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Diabetes A1c Test Article Archives

September 2013

Learn To Control Your Diabetes, Before It Controls You

A Diabetes Health Classic. This article originally was published on June 20, 2007.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2013

February 2013

Mike Fisher, Competitive Snowboarder

Mike Fisher is a 23-year-old from Ontario, Canada, who's been snowboarding since he was 13 years old. At the age of 18, he was involved in a motorcycle crash that necessitated the amputation of one leg below the knee. He says, "At first, I felt that my life was coming to a crashing halt. But I just pushed myself to recover as fast as possible and get my life back on track, go to school, get back into snowboarding and motorcycles-just anything so that my life wasn't affected at all. I had a lot of support, and I would say that I was pretty optimistic about it and took it almost as a challenge. By the time that I was 19, I was happy. I was walking again, I was back in college in London, Ontario, and everything was good. The accident was a minor setback to me, and I rose above it. I was just continuing with my life."

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2013

December 2012

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2012

August 2012

Sometimes I Feel Like a Total Slacker

I don't sleep till noon, wait for other people to clean up my messes, or put off doing the laundry until I'm down to my last clean shirt. Still, when it comes to my diabetes, sometimes I can't help but feel like a total slacker.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2012

June 2012

Entrances and Exits

The Year
What a year I've had. From the spring of 2011 to the spring of 2012, my life changed utterly. There have been few years in my life more eventful, and few years that mixed joy and pain in such bracing amounts. With the year now done, I'm hesitant to draw any lessons--I just look back in amazement.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2012

May 2012

Finding the Right Diabetes Doctor

I once had a doctor ask me what I'd do if someone offered me a drink or a cigarette. I was a teenager, recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and it was the first time that I had seen her. When I told her that I didn't drink or smoke, she kept hounding me with questions as if I were lying. I grew tired of telling her the same thing over and over. She just didn't seem to hear what I was saying. Maybe she was just trying to scare me from starting, but I left feeling annoyed and convinced that I needed to find a different doctor.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 25, 2012

New Blood Sugar Guidelines Give Older Type 2s More Latitude

It may be better for older people with type 2 diabetes to have less stringent A1C goals than younger type 2s, according to new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 3, 2012

April 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

August 2011

Staying Motivated With Diabetes Part 3

Scientific studies -- and our own common sense -- tell us that staying motivated and engaged helps control our diabetes. We know what we should resist temptation at the dinner table, monitor our blood sugars avidly, and get regular check-ups. But knowing all of these things, and knowing that self-motivation is the way to achieve them, isn't quite enough.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 19, 2011

Parenting Style Impacts Control of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

As a dad, do you tend to be authoritative and have high expectations of your child's self control? Do you set clear limits and command respect, without bulldozing him or her? If so, you may be helping your child with type 1 diabetes stick to his or her treatment regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2011

Vitamin D May Reduce Risk for Type 2

A Boston-based study has found that vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes by improving their beta cell functioning.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2011

July 2011

New Website Facilitates Communication Between Type 2 Patients and Their Physicians

People with type 2 diabetes often find visits with their physicians frustrating.  Dr. Jeffrey Mechanick, MD, FACE, FACP, Secretary of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), observes, "Many times when patients come to the doctor, the first thing that they say is really what's on their mind--that's their top priority. But oftentimes physicians don't address that at all. Instead, they move on to what's on their own agenda."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2011

A Rebellious Teenager Finds Team Type 1

I am excited to have this opportunity to write a diabetes-focused blog for Diabetes Health about living and thriving with type 1 diabetes. First of all, I am extremely passionate about racing road and mountain bicycles, running 5K runs and sprint triathlons, and doing other activities that I find to compete in for Team Type 1. But before I start blogging, I would like to tell a little about myself.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2011

Type 2 Drug Victoza Helps Type 1s, Too

Victoza, a drug aimed at type 2 diabetes, may turn out to be a boon for type 1 diabetes patients as well. A small clinical study shows that patients with well-controlled type 1 who took Victoza daily for just one week experienced a 15 percent drop in their blood sugar levels. Patients who took the drug over a full 24-week test period needed less and less insulin, decreasing their average mealtime dose by seven units and their all-day insulin requirement by eight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2011

June 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities

Over the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to become aware of the new realities.  In this article, I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2011

Your Glucose Meter Number?

A few months ago, I had the privilege of traveling to Australia to present at a conference of athletes with diabetes.  During the meeting, prizes were awarded to everyone who scored exactly 5.5 mmol/L (99 mg/dL) on their glucose meter. You should have seen it! Anyone who measured close to 5.5 was testing again and again, hoping for that magic number to pop up. Fingers were suffering, but the test strip manufacturers were making out like bandits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 5, 2011

May 2011

Sanofi Says Late-Stage Trial of Type 2 Drug a Success

French drug maker Sanofi-aventis says that results from a Phase III trial of its experimental type 2 diabetes drug lixisenatide show that the drug successfully lowered patients' blood glucose levels and body weight, but did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 23, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Dr. Jonathan Beach

Dr. Jonathan Beach is a 35-year-old emergency medicine physician who has had type 1 diabetes for 31 years. He owns and operates Urgicare, a wellness center that includes The Northeast Center for Diabetes Care and Education in Plattsburgh, New York, an isolated rural community that has few other resources for diabetes. This is his story of his life with diabetes and his professional experience with the insulin pump.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 12, 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Gene Thornton

Gene Thornton was in the Army in Germany when he got type 1 diabetes. It was 1965, 46 years ago, and he was 24 years old. This is his story, in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 10, 2011

Molly Martin, Motocross Racer

Molly Martin is a vibrant and energetic 18-year-old from Texas who's had type 1 diabetes since the age of two. Five years ago, Molly took up motocross racing. She says, "I love riding motocross---it's just you and the bike. I feel free when I ride, like I don't have to think about diabetes. I do have to make sure that I test before I get on and during breaks, to make sure my sugar is doing what it's supposed to be doing. But when I get out there, it's just me and the bike, going."

comments 1 comment - Posted May 5, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

Profiles in Type 1: Kent David

Kent David is a 47-year-old licensed civil engineer who has had type 1 diabetes since 1981. This is Kent's diabetes story in his own words.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Highlights From the Barbara Davis Center's July Keystone Conference

Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Barbara Davis Center's "Management of Diabetes in Youth" conference, held every other year in beautiful Keystone, Colorado. The focus is on all of the latest and greatest in type 1, and it's a real treat to have so many of the best names in this field gathered in one place. The Barbara Davis Center (BDC) is one of the premier programs in the world focusing on type I diabetes management, and the one (Dr. Peter Chase, to be precise) who brought us the famed" Pink Panther" book, Understanding Diabetes - the reliable handbook of type 1 diabetes that many parents of newly diagnosed kids rely on.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 118 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

A Prodigious Future for Prodigy Diabetes Care

Prodigy Diabetes Care is an aptly named company, a very young enterprise with the talents of a much older organization and a future that promises prodigious rewards. It was founded in 2006 by Ramzi Abulhaj and Rick Admani, two brothers from Palestine who are its sole owners. In the five years since then, they have built a company that is successfully competing against the diabetes old guard by focusing on engineering and a unique marketing strategy.

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2011

March 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

Open Wide! Blood from Dental Procedures Could Be Used to Predict Diabetes

A New York University research team has won a pilot grant to see if blood from dental procedures could be used in conjunction with the A1C test to detect diabetes or pre-diabetes. The A1C test, which is becoming healthcare providers' preferred test for detecting the disease, typically uses blood extracted from finger pricks to make its analysis. The NYU team will see if the blood that flows from gum tissue during dental work can be used for the same purpose.

