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Metformin Archives

Diabetes and Metformin Article Archives

April 2014

Life With Type 2: The Power of Naming

This is not a religious essay, so please don't take the example below wrong.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 9, 2014

January 2014

New Type 2 Drugs Change Treatment Decisions

Metformin, the cornerstone in treating type 2 diabetes, saw an increase in usage among type 2s from 23 percent of that population in 1997 to 53 percent in 2012. But that increase has since plateaued due to the introduction of additional drugs that target insulin secretion and glucose regulation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2014

December 2013

Life With Type 2: In Praise of Metformin

The fellow who writes one of the blogs I visit each morning often features links to articles about the wonders of bacon. Whenever he runs one of these items, showing yet another great thing about pork bellies, he asks, "Bacon: Is there anything it can't do?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2013

Metformin May Offer Defense Against Dementia in Type 2s

Not only can the diabetes drug metformin help control blood sugar levels, it may also reduce the risk of dementia, a health risk that's elevated for those with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 14, 2013

November 2013

Life With Type 2: How (Non-Diabetic) Others See Us

It's always fun to get a different take on things. You sit for years a few rows up from first base and then one day you decide to go sit out by left field. Who knew the game could look so different?

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2013

Common Diabetes Drugs May Carry Risk, Study Suggests

When it comes to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, metformin may be a safer choice than sulfonylureas, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2013

September 2013

Dapagliflozin Teams Well With Metformin, Sulfonylurea

According to researchers, dapagliflozin, a diabetes drug developed jointly by two pharmaceutical companies has shown significant benefits when teamed with metformin and sulfonylurea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2013

Dapagliflozin Teams Well With Metformin, Sulfonylurea

According to researchers, dapagliflozin, a diabetes drug developed jointly by two pharmaceutical companies has shown significant benefits when teamed with metformin and sulfonylurea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2013

Metformin Boosts Survival in Men With Diabetes, Prostate Cancer

The drug of choice to treat type 2 diabetes may have uses beyond the treatment of diabetes alone, according to the results a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2013

Early Diabetes Interventions May Also Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Lifestyle change, medication both linked to cholesterol improvements

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2013

Metformin Better Than Insulin for Gestational Diabetes?

Insulin may not be the best first line of defense for women who develop gestational diabetes, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2013

August 2013

Maryland Researchers Enrolling Type 2 Patients in Long-Term Drug Study

BALTIMORE-Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine are enrolling patients with type 2 diabetes into an NIH-funded clinical trial to evaluate the long-term benefits and risks of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2013

July 2013

My Pal Paul and the Type 2 Jitters

My down-the-street neighbor, Paul (not his real name), has type 2. We often stop to talk about our numbers, our latest visits to the endocrinologist, and our concerns.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 12, 2013

January 2013

Metformin Bests Glipizide in Reducing Cardio Events

A Chinese research study of diabetes patients with coronary heart disease concludes that metformin is more effective than glipizide in reducing the risk of major cardiovascular events, such as stroke and heart attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

December 2012

Metformin May Boost Cancer Survival, Curb Depression

Like aspirin, metformin is one of those drugs that over the years keeps proving itself beneficial in ways it wasn't originally intended to be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2012

November 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms Three Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms 3 Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2012

September 2012

Mayo Clinic Says Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Forestall Type 2

The Mayo Clinic Health Letter for August 2012 has published three lifestyle changes that could stave off the progression of prediabetes to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The list isn't new, but its periodic reiteration indicates that healthcare researchers and providers have settled on a simple prescription for staying diabetes-free.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 4, 2012

August 2012

US Sale of Generic Actos Gets FDA Nod

The Food and Drug Administration has approved US sale of generic pioglitazone (trade name Actos) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Actos, originally developed and trademarked by Takeda Pharmaceuticals, works by decreasing insulin resistance in type 2 patients. The prescription drug, which belongs to the class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has enjoyed great commercial success in the United States since its introduction in 1999, posting estimated sales last year of $2.7 billion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2012

July 2012

Type 2: Early Therapy Helps Retain Beta Cell Function

Immediately starting intense therapy for newly diagnosed type 2s preserved their beta cell functioning for 3.5 years, according to a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2012

Metformin Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

Metformin is the aspirin of the diabetes world, an almost-wonder drug that proves itself again and again the longer it's around. This time, a new study shows that postmenopausal women with diabetes who have taken metformin for several years are 25 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than nondiabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2012

May 2012

Study Says Best Drug Combo for Type 2 Kids Is Metformin and Rosiglitazone

A university study has concluded that a combination of metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) is the best drug therapy for controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 children and adolescents. Metformin alone is the drug most often prescribed for young or recently diagnosed type 2 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2012

Taiwanese Study Identifies Top Three Drugs for Type 2 Glycemic Control

Researchers in Taipei, Taiwan, report that they have identified the top three drugs for reducing A1C levels in type 2 diabetes: biphasic insulin, GLP-1 analogs, and basal insulin. They hedged a little on their endorsement of GLP-1 analogs, however, by saying that although they are not decisively better at controlling A1Cs than other oral diabetes drugs, they have the advantage of helping to reduce weight without adding to the danger of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2012

New Blood Sugar Guidelines Give Older Type 2s More Latitude

It may be better for older people with type 2 diabetes to have less stringent A1C goals than younger type 2s, according to new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 3, 2012

March 2012

Am I Doing the Right Thing?

Readers occasionally ask us for advice about drugs they are taking. When they do, we refer their questions to a medical professional. In the question below, a Florida reader expresses concerns about the interaction of her diabetes drug with the medicines she takes for asthma.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2012

Metformin Shines Again: Long-Term Use Helps Prevent Type 2

Long-term use of metformin as a weight loss aid is both safe and effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, says the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2012

ACP Guidelines Say Metformin Is the Best Starter Drug for Type 2s

The latest clinical guidelines for treating type 2 diabetes from the American College of Physicians (ACP) indicate that when diet, exercise, and weight loss fail to control blood sugar levels in early type 2 patients, physicians should prescribe metformin as the first drug therapy.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2012

February 2012

Hear Me, Doctor

During my 14 years with type 1 diabetes and my time spent interacting with the diabetes online community, I constantly hear the same theme: Doctors aren't listening to their patients, and their bedside manners are deteriorating. Every day, it seems, I hear about people who have been treated as if they are simply a number or dismissed as uneducated in their own health conditions.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2012

Metformin Could Protect Women Against Endometrial Cancer

British researchers say that metformin, the drug most often used to treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, could provide potential protection against endometrial cancer in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2012

Diabetes and Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2012

“You Have Diabetes.” Momentary Panic, Then Dedication and Determination

My best friend from high school, Katherine, married a wonderful man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a little over two years ago. John Schaaf, now 60, lives with Katherine in Berkeley, Calif., and works for Chevron Corporation in nearby Richmond.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2012

FDA OKs Sale of Combo Drug JANUMET® XR

The FDA has approved US sales of JANUMET® XR, a daily oral treatment for type 2 diabetes that combines sitagliptin and extended-release metformin. The drug is the fourth oral type 2 diabetes treatment introduced by Merck, which also sells JANUVIA, JANUMET, and JUVISYNC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 6, 2012

January 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

November 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

October 2011

The Second Trimester- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Welcome to the second trimester!  By now, many type 1s are experiencing fewer hypoglycemic episodes, and insulin resistance is just beginning to rear its head.  You're on the other side of the miscarriage worry hump and getting settled into the pregnancy routine.  Congratulations!  Take a few minutes each day to celebrate your successes and pat your stomach with a smile, knowing you are doing the best you can to give your growing child everything she needs.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2011

Novo Says Early Use of Victoza Aids Type 2 Control

News from Danish pharmaceutical manufacturer Novo Nordisk reinforces the growing trend toward using a two-drug combination in the early treatment of type 2 diabetes. (See "A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes" for more discussion about this phenomenon.) In a study it released in Lisbon, Portugal, at the recent meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Novo said that combining its recently released drug Victoza® (liraglutide) with another drug early in therapy helps recently diagnosed type 2s achieve greater blood glucose control than they can with a single drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2011

September 2011

A Conversation About Janumet and Earlier Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

Combination therapy, in which doctors prescribe more than one drug to treat type 2 diabetes, is a fairly common practice. However, most newly diagnosed type 2 patients start off with metformin or a sulfonylurea and don't go on a two-drug therapy until their first drug begins to lose its effectiveness.

But combination therapy could soon become an earlier option for people with type 2.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2011

August 2011

Metformin Helped My Type 1 Diabetes

My name is Katherine Marple, and I've had type 1 diabetes for 13 years. I'm the first in my family to have the disease, so I've done most of the research and made most of the discoveries on my own. One of those discoveries was the power of metformin (in addition to insulin) to help me control my diabetes.

comments 16 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2011

Drug Combo Slows Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

Low doses of metformin and rosiglitazone seem to delay the onset of type 2 in prediabetic people who have impaired glucose tolerance, according to a Canadian study. However, although the drug combination was effective over the first year of the study in helping to control glucose levels and insulin resistance, it was not effective subsequently in delaying the onset of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell deterioration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2011

July 2011

Righteous About a Diabetes Diet

Recently, we published an article by Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, titled "From Old Dogmas to New Realities. "In the article, Hope voiced the opinion that a low carb diet is not the only dietary option for people with diabetes, and that, in fact, such thinking is an "old dogma." In response, we received a number of strongly worded comments advocating the low carb diet as the only way to go.

comments 49 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2011

June 2011

Type 2s on Sulfonylureas Less Likely to Take Anti-Depressants

Type 2 patients who use only a sulfonylurea are less likely to take anti-depressant drugs than diabetes patients on other medications. That's the conclusion of a report delivered recently in Honolulu at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2011

May 2011

Danish Study Reports Three Diabetes Drugs Best for Lowering Cardiovascular Risk

A Danish study of 107,806 adults taking various diabetes medications has found that three drugs are the most effective at lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease and death: metformin, gliclazide (not marketed in the US), and repaglinide (Prandin). Other common diabetes medications, including glimepiride, glibenclamide (glyburide), glipizide, and tolbutamide, were linked to a higher risk of death both from all causes and from heart attack and stroke.  

comments 1 comment - Posted May 13, 2011

March 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

January 2011

Kombiglyze Komes to a Pharmacy Near You

The kuriously named Kombiglyze XR, a combination of Onglyza (saxagliptin) and the old reliable metformin, has arrived at pharmacies and is available by prescription to people with type 2 diabetes. It's similar to Janumet, an older medication that's a combination of Januvia (sitagliptin) and metformin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

July 2010

GLUMETZA: Extended Release Metformin

Depomed, Inc. and Santarus, Inc. announced new data suggesting that patients previously intolerant of metformin may be able to tolerate higher doses of metformin when treated with GLUMETZA® (metformin HCl extended release tablets).  The finding will be presented at the 70th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in Orlando. GLUMETZA is a once-daily, extended release formulation of metformin, and is approved for use in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is promoted in the U.S. by Santarus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

June 2010

Metformin-Avandia Combo Slows Progression to Type 2 in Two-Thirds of At-Risk Patients

A Canadian study that tracked 207 patients suggests that a low-dose combination of metformin and Avandia can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes by 66 percent in people at high risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

U.K. Study Links Metformin to B-12 Deficiency

If you take metformin to control your type 2 diabetes, ask your doctor to take a look at your vitamin B-12 levels when you get a chance. A recent British study shows that metformin may cause a deficiency in the vitamin, which is necessary for the regeneration of red blood cells and the maintenance of nervous system health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

May 2010

Surprise! Metformin Works Differently Than Thought

CINCINNATI - The popular diabetes medication metformin works in different fashion than the current widely accepted view. This new finding could lead to wider use of the drug-particularly in people with cancer.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 4, 2010

March 2010

Starting Treatment Early Doubles Chance of Success for People with Diabetes

The sooner people with diabetes start taking metformin, the longer the drug remains effective, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2010

Insulin Used to Treat Diabetes May Be Linked to Increased Cancer Risk, Review Suggests

The benefits of using insulin to treat diabetes far outweigh the risks, but a review just published online by IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, suggests that commonly used diabetes therapies may differ from each other when it comes to their influence on cancer risk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 5, 2010

Does Something Smell Fishy? It Could Be Your Metformin

If you regularly take metformin, one of the oldest and most respected tools in doctors' anti-diabetes kits, chances are that you don't detect the unpleasant odor that turns some type 2s against the drug.  Some think it has fishy smell, while others say that it reminds them of the inside of an inner tube.

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2010

February 2010

Study Suggests Extended Release Metformin May Reduce Body Mass Index in Teens

A California study that tracked 77 obese adolescents for almost two years indicates that metformin XR, an extended-release version of the popular anti-diabetic drug, may help lower body mass index in overweight teens who do not have diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2010

December 2009

Is Testosterone the Wonder Drug?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 57 years old. About five years ago, I saw my doctor because I was feeling tired. My waist size was up, and I was not interested in sex. I almost never got an erection. The doctor diagnosed type 2 diabetes and put me on metformin. He also prescribed Viagra, which helped sometimes, but not all the time.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

October 2009

Grapefruit and Metformin May Have Ill Effects on the Body's pH Levels

A South African university pharmacologist has found that simultaneous consumption of metformin and grapefruit juice raises lactic acid to dangerous levels in rats (and conceivably in people) with type 2 diabetes. Too much acid in the blood can cause low pH levels that interfere with the body's metabolic functions. Conceivably, says Dr. Peter Owira, a pharmacologist at the University of KawZulu-Natal, such low levels could be fatal.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2009

September 2009

Mighty Metformin: The New Cancer Wonder Drug

Metformin has always been the old reliable for treating new onset type 2 diabetes, but it's beginning to look like it's got a new calling as a cancer treatment. Diabetes Health recently reported on the fact that metformin reduces a type 2 person's risk of pancreatic cancer by up to 62 percent. It's also been observed that people with type 2 who take metformin have a much lower cancer incidence than those who don't. Now it appears that metformin can help with breast cancer treatment as well. A study of mice with breast cancer generated from human breast cancer cells has found that they remained tumor-free for nearly three months on metformin combined with doxorubicin, a standard cancer chemotherapy. In mice given only the doxorubicin, the tumors recurred.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 25, 2009

Study Investigates Starting with Insulin for Newly Diagnosed Type 2

Adults newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes generally don't take to the idea of using insulin right off the bat. They're worried about gaining weight and fear low blood sugars. They're also concerned about whether they can manage the regimen and fear that taking insulin will lower their quality of life. Those concerns, however, might be assuaged by a study recently conducted by Ildiko Lingvay and his colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2009

August 2009

Good Ol' Metformin Shines Again: Study Says It Reduces Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Type 2s by 62 Percent

Metformin is one of the oldest and most tried-and-true diabetes treatments around, but apparently it has a new talent. According to research from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas, good ol' metformin reduces a type 2 person's risk of pancreatic cancer by 62 percent.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2009

June 2009

Metformin Add-on Drops Fasting Glucose Levels by 12 Points in Phase 2 Trial

CRx-401, an insulin sensitizer intended to assist metformin in type 2 diabetes therapy, has successfully completed a Phase 2 clinical trial in which patients taking it saw their fasting plasma glucose drop by 12 mg/dl after 90 days.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 3, 2009

May 2009

Januvia Taken Alone May Increase Pancreatic Risks, But Using It With Metformin Removes the Threat

A study of Merck's Januvia (sitagliptin), a drug for patients with type 2 diabetes, has found that its use can lead in some patients to a low-grade form of pancreatitis and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in the long term. However, the study, conducted at the Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center at UCLA, also found that the risks associated with Januvia as a monotherapy are removed when the drug is used in conjunction with metformin (trade name Glucophage). Metformin, a low-cost drug that controls glucose production by the liver, is one of the oldest and most benign standbys in the anti-diabetes arsenal.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2009

Metformin Turns Out to Be a More Formidable Diabetes Drug Than Previously Thought

Wow. It's like discovering that the orchestra's second violinist, who does a good job but just isn't as glamorous as the first violinist, also has a fantastic operatic singing voice. In this case, the surprise comes from metformin, the solid performer that since the 1950s has been the first non-insulin drug that doctors prescribe to newly diagnosed type 2s.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 27, 2009

December 2008

The History of Diabetes
The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. In the first century A.D. a Greek, Aretaeus, described the destructive nature of the affliction which he named "diabetes" from the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold in his text Aretaeus the Cappodacian describes Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 48 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

FDA Unlikely to Approve Byetta Monotherapy Soon
FDA Unlikely to Approve Byetta Monotherapy Soon

Hopes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would move soon to make the diabetes drug Byetta a monotherapy are fading. It now appears that the FDA will extend its review of the drug into 2009.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2008

Why Swallow Metformin When You Can Chew It?

If you're like millions of type 2s and people being treated for metabolic syndrome, you take metformin to control your liver's glucose production.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

November 2008

An Old Diabetes Drug Standby Might Lower Heart Risks

Metformin, the tried-and-true diabetes drug that is prescribed to many type 2s when they are first diagnosed, may decrease the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. That's the conclusion of a meta-analysis by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2008

September 2008

Long-Term Benefits of Blood Sugar Control

People who tightly control their blood sugar-even if only for the first decade after they are diagnosed-have lower risks of heart attack, death, and other complications ten or more years later, a large follow-up study has found.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2008

July 2008

Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls
Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls

Metformin, combined with dietary changes and exercise, seems to help obese pre-diabetic adolescents, especially girls, lose weight, says a report in the June 2008 Journal of Pediatrics.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

November 2007

Sitagliptin and Metformin a Useful Combo For Type 2s

A recent study has found that the combination of metformin and sitagliptin lowers A1c's better than either drug alone, apparently because their different mechanisms work together synergistically.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2007

August 2007

Metformin Is Still Tops for Diabetes, Says Study Review
Metformin Is Still Tops for Diabetes, Says Study Review

That old standby, metformin, is still your best bet. In fact, there is no benefit in taking the newer oral medications unless you can't tolerate the older ones.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2007

February 2007

Metformin Associated with B12 Deficiency
Metformin Associated with B12 Deficiency

Asian researchers say there is an increased risk of vitamin B12 deficiency associated with metformin use.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

December 2005

Extended-Release Metformin Combo Drug Given the Green Light

Glumetza, a once-daily extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride, was granted FDA approval in June 2005 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

November 2005

ACTOplus Met Approved by the FDA for Type 2 Diabetes

In August 2005, Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc., announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had approved ACTOplus Met for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

August 2005

Use of Metformin May Decrease Cancer Risk

Metformin activates the enzyme AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), which promotes muscles to take up glucose from the blood. It was recently discovered that the upstream regulator of AMPK is a protein kinase called LKB1, known to be a tumor suppressor.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2005

September 2004

Does Taking Metformin Increase Your Risk for Lactic Acidosis?

A recent study documented the incidents of metformin-associated lactic acidosis at a poison center in Mainz, Germany.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2004

March 2004

Glyburide/Metformin Combination Tablet Delivers Surprising Results

Who would have guessed that taking two diabetes drugs combined in one tablet would offer greater glucose-lowering benefits than taking the same two drugs in separate but still co-administered tablets?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

February 2003

Fewer Deaths With Metformin Than With Sulfonylurea Alone

Death rates are lower among people new to oral anti-diabetes medications if they take either metformin alone or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea, as opposed to taking a sulfonylurea alone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

January 2003

A Two-Headed Type 2 Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on October 11, 2002, that it had approved Avandamet for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

May 2002

Many Patients Given Metformin in Hospitals Despite Contraindications

Many patients who are treated with metformin (Glucophage) during hospital stays have medical conditions or undergo procedures that, when combined with metformin, put them at risk for developing lactic acidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition caused by a build-up of lactic acid that can lead to organ damage.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

March 2002

There’s a New Metformin in Town!

In late January, the floodgates opened as IVAX Corporation, Alpharma, Inc., Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Andrx Corporation, and TevaPharmaceutical Industries announced that they were among the 11 companies who had received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to sell their generic versions of metformin, a popular oral medication used by people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

Researchers Say Metformin Works for Children with Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin is safe and effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in children, according to new research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

February 2002

Testing Brand Names On Kids

On December 18, 2001, the U.S. Congress approved a bill granting brand-name drug makers six months of marketing exclusivity after exclusive rights expire to allow them to test their medications on children. If signed by the president, the renewed bill would extend the current law for another five years, through 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

August 2001

A Do-Good Drug

The insulin-resistance drug metformin (Glucophage) has been shown to improve more than just insulin sensitivity in the body.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

September 2000

New Time-Released Brand of Metformin Well-Tolerated in Clinical Trials

DepoMed of Menlo Park, California, reported a second set of positive phase I data for its oral anti-diabetic drug Metformin GR. Data from a five-day trial enrolling 14 healthy volunteers suggest that 1000 mg of Metformin GR once per day is as well-tolerated as two doses per day of 500 mg Glucophage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

January 2000

Just Say No to Insulin and Meformin?

If you have a child with type 2 diabetes, South Carolina researchers suggest the possibility of getting him or her off of insulin and metformin and onto a very low calorie diet (VLCD) with medical supervision.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

May 1999

Insulin and Metformin Before Bed Proven Effective for Poorly Controlled Type 2s—Drops HbA1cs from 9.7% to 7.2%

In a study conducted in Finland, it was discovered that insulin combined with metformin (Glucophage) taken at bedtime appears to be an effective regimen for controlling type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1999

March 1999

Metformin Demonstrates Improved Glucose Control—Decreases HbA1c by 1.4%

The results of a 20-month study on metformin (Glucophage) use were published in the January 1999 issue of Diabetes Care. Data collected from researchers at the health maintenance organization Kaiser Permanente revealed that there seemed to be good adherence to prescription guidelines, as well as an improvement in glucose control and rare incidence of lactic acidosis, in patients taking metformin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1999

May 1998

Could Glucophage Help Type 1s?A Doctor at the Barbara Davis Center Crosses His Fingers

Since Glucophage's (metformin) arrival on the U.S. market in 1995, the type 2 oral medication has produced significant results in people with type 2 diabetes, including reducing fasting glucose levels an average of 60 mg/dl and lowering HbA1c an average of 1 to 2% (i.e., from 10% to 9 or 8%).

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

August 1997

The One-Two Combination

Metformin and troglitazone were both shown to improve glycemic control of type 2 diabetes. In addition, using them in combination proved to be safe and to provide additional benefit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

May 1996

Acarbose and Metformin: Useful Drugs for Type 2’s

A recent study has concluded that acarbose and metformin can be used as effective therapies in people with type 2 diabetes who are poorly controlled with a sulfonylurea agent alone. Better glycemic control was achieved by patients in the study who also took acarbose or metformin, as opposed to just a sulfonylurea.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

November 1995

Syndrome X And Metformin

Syndrome X is a group of problems associated with type 2 diabetes. It includes obesity, hypertension (high blood pressure), hyperlipi-demia (abnormal cholesterol metabolism), macro-angiopathy, (large blood vessel disease/hardening of the arteries), and insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

July 1995

Questions and Anwers About Metformin and Type 2 Diabetes

DIABETES HEALTH: What is metformin?

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

Metformin: Who Should Take It?

Several prominent endocrinologists gathered in San Diego this past January to develop guidelines for prescribing metformin. Speaking at the American Diabetes Association Post-Graduate course were: Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Houston's Baylor College of Medicine; Ralph A. DeFronzo, MD, Chief of the Diabetes Division of the University of Texas Health Center in San Antonio; and Jay S. Skyler, MD of Miami.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1995

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