The drug was being given to individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to determine if it might be a successful preventative treatment for type 2 diabetes. Parke-Davis (a division of Warner-Lambert), currently markets troglitazone under the brand name Rezulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

Counsult Your Doctor First

Diabetes specialists are warning people with diabetes not to discontinue home glucose monitoring or stop taking Rezulin (troglitazone) because of recent reports of problems with both the medication and SureStep meters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

New Diabetes Foundation Established

Long-time diabetes advocate Charles Ray III recently established a foundation in his name to help low-income diabetics in North Carolina and Virginia to obtain glucose monitors. The foundation also intends to serve as a resource and advocate for minorities with diabetes. Roche Diagnostics, LifeScan and MediSense have committed to donate meters to the foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

June 1998

Peritoneal Dialysis Lowers Risks

A new study shows patients may have a lower risk of death the first two years of treatment on peritoneal dialysis (PD) as compared to hemodialysis (HD). The study, "Hemodialysis versus Peritoneal Dialysis: A Comparison of Adjusted Mortality Rates," published in the Sept. 1997 issue of American Journal of Kidney Diseases, compared death rates for patients on the two forms of treatment using data from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. The 10,633 end-stage renal disease patients studied started dialysis treatment between 1990 and 1994 and were monitored for five years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1998

Face the Fears of Diabetes with Education

Treating fear may be an important yet overlooked element of diabetes management, according to a recent study published in The Diabetes Educator. Patients with diabetes tend to fear long-term complications rather than acute complications, and the study asserts that lack of education may be a factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1998

Healing with Lasers

Low intensity laser irradiation has been shown to induce wound healing in patients with impaired circulation due to diabetes. Foot problems are a common complication of diabetes and account for half of all diabetes-related amputations. Their economic and socioeconomic effects are extensive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1998

Did You Know?

The cost of a kidney/pancreas transplant ranges from $120,000 to $150,000. The average cost of a pancreas transplant is $60,000 to $90,000. Most transplants are covered by major insurance companies. Kidney transplants are covered by Medicare, but it is more difficult to get Medicare to cover a pancreas transplant since they still consider it experimental.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1998

Take an Active Role in Managing Your Diabetes

Have you taken your vitamin E today? - Exercise that is. More than any pill or potion, exercise is the most beneficial thing you can do for your health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1998

May 1998

Questions and Answers

What Can I Do to Save My Eyes?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

A Meering of the Minds-NASA and Diabetes Industry Share Technology

NASA and the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation brought together leading figures from academia, NASA, and the diabetes industry for a two day think tank in Washington D.C. on noninvasive and minimally invasive blood glucose testing.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

Cows' Milk May be A Culprit

In a study of children with diabetes and their non-diabetic siblings, researchers found a possible link between cows' milk and type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

New Transplant Law Promises Equal Treatment

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a new regulation in March which overhauls the existing organ transplant program. The regulation requires the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, a private system created by the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, to develop new allocation programs making the waiting time for donor organs more equal throughout the United States. Almost 55,000 people are on transplant waiting lists and approximately 4,000 people die each year while waiting, according to experts at UCSF Stanford Health Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

Time is Up for GlucoWatch

Becton Dickinson and Cygnus Inc. canceled their agreement for distribution of the GlucoWatch, the glucose monitoring system being developed by Cygnus, according to the companies. Changes occurring in the area of diabetes monitoring since the signing of the two-year-old-agreement were cited as the reason for the decision.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

FDA Investigates LifeScan

Agents from the U.S. Attorney's Office searched the offices of LifeScan Inc., located in Milpitas, Calif., then confiscated documents as part of an FDA investigation of LifeScan's SureStep meters.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

April 1998

New Line of Diabetes Products Coming Soon

The PureTek Corporation recently announced the launch of its D-Care line of products designed for people with diabetes. There are 26 items in the D-Care line including nutritional supplements, skin and foot care products, cough syrup, toothpaste and food bars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Questions and Answers

ACE Inhibitors Sometimes Worth the Cough

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

How Do You Feel the Morning After a "Low?"

Work, or academic performance, is not affected by a hypoglycemic episode the night before, according to a study in March's Diabetes Care. Low blood glucose at night can have an affect on feelings of well-being, vitality and sleep. The "hung over" feeling many people with diabetes experience may actually be caused by the interruption in sleep brought on by the hypoglycemia, not the hypoglycemia itself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

What a Difference a Walk Makes

Walking at least 30 minutes a day can increase your body's sensitivity to insulin, according to a study published in the March 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medial Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Letters from Readers

A study published in the November/December 1997 issue of Practical Diabetes International found that one in six patients interviewed had used some form of complementary, or alternative, medicine. Other studies show that 25 to 49 percent of the general population have made use of alternative medicines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Disturbing Findings Linked to Calcium Blockers

Newly published studies show that calcium channel blockers may be linked to an increased risk of heart attacks and suicide. The drugs may be particularly problematic for people with diabetes and those with coronary heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Caution: Don't Get Caught with Ketones

Ketoacidosis is an extremely serious diabetic complication that can lead to coma and even death. Unfortunately it is also fairly common. The good news, however, is that with proper care and an eye towards prevention, this costly and dangerous complication can be avoided.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

The Mass March Meltdown-The Changing Cast of the Capitol Campaign

Ron Brenners of Plano, Texas, and his son Ben will be there at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., on May 5th at 8:00 am. So will John Reinemann of Washington, D.C., and Martin MacArthur of Winter Park, Florida.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Amylin Downsizes

Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced it will lay off 25 percent of its employees due to Johnson & Johnson's surprise announcement to terminate its pact to collaborate with Amylin on Pramlintide, a diabetes drug currently in phase III clinical development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Biocontrol Goes "Heavy Metal"

The much beleaguered Biocontrol Technology Inc., makers of the Diasensor 1000 noninvasive BG monitor which has drawn fire from both media and its own stock holders, is now in the metal coating business.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

Big Bird Burgers

Everyone's heard about the other white meat, but have you heard about the other red meat? - that's ostrich meat to be exact. That's right, the large prehistoric-looking bird prone to sticking its head in the sand has been cropping up in restaurants all over the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

New Take Home Test Offered for UTIs

Over 13 million people in the United States are affected by urinary tract infections each year. Although women are affected most often, men over 50, people with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, lower paralysis and diabetes are also susceptible.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

March 1998

Questions and Answers

The Wait

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Prevention of High BGs Saves Lives

Life-threatening infections after heart operations are dangerous for anyone, but can be even more so for people with diabetes. Controlling post-operative high blood sugars seems to be the key to preventing mortal infections for diabetic heart operation patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Is Lispro Bad for Babies

While clinical trials with Lispro on pregnant animals revealed no dangerous side-effects, some are suggesting that this may not be the case for pregnant women and that the use of Lispro in pregnant women has not been sufficiently studied.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Lispro - It's All in the Timing

When to take lispro is the subject of a study in January's Diabetes Care. When Mark W.J. Strachen, MRCP, and Brian M. Frier, MD, investigated how lispro and glucose interacted in type 1 patients before and after eating, they found that meal types and times made a significant difference.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Did You Know...-The Latest from the ADA's Post Grad Conference

DIABETES HEALTH attended the ADA's 45th Annual Postgraduate Course January 23-25 in San Francisco where the latest products, services and research findings in diabetes were featured. Here is a brief review of what we heard:

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Santa Clara Valley Diabetes Conference

The Diabetes Society of Santa Clara Valley's "Diabetes Symposium for Professionals" will take place on Saturday, April 4, 1998 at the Fairmont Hotel in San Jose, Calif. The one-day symposium is designed for physicians and allied health professionals to enhance the knowledge of the practioner in the management of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Have No Fear New Dental Technology is Here

Fear keeps many patients away from the dentist. The source of this fear is quite simply pain. New procedures, however, can reduce or do away with the pain that many people associate with going to their dentist

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

MiniMed Founder Endows $200 Million to Spur Biotechnological Development

Alfred E. Mann, founder and CEO of MiniMed Inc., endowed $100 million a piece to two Southern California universities in order to establish biomedical research institutes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Educational Tips for Tools

Sari Edelstein, PhD, RD, CDE, LD, has created a simplified one-sheet educational tool called "Meal and Snack Tips for People with Diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

A Partnership for Progress

Cell Therapeutics Inc. and City of Hope National Medical Center have formed a joint venture to discover and develop a new class of drugs to treat diabetes and its complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

The Newest and Thinnest

Becton Dickinson is now marketing the B-D Ultra Fine II lancet. According to product manager Guillermo de la Vega, "Becton Dickinson's 30 gauge lancet is now the thinnest lancet available on the market."

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

Accu-Chek Yourself

The Accu-Chek Complete blood glucose monitor, Boehringer Mannheim Corp.'s latest addition to its Accu-Chek line, will be available throughout the United States this month.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

A Day of Hope for Diabetes

On March 21st, over 1,500 people are expected to gather in Palm Springs, Calif., for an extraordinary diabetes conference where a top line-up of nationally renowned speakers will discuss the latest developments in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1998

February 1998

Questions and Answers

Does a Vegetarian Diet Alleviate Neuropathy

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

An Argument for Estrogen

According to a recent study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, estrogen therapy protects against cardiovascular disease, decreases glucose levels and improves HbA1cs in postmenopausal woman with diabetes .

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

Sick Babies; Healthy Adults

A new study in the Archives of Disease in Childhood shows that children who have infections before and up to the age of one are protected against diabetes. Making up more than half of the illnesses, respiratory infections seem to offer children the most protection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

I Dream of Gene ... s that Cause Diabetes

Because type 2 diabetes is thought of as a genetic disorder, the ADA is currently sponsoring the GENNID (genetics of non-insulin dependent diabetes) project to study which genes cause the disorder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

Futuristic Hole Pokin'

Cell Robotics, Inc. of Albuquerque, New Mexico, received clearance from the FDA to market its Lasette laser finger perforator to diabetic patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

Investors-a-Plenty for the Diabetic Self-Testing Industry

LXN Corp., developer of the first at-home fructosamine test, announced that it has secured an additional $12.2 million in private financing. The additional capital strengthens the company's financial position as it prepares for the spring 1998 launch of its Duet Glucose Control System which monitors glucose and fructosamine levels. The once-a-week test will allow persons with diabetes to better monitor the effectiveness of their diabetes management programs by giving them data on their current BG level and their degree of BG control over the past two weeks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

Companies Fight Over Rights

A battle over who developed the technology for a noninvasive glucose monitoring system has erupted between Americare Diagnostics and Technical Chemicals & Products, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

A Merge Made in Monetary Heaven

Gainor Medical Management LLC recently bought Universal Self Care Inc., a provider of product services for people with diabetes, for $37 million. The sale price includes $17 million in cash and a convertible note for up to $20 million.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

January 1998

Questions and Answers

Can Quinapril Prevent Kidney Disease?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Pill-less Pain Relief

Peripheral neuropathy affects more than 36 percent of those with type 2 diabetes. Now doctors and sufferers may have a non-pharmacological treatment to lessen the pain associated with this often painful diabetic complication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Husbands Worry More

The first study to determine how severe hypoglycemic episodes in type 1 patients impact spouses was recently conducted by researchers Linda Gonder-Frederick, PhD, Daniel Cox, PhD, et al. Two sets of spouses were compared: spouses of diabetics who had a severe hypoglycemic episode within the last year and spouses of diabetics who had not. Data on psychological status and intensity of marital conflict was measured and compared.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

More Meals Doesn't Matter

Past studies have suggested that increasing the frequency of meals may have beneficial effects on people with type 2 diabetes. Studies of healthy, nondiabetic individuals have shown that insulin, LDL and total cholesterol levels are often lowered when meal frequency is increased. In addition, two studies of people with diabetes have shown that insulin levels and glucose levels have been lowered on days of increased meal frequency.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Ketoacidosis Alert

Although it is usually associated with type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can occur in some patients with type 2 diabetes. Researchers Charlton Wilson, MD, Jonathan Krakoff, MD, and Dorothy Gohdes, MD, studied type 2 patients from two Apache Indian reservations and found that 17 of 724 patients had experienced at least one DKA episode.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

The Healing Touch - A Massage a Day Keeps BGs at Bay

Getting a child with diabetes to adhere to his or her BG control regimen can feel like pulling teeth at times. However, recent research shows that something as simple and enjoyable as touch can help kids relieve stress, make them more resistant to disease and improve their BG control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

A Rezulin Recall

The FDA has recommended that labeling on the medication Rezulin be revised after learning of three deaths linked with Rezulin in Japan. One hundred fifty cases of liver damage have also been associated with the medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Gluc-O-Bar Fights Lows

Another food designed for people with diabetes has entered the market. Gluc-O-Bar, from Apic USA, Inc., is especially notable because the bars are designed to stabilize blood sugars and keep patients from eating high fat foods like ice cream and peanut butter to avoid hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

Summer Fun Times Two

The Diabetic Youth Foundation is offering two new camping programs at Bearskin Meadow Camp in California during the summer of 1998.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

It Takes a Diabetes Village

Becton Dickinson and Company recently announced the introduction of its internet website, The Diabetes Village. The site is designed to serve people living with diabetes and the health care professionals who work with them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1998

December 1997

Questions and Answers

Beating the Bruise Blues

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Pills Don't Work Unless You Take Them

In the past five to ten years there has been an explosion in the number of diabetes medications available. These medications are effective and can be very helpful, but only if taken correctly. Unfortunately, a study in October's Diabetes Care by Arseniko H.P. Paes, PhD, and Albert Baker, PhD, found that a lot of patients don't properly self-administer their medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

What Causes Diabetes?

What causes diabetes? We still don't know for sure, but Swiss and Italian researchers have discovered another link in the chain of genetic and immunological factors that are believed to lead to the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Rezulin Warning

Parke-Davis and the FDA have recently changed Rezulin's (troglitazone) prescribing information and label to warn users and doctors of Rezulin's association with a rare but severe form of liver damage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Is Chromium No Longer Ho-Hum?

A recent USDA study has found that chromium picolinate significantly lowers blood sugars. Chromium is not a drug, but a trace mineral that helps insulin attach to cell membranes to control blood sugars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

March on Washington Planned for May 8. 1998

A march to focus the nation's attention on diabetes has been planned for May 8, 1998. It will take place in front of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Diabetes Marketplace Booms

The estimated $6.85 billion worldwide diabetes therapeutics marketplace of 1997 is expected to increase to $17 billion by 2005. Analysts attribute the influx of non-insulin therapies and devices as the major reason for the market rise.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

MiniMed Buys Supply Company in $16 Million Deal

MiniMed Inc. recently acquired Home Medical Supply, Inc. (HMS) and its affiliated companies. HMS operates a medical products and supplies distribution business in approximately 30 states.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Helpful Videos Increase Awareness

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) is announcing the release of three new videos in its patient education video series, which it developed in response to topics most requested on customer surveys.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Rezulin Launched in UK

Glaxo Wellcome will be marketing Sankyo Co.'s troglitazone antidiabetes drug (Noscal) in the United Kingdom. Troglitazone was developed by Sankyo and granted FDA approval in August. The drug was launched in the United States by Sankyo Parke-Davis and Warner-Lambert Co. as Rezulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Free Diabetes Eduction Video

Eli Lilly and Blockbuster Video are now offering a free educational video to help people understand and manage their diabetes. Through real-life examples and interviews with leading doctors, the 26-minute, "Stop! Take Control of Diabetes," video teaches viewers how to achieve the ADA's recommended BG level of 140 mg/dL.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Cowabunga! Surf with Club Ed

Robert Dixon, a type 1 diabetic for 25 years, will set up a surfing school in the spring of 1998 for active and fit diabetics who want to experience the thrill of surfing. The classes are designed for inexperienced surfers and no surfing experience is necessary.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

Health Care Plans Not Paying for Essential Supplies

According to a recent Gallup survey of 252 of the nation's largest employers, 75 percent of health care plans available to employees do not cover patient education classes, 49 percent do not cover lab tests, 38 percent do not cover BG meters and 25 percent do not cover test strips. This is despite the fact that diabetes remains the fourth leading cause of death from disease in the United States and costs an estimated $105 billion annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

November 1997

Home Diagnostics Has a New Home

Home Diagnostics, Inc. (HDI), the only diabetes product manufacturer whose sole specialty is glucose testing systems, has recently broken ground on a new 72,00 square foot facility.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Questions and Answers

Pump Okay for Teens

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Could Diabetes be Caused by Sleeping Virus

Researchers Bernard Mach and Bernard Conrad from Geneva, Switzerland, have made a discovery that could possibly be a turning point in the research and treatment of diabetes reports Taiwan's Central News Agency.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Flu Prevention - Just a Shot Away

The risk of death from influenza increases if you have diabetes. That's why California, Montana, Florida and Texas, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), are collaborating to prompt people with diabetes to take another shot - a flu shot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Developing Countries, Developing Problems

A diabetes epidemic is hitting developing countries according to the World Health Reports (WHO). The impact on health care resources will be enormous. The global number of people with both type 1 and 2 diabetes is approximately 132 million. By 2010 the number will be 240 million. China, India and Africa are projected to develop the majority of new type 2 cases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

IDF: Diabetes Activism Global Style

An abundance of valuable information was gathered at the 16th Annual International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Congress in Helsinki, Finland this past July.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

November Calendar

November 1: Diabetes is the reason for the season. November is National Diabetes Month, for more information about events and resources available to you check with your local diabetes care and education center.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Shaking Up the Family Tree

Julio Castro could not keep his eyes open. At ten o' clock in the morning his eyes would begin to droop. "I felt like I could sleep all day, no problem," says Castro.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Novo Protects Its Own - Sues Four Companies

Novo Nordisk has recently filed a patent infringement lawsuit in New Jersey Federal Court against Genentech, Eli Lilly, Pharmacia & Upjohn and Serono corporations. The companies all make and/or sell biosynthetic human growth hormone products that compete with Novo's Norditropin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

From Star Trek to Reality: The Laser Blood Sampler

Cell Robotics International has gotten the green light from the FDA to market its Lasette laser finger perforator. The Lasette, a small, hand-held, battery operated laser device, emits a single pulse of laser light, making a small hole in the finger. The device eliminates the need for a lancet for capillary blood collection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Plane Sense

Did you know that most airlines offer special meals for people with diabetes? While other airlines' policies may differ, United Airlines can provide a meal specially designed for people with diabetes free of charge if given at least 24 hours notice. It is advisable to call first to see if a particular airline offers the same service.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

Treatment Center Wins Awards for Innovative Care

Managed Healthcare magazine recently named Diabetes Treatment Centers of America (DTCA) as one of twelve award winners for innovative managed care leadership. Managed Healthcare, an industry magazine for managed care executives, health care providers and employers, based its award on DCTA's ability to control costs and improve outcomes and quality for the patient, and on its public service initiatives during 1996.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1997

October 1997

Questions and Answers

Awake and Aware to a Sleeping Hypoglycemic Coma

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

Small Babies - Big Risk

Are babies born small at a higher risk of developing diabetes? Yes, according to French researchers who published their findings recently in the British Medical Journal .

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

The High Costs of Diabetes

People with diabetes miss more work days due to sickness. Consequently, they earn less money, yet have higher medical costs for their illnesses. For those on tight budgets, this can lead to a higher probability of having to depend on public assistance, like Medicaid, to cover medical expenses.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

Achoo! Which Cough and Cold Medicines are Right for You?

Managing diabetes alone is tough enough. Add a cough or cold and health management becomes even more time consuming and possibly dangerous.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

25 Tips

October 1: Walking is one of the best possible exercises, so why not walk for diabetes? Walktoberfest is the ADA's national walking event to raise money for diabetes research. Over 100,00 walkers participate each October. Call 1(800) 254-WALK for more information.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

I'm Your Venous

A new treatment for erectile dysfunction from Vivus, Inc., the Actis Venous Flow Controller, is now commercially available in the United States. Actis works for patients who have venous leak syndrome - or the inability to store blood within the penis and maintain an erection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

Drug Prices Rise Faster than BGs

The Wall Street Journal reports that increases in prescription drug prices significantly outpaced the general inflation rate in 1996. Drug prices rose by 4.1 percent, while the inflation rate was only 3.2 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

LifeScan Awards Athletic Excellence

LifeScan, one of the leading manufacturers of BG monitoring systems, recognized athletes with diabetes for outstanding athletic accomplishments at the International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA) this past May. Winners Scott Coleman, the first male swimmer with diabetes to swim the English Channel; U.S. amateur tennis player Gwen Sikora; and blind cyclist Pam Fernandes split the $20,000 prize awarded by LifeScan.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

Products to the People

Eli Lilly & Co. has jumped on the consumer ad bandwagon and begun advertising in general interest magazines. Among others, Lilly has placed ad space in People, Parade and Good Housekeeping.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

September 1997

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Serious but Avoidable

Managing diabetes is hard enough but when experiencing illness or stress, extra pampering - and extra insulin - is necessary to avoid Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The latest statistics show that DKA is responsible for one third of the total of health insurance costs for diabetes. Preventing DKA will not only prevent chronic health complications but it will save big dollars as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Questions and Answers

Acarbose Anxiety

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Should You See an Opthalmologist or an Optometrist?

Should people with diabetes in need of a retinal examination go to an ophthalmologist or an optometrist?

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Inactivity - The Root of All Weight Gain?

A press release from the British government's Health Education Authority (HEA) confirms what we've heard time and time again:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Stress: Let It Go and Keep Your BGs Low

You know your friends and family can raise your blood pressure, but what about your glucose level? A study published in the July 1997 Diabetes Care shows a relationship between environmental stress and increased BGs for people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

New Project Hopes to Help Diabetics World-Wide

Becton Dickinson recently launched The Compass Project, a five-year campaign dedicated to helping people with diabetes worldwide lead healthier lives. The Compass Project plans to develop global and local strategies to spotlight the scope of diabetes and related problems. The project wishes to recognize the best practices by health care professionals worldwide, advocate the use of clinically proven models of diabetes care, improve self-care behaviors and spark innovative community programs. Currently, a quarter of the world's nations have no diabetes care budget.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Read All About It!-Diabetes Digest Free at Pharmacies Nationwide

During National Diabetes Month this November, the third edition of Consumer's Diabetes Digest (formerly Consumer's Guide to Diabetes Care Products) will be available free at over 15,000 nationwide pharmacies including American Drug Stores, Albertsons, Bergen Brunswig, CVS, Kmart, Kroger, Longs and McKesson.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

Run for the Money

In Boston, marathoner Bill Rogers led off the Precision Walk for Diabetes Research, an event which was held in conjunction with the 57th Annual Scientific Sessions of the ADA. Over 1,000 people registered for the walk, and for each participant, MediSense, Inc. donated $5 to the ADA National Research Fund.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

August 1997

Questions and Answers

Riding the Rollercoaster

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Death Underestimated - Abstract #237 & #55

Why do the majority of women with diabetes not plan their pregnancies and enter pregnancy with poor BG control that can increase the chances of birth defects? Two studies from the AMSS show that there are multiple reasons.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Problems with Calcium Blockers - Abstract #379

The study found a borderline association between short-acting calcium channel blockers and increased mortality in people with type 1 diabetes. While the association was not statistically significant, mortality was more common in people who had hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Diabetes Specialists Save Dollars - Abstract #137

This study provides people with diabetes one more good reason to be seen by a diabetes specialist. The study found that people hospitalized for life-threatening DKA had shorter hospital stays - 2.9 versus 5.2 days - and less than half the costs - $4,700 versus $10,700 - when treated by endocrinologists rather than a generalist physician, like an internist.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Getting the Blues - Abstract #47

While depression can be treated with drug therapy, it is ineffective or poorly tolerated in up to 50 percent of people with diabetes. The study found that cognitive therapy was more successful and had the potential to improve diabetes self-management as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Death Underestimated - Abstract #540

The Centers for Disease Control has confirmed that diabetes is grossly underestimated as a cause of death on death certificates. Its study found that vital statistics on mortality that rely solely on death certificates that list diabetes as the underlying cause of death underestimate diabetes' effect on mortality by three-fold. The study suggests that death rates based on death certificates that have diabetes mentioned anywhere on them may provide a more realistic and reliable picture of the impact of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Syndrome X on the Rise

Syndrome X, or insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia metabolic syndrome, is the name given to a constellation of metabolic factors and hypertension associated with type 2 diabetes that lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The components of syndrome X include insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, decreased HDL cholesterol, increased triglycerides, elevated blood pressure and albuminuria.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Happy with Humalog - Abstract #373

Switching patients from an established insulin regimen to Humalog does not necessarily improve glycemic control, but it does reduce the frequency of mild and severe hypoglycemia and improves their quality of life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

The High Cost of Poor Glycemic Control - Abstract #138

Patients with better glycemic control have lower medical care expenses, report researchers from Minneapolis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Keep It in Control - Abstract #263

It is well known that poor BG control leads to greater risk of infections. In the first clinical study of this relationship, heart surgery patients with the highest blood glucose levels were found to be 70 percent more likely to develop post-operative complications like wound and urinary tract infections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Lispro for Dessert?

It is commonly recommended that insulin boluses be taken 15 to 45 minutes before eating. The new fast acting insulin Lispro has cut this time down considerably. Now it appears that if the dosage is adjusted to the amount eaten, the insulin can even be taken after a meal and provide equal or better control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Weighting for Approval - Abstract #213

Most of the weight loss drugs currently available affect the central nervous system. Orlistat is a weight-loss drug being studied that inhibits the breakdown of fat in the intestines. It enables the passing of fat from the body without it being metabolized. People can pass up to 25 to 30 grams of fat, or 300 to 400 calories, in a day on orlistat.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Know Your Mean to Achieve Better BG Control - Abstract #29

The DCCT showed that there is a strong relationship between HbA1c values and the risk of developing chronic diabetes complications. But this information is of limited benefit to people with diabetes in setting up day-to-day glycemic goals if they don't understand the relationship between HbA1cs and mean blood glucose levels (MBG).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Keep Your Boss Happy - Abstract #142

Better BG control for type 2s not only reduces the risk of diabetes complications, but also has short-term benefits as well. Patients with improved glycemic control resulting from glipizide GITS therapy were shown to have enhanced work productivity compared to those on a placebo. They also had less absenteeism, bed days and fewer doctor visits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Friendly Fire - Abstract #488

Why is neuropathy (nerve damage), once begun, so difficult to halt even if you control blood sugar very well? This study suggests it's due to a secondary autoimmune attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Viva España!

The Spanish know how to live, in more ways than one. A recent study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care suggests that the Spanish diet, which is high in fat due to the prevalence of olive oil, may be a healthy one for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Tortillas and Beans or Hamburger and White Bread?

Do modern conveniences lead to modern diseases? According to a study presented at the ADA's 57th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions, lifestyle may play an even bigger role in the development of type 2 diabetes than was previously thought.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

16 Million People With Diabetes in the United States: 2 Million More Expected

It's been 20 years since the standards for the diagnosis of diabetes were set. Things have changed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Highlighted Letter to the Editor

Don't you hate it when people say...

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Dollars and Sense - Education is the Key

Reducing the rising costs and prevalence of diabetes in the United States is the goal of the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Rocketing Toward Health

NASA and the JDF signed an agreement in June that allows the JDF and researchers in the diabetes community access to important technological advances developed by NASA. The agreement also allows NASA and the JDF to work in conjunction on future research projects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Boundaries Being Broken

For the first time in history an international panel of diabetes specialists has come together to work toward a cure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Helping to Heal

The FDA recently cleared Amerx Health Care Corporation's Amerigelª Ointment as a wound management product. This FDA clearance has helped to usher the product into Wal-Mart Stores and generated interest in stocking the product in other drug and supermarkets as well.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Taking the Blood Out of Glucose Testing

Integ Inc. received some good news regarding their LifeGuideª System hand-held glucose meter at the AMSS. Two separate clinical studies were presented that confirmed the use of interstitial fluid (ISF) - the clear fluid between cells found throughout the body and skin - as a viable, bloodless method for measuring glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

July 1997

Questions and Answers

Doing Time with Diabetes

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 1997

Diabetes Briefs

A Family Affair

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

CDEs Reach Out to Help Someone—Telephone Proves to be a Valuable Tool

A recent survey of diabetes educators found that they feel the telephone is a valuable tool to help patients with their diabetes care regimes. However, the survey also determined that years of experience and certification were factors that significantly affected the topics covered in their phone conversations.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

Parents want Accountability in Diabetes Research

Our only child, Katherine, was diagnosed with diabetes in 1991 at age eight. We immediately learned as much as possible, not only about its management, but about research for a cure. After more than six years of reading countless articles, corresponding with researchers, and living with diabetes, we consider ourselves knowledgeable about the best hope for eradicating it. Our concern today is that the last ten years of research, at a cost of millions, has turned up little to improve the lives of people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

The AACE Puts Patients First

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) has launched a new campaign called Patients First to help managed care organizations treat people with diabetes more effectively. The campaign has two initial goals: to help patients aim for intensive diabetes self-management by having their physician sign a patient-physician contract; and to persuade insurers, managed care companies and public officials to provide coverage for an intensive diabetes self-management system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1997

June 1997

Questions and Answers

The Goods on Glucotrol XL

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

Study Weighs the Influences on Obesity

A recent study by the Coalition for Excess Weight Risk Education ranked the 33 largest metropolitan areas in the United States by their percentage of obese residents. The study found that for many Americans being "overweight" is normal, and they expressed a strong loyalty to frequently consumed "comfort foods," whether the foods are healthy or not.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

Eating Right

For many, having to give up favorite foods and follow the nutritional guidelines of their diabetes control program seems like a fate worse than death. But sacrifice doesn't necessarily have to be the name of the game. Below, cookbook author Suzi Castle provides some delicious advice on how to make a healthy diet taste great.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

Seventeen-Year-Old Passes Her Life Exams

Growing up is a confusing time for everyone - even more so for an adolescent who has been diagnosed with diabetes. Kelli Sweitzer's life changed at age 15 when she was diagnosed with type I diabetes. Kelli describes in her own words the frustration and confusion of struggling with her disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

Lasers Instead of Lancets?

Venisect Inc., based in Little Rock, Arkansas, has been granted clearance by the FDA for its Laser Lancetª. The Laser Lancet is a small hand-held, battery-powered blood letting device. According to the company, the new device draws blood by sending a laser pulse through a disposable plastic tube. The laser perforates the skin and a small slit is made, normally in the fingertip, just deep enough to break through the outer skin layers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

The ADA and Yahoo! Peddle Toward a Cure

The American Diabetes Association has teamed up with Yahoo!, a World Wide Web navigation guide, to promote its national bicycling fundraising event, the Tour de Cure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1997

May 1997

Questions and Answers

Chemotherapy And Diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

New Frozen Shoulder Findings from Finland

Researchers in Finland have found that people with diabetes who suffer from frozen shoulder also have a greater chance of developing autonomic neuropathy and heart problems.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Ketoacidosis Costs Us

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) episodes account for one dollar of every four dollars spent on direct medical care for people with type I diabetes in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Dia-what-es?

Judging from the number of letters to the editor on the subject, many members of the diabetes community realize the importance of an active patient advocacy program to bring more national attention to diabetes. What is perhaps less understood is how terribly far we are from realizing this goal.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

The Gift of Jab

Injecting insulin through clothing has apparently become a sore subject among people with diabetes, who are just now learning the benefits of this relatively new practice.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Letter of the Month

Here is a letter that DIABETES HEALTH received from a subscriber voicing her anger and frustration with diabetes:

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Making a Difference in Michigan

Diabetes advocates often have to do more than just write letters to get the attention of politicians. In Michigan, "Delegates for Diabetes on the March" grabbed their banners and marched to the state capital to get the ear of their elected officials.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Control in the Palm of Your Hand

Boehringer Mannheim Corp. (BMC) has released a new meter that can provide BG readings as well as monitor cholesterol levels. The new palm-sized monitor, the Accu-Chek¨ InstantPlusª System, can provide a cholesterol reading in three minutes and a blood glucose reading in 12 seconds.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Prevention - Better Sooner Than Later

A recent international meeting of diabetes specialists in Lisbon, Portugal found education and prevention to be the most powerful and under-utilized weapons against diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

I Can See Clearly Now

Advanced Corneal Systems Inc. (ACS) is now enrolling qualified patients in a research study designed to test Vitraseª, a new drug being developed as a non-surgical treatment for vitreous hemorrhage.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

Cloning LifeScan

A host of new diabetes start-ups are trying to develop alternatives to finger-stick home glucose testing. It is their hope that an alternative to the finger-stick will bring high acquisition valuations like those paid for LifeScan by Johnson & Johnson and for MediSense by Abbott Laboratories Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

April 1997

Prevention Trials Seek Participants

Two major clinical trials aimed at discovering whether or not type I and type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed are currently underway. Both the type I Diabetes Prevention Trial (DPT-1) and the type 2 Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP also referred to as the DPT-2) are sponsored by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Medical Center Sweats It Out Over Diabetes

The City of Hope National Medical Center is in the midst of a study investigating the "insulin-like effects" of exercise. The City of Hope was awarded a $99,339 grant from the American Diabetes Association to research the increase of insulin sensitivity following exercise in July 1996.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

C-Peptide Test Sheds Light on Diabetes Diagnosis

A study published in the February 1997 issue of Diabetes Care shed new light on the importance of the C-peptide test.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Youngsters at a High Risk for Lows

Children and adolescents with diabetes are far more likely to experience moderate to severe hypoglycemic episodes than their adult counterparts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Show Me the Money

The American Diabetes Association, researchers and other advocates are lobbying for more research money from a poll-driven, tight-fisted Congress. They say the small increase in funding for 1997 is eclipsed by inflation alone, and that related to diabetes' cost to the taxpayer, more research is a wise investment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Biocontrol Closes Shareholders' Meeting to Press

Biocontrol is once again going to bat for their Diasensor 1000 non-invasive blood glucose meter. Defending its much-plagued meter is nothing new for Diasensor at this point. What is different is that the company is employing more intense measures in its clash with the media.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Assembly Bill 221 Offers Fair Play

Good diabetes control protects against diabetes complications. In the case of children with diabetes, good control should start immediately after diagnosis with frequent blood glucose testing (usually four to six times a day).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Color-Coded Caps at Hand

A new color-coded system for insulin identification is on the market. Ident-A-Caps, developed by Terron Inc., are color-coded plastic vial caps with three-dimensional raised symbols on top to designate different insulin types by touch.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

Hooray for Humana Health Care

Call it the Humana touch. At a time when many other health management organizations (HMO) are cutting back on care for people with diabetes, Humana Health Care Plans was recently recognized for its diabetes education programs.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 1997

March 1997

Questions and Answers

Are Tattoos Taboo?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Patients Don't Like Being Judged

Don't ignore kids with diabetes' psychological health, say experts from the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Another Good Reason for Good Control - Possible Hearing Loss

The relationship between diabetes and hearing loss has been controversial for some time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Does “Reflective Listening” Hold the Key to Behavioral Changes?

The importance of dietary changes and exercise for the proper management of type 2 diabetes is well documented. Doctors, educators and many people with the condition realize its benefits. The difficulty people with diabetes have making these lifestyle changes is just as well understood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

New Adjustable Lancing Devices Reviewed

In our last issue, we reviewed injection aids. Here we present a review of lancing devices with a few comments from our readers. Like our last review, this is an unscientific and informal review, not an exhaustive consumer survey. The comments of readers are solely the opinions of the respondents and do not necessarily reflect the views of Diabetes Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Activists Promote Ribbon with Hopes of Increasing Awareness of Diabetes

You've seen the distinctive ribbons worn on the lapels of noted celebrities at awards ceremonies and public functions - red for AIDS awareness, blue for domestic violence and pink for breast cancer. These ribbons are important because they make us conscious of those who are suffering from these deadly afflictions. They remind us that with time, money and hope a cure or a solution might be found and the suffering of millions of individuals ended.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Beverage Promises Balanced Nutrition

Do you ever find yourself short of time and in need of a healthy snack to control your blood sugars? Mead Johnson may have the solution for you. Their Choice dmª beverage is designed to offer meal planning flexibility that aids diabetes self-management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Strips’ Reliability Questioned by FDA

In early December 1996 Diagnostic Solutions Inc. (DSI) stopped their shipping of Chronimed's Quick Check One blood glucose test strips after the FDA questioned the strips' reliability.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

B12 Nose Gel May Eliminate Injections

Nastech Pharmaceutical Company Inc. has recently received Food & Drug Administration marketing clearance for Nascobalª, a gel for intranasal delivery of vitamin B12. The product is intended for use by those with vitamin B12 deficiency, a condition that leads to increased rates of disease and mortality when left untreated.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

Diabetes Brief

A Predictor of Heart Disease

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

February 1997

Questions and Answers

The News on Nutrasweet

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

One More Good Reason to Have Urine Checked Regularly

There is now one more good reason to have your urine checked regularly. A new study shows that elevated protein (microalbumin) levels in the urine of people with type 2 diabetes are associated with a greater risk of developing kidney disease, heart disease, and neuropathy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

Intensive Therapy

What would you do for an extra five years of life, eight years of sight, six years free from kidney disease and six years free from nerve damage and the risk of amputation?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

NIH Funding for Diabetes-Is It Enough?

With no significant advances for people with diabetes on the horizon, many in the diabetes community wonder what the future holds. Will there ever be a cure? Is research moving in the right direction? Just what can people with diabetes expect in 1997?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

Will the 105th Congress Give Diabetes its Due?

The American Diabetes Association sent letters to President Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich in mid-November urging them to make changes to diabetes-related Medicare coverage the first order of business in the 105th Congress.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

FTC Probe of Lily-Conflict of Interest?

Eli Lilly is currently the subject of a U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) probe into its relationship with PCS Health Systems, a pharmacy benefits management (PBM) company.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

NDIC-Free Information for Better Health

Have a question about your diabetes? The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC) might have the answer. The NDIC is a free informational service funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, an arm of National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

January 1997

Questions and Answers

Keeping Sugars Stable While Exercising

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

Teddy Bears Teach Tots

Researchers from the University of Florida at Gainsville have developed alternative visual aides to help children find the correct insulin injection sites. The report, published in the April 1996 issue of Clinical Pediatrics, found that children ages 6-11 were significantly more successful at finding injection sites when using "injection bears" than when using the traditional injection charts. The injection bears simplify the process of site recognition by marking teddy bears with injection sites that correspond to the same sites on a child's body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

More Complications Recently Linked to Diabetes

It is not news that people with diabetes over the age of 45 are prone to develop a large number of medical problems. What is news is the finding that people with diabetes have a far greater chance of being hospitalized for conditions that were thought to be unrelated to diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

Captopril Therapy Saves Money and Lives

A little pill could save some big money. A recent study determined that using captopril to prevent kidney problems for people with diabetes could save $2.4 billion dollars in cumulative health care costs from 1994 to 2004 alone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

Pam's Second Chance

This case study comes from Peter Lodewick, MD, one of our endocrinology board advisors and the medical director of the Diabetes Care Center in Birmingham, Alabama.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

Diabetes Camp Needs Counselors

Bearskin Meadows Camp, for children and families with diabetes, has staff positions available for summer 1997. Counselors are needed to teach arts, riflery, archery, rock climbing, backpacking, nature and ecology. Registered and student dietitians are needed, as well as office help, drivers, cooks and assistants. The camp is also looking for lifeguards, nurses, a photographer and a songleader. The summer camp begins June 14 and ends August 29. Part-time positions are also available. All positions are paid. Salaries are dependent upon the position and level of experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

Grab Bag

A study, conducted at the University of Wisconsin Medical School at Madison and published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in March of 1996, found that hypertension is significantly related to high HbA1c levels in people with diabetes who are taking insulin. The study concluded that controlling high blood sugars may reduce the risk of developing hypertension.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1997

November 1996

Questions and Answers

Building Muscle Despite Diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

We are the “Lucky People”

In the spring of 1973, while on vacation in Morro Bay, California, I began experiencing severe thirst and corresponding urination, along with a loss of appetite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

“Dream Beam” Accused of Grand Scheme

The Security Exchange Commission (SEC) has filed suit against Futrex and its president Bob Rosenthal-the makers of the proposed "Dream Beam" non-invasive glucose meter-alleging that the company made false and misleading claims to investors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

Switching to Humalog? Try These Helpful Hints

The new fast-acting insulin Humalog is finally here. Since Lilly's introduction of the insulin many people have been switching over. However, Humalog can produce unexpected surprises in blood sugar control. This column explains several important differences in the action of this new insulin and suggests ways to best utilize Humalog.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

Hepatitis C Risk Factors Increase with Diabetes

The risk of infection with the hepatitis C virus for people with either type I or type 2 diabetes is more than four times higher than it is for people without diabetes, according to a study in the September issue of Diabetes Care. The study also hypothesizes that hepatitis C infection may play a direct role in the development of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

Doctor Describes Her Ideal Diabetes Patient

Have you ever wondered if you were a good diabetes patient? Nancy Bohannon, M.D., an experienced diabetes specialist from the Monteagle Medical Center in San Francisco, explains how to be a good patient and feel empowered with your diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

Meal Wrapped in a Silver Foil

As high-carbohydrate diets are on the decline, Bio Foods, Inc. is experiencing an increase in the popularity of its nutritional food bar Balance. The Balance bar offers a supplement to high-protein diets similar to the program promoted in Dr. Barry Sears' bestseller The Zone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

VIA Continuous Glucose Monitor Helps Patients Sleep Tight

A good night's sleep for diabetics during hospitalization may be a reality with the new VIA Continuous Glucose Meter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

High Blood Pressure and Retinopathy Linked

People with type I diabetes who have high blood pressure have a greater chance of developing retinopathy, according to a study by R. Miccoli of Pisa, Italy. The study, presented at the American Diabetes Association's 56th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in San Francisco, found this relationship to be unaffected by long term glycemic control or duration of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1996

October 1996

Three Autoantibodies May Be Strong Indicators of Risk For Relatives of People with

Relatives of people with type I diabetes who test positive for three specific autoantibodies may have a 100 percent chance of developing the disease in the next five years, according to a new study in the July 1996 Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

Selfcare Earns $10 Million on the Promise of Cheap, Generic Test Strips

The prospect of developing cheap generic test strips for blood glucose monitors earned Selfcare a $10 million vote of confidence this past August, when the company completed its initial public offering.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

Rival Companies Swap Espionage Charges

Charges of espionage filled the pages of a lawsuit filed in federal court on June 19 by German corporation Boehringer Mannheim against LifeScan, a diabetes product subsidiary of Johnson and Johnson.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

Time Life Video Provides Answers for the Newly Diagnosed

The unfortunate consequence of healthcare cost-cutting is that patients are often shuffled out the door without all their questions answered. Not fun for anyone, especially patients just diagnosed with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

Grab Bag

In India, a country with 25 million people with diabetes, Novo Nordisk human insulin is six times more expensive than locally produced insulin, according to a June, 19, 1996 Chemical Business Newsbase report, making the Novo product a choice for the affluent only.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

September 1996

Questions and Answers

ACE Inhibitors Sometimes Worth the Cough

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1996

August 1996

Keeping Track With Beverly Mack

Beverly Mack wasn't always a diabetes educator. Advertising was her first profession, but a change of interest and a diagnosis of type I diabetes conspired to change that.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

Another Victory For The IDAA Conference

The day began with a crisp breeze buffeting over the desert. Men and women clad in sweatshirts and neon spandex spoke quietly to each other while stretching; others checked their blood sugars next to their bicycles. Though the group of roughly 60 people had come from such scattered locations as Washington state, Montreal, Canada and Papua, New Guinea, each person dealt with diabetes every day. The bicyclists spread out along the road that morning like a long line of ants, bound for Tempe, Arizona 125 miles away.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

New Anti-obesity Drug Related To Prozac Is No Miracle Cure

The newest pharmaceutical weapon in the battle-of-the-bulge will not be a "magic bullet" for people with diabetes, according to researchers who have worked with the drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

Clear Cough Medicine Avoids Nasty Additives

Back in the early fifties, Dr. Salvatore G. Scotti, a Doctor of Chemistry, decided to create a medication without sugar, dye or alcohol. Those were the days before the word "sugar-free" had been invented. He called his first concoction "Sucro-Sine," meaning "without sugar." He went on to coin the phrase "sugarless" before becoming the first pharmacist to label his cough medicine "sugar-free."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

Smallest Lancet Device Just Released

Taking blood samples may become a bit more convenient thanks to the advent of the Autolet Mini, the smallest lancet device on the market. Owen Mumford, the developers of the device, released the Autolet Mini in August.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

July 1996

Lispro Approved By FDA

The new fast acting Lispro insulin received FDA approval on June 17, thanks in part to a study presented during the American Diabetes Association's 56th annual scientific meetings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

Continuing Control Hinges On Quality Of Health Coverage

An on-going follow-up study of the original DCCT patients found those with poor insurance coverage had poor blood glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

Doctors Still Blame Patients For Poor Control

Two studies identifying shortcomings in physicians' approaches to improving patient self care were identified at the American Diabetes Association's 56th annual sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

June 1996

New Sweetener for People with Diabetes

DiabetiSweet, a new sugar substitute, has been available on the market since mid-March. The sweetner, produced by Health Care Products, has three sweetening ingredients-Isomalt, Sunette and Aspartame.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1996

Abbott to Acquire MediSense

In a statement released this past March, Abbott Laboratories and MediSense, Inc. jointly announced that Abbott would acquire MediSense by buying 100% of MediSense's outstanding shares-a value of $876 million.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1996

May 1996

Use Jet-Injection Devices for Lipoatrophy

Researchers have found that jet-injection devices might be a helpful method to treat those affected by severe human insulin-induced lipo-atrophy-a loss of fat from beneath the skin.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

Photography Used in Identifying Health

In order to understand how young people with diabetes perceive health, the School of Nursing at the University of Wyoming recently told a group of adolescent diabetics to take pictures of what they considered to be "health."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

Diabetes Centers May be the Difference Between Life and Death

Attending diabetes centers can mean the difference between life and death, according to a study published in the March 1996 issue of Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

Protein Linked to Juvenile Diabetes

A protein believed to be linked to juvenile diabetes has been identified by scientists at the National Institute of Dental Research.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

April 1996

Polymer Reorganizes Under Weight Of $7.5 Million Debt

Despite Polymer Technology International's legal struggle with LifeScan and current Chapter 11 status, its newly appointed Chief Executive Officer, Matthew P. Pazaryna, is optimistic about the company's future.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1996

African Americans Are Targeted In New Program

According to reports from the American Diabetes Association, African-Americans are twice as likely as whites to get diabetes, due to a genetic predisposition to the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1996

International Diabetic Athletes Association Conference: March 31 To April 3

If you're in Tempe, Ariz. the week of March 31, you'll be sure to run into some active people with diabetes. The International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA) will be holding their seventh international conference that week, and it's certain to be fun and informative.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1996

New Tool For Monitoring On The Horizon

Scientists in Paris and at the University of Kansas have developed an implantable blood glucose sensor. The device, inserted with a needle much like the cannula on an insulin pump, can remain in place beneath the skin for up to four days. A wire connects the sensor to a pocket-sized monitor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1996

March 1996

Questions and Answers

Q: How and why do certain foods raise my blood sugars more than others? I find that pizza causes higher BGs than candy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

Frozen Shoulder—11% Of People With Diabetes Get It, Readers Want Answers

Recently, DIABETES HEALTH received two letters regarding Frozen Shoulder (also called diabetic shoulder). Readers, Anna of Illinois and Joan of Michigan, wrote seeking additional information on the subject, stating that they could find very little.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 1, 1996

Neonatal Diabetes: Rare, Unpredictable, Occuring In Infants

A rare form of diabetes that affects children in the first month of life has been found to travel an unpredictable course over the life span. Neonatal diabetes-hyperglycemia in infants requiring insulin therapy-is a little-known form of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

February 1996

New Diabetes Symposium

Noted authors and diabetes experts are slated to speak at a diabetes symposium in San Jose, Calif. The event will take place on Saturday, February 17, 1996 at the Fairmont Hotel.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

Lifesavers To Make Life Sweeter-And Sugar Free

Good news for your sweet tooth-LifeSavers are now available without sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

Needle Free Injector Now Available

A new disposable needle-free injector became available in December 1995. The J-Tip Needleless Injector, manufactured by National Medical Products of Irvine, Calif., uses a cartridge of CO2 to propel insulin into the body without breaking the skin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

A Less Painful Lancet-With A Money-Back Guarantee

What's the worst part about testing blood glucose? If you say "the discomfort," Boehringer-Mannheim Corporation may have the product for you. According to company literature, "Three-fourths of diabetes educators with diabetes surveyed said obtaining a drop of blood with the Softclix device was less painful than with their current device. Eighty percent said they would recommend the device to their patients."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

Glucose Biosensor Showing Promise In Animals

Synthetic Blood International, Inc. recently announced that preliminary laboratory and animal studies on its implantable glucose biosensor appear to be positive enough to result in long-term implant studies in animals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1996

January 1996

Going Vegetarian

Q: What are some things I should consider when deciding whether to become a vegetarian? Do people with diabetes need to eat meat?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Questions and Answers

Q: I am wondering about the benefits and problems of using different injection sites. I am also curious to know about how hormones affect glucose control. I notice that my BGs are different at various points in my menstrual cycle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Can Prayer Heal? Science Looks At Spirituality

Prayer may do more than enrich your spirit. It may also contribute to healing your body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Learning From Pachyderms: Diabetes Goes Nintendo

Any kid with diabetes can tell you that having the disease is no fun. But surprise! It can be if you have Packy & Marlon, a new game for the Super Nintendo.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Heredity An Important Factor In Infant Diabetes

When children develop diabetes before turning two years-old, they are more likely to have a parent with type I diabetes. This may indicate that such children are genetically predisposed to the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

IUD Risk No Greater For Women With Diabetes

Many doctors are hesitant to prescribe IUDs (intrauterine devices) for women with diabetes. There is a general belief that the devices pose a threat of pelvic inflammatory disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Diabetes Rate Triples—Americans Are Older And Heavier

More and more Americans are getting diabetes-there are three times more cases today than there were in 1958.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Diabetes May Put You Below Peak Performance

If you think diabetes makes exercise an extra challenge, you may be right. A report published in the May 1995 Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise shows that people with type 2 diabetes "have a decreased exercise performance compared with non-diabetic subjects."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Methane Producers Have Higher Cholesterol

What could methane gas have to do with your cholesterol level? Plenty, according to a Canadian study published in the July 1995 issue of Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Study Shows United States Has High Diabetes Mortality Rates

The Diabetes Epidemiology Research International (DERI) study found that Americans with type I diabetes have a higher mortality rate than diabetics in Finland and Israel. Only Japan surpassed the United States in this respect.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Diabetes More Common In Milk-Drinking Countries

Finland consumes more cow's milk than any other country and Finnish people have the highest incidence of diabetes in the world-40 cases per 100,000 people. This is about six times higher than the frequency of diabetes in France. The French drink much less milk and have only 7.5 people with diabetes per 100,000 among the Caucasian population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Today’s Patients Know More, Ask More, Read More

A recent study of patient and physician practices revealed that many changes have taken place over the past few years. The Scott Levin Associates 1995 Direct-To-Consumer Advertising Study found that patients are moving toward greater participation in their own wellness and doctors have become more willing to encourage that involvement. Also evident is the fact that patients pay more attention to drug advertising and now seek more information about products than they did in the past.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

December 1995

Military Strategy: Army Man Meets New Challenge

Picture this: You're a bomb disposal technician for the United States Army. You've been in the military for 13 years-your entire adult life. You've disarmed and disposed of bombs, both nuclear and conventional, and have worked in conjunction with the FBI and Secret Service.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Two Diabetes Prevention Trials Begin

There are two major diabetes prevention trials underway, and both are actively seeking participants.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Laser Lancet

Clinical trials are nearing completion for the Laser Lancet, a handheld, battery powered device that allows people to draw blood without the use of needles or lancets.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Are You Afraid Of A Box Of Cookies?

Food is an important part of life, and it takes on extra significance when a person has diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Ultrasound Needles

The same thing doctors use to monitor a fetus in the womb may one day bring you pain-free insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Palateability Makes Safe Cakes

Low-cal plus low fat-since when does this combination equal delicious? Since PalateAbility of Coral Springs, Fla. went into business.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

Living With Diabetes Returns To Cable

The popular medical news magazine show, Living With Diabetes, has returned to television. Kaleidoscope, the Americans with Disabilities Channel, airs the program every Monday at 8:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, and on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. EST. Living With Diabetes is available in 15 million homes across the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

New Web Site Lists Current Clinical Trials

CenterWatch, a publishing company that covers clinical research, has established a site on the Internet that patients can use to search for clinical trials by therapeutic area and by geographic region. Each posting contains contact information. The site currently includes postings for trials for treating diabetes. The Internet address is: www.centerwatch.com

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

November 1995

Questions and Answers

Q: I witnessed a problem that seemed related to the extreme heat at a sports camp in Tucson.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

What's Lacking In Long-Term Care, How To Makeit Better, 95 AADE Conference

When a person is in a long-term care facility, his or her diabetes is often in the hands of the nursing staff. A study led by Monica Turner Parker, RN in Greenville, N.C. recently revealed that there may be some problems with this arrangement.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Syndrome X And Metformin

Syndrome X is a group of problems associated with type 2 diabetes. It includes obesity, hypertension (high blood pressure), hyperlipi-demia (abnormal cholesterol metabolism), macro-angiopathy, (large blood vessel disease/hardening of the arteries), and insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Stressed Out? Put Out That Cigarette

Although some people smoke because they say it's relaxing, a study led by C. Lloyd in Pittsburgh determined that, among stressed people, smokers have the worst glycemic control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Cultural Sensitivity

Diabetes educators shouldn't assume that there is just one way to talk to their patients. Like the general population, people with diabetes come from many different cultures, and it is essential that all patients understand how to take care of themselves.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Appetite Suppressant

Five percent of people with type 2 diabetes develop secondary failure to sulfonylureas every year (secondary failure describes the condition wherein a drug that has been effective in controlling blood sugars stops functioning for a particular individual).

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Walk It Off, Study Shows Walking Helps In Sucessful Weight Loss

Do you have to jog ten miles a day to lose weight and maintain good blood glucose control? No, not according to some recent reports.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

Carbohydrates And Glycemic Control

Do you have to be skinny to have good control? Not necessarily, according to a study at the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences in Galveston. Led by E. Ann Cabanas, researchers concluded that "consistent carbohydrate consumption in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with improved glycemic control without regard to weight loss."

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

October 1995

Medical Research Shows- People With Diabetes At Risk For Increased Dental Problems

Most people don't think about their teeth until something goes wrong. Several dental journals have recently published reports about the effect of diabetes on oral health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

Minimed Inc. Has Gone Public

The company offered 2,500,000 shares of common stock for $13.00 per share (before underwriting discounts and commissions). On September 1st the stock was trading for $11.50 a share since hitting a low of $8.75. The company will receive net proceeds of about $30 million. 850,000 additional shares are available from selling stockholders, one of whom has granted the underwriters an option of an additional 502,500 shares.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

Medisense Wins European Patent Appeal

MediSense recently won an appeal to the European Patent Office to protect its exclusive right to use ferrocene in blood glucose strips. Boehringer-Mannheim, another medical supplies company, opposed MediSense's exclusive patent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

Lifescan Joins Amylin To Develop And Commercialize An Experimental Medicine

Amylin Pharmaceuticals will be working in conjunction with LifeScan to develop and commercialize AC137. AC137 is an experimental medicine that mimics the effects of the recently discovered pancreatic hormone amylin, which apparently plays a significant role in blood glucose control. Research has shown that patients who self-administer AC137 in addition to insulin have better blood glucose control after meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

Giants Join Forces

Novo Nordisk, the world's largest insulin producer, and LifeScan, Inc., the leading maker of blood glucose monitoring systems, have announced a worldwide alliance to enhance diabetes management solutions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

Eye On The Future: If Shoots Powdered Insulin Through Your Skin

Imagine taking your insulin in powder form right through your skin. Sound strange? Not to Oxford BioSciences Ltd., a company in England.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1995

September 1995

Water: What You Drink Can Change Your Life

As a doctor living with diabetes for more than 25 years and caring for more than 8000 people with diabetes, I know that diabetes can, though does not need to, cause accelerated aging of the vascular and nervous systems. Eating the best foods, including plenty of fresh raw vegetables and fruits, taking vitamins and anti-oxidants, controlling blood sugars, blood pressure and cholesterol are all crucially important in keeping healthy with diabetes. But there has been one element left overlooked by most people: water.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

What's On Your Mind? The Paid Survey

It has been found that stressful and unpleasant feelings contribute to poor self-care. For many doctors, however, this problem of emotional distress may not seem important. Today, researchers are looking for a comprehensive way to monitor patients' attitudes about living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

Unemployed Doctors?

About 163,000 physicians could be unemployed by the year 2000 if projections published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and in the University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter are accurate.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

Should Women With Diabetes Take Hormones?

Though hormone replacement therapy is generally recommended for post-menopausal women, not much is known about whether women with diabetes should take hormones. A study in Minneapolis recently shed some light on this tricky topic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

Listen To Your Body And Your Buddies

In a recent study in England, researchers wanted to find out if people with diabetes perceive their hypoglycemic symptoms differently than their partners and nurses.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

Researchers Find Link Between Virus And Diabetes

Diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune disease, and a Scottish study recently found some more evidence to support that theory.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

August 1995

Sucrose Isn't The Enemy, Study Shows

This study measured the effect of sucrose in the diet of children and adolescents with type I diabetes. One group received a diet containing five percent of their total calories as refined sugar. The second group remained on its usual sucrose-free diet. Long term metabolic control, which was measured by hemoglobin level, was not affected by the change in diet and did not differ between the two groups. (Published in Acta Diabetologica, December 1994.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

Prevent Complications

There is only one way to prevent complications: Start now.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

What Comes First? The Weight Gain Or The Diabetes?

Weight Gain Linked to Diabetes Onset

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

Don't Take Your Wife's Diabetes Pills

Hypoglycemia, extreme low blood sugar, is regularly treated in emergency rooms, and the patients are not always diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

LifeScan Wins Patent Suit, Judge Rothstein Orders Polymer to Retrieve All Infringing Test Strips.

After more than a year of legal wrangling, Polymer, the manufacturer of First Choice blood glucose meter strips, has been ordered to remove its product from the market and reimburse its customers. The ruling came from the Federal District Court in Seattle on June 19, almost three weeks after LifeScan won its patent infringement suit against Polymer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

July 1995

Virginia Mason Research Center Receives $5 Million Grant

The Virginia Mason Research Center in Seattle has been awarded a $5 million grant by the National Institutes of Health. The money will aid in the development of treatments that could prevent insulin-dependent diabetes, which affects one in two hundred people born in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Diabetes Conference

Will you be in San Diego on Sept. 23?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Home Diagnostic Market to Triple, Glucose Testing Leads the Way

In this era of rising medical costs, the popularity of inexpensive home medical tests is growing rapidly. Americans have become more health conscious, and the population of older people has grown, enlarging the target market for home testing and monitoring devices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Hillary Rodham Clinton Speaks out on Diabetes

Diabetes isn't cheap and the First Lady knows it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Beat the Heat! A Frozen Treat!

Do you crave sweets? Worried about what you can eat as a person with diabetes who is watching fat and sugar? How does some luscious frozen yogurt sound?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

June 1995

LifeScan/Polymer Trial Wraps Up, U.S. Court Hears Final Arguments in Patent Infringement Case, Verdict Due in May

Final Arguments in the patent infringement suit leveled by LifeScan, Inc., against Polymer Technology International were heard on April 18, but a ruling in the bench trial will have to wait until at least mid-May.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1995

May 1995

Youth Should Express Themselves

Researchers have demonstrated that family environment and psycho social factors have an important influence on glycemic control in children and adolescents suffering from type I diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

They Might Ask You To Pull Out Your Hair Strand By Strand

A new discovery suggests that long enough hair samples may be able to provide extended records of hyperglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

The Asian predisposition to diabetes might be genetically determined, journal says

There appears to be a prevalence of diabetes, hyperinsulinemia and associated metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk in people of Asian descent.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

Update On Infections

Although it remains controversial as to whether people with diabetes have an overall increased incidence of infection as compared to people without diabetes, several potentially life-threatening infections do appear to be uniquely associated with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

Patients Make Errors When Estimating Glucose Levels

In a recent study conducted at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, 42 insulin-dependent patients were asked to estimate their glucose levels and to rate the intensity of their corresponding symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

Diabetes Research Needs To Address Problems That Are Unique To Women

It has long been recognized that nearly one-third of all women of reproductive age with type I diabetes suffer menstrual dysfunction. Additionally, studies have shown that the age of the first menstrual period is frequently delayed in patients who develop diabetes before puberty.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

Smart Dot Available-For Visually Impaired

Blood glucose testing just got easier for people who are visually impaired, with the introduction of the Smart Dot Blood Collector.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

New Single-Use Blood Glucose Sampler

Ulster Scientific, Inc., has introduced a new single-use blood sampling device which the company claims has been designed to be the safest, most gentle, convenient and cost-effective device of its kind.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

Miles Gets Down to the 'Bayer' Basics

Miles, Inc. announced Jan. 30 that it planned to begin using the name of its parent company, Bayer, in April.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

SpectRx, BM Develop Painless Diabetes Test

SpectRx, Inc. and Boehringer-Mannheim Group (BM) have announced that the two companies have entered into an agreement to develop the world's first painless, non-invasive device for detecting diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

MediSense announces new blood glucose testing system

MediSense, Inc. has announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's acceptance of a new blood glucose monitoring system.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

DI has Acquired Real Living with Diabetes

Now Diabetes Health will begin serving the subscribers of the journal Real Living with Diabetes. Real Living ceased publication with its March/April issue, and Diabetes Health has agreed to fill their remaining subscriptions.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

LifeScan Survey Says Half of Diabetes Patients Don't Monitor

A pair of surveys commissioned by LifeScan reveal that nearly half of the country's diabetes and heart disease patients do not follow their doctor's orders.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

1995 Boehringer- Mannheim Research Award

One hundred thousand dollars will be awarded in Fall, 1995, for promising basic scientific or clinical research which has the potential to make a substantial difference in the way that diabetes mellitus is prevented, detected, treated or cured. Winner(s) will be selected by a panel of internationally recognized diabetes experts.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

April 1995

Questions and Answers

Answering questions this month is Peter Lodewick, MD, medical director of the Diabetes Care Center in Birmingham, Ala., and a member of our advisory board.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1995

Patent Watch

Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Reading

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1995

March 1995

Chronic Respiratory Failure Linked with Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetics

Researchers performed an oral glucose tolerance test on 18 non-diabetic patients with chronic respiratory failure, and found that half of them had impaired glucose tolerance as if they did have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

Diabetes a Risk Factor for Development of Fibrous Arterial Plaque

Having diabetes as a risk factor may affect the type of plaque that forms on the arteries, which can eventually lead to heart disease and stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

HemoCue Lab-Quality Blood Glucose Analyzer Reclassified

The HemoCue Blood Glucose Analyzer has been reclassified for use by diabetes educators, home-care agencies and wellness clinics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

Letters from Readers

Alteon Inc. announced Jan. 4 that it has licensed it's advanced glycosylation end products (A.G.E.) detection technology to Boehringer Mannheim Diagnostics.

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