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Michael Hamman

Michael Hamman is a 63-year-old contractor.  He recalls, "I first was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes five or six years ago.  I probably had elevated blood sugar well in advance of that, but I was unaware of it. I don't remember how high my blood sugar was at the time, but I think my A1C was 7.5%.  My blood sugar's never really been awful. Since I started monitoring myself, my sugar readings are normally between 150 and 165.  I think it was pushing 200 before I was medicated, but the medications brought it down. They started me on glyburide and I took that for a long time, and then the A1C was moving up again, so they added the metformin. The A1C now is down in the mid-sixes. They consider it controlled, not well controlled or as good as it could be, but certainly for someone my size, it's probably as good as you can get."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 25, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

February 2011

Tyler's Ten Objectives for Staying Healthy

Everywhere you look, there seems to be a great tasting high carb meal, dessert, or snack staring back at you. While away at college last fall, I found a t-shirt picturing a cupcake above a skull and crossbones. For me, that image really sums up how we need to deal with being diabetic while being constantly tempted by sugary treats.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

January 2011

Getting Personal With Bret Michaels

It's Labor Day weekend in Pittsburgh, just outside of the Steelers' Heinz Field, and the Bret Michaels Band has come home for some hard-driving rock and roll.  The 20,000 screaming fans are a generational mix, shrieking 16-year-old girls side-by-side with moms and dads who have temporarily abandoned their parental roles to dance, sing the familiar words to "Look What the Cat Dragged In," and howl into the nighttime air. On stage is Bret Michaels, the boy from Butler, Pennsylvania, a coal mining town just an hour north.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 27, 2011

New Primary Care Physicians Haven't Learned Enough About Diabetes

Your young primary care doctor may not know a lot about diabetes, according to a study led by Stephen Sisson, MD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  "When I graduated from residency here, I knew much more about how to ventilate a patient on a machine than how to control somebody's blood sugar, and that's a problem," said Sisson in a press release.  "The average resident doesn't know what the goal for normal fasting blood sugar should be. If you don't know what it has to be, how are you going to guide your diabetes management with patients?"

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

The Lowdown on Downloading

It doesn't matter if you're a computer geek or complete technophobe: If you've ever made the effort to download your blood glucose meter, you probably don't have a clue about what to do with the data once you've gotten it.  That needs to change. Those of us who live with diabetes need to become more adept at analyzing our own data, to see what's working and what isn't both for our own sake and that of our time-strapped healthcare providers. .

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

Infopia USA's Thermal Weight Scale

Infopia USA's Eocene System is a diabetes management system with a data collection device that gathers data from a meter, blood pressure cuff, and a thermal scale. Readings are stored on Infopia's network and available to you and your health team. See the video on Diabetes Health TV here.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2011

The A1C: A Better Way to Diagnose Pre-Diabetes?

A full third of adult Americans are pre-diabetic, and a third of those will develop type 2 diabetes before they're ten years older. Unfortunately, only about seven percent of them have been tested for pre-diabetes and warned of their condition; the rest are ignorant of the road they're on. By losing just 10 to 15 pounds, the whole group could cut their chances of getting type 2 by half. The problem is, how to alert them in time for them to stop their progression to type 2?

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

December 2010

Lorcaserin Shows Statistically Significant Weight Loss in Patients With Diabetes

Arena Pharmaceuticals and Eisai Inc. recently released results of a phase 3 clinical trial for lorcaserin, a weight-loss drug they are developing in partnership. The trial, called BLOOM-DM (Behavioral modification and Lorcaserin for Overweight and Obesity Management- Diabetes Management), targeted patients with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2010

Life and Long-term Care Insurance Becoming Increasingly Available for Those With Type 1 Diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, you know that the process of obtaining life insurance or long-term care insurance has been a long, tough road, most often leading to the dead end of declined coverage. In fact, most insurance companies have classified anyone with type 1 as an automatic decline, without any consideration of each case individually.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2010

November 2010

A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes

A new drug for type 2 diabetes started showing up in drugstores this week, according to manufacturer Santarus. The FDA-approved drug, called Cycloset, takes an distinctive -- and not well understood -- approach to reducing blood sugar levels. The pill apparently works by increasing dopamine activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain. Dopamine is a brain chemical that plays a big role in people's behavior, mood, and ability to sleep. Scientists theorize that glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may in part result from abnormal activity of this chemical, and that upping dopamine activity may iron out these problems.That's the theory, at least: the drug's exact workings aren't known.  But it seems to do the trick.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2010

Diabetes and Pregnancy: The Battle to Have a Baby

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 23 years ago, I remember being told that having children would be a very difficult challenge.  I was seven years old at the time - still a child myself - and had no interest in becoming a mom.  My own mother was very distressed at this news, but I didn't pay it any mind.  I had other things to focus on:  trees to climb, bikes to ride, and friends to play with.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 18, 2010

Activity roundup. Australia, Ireland and the Big Blue Test

With just a few days left to 14 November, we imagine that a lot of you are making those final touches to your World Diabetes Day celebrations or have already started your awareness activities. Here's a further look at what will be taking place around the world to mark the day:

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2010

October 2010

Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose in Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2010

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Consensus Statement Released by AACE

JACKSONVILLE, FL - October 13, 2010 - The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) today published a consensus statement for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) online, and will be published in the next issue of the association's official medical journal Endocrine Practice.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Dancing for the Health of It

Dance Out Diabetes is a non-profit organization that addresses a critical component missing in most diabetes programs: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY! Our mission is to help individuals prevent or manage diabetes through dance and education.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2010

Paul and Mira Sorvino Partner with sanofi-aventis to Launch Diabetes Co-Stars

We all know of Paul and Mira Sorvino, the legendary father and daughter actors who have graced the small and big screens for decades. Paul has played such classic characters as Paulie Cicero in the film Goodfellas and Sgt. Phil Cerreta on the TV series Law & Order and is a well-known chef and singer, while Mira has starred in over 30 movies and won an Academy Award in 1995 for her role as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2010

September 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Your Meds and Your Love Life

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 62 years old. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1997, and I am doing OK on metformin. My last A1c was 7.2 %. About a year ago, they put me on medicine for my blood pressure (which was 142/90) and for cholesterol.  I started having less interest in sex, which I had really liked before.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 7, 2010

August 2010

Finally, the Pump.

"Absolutely not. I'm not going to mess with that."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2010

July 2010

Johns Hopkins Team Discovers Sweet Way to Detect Pre-Diabetes

Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple, routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Pump and Sensor Combo Beats MDI Decisively in Medtronic’s STAR 3 Study

A massive study involving 485 people with type 1 diabetes at 30 locations across North America shows that the combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor helps patients achieve significantly lower A1c levels than multiple daily insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

AFREZZA Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy with Type 2s

AFREZZA TM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder, a well-tolerated, investigational ultra rapid acting mealtime insulin, as part of a diabetes treatment regimen, provides long-term glucose control comparable to usual insulin therapy but with a significantly reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a two-year study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Vitamin D Deficiency Common in People With Poor Diabetes Control

In a recent study of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and glucose intolerance in people with type 2 diabetes, more than 90 percent of the type 2 diabetes patients were found to be deficient in vitamin D, with their control over the disease worsening as their deficiency increased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 4, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

June 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

May 2010

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2010

Ethnic Disparities Found in A1c Test

A new study released by the Children's Hospital of New Orleans has found that black children with type 1 diabetes scored higher on A1c tests than white children who had similar blood glucose levels. Such ethnic disparity has already been shown in previous studies with adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

Team Type 1 Cyclers Race Against Diabetes

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was seven months old. Now 28, he has always taken an aggressive approach to managing the disease. He recalls, "My mom scared the daylights out of me when I was six years old by letting me know about the severe complications of diabetes if you don't take care of it. That has motivated me to never let those complications fall on my shoulders."

comments 0 comments - Posted May 17, 2010

CVS Loyalty Program for People with Diabetes

Rhode Island-based CVS/pharmacy, which operates more than 7,000 pharmacies and drug stores in the United States, has announced three diabetes-related initiatives:

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 13 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

April 2010

Sex and Diabetes: Diabetes for Couples

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 60 year old married woman who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago.  In the last two years, I have lost interest in sex. I just don't feel like it, although I still like hugs.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Bayer Diabetes Care Introduces DIDGET

Bayer Diabetes Care today announced the introduction of the DIDGETTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.  The DIDGET meter is unique because it is the only blood glucose meter that connects directly to Nintendo DSTM and DS Lite gaming systems to help kids manage a lifelong disease by rewarding them for building consistent testing habits and meeting personalized blood glucose target ranges. Bayer's DIDGET meter is now available for purchase in the U.S. through CVS.com, Drugstore.com and Walgreens.com.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2010

National Conference on Diabetes

Conference Task Force Members will meet with policymakers, healthcare providers, payers, patients, and other stakeholders to discuss how to tackle the diabetes epidemic and reverse its economic impact on our nation's healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

Generic Drug Salsalate Continues to Show Promise

We continue to monitor the progress of studies to determine the effectiveness of salsalate, a generic aspirin-like drug, to reduce inflammation and lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.  As previously reported here in October 2008 and January 2009, researchers from the Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard University are conducting clinical trials to determine if this well known and proven drug for joint pain can be added to the list of diabetes drugs.  Recently, results from a three-month trial were announced online in the Annals of Internal Medicine, showing that those who took salsalate demonstrated significantly improved blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2010

Synthetic Molecule That Stops Diabetic Inflammation Could Become a Type 2 Therapy

Tests of an experimental drug called CPSI-1306 at Ohio State University were so successful at lowering inflammation and blood sugar levels in lab mice with type 2 diabetes that scientists consider it a prime candidate to become a new therapy for the disease. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2010

March 2010

"I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream!"

I do not conceal the fact that I love dessert. I believe that it is something that I deserve, a reward for working out that morning, keeping my blood sugar in check, monitoring my carbohydrate intake, going to work, and taking care of household duties. 

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

Consensus Moving to A1c as a Better Predictor of Diabetes Than Fasting Glucose

Over the past few months, there has been a discernible shift of opinion among healthcare providers about which test best reveals a high risk of acquiring diabetes. The old standby, fasting glucose, seems to be giving way to the hemoglobin A1c test as the preferred method.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 26, 2010

Medtronic Receives FDA Approval for Industry's Most Advanced Integrated System for Diabetes Management

MINNEAPOLIS - March 17, 2010 - Medtronic, Inc. today announced it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, the next generation of the industry's only integrated diabetes management system (insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and diabetes therapy management software). The system incorporates new innovative CGM features including predictive alerts that can give early warning to people with diabetes so they can take action to prevent dangerous high or low glucose events.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2010

Starting Treatment Early Doubles Chance of Success for People with Diabetes

The sooner people with diabetes start taking metformin, the longer the drug remains effective, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2010

February 2010

Happy (?) Anniversary

My four-year-diabetes-diagnosis anniversary is almost here.   It falls on March 24th, a day just like any other to most people, but a day full of sadness, loss, and victory for me.  Will I celebrate?  I'm not sure if reflection is a form of celebration.  I'd much prefer a birthday-like affair featuring balloons, cards, and, of course, something sweet to eat. But I also feel as if the impending date is much like a funeral on the calendar, a time for mourning as well as reflection.

comments 28 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2010

Bayer's A1CNow® SELFCHECK At-Home A1C System Now Available In Local Pharmacies

Bayer's A1CNow SELFCHECK, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration last year, is the first and only system of its kind with at-home results in five minutes. It enables patients to more closely watch their A1C level in between doctor visits so they may have a more informed discussion with their healthcare provider to ensure their diabetes plan is working.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2010

UK Study Finds That People With A1c's of 7.5% Run Less Risk of Death Than Those With Lower A1c's

Results of a 22-year study by researchers at Cardiff University School of Medicine in Wales indicate that older type 2s who try too hard to drive their A1c's down to "normal" (4.5% to 6%) may significantly increase their chances of early death. In fact, the study, just published in the British medical journal The Lancet*, found that type 2s with the lowest risk of death had A1c's of 7.5% -- a figure that few authorities on the disease have recommended as ideal.

comments 15 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

January 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Moving Toward a Healthcare Bill: What People with Diabetes Need to Know

The effort underway in Washington, D.C., to draft a healthcare bill is often described as "trying to get a handle on so many moving parts." At issue is this: the House passed a 1,990 page bill in December followed by the Senate passing a 2,074 page bill on Christmas Eve. Now, those two versions are being merged into one with a conference committee that would be composed of House and Senate Members while, at the same time, the White House has been pushing for a deadline by the State of the Union Address, now scheduled for Wednesday, January 27.  So far, all sides believe there will be a health care bill in front of the president within the next few weeks. What it looks like is one of the "moving parts."

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2010

Study Finds Tight Blood Sugar Control not so Important if Other Medical Problems are Present

A five-year study of 2,613 people treated for diabetes at Italian clinics shows that tight blood sugar control may not be the number-one priority for patients who have other medical problems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Out of Love

Dear Diabetes Health, I hope you can help me. I am 49 years old and was diagnosed with type 2 five years ago.  My husband still wants sex. I don't even want him to touch me.  He is very mean to me. He yells at me and calls me names.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2010

Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 4, 2010

December 2009

American Diabetes Association Revises Diabetes Guidelines

December 29, 2009 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) revised clinical practice recommendations for diabetes diagnosis promote hemoglobin A1c (A1c) as a faster, easier diagnostic test that could help reduce the number of undiagnosed patients and better identify patients with prediabetes. The new recommendations are published December 29 in the January supplement of Diabetes Care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Resolutions vs. Changes: Make 2010 Count!

I have never been one to make New Year's resolutions.  This probably stems from my life experiences.  Every year at my fitness club, the place is flooded with new faces from January until late February.  Then, as the days tick by, the club becomes less and less crowded. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2009

Is Testosterone the Wonder Drug?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 57 years old. About five years ago, I saw my doctor because I was feeling tired. My waist size was up, and I was not interested in sex. I almost never got an erection. The doctor diagnosed type 2 diabetes and put me on metformin. He also prescribed Viagra, which helped sometimes, but not all the time.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2009

November 2009

The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years, diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. A Greek by the name of Aretaeus described its destructive nature in the first century AD, naming the affliction "diabetes," the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold, in his text "Aretaeus the Cappodacian," described Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain, and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body, while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2009

Endocrinologists Recommend Describing Dramatic Reversals of Diabetes Symptoms As

How careful should healthcare workers and patients be in describing a total remission of diabetes as a "cure?" That's a question that has taken on increasing urgency in the wake of reports about dramatic reversals of type 2 symptoms after gastric bypass surgery and the cessation of symptoms in people with type 1 diabetes after pancreatic islet replacement. To answer it, a group of endocrinologists met earlier this year to come up with descriptions and definitions that accurately describe what happens when people with diabetes experience a reversal of symptoms.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2009

Dear Medical Health Professional,

When I was a child, my mother always said, "Think before you speak." Have you heard of this before? If not, please digest my words. If you have heard of this simple yet beneficial policy, please reconsider its merit and then implement it into your practice.

comments 34 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

AACE Releases New Algorithm for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the College of Endocrinology (ACE) released online a one-page resource for physicians and healthcare providers for the management of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

Notes from the California AADE Meeting

The California Association of American Diabetes Educators held its second annual meeting October 22 through 24, 2009, in Monterey, California, and Diabetes Health was there. The clinical and educational program, put together by Debra Norman and Kim Higgins, was called "Tidal Wave of Diabetes."  The invited speakers shared innovation, research, and new techniques with the attendees.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2009

October 2009

Study Shows Resolution of Type 2 Diabetes in Morbidly Obese Patients; Data Published in Annals of Surgery

LEXINGTON, Mass., October 27, 2009 - GI Dynamics, a leader in non-surgical treatments for type 2 diabetes and obesity, today announced data which support the safety and efficacy of the EndoBarrierTM Gastrointestinal Liner for pre-surgical weight loss treatment, along with a positive effect on glucose homeostasis in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to the study, mean excess weight loss (EWL) achieved after 12 weeks post implantation was 19.0 % for EndoBarrier patients versus 6.9 % for control patients (p<0.002).  The results of this European weight loss study were published today in the advance online publication of Annals of Surgery.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

Phentermine the Phoenix Rises Again

The demise of Fen-phen dealt a body blow to hopes for an obesity pill that is actually effective. Unfortunately, the fen in Fen-phen, fenfluramine, caused grave pulmonary hypertension and heart valve problems. The phen part of the drug, though, was apparently just an innocent bystander. And now phen (phentermine) has resurfaced in a new pill that has posted some amazing results in Phase III clinical trials. Patients who were treated for 56 weeks with the new drug, Qnexa, lost an average of 14.7 percent of their weight, or 37 pounds.

comments 8 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2009

Afresa: A New Insulin (By the Way, It's Inhaled)

The enthusiasm for inhaled insulin has waned, to say the least, since Exubera was pulled off the market by Pfizer. Following the Exubera debacle, the development of two other inhaled insulins (AIR by Eli Lilly and Alkermes, and AERx by Novo Nordisk) was halted as well.

comments 14 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2009

Diabetes + Poor Math Skills = Higher A1c

Having diabetes involves a lot of  pretty complex arithmetic. You've got to calculate carbs from nutrition labels, total the calories and carbohydrates in a meal, calculate insulin dosage based on insulin-to-carbohydrate intake, and on and on. These tasks aren't simple: They require an understanding of measurement, estimation, time, logic, and multi-step operations, and the knowledge of which math skills to apply to each problem.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2009

CGM Continues to Elicit Strong Opinions

In our June/July 2009 issue, we published a letter from reader Sheila Payne, who wrote that we had been far too positive about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in our June/July article Get the Facts on Continuous Glucose Monitoring. Her letter provoked a stack of letters from people who believe that the benefits of CGM substantially outweigh its negatives.  To let you in on the debate, we are reprinting Ms. Payne's thought-provoking letter here, followed by two equally thoughtful responses from readers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

September 2009

Continuous Glucose Monitors: Even More of a Good Thing

For a while now, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) has been conducting clinical trials on the effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with type 1 diabetes. Last year, they issued their first two reports on their findings, showing that CGMs can improve control even for people who already have A1c's below 7%.  That information has already had a powerful impact: It's convinced a number of large health insurers (including Aetna, Cigna, Kaiser Permanente, United Healthcare, and Wellpoint) to cover CGMs for type 1s, and it's led to the inclusion of CGMs in national standards of care for type 1 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2009

Study Investigates Starting with Insulin for Newly Diagnosed Type 2

Adults newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes generally don't take to the idea of using insulin right off the bat. They're worried about gaining weight and fear low blood sugars. They're also concerned about whether they can manage the regimen and fear that taking insulin will lower their quality of life. Those concerns, however, might be assuaged by a study recently conducted by Ildiko Lingvay and his colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2009

The DCCT Lives On! Intensive Glucose Control Halves Complications

The famous Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, known to its friends as the DCCT, was the first to prove the power of "intensive control" of  blood glucose to reduce the complications of diabetes. Although the ten-year study ended in 1993, researchers have continued to follow about 90 percent of the nearly 1,500 original DCCT volunteers. And the follow-up study, called the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), is measuring up to its illustrious parent in terms of demonstrating the value of tight control.  According to results published in the July 27, 2009 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, microvascular and cardiovascular complications of type 1 diabetes are cut in half for patients with near-normal glucose. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

August 2009

CGM Continues to Elicit Strong Opinions

In our last issue, we published a letter from reader Sheila Payne, who wrote that we had been far too positive about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in our June/July article Get the Facts on Continuous Glucose Monitoring. But her opinion provoked a stack of letters from people who believe that the benefits of CGM substantially outweigh its negatives.  To let you in on the debate, we are reprinting Ms. Payne's thought-provoking letter here, followed by two equally thoughtful responses from readers.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

Low Levels of Sex Hormone Protein Indicate Higher Risk of Type 2, Says Study

Researchers have recently reported that people with the lowest levels of a protein that regulates sex hormones, "sex hormone-binding globulin," were 10 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the highest levels of SHBG. In short, the lower a person's SHBG levels, the higher his or her risk of developing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2009

Saving Limbs by Healing Chronic Diabetic Foot and Leg Wounds

A 43-year-old Iraq war veteran with diabetes is living in Texas with his wife and four young children when he is told that he must prepare for the amputation of one of his legs.  The spreading, non-healing wounds and their complications make the amputation necessary to save not just his limb, but his life, his doctors tell him.  But he refuses to proceed with the amputation surgery.

comments 6 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2009

Surfing with Type 1

Initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Rob subsequently discovered that he had type 1. Knowing that he needed to exercise more, he returned to professional surfing. Today, he is a sponsored professional athlete who uses a CGM.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2009

Nine months on the Protégé teplizumab clinical trial: How it started, how we are doing...

In April of 2008, our healthy nine-year-old son, Gaspar, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After his two days in the ICU and a week in the hospital, a new life began for all of us. Although we couldn't immediately grasp all its implications and were simultaneously dealing with our shaken world, we gave the situation a "think outside the box" approach. When the endocrinologist told us, "That's the way it is. Just focus on the controls and all will be fine," we asked whether the condition might be cured or attenuated if we acted quickly at the beginning. We were met with the usual answer:  "There's nothing you can do. Just focus on the controls."

comments 8 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2009

Letters to the Editor : August-September, 2009

Mon Has CGM Concerns

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

A Chat with Kelli Kuehne on Life, Golf, and Diabetes

In 1994, Kelli Kuehne was on a roll. That year, she won the United States Girls Junior Amateur Golf Championship and a year later, she won the U.S. Women's Amateur Golf Championship, repeating that win in 1996 while also taking the British Ladies Amateur Golf Championship. The roll continues. Today, Kelli Kuehne is still playing matches in the LPGA and, through it all, has never allowed type 1 diabetes to beat her on the golf course or in her life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

A Good Relationship with Your School Nurse Pays Off in Dividends

Because we have good health insurance, my son sees his endocrinologist twice a year, his diabetes health educator twice a year, and his nutritionist once a year. Meanwhile, he sees his school nurse one to three times a day. As you know, this relationship can make a difference for the rest of a child's life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Naturopathic Physicians: Up and Coming Partners in Diabetes Care

After experiencing blurry vision and excessive thirst, Mr. R visits his primary care doctor, who tests him and diagnoses diabetes and high lipid levels.  Mr. R is placed on hypoglycemic and statin medications and sent to a dietitian for nutritional advice, but he is confused about to how to shop and cook according to the new recommendations.  In the next weeks, he experiences dangerous blood glucose swings and inadequate improvement in his LDL level.  His primary care doctor refers him to an endocrinologist, but the next available appointment is three months away.  What now?

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2009

Dealing With Your Newly Diagnosed Diabetes: First, Look for Patterns

A man who has been married for 15 years suddenly begins losing weight and buying new clothes. He starts staying late at work and taking weekend business trips, unusual behaviors for him. His wife thinks he is having an affair. Why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2009

Staying on Your Teen's Diabetes Team

Growth hormones, peer pressure, independence struggles, and mood swings: welcome to the teenage years! There's nothing like a warning glance from a fed-up teenager to make a parent retreat. As your child takes more control of his or her diabetes, it becomes ever more tempting to step back and avoid the friction that sometimes comes from being involved. Nevertheless, your teenager needs your reliable presence more than ever. The beauty, strength, and sheer courage our kids exhibit in meeting their teenage challenges can inspire us to stand up and work with them to keep their health and well-being firmly in the forefront of their minds. Each child and each situation is different, but here are a few suggestions for staying on your teen's diabetes team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2009

Medicare helps cover diabetes supplies and services

Medicare offers: Screenings for people at risk, Diabetes self-management training, Medical nutrition therapy services, Hemoglobin A1c tests, Glucose monitors, test strips, lancets, insulin, and some insulin pumps, Glaucoma tests, Foot exams, foot treatment, and therapeutic shoes, Flu and pneumonia shots, and Cholesterol and lipid checks.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 15, 2009

Diabetes and the iPhone

People often ask me, "Why limit diabetes-related services to the iPhone when there are so many other cell phones out there?" I always answer them by asking, "How many applications have you downloaded onto your cell phone?" 

comments 15 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2009

Sex & Diabetes: Not Wanting It

Dear Aisha and David: I am a 66-year-old woman who has had diabetes for over 64 years. My husband is 52. He wants sex two or more times day. I hate it.  I have no sexual drive, and most of the time it is painful. It was not always like this, but he has always wanted more sex than any man I know! We talk about things, but he basically ignores a lot of what I say when it comes to sex. He is actually a very caring person and has put up with a lot considering all the complications I have after 64 years of diabetes.  We have been together for 18 years (married for nine). He waits on me hand and foot. I have to tell him to let me do things myself! 

comments 14 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2009

June 2009

News from the ADA Conference in New Orleans, June 2009

Every time I return from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions conference, my head is so full of information that I need a week or two to sort through it. But now I've had a chance to choose what I think are the top five things that you need to know.  Here they are...

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2009

Get the Facts on Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Until now, care for insulin-dependent diabetes has focused on the delivery of insulin combined with frequent blood glucose (BG) testing. Keeping your A1c down is, and always will be, the name of the game. But numerous studies have shown us in the last few years that having access to continuous glucose data has a huge impact. How you deliver the insulin doesn't necessarily matter-you can use a pump, a syringe, or an insulin pen, it's knowing your personal BG trends that makes all the difference.

comments 11 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2009

Parenting with Diabetes

Rachel and her husband adopted a beautiful baby girl in November of 2008. Their daughter is now seven months old. You can read Rachel's article about diabetes and adoption here.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2009

Non-compliance vs. diabetes self care: Are we still playing a blame game?

In 1993, I published an article entitled "Is non-compliance a dirty word?" in The Diabetes Educator in which I expressed my sadness that people with diabetes were actually getting blamed by their health care providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's failure might really be a failure in the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work together with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2009

International Committee Urges Adoption of A1c as the Standard Test for Diagnosing Diabetes

The A1c test (also called the HbA1c test), which establishes average blood sugar levels over a three-month period, should replace fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests as the standard for diagnosing diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2009

AACE Conference Wrap-Up

I attended the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), held from May 14th to 18th, 2009.  Here's a re-cap of the buzz about ICU glycemic control, prediabetes, and vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2009

Bayer’s

Bayer Diabetes Care's new A1c monitor enables people with diabetes to check their A1c levels at home. The FDA-approved A1CNow SELFCHECK is not considered a replacement for a healthcare provider's A1c test, but rather a tool with which to monitor  A1c levels between doctor visits. A1c's provide an average assessment of blood sugar levels over the past three months and are an indicator of how well diabetes is being managed

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2009

British Researchers Say Strict Blood Sugar Control Lowers Non-Fatal Heart Attack Risk by 17%

University of Cambridge researchers are reporting that people with type 2 diabetes who maintain strict control of their blood sugar-defined as lowering their A1c levels by 0.9% over a five-year period-can lower their risk of non-fatal heart attacks by 17 percent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2009

Metformin Add-on Drops Fasting Glucose Levels by 12 Points in Phase 2 Trial

CRx-401, an insulin sensitizer intended to assist metformin in type 2 diabetes therapy, has successfully completed a Phase 2 clinical trial in which patients taking it saw their fasting plasma glucose drop by 12 mg/dl after 90 days.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 3, 2009

Insulin Analog Levemir Lowers BG Levels in 60 Percent of Type 2 Patients

Novo Nordisk has announced that results from a study show that almost 60 percent of type 2 patients taking once-daily doses of its Levemir insulin analog were able to reach the average blood sugar level recommended by the American Diabetes Association. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2009

May 2009

New Type 2 Drug, Welchol, Discussed at the AACE Conference Reduces A1c's and LDL Cholesterol

In a recent 16-week randomized, open-label pilot study, 169 patients were randomized to receive Welchol (n=57), Januvia (n=56), or Avandia (n=56).1  The results demonstrated that Welchol (colesevelam HCl) significantly improved glycemic control and reduced mean LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) when added to metformin monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the study, Januvia® (sitagliptin) and Avandia® (rosiglitazone) also significantly improved glycemic control, but LDL-C increased in patients on both of these treatment regimens.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2009

Adult Stem Cell Implants Make Newly Diagnosed Type 1s Insulin-Free

After American and Brazilian researchers implanted 23 newly diagnosed type 1 patients with their own adult stem cells, 12 of the patients became insulin-free for periods lasting from 14 to 52 months (the mean was 31 months).

comments 16 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

April 2009

Diabetes and Adoption

There is an old schoolyard chant that starts out with an image of two people "sitting in a tree" and "K-I-S-S-I-N-G." This is followed by, "First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes the baby in the baby carriage." The natural progression of life is to find one's "soul mate," tie the knot, and then have children.  

comments 37 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2009

Long-Acting Byetta Tops Two Other Diabetes Drugs in Direct Comparison

Results from DURATION-2, a 26-week test comparing the diabetic drugs Januvia, Actos, and experimental long-acting Byetta (Byetta LAR) show that Byetta produced lower A1c's and more weight loss than the other two drugs.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2009

Adjustable Gastric Banding and Diabetes

Diane Helms has spent most of her life struggling with her weight.  She's tried just about every diet you can name and, despite them all, has watched the pounds pile on year after year. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2009

British Researchers Say Strict Blood Sugar Control Lowers Non-Fatal Heart Attack Risk by 17%

University of Cambridge researchers are reporting that people with type 2 diabetes who maintain strict control of their blood sugar-defined as lowering their A1c levels by 0.9% over a five-year period-can lower their risk of non-fatal heart attacks by 17 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

British Researchers Say Strict Blood Sugar Control Lowers Non-Fatal Heart Attack Risk by 17%

University of Cambridge researchers are reporting that people with type 2 diabetes who maintain strict control of their blood sugar-defined as lowering their A1c levels by 0.9% over a five-year period-can lower their risk of non-fatal heart attacks by 17 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

March 2009

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews Finds He Needs to Make Time for Type 2 Diabetes

The first time Chris Matthews heard the words "high blood sugar" was in 2002 at a doctor's office in Washington, DC, where he was being treated for malaria after a trip to Zimbabwe. He didn't pay a lot of attention to the warning about his glucose levels after a blood test. The malaria was subsequently cured, and he continued at his usual rapid-fire pace, traveling the country giving speeches about his best-selling books ("Life is a Campaign" is his latest;  "Hardball" is his best known) and his work both inside the White House, where he was a speechwriter for President Carter, and outside, where he was administrative assistant to House Speaker Tip O'Neill on Capitol Hill. Then there's his work on television, where he is host of Hardball on MSNBC and the Chris Matthew Show, which airs on Sundays just before Meet the Press on NBC. He stayed busy, and his schedule remained overbooked. He let the warning about high blood sugar go into the background-so far back it was out of sight and definitely out of mind. Besides, there just wasn't any room in his life to deal with it. 

comments 10 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2009

Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes: Who, When, And Why?

Physicians who treat people with type 2 diabetes face difficult choices when selecting the best medical therapy for each patient. The decision process is further complicated by the fact that because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, therapeutic agents that were initially successful may fail five or ten years later.

comments 159 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2009

Living With Diabetes: New Hope for Health

New cases of adult type 2 diabetes have increased by more than 90 percent in the past 10 years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease and Prevention.(1) Equally troubling is the dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes among children. Recent reports reveal a 200 percent increase in hospitalizations for children with type 2 diabetes, a condition that was rarely diagnosed in children decades ago.(2) In the words of the CDC, "Diabetes is common, disabling, and deadly."(3)

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2009

Diabetes Camps List for 2009

US Camps Camp Name Type Session Start Date

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2009

Diabulimia: What It Is and How To Treat It

A few years ago a young man named Jeff came into my office seeking help to lose weight.  He was 5'10" tall and weighed 130 pounds. Jeff denied starving himself, denied making himself throw up, and denied over-exercising. I tried to convince him that he was actually 30 pounds underweight. As I looked for the most effective ways of motivating him to restore his health, he brought up the fact that he had type 1 diabetes.  Jeff said that he rarely gave himself insulin and that he had "diabulimia." I had never heard of diabulimia and had no idea what I was dealing with. I gave him a list of clinicians and asked him to call me back after he made appointments with an endocrinologist and a psychotherapist.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2009

February 2009

Sample Request for CGM Insurance Coverage

We recently published an article about how you can avoid losing money in insurance claims. The article gave helpful hints on how to deal with your insurance company including an sample appeals letter. We promised to publish in the near future a sample CGM appeals letter. Here they are!

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2009

Type 2 Drug Improves Glucose Metabolization by 41% in Clinical Trial

DM-99, a drug under development by the Canadian drug company DiaMedica, Inc., has just finished a phase 2a "proof of concept" trial with 40 type 2 patients in Europe. Although the company did not release performance figures from the trial, it found them sufficiently encouraging to move further into phase 2 testing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2009

Liraglutide Best at Reducing A1c’s When Used in a Two-Drug Combo

Data from a phase 3 study of the Novo Nordisk drug liraglutide shows that when it is used in combination with glimepiride, it is more effective at reducing A1c's than glimepiride by itself or glimepiride in combination with the drug rosiglitazone. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2009

A New Kind of Hospital and a Different Way of Viewing Diabetes

Can you imagine a hospital where the floors are carpeted, so you feel soothed and protected? Where the doors open silently so as not to jar your nerves? Where vending machines are filled with fresh fruits, and the healthier the meal in the cafeteria, the less it costs? How about elevator doors covered in exotic floral motifs, or a diabetes center where you never wait more than ten minutes to be seen?

comments 8 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2009

Noncompliance Versus Diabetes Self Care: Are We Still Playing a Blame Game?

Back in 1993, I published an article titled "Is Noncompliance a Dirty Word?" in which I expressed sadness that people with diabetes were being blamed by their healthcare providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's "failure" might really be a failure of the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen long years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So, how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2009

January 2009

U.S. Academic Medical Centers Are Not Cutting the Mustard

A study published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine has found that the glucose control practices at academic medical centers are below par and fail to meet the current standards set by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). 

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2009

It’s Not Too Late to Follow Your New Year’s Resolution

Remember that New Year's resolution that you made a few weeks ago?  Oh yeah, that one.  How's that going?  If you're like most people, you may have started to slack off just a little bit.  Or even worse, maybe it's already a distant memory.  No worries, I won't tell.  Let's get you going again.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 27, 2009

Supply and Demand

The treatment of diabetes has come a long way since Dr. Elliot Joslin wrote The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in 1916. But Dr. Joslin's idea that diet, exercise, and insulin (when it became available as therapy in 1922) are the keys to managing diabetes remains true today. This doesn't mean that diabetes is not a complex illness requiring ongoing education and individualized care. People with diabetes benefit greatly from the services of a team of health care professionals including a certified diabetes educator and an endocrinologist--a doctor who specializes in treating disorders of the endocrine system.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2009

Experts Change Their Tune About Whether People With Longstanding Diabetes Should Pursue Low Blood Sugar

One of 2008's most interesting developments was the change in one long-standing recommendation for treating diabetes in people who have had the disease for a long time: Work intensely on getting blood sugar levels as low as possible. 

comments 11 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Nursing Home Care for People With Diabetes a Mixed Bag

As the 76-million-member Baby Boomer generation ages-its oldest members are now 63-nursing homes are bracing for an unprecedented demand for their services. Along with increased pressure from the sheer number of patients, nursing homes will also have to deal with the skyrocketing number of seniors with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2009

Extremely Low-Carb “Ketogenic Diet” Leads to Dramatic Reductions in Type 2 BG Levels, Medications

Two diets - one severely restricting carbohydrate intake but with no limit on calories, and the other emphasizing low-glycemic carbohydrates and low calories - allowed high percentages of obese type 2 patients in a university study to reduce or even eliminate their diabetes medications (95.2 percent of the patients on the extreme low-carb diet and 62.1 percent of the patients on the low-glycemic diet).

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2009

December 2008

Resolve and Evolve!

Here at Diabetes Health, we've learned the hard way that specific resolutions are the way to go. General plans like "I'll watch my weight" or "I'll check my blood glucose more often" tend to be less successful than the more specific: "I'll eat x number of carbs each meal" and "I'll check my BG before and after every meal." 

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

ADA 2009 Recommendations Reaffirm Acceptance of Low Carb Diet

Every year the American Diabetes Associations revises and updates its Clinical Practice Recommendations, a publication upon which many doctors and medical caregivers depend as a primary source of diabetes treatment information.

comments 12 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Small Bedtime Dose of Terbutaline May Prevent Type 1 Hypoglycemia
Small Bedtime Dose of Terbutaline May Prevent Type 1 Hypoglycemia

A study of the effectiveness of the drug terbutaline on controlling nighttime hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes indicates that it may be a safe and useful treatment with no ill effects.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Has Anyone Else Reversed Diabetes Complications? If You Have, I Want to Hear From You!
Has Anyone Else Reversed Diabetes Complications? If You Have, I Want to Hear From You!

Are you a scientific anomaly like me?  Have you or someone you know reversed the complications associated with diabetes? Did you suffer microvascular and macrovascular damage during the “growing pains” of coming to terms with having no choice but to live your life with diabetes? Then, did you turn around and find love and hope, which made you change your life? And after changing it, did you find after several years that you were healing the damage that you had incurred by your own misguided hand? 

comments 118 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Cinnamon: Should It Be Taken as a Diabetes Medication?
Cinnamon: Should It Be Taken as a Diabetes Medication?

The Chinese mentioned cinnamon in their written work more than 4,000 years ago. The ancient Egyptians used cinnamon in their embalming process, and the Roman writer/philosopher Pliny the Elder wrote in the first century AD that cinnamon was worth 15 times more than silver of the same weight.

comments 43 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

The History of Diabetes
The History of Diabetes

For 2,000 years diabetes has been recognized as a devastating and deadly disease. In the first century A.D. a Greek, Aretaeus, described the destructive nature of the affliction which he named "diabetes" from the Greek word for "siphon." Eugene J. Leopold in his text Aretaeus the Cappodacian describes Aretaeus' diagnosis: "...For fluids do not remain in the body, but use the body only as a channel through which they may flow out. Life lasts only for a time, but not very long. For they urinate with pain and painful is the emaciation. For no essential part of the drink is absorbed by the body while great masses of the flesh are liquefied into urine."

comments 47 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

American Idol's Elliott Yamin Brings Diabetes Message to Millions
American Idol's Elliott Yamin Brings Diabetes Message to Millions

It has been rags to riches for singer Elliott Yamin. With his naturally soulful singing voice, listeners feel his raw emotion and they like it. When you hear him, you know immediately that few guys in any musical genre sing with this kind of authenticity.

comments 29 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Top 10 Patient Gripes
Top 10 Patient Gripes

Most people with diabetes will tell you this: Everything about having it is a hassle, an annoyance and sometimes utterly overwhelming. Endless worrying over meal plans, carbohydrate counting, finger-stick checks, pills, injections, lab tests, prescriptions, supplies and doctors’ appointments are nobody’s idea of fun.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Internal Body Clock May Increase Risk of Type 2

An international team of researchers reports that a mutation in a gene that controls a person's body clock can cause higher blood sugar levels, leading to a 20 percent increased risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2008

Holiday Songs for Children with Diabetes
Holiday Songs for Children with Diabetes

Why not sing it out, sing it proud this holiday season! Singing songs with your children is always fun and if you get to both acknowledge the presence of diabetes and laugh at it a little at the same time, so much the better!

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2008

Rethinking the Treatment of Diabetes

The first time I presented medical research findings, I was not yet a physician. The year was about 1975. I was in my early forties and a mid-career engineer. The forum was a scientific symposium on diabetes. At the time, I felt that I had discovered the holy grail of diabetes care and was eager to share what I had learned.

comments 22 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2008

A Father of A Child with Type 1 Child Warns: Be Prepared for Hypoglycemia
A Father of A Child with Type 1 Child Warns: Be Prepared for Hypoglycemia

My daughter Lauren was five days shy of her twelfth birthday when she was diagnosed with type 1. We were blessed with a child who could and did take the lead in her recovery and care. She never had any "teen diabetic rebellion" and never adopted a "why me?" mentality. Her health has been great, and her last A1c was 6.7%. With all the hormonal changes that can affect a teenage girl's body and thus change her insulin requirements, Lauren has always stayed on top of her care and never lost her fantastic personality.

comments 24 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes
Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes

Becoming pregnant for the first time can be overwhelming for any woman, especially if that woman has diabetes. When my husband and I decided we were ready to have children, the first thing I did was make an appointment with my endocrinologist. Diagnosed when I was fourteen, I've had type 1 diabetes for twenty-four years. My doctor explained that I would need to be in tight control for three months before I could even think about babies, so I got right to work. Learning everything I could about diabetes and pregnancy, I was pleased to discover that with education, support, and practice, a woman with diabetes has every opportunity for a healthy pregnancy.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

Letter to the Editor: Reader Responds to Laura Plunkett’s Diabetes Health TV Interview
Letter to the Editor: Reader Responds to Laura Plunkett’s Diabetes Health TV Interview

Dear Laura,

I just finished viewing your clip online.  You seem like a very intelligent and involved mom who decided it was time to take charge.  I applaud you, and I agree with many points you make, but I disagree with your position on food.

comments 10 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

FDA Approves Apidra for Use With Children
FDA Approves Apidra for Use With Children

The FDA has approved the fast-acting insulin Apidra (insulin glulisine) for use in children four years and older who have type 1 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 3, 2008

October 2008

Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives
Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives

I have had type 1 diabetes for 16 years and, after a long path with many ups and downs, I have finally achieved optimal diabetic health. I have discovered the special lifestyle and diet mix that works and have brought my A1c from 11.4% to 5.2% while increasing my energy and overall health. I'm an elite athlete who plays professional ice hockey, and I currently run marathons. 

comments 19 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

New Data From Phase 3 Trial Says Liraglutide Is More Effective Than Exenatide For Type 2s

Novo Nordisk recently announced results from its LEAD 6 study showing that once daily liraglutide was significantly more effective at improving blood glucose control (as measured by A1c) than exenatide, a GLP-1 mimetic administered twice daily.

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

New Drug Shows Exenatide-Like Promise in Type 2 Treatment

An experimental exenatide (Byetta)-like drug called liraglutide has shown the ability to enhance insulin and glucagon production and suppress appetite in type 2 patients, according to a report in the British medical journal The Lancet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2008

An A1c as Low as 5.4% Can Mask Undiagnosed Diabetes in Some High-Risk People

An article in Endocrine Today presents some interesting findings regarding A1c's, including the fact that even a relatively low A1c of 5.4% may not preclude undiagnosed diabetes in high-risk individuals.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2008

A1c Rx Specializes in Diabetes, Uses a Robot for Accurate Pill Dispensing

A new pharmacy that focuses on patients with diabetes, A1c Rx, opened this month in the San Diego, California, area. A1c Rx works with patients to review medications and demonstrate testing techniques. It also utilizes a robotic pill dispenser to safely and accurately dispense diabetes meds.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2008

Heritage Labs Debuts $19.95 Home A1c Test
Heritage Labs Debuts $19.95 Home A1c Test

Heritage Labs has introduced the Appraise® Home A1c Kit, a product that allows people with diabetes and pre-diabetes to measure their average blood glucose level over a three- or four-month period. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

September 2008

Sanofi-Aventis Study Sees Significant A1c Reductions with Lantus and Apidra Compared to Pre-mixed Insulin for Type 2s

At the recent 44th annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), sanofi-aventis announced a study demonstrating that a basal-bolus insulin regimen with Lantus® once daily (basal insulin) and rapid-acting Apidra® (insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection) at mealtime (bolus insulin) resulted in significant A1c reductions from baseline as compared to pre-mixed insulin in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2008

Researchers Suggest Adjusting the Glucose Level We Think of as Hypoglycemia
Researchers Suggest Adjusting the Glucose Level We Think of as Hypoglycemia

An article published in Diabetologia this month challenges the accepted glucose cut-off values that define hypoglycemia because they have a major effect on reported frequencies of hypoglycemia.

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2008

Bret Michaels, Diabetic Lead Singer of Poison

Bret Michaels was only six years old when he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Now 44 years old, he's a twenty-year veteran of the rock and roll scene as the lead singer of the eighties band "Poison."

comments 64 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe
Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe

These days, Doug Burns is a modern Sampson. The reigning Mr. Universe, he’s two hundred pounds of sheer muscle and the picture of good health. Of the skinny little boy with type 1 who used to work out in the woods alone, all that remains are a wry sense of humor and an attractively self-deprecating manner. They’re unexpected in a man who’s triumphed in the uber-masculine world of bodybuilding, but there’s a lot that’s unexpected about Doug Burns.

comments 31 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2008

Good News for Byetta (Exenatide): Canadian Study Reports Once-Weekly Dose Is Better at BG Control Than Twice Daily

A Canadian clinical study has delivered a double dose of good news for proponents of exenatide (sold commercially as Byetta), a drug used by more than 700,000 Americans to control blood glucose, ease food cravings, and, incidentally, lose weight.  

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2008

Study Shows CGMs Help Type 1s Achieve Better Blood Sugar Control-Especially Those Over 25
Study Shows CGMs Help Type 1s Achieve Better Blood Sugar Control-Especially Those Over 25

A study sponsored by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation confirms that many older type 1 patients achieve better control of their blood sugar levels by using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) than by conventional monitoring with a meter and finger pricks. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2008

As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes
As Diabetes Becomes a Growing Concern, a Consensus Is Developing for Assertive Treatment of Pre-Diabetes

With 21 million U.S. residents now officially diagnosed as having diabetes, healthcare professionals are looking at another statistic that is causing them many a sleepless night: The Centers for Disease Control estimate that there are 57 million people with pre-diabetes in the United States. (Pre-diabetes is defined as impaired fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl, impaired glucose tolerance of 140 to 199 mg/dl, or both.)

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

Out of the Pot and Into the Fire: Pressuring Insurance Companies to Cover Continuous Glucose Monitors
Out of the Pot and Into the Fire: Pressuring Insurance Companies to Cover Continuous Glucose Monitors

When Gina Capone, a thirty-something type 1 for eight years, got married this year, she and her husband decided it was time to start thinking about having a baby. Like all women with diabetes who are planning a pregnancy, Gina needs her A1c to be as low as possible in order to prevent complications for her and her baby. This strict control can be very challenging and time-consuming, requiring up to 20 blood sugar tests a day. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

August 2008

Byetta Takes a Beating as Feds Question Its Safety; Defender Chides FDA for Bureaucracy and Bad Science

Byetta has had a tough past few days. A lawsuit by a Virginia man alleges that the drug caused his life-threatening bout of severe pancreatitis, and there are rumblings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that it may force Byetta's makers to attach a "black box" warning to its container and packaging-a stern, highlighted caution about potentially dangerous, even fatal, side effects. 

comments 19 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

Family with Nine Kids, Three with Type 1, Finds There Are Some Silver Linings
Family with Nine Kids, Three with Type 1, Finds There Are Some Silver Linings

My husband and I have nine children. Elliott is our oldest and when he was diagnosed with type 1 at age 11 in 1996, we were blindsided. Neither my husband, nor I, nor anyone in our extended family had diabetes. Elliot had all of the classic symptoms: excessive thirst, frequent urination, uncontrollable hunger, occasional blurry vision, and (something I think a lot of parents don't recognize as a sign) bedwetting.  

comments 11 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2008

Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators
Report From the AADE: In the Convention Center with Diabetes Educators

The members of the AADE are an impassioned group who genuinely want to make a difference in their patients' lives. It was an ideal place for me to be, especially because I had a concern of my own: Why am I getting red dots every time I inject? Every educator I asked went right to work examining the problem and investigating my behavior, truly wanting to help. Unfortunately, they are dwindling in number each year, while patients are increasing in number, making their work ever more demanding.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Are You Paying for Test Strips When You Don’t Have To?
Are You Paying for Test Strips When You Don’t Have To?

Diabetes educator Mary M. Austin reported that many people are paying for blood glucose test strips even though their insurance plans would cover them. "There is a lot of misunderstanding," she said. For example, a client of Austin's got a free meter at a health fair. He then paid for strips on his own for six months, until he found out that his insurance plan would cover them if he got a prescription for the strips from his healthcare provider.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2008

Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think
Going Vegan Might Be Easier Than You Think

Do you want to lose weight and improve your blood glucose levels? Do you want to do it without having to weigh your portions and count your calories? Try a low-fat vegan diet. A vegan diet is one with no animal products: no fish, no eggs, no dairy, and, of course, no meat.

comments 22 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

Is This the ACCORD Study’s Silver Lining?

Several months ago researchers suspended work on the landmark ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) study, which tracked 10,251 type 2s, some of them undergoing very tight control of their blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

A1c Testing Should Be Routine for Everyone, Not Just Those with Diabetes, Say Researchers
A1c Testing Should Be Routine for Everyone, Not Just Those with Diabetes, Say Researchers

The hemoglobin A1c test (HbA1c) is a staple among people with diabetes attempting to map out their long-term blood glucose levels. However, it is not a standard test for non-diabetics, even those whose doctors suspect they may have the disease.

comments 14 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

Study Shows Type 2s Can Lower BGs, A1c’s, Whether They Take Set Insulin Doses or Tailor Them to Carb Consumption

Type 2s who tried out either of two different basal-bolus treatments using Lantus and Apidra enjoyed significant reductions in post-meal BG levels and longer-term A1c’s.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

July 2008

Type 2 Diabetes: Is Carb Counting Unnecessary?
Type 2 Diabetes: Is Carb Counting Unnecessary?

You’ve got type 2 diabetes. A few years ago, you started using a long-acting insulin once a day, and your fasting glucose levels and your A1c came down. But now your A1c is creeping back up. Your doctor tells you that you need to add a mealtime insulin to your plan.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2008

Letter of the Week: Any More Honeymooners Out There?
Letter of the Week: Any More Honeymooners Out There?

July 27, 2008 marked the eighth full month that my son has not used insulin. His last A1c was 5.9%, on July 9, 2008. On August 14th of this year, it will be one year since he was originally diagnosed with type 1. As you know, he was taken off insulin on November 27, 2007, about a month after getting the experimental drug teplizumab. I don't know if it is the drug or not, but others have taken it with good results. It will be interesting to see if they ever get the drug approved and can use it quickly on newly diagnosed type 1s.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2008

Byetta Breaks the Piggy Bank

San Diego-based Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., posted a second-quarter loss of $64.8 million, or 47 cents per share. This compares to a 2007 second-quarter loss of 45 million, or 34 cents a share.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 31, 2008

Medtronic's Response to Zachariah Kramer's Letter Cautioning Against Unrealistic Expectations About CGMs

What follows is Medtronic's response to Zachariah Kramer's letter to Diabetes Health cautioning against unrealistic expectations about CGM systems.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2008

June 2008

This Week's Diabetes Research Highlights
This Week's Diabetes Research Highlights

Tekturna Reduces Kidney Disease Indicator

The blood pressure medicine Tekturna (aliskiren) may have a beneficial side effect for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure who are at risk of kidney disease. According to a recent article in The New England Journal of Medicine, the drug reduces proteinuria, a key indicator of kidney disease, by 20 percent in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Novo Nordisk Seeks U.S. and European Approval for Type 2 Drug Liraglutide
Novo Nordisk Seeks U.S. and European Approval for Type 2 Drug Liraglutide

Drug manufacturer Novo Nordisk has applied to the U.S. Federal Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for approval of liraglutide, a human GLP-1 analog* that is taken once daily for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2008

Letter of the Week: Mother Caught Between Medtronic and BlueCross BlueShield  Refuses to Give Up
Letter of the Week: Mother Caught Between Medtronic and BlueCross BlueShield Refuses to Give Up

Dear Diabetes Health,

After reading the story in the April/May Diabetes Health about the mother and daughter who won approval from Blue Cross/Blue Shield to pay for the continuous monitor, I wanted to share our story.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2008

May 2008

Type 1s Live Insulin-Free For Up to Two Years, Thanks to Transplanted Human Islet Cells... But There's a Catch
Type 1s Live Insulin-Free For Up to Two Years, Thanks to Transplanted Human Islet Cells... But There's a Catch

HealthDay reports that according to a University of Miami study, people with type 1 diabetes who received transplanted islet cells from human donors lived insulin-free for up to two years.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 30, 2008

Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes
Hot Tub Therapy For People With Diabetes

Is it possible that a dip in the hot tub can cause a dip in the blood sugars? According to a pilot study that appeared in the September 16 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), "hot tub therapy" helped a group of type 2s reduce their blood sugars, lose weight and improve sleep patterns.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 23, 2008

Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body?  What Do You Feel In Your Mind?
Hypoglycemia: What Do You Feel In Your Body? What Do You Feel In Your Mind?

A word of caution about the values used below. This study was conducted using people without diabetes.  Some people with diabetes experience symptoms at higher glucose levels than the study suggests. Other people with diabetes appear to function well with blood sugars in the 30's and 40's (mg/dl). Therefore, the values in the study should only be used as an approximation. This study also used plasma glucose levels. Your values done at home might be 20 percent lower or higher than these lab values. For example, epinephrine release in someone without diabetes would begin at about 63mg/dl with a home blood glucose meter.

comments 43 comments - Posted May 1, 2008

April 2008

Readers Exchange Opinions on Whether Low-Carb Diets Can Hurt Children
Readers Exchange Opinions on Whether Low-Carb Diets Can Hurt Children

Does Low-Carb Cheat Young Children of Their Needs?

KheurserRD wrote us to say, “From a dietitian's perspective, 30 grams of carbs doesn't allow for much. It would not allow for the recommended amounts of milk/milk equivalents or fruit a child needs. Not to mention the lack of fiber. Whatever happened to balance, portion control, physical activity, and eating within your calorie needs? ...If such extreme restrictions are being made, how can very young children meet their requirements for calcium and other vitamins and minerals present in milk or fruit and some carbohydrate-containing vegetables?  Were these children monitored for nutritional deficiencies, or have the long-term effects of such a diet been studied when the diet was started at such a young age? Even if there are no recommendations for fiber, diets rich in fiber are associated with the prevention of many diseases.”

comments 6 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

Vitamins and Supplements: Taken For Health Or Taken For A Ride?
Vitamins and Supplements: Taken For Health Or Taken For A Ride?

Does anyone living in our well-nourished country, eating a reasonable diet, really need to take vitamins, minerals, or herbs? Should a person with diabetes take them? If so, which ones and how much? When it comes to supplements, the answers are often unclear.

comments 20 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2008

"I Don't Live Like I Have Diabetes"
"I Don't Live Like I Have Diabetes"

A Question-and-Answer Session With Jordan Hoese, A 14-Year-Old Type 1 Marathon Runner.

comments 16 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2008

Can Byetta Be a Standalone Treatment for Type 2?

Since its introduction in 2005, Byetta has become “the talk of the town” as one of the most powerful, yet benign, diabetes drugs of the 21st century.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2008

Type 2 Diagnosis Lit My Fire: 100 Lbs. Down and a 4.9 A1c!
Type 2 Diagnosis Lit My Fire: 100 Lbs. Down and a 4.9 A1c!

In November 2005, with an A1c of 7.5%, I was told that I had type 2 diabetes.  It shouldn’t have come as much of a surprise to me because my mother has type 2 and her mother died from complications due to her uncontrolled diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2008

March 2008

Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21
Scott Dunton, Diabetes at 16, and a Nationally Recognized Surfing Sensation at 21

Professional surfer Scott Dunton, 21, has two missions in life: To keep climbing in the rankings as one of the world’s top competitive surfers, and to spread the word to children and teenagers everywhere that having diabetes doesn’t mean life’s joys come to a halt.

comments 16 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Not Surprised by ACCORD Study Halt

What is “surprising” about the partial halting of the ACCORD study (“Diabetes Study Partially Halted After Deaths,” Feb. 7, 2008) is that the researchers were so surprised by completely predictable results.

comments 13 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Cedars-Sinai Seeks Type 2 Participants For 3-Year Implantable Device Study

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles is seeking participants with type 2 diabetes for a randomized, controlled clinical study to evaluate an implantable device that delivers electrical impulses to the stomach.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2008

Letter of the Week: Experimental Drug Has Cured My Son of Type 1, Says RN

Editor:
My son was diagnosed in August 2007 with juvenile diabetes. I am a registered nurse and was devastated by the diagnosis because I was just completely paralyzed by the fear of potential complications. It was also a tremendous shock to be on the other side of health care – receiving information from hurried staff, including doctors, glancing at their watches while I asked one too many questions.

comments 28 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2008

Research Into Natural Herbs Leads To Lower A1c, 190-lb Weight Loss

I am a diabetic and was taking four insulin shots per day and still had problems with my sugar. I did two months of research on the Web because I had to find a way to get off the shots. I hate needles I was astonished at what I found on natural herbs!

comments 38 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

Blood Sugar Management: the Core of Your Care

Blood sugar control is the heart and soul of diabetes management. How you handle it determines what will be the consequences of your diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2008

The ADA and Low Carb Diets

For the first time, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) came out in support of low-carbohydrate diets for people with diabetes who want to manage their weight. The ADA announced this landmark decision in December 2007 with its 2008 clinical practice recommendations. The latest recommendation is in sharp contrast to decades of promoting only low-fat/high-carb diets.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2008

February 2008

A1c's Give Inaccurate Results for Hemodialysis Patients

A1c tests, the standard measurement of blood glucose, underestimate the amount of glucose in people who are on kidney hemodialysis, says a Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center study.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 27, 2008

The Era of "He Said, She Said": International Study Contradicts Recent ACCORD Mortality Fears

Just after a massive U.S. study dropped its aggressive treatment of blood glucose levels because of increased deaths among type 2 patients, international researchers announced that their similar intense study of tight blood sugar control showed no increased risk of death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2008

Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely
Medtronic's New iPro Monitoring Device Lets Doctors Track Patients More Closely

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the newest continuous glucose monitoring system from diabetes management device manufacturer Medtronic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2008

What You Should Know About Type 2 Medications
What You Should Know About Type 2 Medications

To successfully treat diabetes, you must take charge of your own diabetes management. You need to know your medications, and you need to know your pharmacist. But that kind of intimate knowledge has become a lot more complex in the past decade.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2008

U.S. