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Lantus Article Archives

June 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #8

Every Sunday, a new crossword puzzle will appear on diabeteshealth.com

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2014

March 2014

Promising Results Reported for New Insulin

A new kind of long-acting insulin, developed by pharmaceutical giant Sanofi, has shown promising results in clinical trials, according to information released by the company.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2014

January 2014

New Type 2 Drugs Change Treatment Decisions

Metformin, the cornerstone in treating type 2 diabetes, saw an increase in usage among type 2s from 23 percent of that population in 1997 to 53 percent in 2012. But that increase has since plateaued due to the introduction of additional drugs that target insulin secretion and glucose regulation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2014

October 2012

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2012

August 2012

An Interview With Robert Cuddihy, MD, of Sanofi US

Endocrinologist Robert Cuddihy, MD, joined Sanofi US over a year ago to be the company’s Vice President and Medical Diabetes Head in the United States. He is responsible for developing and executing the US strategy for Sanofi’s Diabetes Division, including pharmaceuticals, devices, and other technologies. He previously served as the medical director for several organizations, including the International Diabetes Center-Park Nicollet in Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2012

March 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

November 2011

Hospitals Moving Toward Greater Use of Insulin Pens

The introduction of insulin pen devices in the 1980s facilitated accurate and simple administration of insulin for people managing their diabetes on an outpatient basis. The use of insulin in hospitals, however, continues to be associated with medication errors and severe adverse events.  Published practice guidelines have helped address insulin error prevention, and the availability of diabetes technologies has presented another opportunity to promote the safe use of insulin in hospitals.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2011

September 2011

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock in the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Diabetes

A couple of factors lead to increased risk of insulin shock comas during the first trimester.  For many, insulin sensitivity increases and the pancreas isn't yet producing the hormones associated with insulin resistance.  In addition, many type 1s will be taken off of their current basal insulin if it is not yet approved for use during pregnancy.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2011

May 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Dr. Jonathan Beach

Dr. Jonathan Beach is a 35-year-old emergency medicine physician who has had type 1 diabetes for 31 years. He owns and operates Urgicare, a wellness center that includes The Northeast Center for Diabetes Care and Education in Plattsburgh, New York, an isolated rural community that has few other resources for diabetes. This is his story of his life with diabetes and his professional experience with the insulin pump.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 12, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Gene Thornton

Gene Thornton was in the Army in Germany when he got type 1 diabetes. It was 1965, 46 years ago, and he was 24 years old. This is his story, in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 10, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Kent David

Kent David is a 47-year-old licensed civil engineer who has had type 1 diabetes since 1981. This is Kent's diabetes story in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2011

March 2011

Living With Type 1 Diabetes Since 1931

Edward Danielson developed type 1 diabetes 79 years ago, in 1931, only a decade after the discovery of insulin. Edward's wife of 67 years, Dorothy, recalls, "In the spring of 1930, when Edward was ten, his teacher told his mother that he ought to be checked by a doctor because something seemed to be wrong. His mother got on the streetcar with Edward and they went down to see the doctor, who said, ‘There's nothing wrong with him. He's just slow.' So they went home. In the fall of the same year, his new teacher said, ‘Something's wrong with Edward--he ought to be checked out by a doctor.' So they went back, and that doctor diagnosed him with diabetes. They kept him in the hospital for a month because the doctors then didn't know that much about diabetes 1."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 10, 2011

December 2010

Combining exenatide with insulin may be ‘best result ever' for diabetes patients

A new study finds that combining the newer diabetes drug exenatide with insulin provides better blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes than insulin alone and helps promote weight loss.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2010

October 2010

Paul and Mira Sorvino Partner with sanofi-aventis to Launch Diabetes Co-Stars

We all know of Paul and Mira Sorvino, the legendary father and daughter actors who have graced the small and big screens for decades. Paul has played such classic characters as Paulie Cicero in the film Goodfellas and Sgt. Phil Cerreta on the TV series Law & Order and is a well-known chef and singer, while Mira has starred in over 30 movies and won an Academy Award in 1995 for her role as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2010

May 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

September 2009

You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks

That old dog is me (thirty-seven years living with diabetes). There's a lot to be said for teaching someone who's lived with diabetes for years new ways to manage diabetes, and some new things that have come into the marketplace recently.

comments 9 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2009

August 2009

An Insulin Primer

Until the twentieth century, type 1 diabetes was a fatal disease. Once we came to understand how insulin works in the body, however, everything changed. The discovery of the role of insulin was a group effort by people who didn't know each other, but built on each others' work. In 1869, a German medical student named Paul Langerhans figured out the regulatory role of insulin in the mammal body. In honor of his efforts, his name was given to the islets of Langerhans, where insulin is synthesized within the beta cells of the pancreas. Other Europeans and North Americans made important advancements right up until January 23, 1922, when a 14-year-old boy who was dying of diabetes at Toronto General Hospital was given the first successful injection of cow insulin.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2009

June 2009

Joslin 50-Year Medal Winner Triumphs over Diabetes

Gale Fullerton is a 65-year-old Californian who has the distinction of being a Joslin 50-Year medal winner. Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., knew that good self-management was the key to minimizing long-term diabetes complications, and the medal program was designed as an incentive for those committed to good diabetes care. In 1970, Joslin Diabetes Center expanded the program and began awarding a 50-year bronze medal. They presented the first 75-year medal in 1996.

comments 24 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2009

April 2009

Apidra SoloSTAR Pen Now Available in the United States

Insulin pens have been very popular in Europe for quite some time and interest is building steadily in the United States. Many people prefer an insulin pen over the standard syringe and vial because the pens are more convenient and more accurate.  Pre-filled disposable insulin pens are the easiest of all, because you don't never have to install a new cartridge when the pen is empty-you just toss it out.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2009

Living with Diabetes: Diabetes Doesn't Define Me

My whole childhood, I was a bit of a pudgy girl.  At the age of eight, I weighed over 110 pounds, wore a woman's size 8, and stood a mere five feet tall.  I wasn't grossly obese, by any means, but it was enough to keep me off the cheerleading squad and out of the popular crowd at school.  I didn't really have any health issues besides the weight.  

comments 27 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

March 2009

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews Finds He Needs to Make Time for Type 2 Diabetes

The first time Chris Matthews heard the words "high blood sugar" was in 2002 at a doctor's office in Washington, DC, where he was being treated for malaria after a trip to Zimbabwe. He didn't pay a lot of attention to the warning about his glucose levels after a blood test. The malaria was subsequently cured, and he continued at his usual rapid-fire pace, traveling the country giving speeches about his best-selling books ("Life is a Campaign" is his latest;  "Hardball" is his best known) and his work both inside the White House, where he was a speechwriter for President Carter, and outside, where he was administrative assistant to House Speaker Tip O'Neill on Capitol Hill. Then there's his work on television, where he is host of Hardball on MSNBC and the Chris Matthew Show, which airs on Sundays just before Meet the Press on NBC. He stayed busy, and his schedule remained overbooked. He let the warning about high blood sugar go into the background-so far back it was out of sight and definitely out of mind. Besides, there just wasn't any room in his life to deal with it. 

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2009

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes: Who, When, And Why?

Physicians who treat people with type 2 diabetes face difficult choices when selecting the best medical therapy for each patient. The decision process is further complicated by the fact that because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, therapeutic agents that were initially successful may fail five or ten years later.

comments 159 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2009

February 2009

Team Type 1 Expands to a Family of Five

Over the past few years, Team Type 1, a team of elite and professional cyclists living with type 1 diabetes, has competed in races like the Tour of Georgia and the AT&T Austin Downtown Criterium, and it has twice won the ultra-endurance, 3,052 mile Race Across America (RAAM).   

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2009

December 2008

Readers Challenge Insulin Manufacturers: Help Us Avoid Near-Fatal Mistakes!
Readers Challenge Insulin Manufacturers: Help Us Avoid Near-Fatal Mistakes!

Sandy was giving her son his evening dose of NPH insulin - something she had done many times. But as she finished pushing in the plunger, she said to herself, "That shot took too long." She immediately realized that she had given Joey the wrong dose. In other words, by mistake, she had given him a potentially lethal dose of insulin.

comments 61 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

My Insulin Overdose
My Insulin Overdose

When the sun rose that morning, I was in the kitchen as usual with my daughter, preparing to take my insulin. I usually don't take it in front of her, but we were engaged in one of those frustrating conversations that were so common now that she was a teenager.

comments 20 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Brothers’ Diabetes Spans History of Insulin
Brothers’ Diabetes Spans History of Insulin

Bob Cleveland wondered if he’d live when he went to the hospital as a 5-year-old. In 1925, hospital visits were made for dire reasons.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Are You an Athlete with Diabetes? Then You Need This Book! (Part 2)

Last week we published an excerpt from Chapter 4 of Sheri Colberg's revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg has a PhD in exercise physiology, is a Diabetes Health board member, and is herself an athlete with diabetes. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!
Are You an Athlete With Diabetes? Then You Need This Book!

Diabetes Health board member Sheri Colberg, PhD, has published a completely revised, updated, and expanded version of her 2001 book, Diabetic Athlete's Handbook: Your Guide to Peak Performance. Dr. Colberg, a diabetic athlete herself, has a PhD in exercise physiology. Her book draws upon the experiences of hundreds of athletes with diabetes to provide the best advice for exercisers with diabetes, either type 1 or type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Young Athlete
Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Young Athlete

I'll never forget the afternoon of January 22, 2003. I was just leaving my classroom when my phone lit up, alerting me to a new voicemail. My heart stopped when I listened to the message. It was my son's pediatrician, asking me to call him back as soon as possible.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Letter to the Editor: Reader Responds to Laura Plunkett’s Diabetes Health TV Interview
Letter to the Editor: Reader Responds to Laura Plunkett’s Diabetes Health TV Interview

Dear Laura,

I just finished viewing your clip online.  You seem like a very intelligent and involved mom who decided it was time to take charge.  I applaud you, and I agree with many points you make, but I disagree with your position on food.

comments 10 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

October 2008

Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes
Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes

I'll never forget the afternoon of January 22, 2003, and the phone call that came from Derek's pediatrician. I was just leaving my classroom that day when I noticed the light on my phone lit up, alerting me to a new voicemail. My heart stopped when I listened to the message.  The doctor asked me to call him back as soon as possible.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

September 2008

Sanofi-Aventis Study Sees Significant A1c Reductions with Lantus and Apidra Compared to Pre-mixed Insulin for Type 2s

At the recent 44th annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), sanofi-aventis announced a study demonstrating that a basal-bolus insulin regimen with Lantus® once daily (basal insulin) and rapid-acting Apidra® (insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection) at mealtime (bolus insulin) resulted in significant A1c reductions from baseline as compared to pre-mixed insulin in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2008

August 2008

Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators
Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators

The members of the AADE are an impassioned group who genuinely want to make a difference in their patients' lives. It was an ideal place for me to be, especially because I had a concern of my own: Why am I getting red dots every time I inject? Every educator I asked went right to work examining the problem and investigating my behavior, truly wanting to help. Unfortunately, they are dwindling in number each year, while patients are increasing in number, making their work ever more demanding.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Study Shows Type 2s Can Lower BGs, A1c’s, Whether They Take Set Insulin Doses or Tailor Them to Carb Consumption

Type 2s who tried out either of two different basal-bolus treatments using Lantus and Apidra enjoyed significant reductions in post-meal BG levels and longer-term A1c’s.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

June 2008

Letter of the Week: Reader Reassured in Crisis by <em>Diabetes Health</em> Online Article
Letter of the Week: Reader Reassured in Crisis by Diabetes Health Online Article

Dear Editor:
 
A few weeks ago, I was reading in bed at around one o’clock in the morning. I got up to administer my twice-daily Lantus dose and a small amount of Humalog to "cover" the carbs I'd consumed about an hour earlier.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Would You Cure A Profitable Disease?
Would You Cure A Profitable Disease?

People in the diabetes community, desperate for a cure, sometimes express considerable paranoia about the goals of the pharmaceutical industry.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2008

April 2008

To Color or Not to Color Insulin With Vitamin B-12? Our "Help Us Avoid Fatal Mistakes!" Discussion Continues
To Color or Not to Color Insulin With Vitamin B-12? Our "Help Us Avoid Fatal Mistakes!" Discussion Continues

Hi, Keith,
One of our most popular articles right now is about the many, many folks who accidentally mix up their insulin bottles and take a huge dose of fast-acting insulin by mistake, thinking they are taking long-acting.  (See the article and the 22 reader comments here.)

comments 10 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

Letter of the Week
Letter of the Week

This is a thank-you note for the article, “An Appeal to Insulin Manufacturers,” on page 27 of Diabetes Health (Feb/March 2008). In the 10 years that I have been using insulin, I have made the “near fatal” mistake twice. I use Lantus and Apridra (5 units of Apidra before breakfast and lunch, and 8 units before dinner; 50 units of Lantus at bedtime). I realized what I had done after the fact and stayed up all night eating and monitoring. I was so scared each time I ate my blood sugar up to 300 mg/dl and 400 mg/dl!

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 21, 2008

Talent and Dreams Fulfilled! (Despite My IDDM of 46 Years)
Talent and Dreams Fulfilled! (Despite My IDDM of 46 Years)

Forty-six years of coping with IDDM hasn’t stopped me!  I’m a published, award-winning poet, an actress and, in my “retirement,” a vocalist.  All this from a girl from a far off place known as The Bronx – and a policeman’s daughter, no less!  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2008

Letter of the Week: There’s One More Thing Insulin Manufacturers Can Do to Prevent Potentially Deadly Mix-Ups
Letter of the Week: There’s One More Thing Insulin Manufacturers Can Do to Prevent Potentially Deadly Mix-Ups

Editor: I’m writing in regard to an article in Diabetes Health (Feb/March 2008) on page 27 about help in avoiding near-fatal mistakes taking insulin. To read the original article, go here.

comments 9 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2008

March 2008

Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21
Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21

Professional surfer Scott Dunton, 21, has two missions in life: To keep climbing in the rankings as one of the world’s top competitive surfers, and to spread the word to children and teenagers everywhere that having diabetes doesn’t mean life’s joys come to a halt.

comments 16 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Why Am I Tripping Myself Up? Five Weeks in, and I Can't Wait for Out

Five weeks ago I hurt my ankle. Really hurt it. I either tore a tendon or a ligament or had a severe stress fracture or something. Although I’ve been to my podiatrist twice now, the diagnosis is still unclear. The X-ray showed no break, and while the doc didn’t feel I needed an MRI, I figured that if my insurance paid for it, I did. I want to know we’re doing everything possible to get this fixed as quickly as possible (which already seems impossible after five weeks), because not walking is having several unpleasant effects on me:

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

February 2008

The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin
The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin

SK: We’re joined on our show by Craig Eberhard, vice president of sales at Amylin Pharmaceuticals. Hey, Craig, thanks for coming on the show. Amylin has one of the most innovative products that I’ve heard of in years. It’s called Byetta.

comments 8 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2008

January 2008

Study Aims to Prove by 2010 Insulin's Ability to Ease Heart Attack Damage

By mid-2010, an international clinical trial now underway may conclusively confirm insulin's ability to limit damage from heart attacks. The trial, called INTENSIVE, will be conducted at 90 centers in the United States, Canada, Brazil and Argentina.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2008

December 2007

The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?
The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?

Recently on "Good Morning America," a friend of mine (and fellow A1c champion) watched author Gary Taubes talk about his new book, Good Calories, Bad Calories. My friend sent this email around: "Taubes says that exercise makes us hungry for carbohydrates and that carbohydrates cause insulin secretion, which creates fat."

comments 49 comments - Posted Dec 27, 2007

Interesting Insulin Facts
Interesting Insulin Facts

The name insulin comes from the Latin insula, for islands. It refers to the pancreatic islets of Langerhans that contain the beta cells.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2007

Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change
Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change

To conclude our pump survey, we asked you how you'd like to see pumping improved. As usual, you came up with a plethora of intriguing suggestions, although some were a bit more visionary than others: One reader said, "I wish someone would invent a device that could be waved over a meal, and it would display the number of carbs in the meal."

comments 43 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2007

Byetta Dusts Insulin In Year-Long Trial

In a recent randomized study, 69 people with type 2 diabetes who were already taking metformin were given either Byetta or Lantus for a full year. When the results were in, Byetta came out ahead on several fronts.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2007

Packaging Practices Represent a Major Waste of Insulin
Packaging Practices Represent a Major Waste of Insulin

For more than fifty years, I have been a type 1 diabetic. I am writing to bring attention to the fact that huge amounts of insulin are wasted due to the insulin packaging practices of the pharmaceutical industry.

comments 39 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2007

"I Just Injected 46 Units of the Wrong Insulin!"

I have lived with type 2 diabetes for thirteen years, and I know very well how to take care of myself. In fact, I have it down to a routine. The flaw of a routine activity, however, is that it is so very routine: you go through the motions without thinking. And that, as I learned to my deep chagrin, can be dangerous.

comments 45 comments - Posted Dec 6, 2007

Study Says Lantus Lasts Longer Than Levemir

In an Italian study to compare once-daily injections of insulin glargine (Lantus) with once-daily injections of insulin detemir (Levemir), 24 patients with type 1 diabetes were treated for two weeks with either one or the other in a randomized double-blind study.

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2007

November 2007

In My Opinion: There is No 24-Hour Basal Insulin

You can make any insulin last longer by injecting a large enough shot. (See Scott King's column, "Why Smaller Shots of Insulin Get Absorbed Faster, Peak Sooner, and Are Out of Your System Quicker", for the math on this.) In fact, about 25 years ago, Dr. John Galloway of Eli Lilly and Company performed an important experiment that demonstrated this very fact.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2007

Why Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy May Be The Best Choice for Type 2 Diabetes

Many medications, both oral and injectable, exist to manage blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Even insulin has many different formulations, including fast-acting and long-acting analogs as well as various pre-mixed combinations of faster and slower acting insulins in the same vial.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2007

Novo Touts Levemir as a 24-Hour Insulin

Novo Nordisk's Levemir, which came out about five years after sanofi-aventis's Lantus, constitutes about twenty percent of the long-acting basal insulin sold worldwide. Lantus, the only other long-acting insulin analogue, makes up the other eighty percent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2007

An Insulin Prescription for Disaster

In July, I flew from New York City to Phoenix to meet my new book agent. (Trust me, I would not have deliberately sought out 100-degree weather without good reason.) Always thinking ahead, I decided to bring along a fancy new bag specially insulated to keep my insulin cool. Alas, either the bag failed me, or I failed the bag.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2007

October 2007

Chip Sullivan
Chip Sullivan

Chip Sullivan is a golf pro. This June he played his best game ever, beating the top club professionals in the country and qualifying for the fourth time to play against the likes of Tiger Woods in the PGA championship tour.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2007

A Story of Fatherhood

Bryan Stubblefield is a big ruddy man with the gentlest manner you could imagine. This is the story of his little boy, who's overcoming almost insurmountable problems, and of the man who has learned from him what it really means to be a father.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2007

August 2007

Get Your SoloSTAR Here!

It's about time that we Americans catch up with the rest of the world when it comes to using insulin pens. Maybe we will, now that SoloSTAR, sanofi-aventis's disposable insulin pen, is available in the United States.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2007

July 2007

After All These Years:  Robert
After All These Years: Robert "Bob" Cleveland, Age 87, Living With Type 1 Diabetes for 82 Years

Not to be outdone by his older brother Gerald (the oldest living person with diabetes most of his life), Bob Cleveland is believed to be the longest-living person with type 1 diabetes to date after Gladys Dull, who beats him by less than a year.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2007

Lantus and Levemir: What's the Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas.

comments 119 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2007

Carolyn Gridley:  A Farm Girl Grows Up With Diabetes
Carolyn Gridley: A Farm Girl Grows Up With Diabetes

Born on the family dairy farm in New York, the second of five children, Carolyn Gridley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after her grandmother noticed sugar crystals on her diaper that attracted the bees and flies around the farm.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 11, 2007

Are You and Your Diabetes Ready for a Hospital Stay?

You have made a point of checking your blood glucose and getting your annual eye and foot checkups. You track your blood cholesterol and blood pressure. But now the pain in your hip is unbearable and interfering with your walking program, so your doctor suggests hip surgery. You will be admitted to the hospital for hip surgery, not diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2007

A Pilgrimage to Peace With Diabetes
A Pilgrimage to Peace With Diabetes

Each year, one hundred thousand peregrinos, or pilgrims, set out for Santiago De Compostela in northwestern Spain to visit the bones of St. James buried beneath the cathedral. Called El Camino de Santiago, it's one of the world's largest Christian pilgrimages.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 6, 2007

June 2007

Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes
Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes

Kevin Powell is an athlete, first and foremost. Twice a year, he competes in an Ironman event, a grueling test of endurance that entails a 2.4-mile swim and a 112-mile bike ride, topped off by a full marathon of 26.2 miles.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

Cochrane Review Finds NPH Equal to Lantus and Levemir for type 2's

The Cochrane Library recently conducted a review of studies to see if NPH is as good as Lantus and Levemir when used as a basal insulin for people with type 2 diabetes. Six studies comparing insulin glargine (Lantus) to NPH (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn) were examined, as well as two studies comparing insulin detemir (Levemir) to NPH.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2007

May 2007

FDA Approves Lantus SoloStar®: A New Prefilled Disposable Insulin Pen For Use With LANTUS® In People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to administering insulin, many people prefer an insulin pen over the standard syringe and vial because they find pens more convenient and more accurate.  And pre-filled disposable pens are easiest of all, because you don’t have to install a new cartridge when the pen is empty­–you just toss it out.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 5, 2007

April 2007

Type 1 Pop Star, Nick Jonas Tells His Story
Type 1 Pop Star, Nick Jonas Tells His Story

Nick Jonas is a personable boy of fourteen who happens to be a member of the Jonas Brothers Band, a group of three brothers with a devoted following of very passionate young fans. In November 2005, Nick Jonas found out that he had type 1 diabetes.

comments 1470 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2007

Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education
Mr. Universe's Police Run-In Becomes a Force for Education

The story of Doug Burns’ arrest during a low blood sugar episode has generated a lot of comments from the diabetes community. How did it happen, why did it happen, and how could it have been handled differently?

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 19, 2007

Left-Handed? Read Your OptiClik Pen Right Side Up
Left-Handed? Read Your OptiClik Pen Right Side Up

Are you a lefty? Then be sure to read your OptiClik pen right side up, advises the Institute for Safe Medication Practices.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2007

A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady
A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady

What’s the most important goal for kids and families dealing with diabetes? Learn all you can, and then strive for the best possible blood glucose levels without excessive hypoglycemia. This is a tough goal to attain. Our tools, food, insulin, and monitoring, while the best they have ever been, are still imprecise. And although optimal glucose control is critical for immediate and long-term health, one must always be wary of severe and recurring hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2007

March 2007

Dr. White Answers Your Medication Questions

Q: Are there any long-term side effects of the popular drugs to treat type 2 diabetes?

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2007

February 2007

Twice Daily Lantus Better for BG Rises

U.K researchers say that twice-daily injection of insulin glargine (Lantus) helps to alleviate blood glucose rises in the late afternoon and drops toward the end of a 24-hour period that are frequently seen in type 1s who inject Lantus once daily with a meal-time fast-acting insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

November 2006

Kendall Simmons Tackles Diabetes
Kendall Simmons Tackles Diabetes

When Pittsburgh Steelers’ offensive lineman Kendall Simmons won the 2002 Joe Greene Great Performance Award for being the Steelers “Rookie of the Year,” he felt at the top of his game.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2006

September 2006

Insulin Research
Insulin Research

Levemir Improves BGs and Maintains Weight

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

August 2006

Fifteen Questions and Answers About Oral Medications
Fifteen Questions and Answers About Oral Medications

1. How do these oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) work?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

June 2006

Type 1s Are The Idol to Millions

In recent history, can you think of a more popular television show than “American Idol”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2006

The Ever-Changing Insulin Landscape
The Ever-Changing Insulin Landscape

In 1998, Eli Lilly & Co.’s rapid-acting insulin analogue lispro (Humalog) appeared on the U.S. market, followed in 2000 by Novo Nordisk’s rapid-acting counterpart aspart (NovoLog). Joined now by sanofi-aventis’ glulisine (Apidra), these rapid-acting insulins offer both convenience and improved blood glucose control to people who require bolus insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2006

May 2006

Apidra Now on Pharmacy Shelves
Apidra Now on Pharmacy Shelves

On February 28, 2006, sanofi-aventis announced that its fast-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection) is now available by prescription in the United States. Apidra was granted FDA approval in April 2004.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2006

New Long-Acting Insulin Now Available

My life depends entirely on getting little squirts of insulin into my bloodstream on a regular basis. Too little, and high blood glucose hijacks my moods—tired and cranky are the watchwords here. Too much insulin makes my BGs plummet—and shakiness and confusion take over until I eat something containing sugar.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

Letters to the Editor

Why Can’t Diabetes Get Better Coverage?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

Dudley Shoots to Help Kids With Diabetes
Dudley Shoots to Help Kids With Diabetes

When retired NBA center Chris Dudley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1981, the high school sophomore’s first concern was whether he would be able to continue playing sports.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

April 2006

The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night
The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night

Mary is a 64-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for 14 years. She is obese at 220 pounds. Mary has been treated with a sulfonylurea (a medication that stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, such as glypizide and glyburide) for the past 10 years. Her glucose control for the past three or four years has not been good. A recent A1C was 9.5% (normal range is 4% to 6%, with a goal of 7%). Metformin (Glucophage) and rosiglitazone (Avandia) were added to her sulfonylurea. Both her pre-meal and post-meal glucose values improved and her A1C came down to 7.8%. However, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the upper 100 mg/dl to low 200 mg/dl range. She was afraid of “the needle” and did not want to start on insulin. In addition, Mary was recently diagnosed with early diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) and nerve disease (neuropathy).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Is Levemir the Better Basal Insulin? Researchers Think So
Is Levemir the Better Basal Insulin? Researchers Think So

Compared with other basal insulins, French researchers suggest that insulin detemir (Levemir) may offer a “better reproducibility.” In addition, it may also reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and lead patients to titrate their insulin doses more easily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Lantus Combined With Oral Meds Can Save Your Patients Money

For people with type 2, Lantus in combination with oral medications can be a cost-equivalent alternative to conventional insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Premixed Insulin Analogues Help Your Patients Reach BG Goals

In three comparative randomized trials, researchers at the department of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, demonstrated that type 2s who used premixed insulins were more likely to reach blood glucose goals than those using only Lantus once daily.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Byetta Added to Type 2 Regimens Improves Control
Byetta Added to Type 2 Regimens Improves Control

A recent study compared the effect of adding exenatide (Byetta) or insulin glargine (Lantus) to type 2 patients’ treatment regimens. The type 2s previously had been taking metformin and a sulfonylurea with little success.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Levemir, Apidra and Lantus—Oh My! How Do the New Insulin Analogues Affect the Care of Your Patients?

In 1998, Eli Lilly & Co.’s rapid-acting insulin analogue lispro (Humalog) appeared on the U.S. market, followed in 2000 by Novo Nordisk’s rapid-acting counterpart aspart (NovoLog). Joined now by sanofi-aventis’ glulisine (Apidra), these rapid-acting insulins offer both convenience and improved blood glucose control to your patients who require bolus insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Letters to the Editor

Readers Respond to Insulin Article

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Take a Deep Breath!
Take a Deep Breath!

If you have ever dreamed of taking your insulin without needles, your dream came true on January 27, 2006. That was when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Exubera (insulin of human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder for treatment of adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

March 2006

Aida Turturro Puts a Hit Out On Her Diabetes

For six seasons, actor Aida Turturro has played the role of Tony Soprano’s sister Janice on the award-winning and critically acclaimed HBO series “The Sopranos.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2006

February 2006

Kris Freeman Skis for Olympic Gold in Italy
Kris Freeman Skis for Olympic Gold in Italy

Kris Freeman, 25, is a three-time national champion and the number one cross-country skier in the United States. In the history of American cross-country skiing, Freeman is the second most successful skier of all time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

Should Patients Be Switched to Another Insulin If There Is No Clear Advantage?
Should Patients Be Switched to Another Insulin If There Is No Clear Advantage?

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF), in its March 2005 position statement, stated that “All insulins have slightly different properties, and patients should not be changed from one to another insulin type unless there is a clear advantage.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

Can Insulin Cause Cancer?

Richard K. Bernstein, MD, says that a potentially serious problem with eliminating Ultralente is the “long-term forecast of potential adverse effects” in people taking Lantus, as outlined by Ernst Chantelau, MD.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

How Will We Dilute Insulin?

Dr. Bernstein says that the biggest problem with losing Lente and Ultralente is that we are now left with fewer insulin-diluting options for children or adults who require very little insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

And Then There Were Some

Since his type 1 diagnosis 20 years ago, Doug Frazer of Forest Knolls, California, had been using Lente as his basal insulin. His regimen of Humalog at mealtimes coupled with Lente at bedtime provided him with what he considered great control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

January 2006

Byetta Matches Lantus for Type 2 Control

Exenatide (Byetta) and insulin glargine (Lantus) achieve similar improvements in overall blood glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes who were not being controlled sufficiently on oral combination therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

December 2005

Severe Hypos May Impair Spatial Memory
Severe Hypos May Impair Spatial Memory

In a recent journal article, researchers noted that early exposure to and high frequency of severe hypoglycemia “negatively affects long-term spatial performance” in children with type 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

November 2005

Lantus a Suitable Option for Type 1 Tykes

“The use of flexible multiple daily insulin [FMDI] therapy with glargine [Lantus] among preschool-aged children with type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated with improved overall glycemic control and decreased frequency of severe hypoglycemia.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

October 2005

Trick or Treats

Come October, I immediately start thinking about Halloween and trick-or-treating with my children. I always allow myself a few chocolates—if I can get them away from my kids as we go door to door. “May I have a piece?” I ask them, sweetly. “Sure, Dad,” they say, as they let me rummage through their bulging goody bags. I choose a piece of plain chocolate, like a mini Hershey bar, or one with nuts, but I stay away from anything with caramel in it. Depending on how much I eat, I will need two to five extra units of fast-acting insulin this night.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

September 2005

Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff
Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff

Diabetes professionals from all over the world descended on San Diego, California, this past June for the 65th Annual American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions. Some brought with them the latest drugs, meters, pumps and software. Others came armed with research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Levemir’s Approval Means One More Long-Acting Insulin Option for Diabetics
Levemir’s Approval Means One More Long-Acting Insulin Option for Diabetics

On June 17, 2005, Novo Nordisk received word from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that their long-acting insulin analog, Levemir (insulin detemir), had received approval. Levemir will join Lantus (insulin glargine) as a basal insulin option for people with diabetes who take insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Nine Guidelines for Injecting Insulin Comfortably and Safely
Nine Guidelines for Injecting Insulin Comfortably and Safely

Guidelines for Injecting Insulin Comfortably and Safely

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Studies Demonstrate Benefits of Pumping
Studies Demonstrate Benefits of Pumping

Type 1 Kids Do Well on Pumps

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

August 2005

The Gifts of Experience
The Gifts of Experience

There is no doubt that living with type 1 diabetes is a fulltime job. But like any job, the more knowledgeable and skilled you become, the better your chances of success.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

Ironman Jay Hewitt
Ironman Jay Hewitt

He trains about 22 hours during the average week—not counting the additional seven hours of workouts on weekends. Through his twice-daily workouts, he totals nearly 120 miles of bicycling, about 10 miles of swimming and between 50 to 100 miles of running each week. For Ironman triathlete Jay Hewitt, training and diabetes have something in common: Working at them every day is critical to achieve his goals.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2005

July 2005

Getting Blood Glucose in Control by the End of the Summer
Getting Blood Glucose in Control by the End of the Summer

So, you have decided you want to do all it takes to get your type 2 diabetes in control—by the end of the summer. Congratulations! But how?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

Tip for Type 1s: Consider Lantus

Type 1s who switch from NPH to Lantus (insulin glargine) in multiple daily injection (MDI) regimens significantly reduce severe hypoglycemic episodes without significant weight gain.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2005

Basal Bolus Dosing

When insulin first became available in 1922, the treatment goal in diabetes management was to minimize ketoacidosis and high blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

May 2005

The Case of the Missing Kit

Back in February, I wrote about what I keep in my diabetes kit. Well, just last month, the contents of that kit, along with my waist pack, disappeared during a trip out of town. I found myself without a meter and no insulin. Anyone whose life depends on these things will be able to identify with me—I felt quite naked.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

April 2005

Readers Chime In On Scott’s February Column

I appreciate the many letters we received about my February 2005 column. It’s great to have a good debate every now and then.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

February 2005

Random Shots!

A friend recently asked me what I have in the diabetes pack that I carry everywhere.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

January 2005

What’s Better and Why—Taking Long-Acting Insulin or Going on the Pump?
What’s Better and Why—Taking Long-Acting Insulin or Going on the Pump?

The insulin pump remains the gold standard for optimal control of type 1 diabetes and for anyone who needs intensive insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

December 2004

NHL’s Boynton Scores on Diabetes Control
NHL’s Boynton Scores on Diabetes Control

Hockey players often joke about the rugged nature of their sport by touting the popular mantra, “Give blood, play hockey.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Ask Dr. Einhorn

How do you choose which insulins to use for your patients who use insulin?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

October 2004

Estimating Your Blood Glucose Level

Some researchers believe that having type 1 children practice at estimating their blood glucose (BG) levels is not an effective way to increase accuracy and “may be contraindicated.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

August 2004

Call It Predictable

Insulin detemir, the long-acting insulin analog from Novo Nordisk, has a more predictable blood glucose-lowering effect than both long-acting insulin glargine (Lantus) and NPH.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

July 2004

Insulin Detemir Beats NPH at Blood Glucose Control

Blood glucose control with detemir, a long-acting insulin analog, is better than NPH insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Establishing a Baseline

Since Lantus first appeared on the market in 2001, it has been praised as the best basal insulin for good blood glucose control, primarily because it has a flat, peakless action. It fills a need for people who desire consistent insulin action around the clock, but like other basal insulins, it has to be set, tested and adjusted to match the user’s need.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2004

May 2004

Hoopin’ It Up!
Hoopin’ It Up!

Mindy Mendenhall plays basketball the way a bull browses a china shop. She’s all muscle and emotion under the hoop, and she’s manic enough to launch her body across the court after loose balls.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2004

April 2004

Lantus Stands Out in Study

Nighttime relief is on the way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Mail Order: A Convenient Option for People With Diabetes

Several years ago, the dot-com phenomenon was making millionaires out of anybody with an idea for selling a product or service online.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

February 2004

Novo Nordisk Receives ‘Approvable Letter’ From FDA

On October 8, 2003, Novo Nordisk announced that it had received an “Approvable Letter” from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for insulin detemir, its long-acting insulin analog.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

May 2003

Never a Dull Moment

The hardest part was not the climbing," says Midge Cross, 59, of her attempt to scale Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world. "It was the tedium."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

March 2003

Insulin Usage Continues to Evolve

Looking at a list of the many types of insulin available today is impressive, but there's even more to the story. Overall, patterns of insulin use have changed dynamically during the past six years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

Sailing on Smooth Waters

I can't wait to see what my next A1C will be! My last one was 7.3%, with my blood glucose up, down and all around. I was low, I was high, and just way out of control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Grassroots Diabetes Programs for Latinos Receive Support

In an effort to help fight the diabetes epidemic among the Latino population in the United States, organizations in four states have received $10,000 each from the Aventis Adelante! Diabetes Community Excellence Awards. The Spanish word "adelante" means "to preserve" or "to move forward."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Letters to the Editor

To Your Health

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

November 2002

Could U Be in Danger?: Insulin. The #1 Drug Error in Hospitals

It's fortunate that Gillian Larner was at her 11-year-old son's bedside in the hospital after his surgery in May 2002.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

September 2002

Lantus Reduces Nighttime Lows in Pregnant Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

A 37-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes who was pregnant with her second child was able to eliminate frequent severe hypoglycemic episodes after being switched from NPH insulin to Lantus (insulin glargine), report two doctors and a nurse practitioner in a letter to Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

August 2002

Questions and Answers

Will Lantus Give Me the Same Flexibility the Pump Does?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

A Research Extravaganza

Once again, Diabetes Health has read through more than 2,500 abstracts of research presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual Scientific Sessions and selected a few of the more interesting ones to pass along to you as part of our annual "Research Extravaganza" feature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

Reader Finds Charts Useful

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

July 2002

Letters to the Editor

I Loved Taking NPH

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2002

June 2002

Lantus Users Beware

People who inject insulin can confuse Lantus (insulin glargine) with short-acting Regular insulin or rapid-acting Humalog (insulin lispro) or NovoLog (insulin aspart) because they are all clear in color, warn doctors from the Yale University School of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

I Developed Type 2 Diabetes From Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

Winning or Losing? - Type 2s Share Stories of Success and Frustration With Weight Loss and Diabetes Control

"Clearly no diet works reliably," says Jan Harper of San Jose, California. Harper, who has type 2 diabetes, takes oral medications to control her diabetes and tries to adhere to a "good diet"-the advice most often given to people who have type 2. However, as Harper laments, what is a "good diet" or the "right diet" for a person with type 2 diabetes? Does such a thing actually exist?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

May 2002

Give It to the Kids

Children with type 1 diabetes need intensive insulin therapy to help them achieve better long-term blood-glucose control and avoid complications later in life, according to Swedish researchers writing in the October 2001 issue of Diabetes, Nutrition & Metabolism.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Break Your Own Record

The heroes featured in this issue have two things in common: They've achieved top success in their various fields, and they have diabetes. I'm inspired by these people, who face the same challenges that I do with diabetes. It's too easy, sometimes, to use diabetes as an excuse not to try. Seeing these individuals reach the top encourages me to do as much as my capabilities allow.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

April 2002

Your Best Shot?

Insulin delivery devices come in many shapes and sizes. The most familiar and widely used in the United States is the traditional insulin syringe.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

New Size and Improved Format

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2002

March 2002

"Kiss NPH Goodbye"

The evolution of insulin has taken a turn that even Banting and Best could not have foreseen when they discovered the hormone back in the 1920s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

When Type 2s Take Insulin - A History of Insulin

While someone with type 1 diabetes needs insulin from the beginning of the disease, people with type 2 diabetes have some residual insulin secretion. However, first-phase insulin response-the initial surge of insulin that normally occurs when food is ingested-is lost, resulting in high blood-glucose levels after meals. Nat-ural insulin production also is insufficient to handle insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

February 2002

Letters to the Editor

"Fat and Lazy?" Editorial

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

Dont Worry, You’ll Get It Down

Why Check Your Blood Glucose?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

January 2002

Starting Anew in 2002

Welcome to the New Year!

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

When Will Medicare Cover the Cost of Insulin Pumps for Type 2s?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2002

December 2001

Letters to the Editor

Correction: In the Letters to the Editor of the November issue (p. 61), we made an incorrect statement about the use of Lantus. The sentence should read "..those who take three meal-time shots of short-acting insulin plus basal Lantus will take four shots of insulin a day." We apologize for this error.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

Letters from Readers

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

November 2001

Letters to the Editor

Correction About How Much Magnesium To Take

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2001

October 2001

Letters to the Editor

Diabetes Prevention Trial Not a Waste

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

August 2001

15,000 Miles and Counting: Type 1 Bicyclist Sees the World

For Marco Meijerink, having type 1 diabetes is a challenge, but it is not his biggest challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

One-Shot-A-Day Insulin is Here

In July 1999, John Buse, MD, PhD, CDE, director of the University of North Carolina's Diabetes Center told Diabetes Health that patients enrolled in clinical trials for insulin glargine (Lantus) absolutely "loved" the 24-hour-a-day long-acting (basal) insulin. Most of the people who participated in the clinical trials were not doing well on just NPH or Ultralente, and Lantus improved their control. However, Buse added, "[The clinical-trial participants are] upset that they cannot continue on it." That was because, at the time, the clinical trials had ended and the participants were told they would have to wait at least one year for FDA approval of Lantus and longer until they could get their hands on it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

September 2000

June 2000

New Long-Acting Insulin Shown to be Better

There was an outcry from insulin users when Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly decided to withdraw animal-derived basal insulins from the market and replace them with biosynthetic NPH and Ultralente, which many consumers consider inferior. These same critics are hoping that a new generation of basal insulins such as HOE901, Basulin and Lantus will prove to be more effective.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Kellie Kuehne is One Stroke Ahead of Diabetes

Kellie Kuehne, 23, is in her third year on the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) tour. Kuehne (pronounced key-knee), who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 10, is a two-time U.S. Women's Amateur champion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Novo to Sue Aventis Over Long-acting Insulin — Claims Patent Infringement

On April 27, three days after glargine (Lantus) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Novo Nordisk filed a lawsuit with the Court of Dusseldorf in Germany against Aventis for patent infringement.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

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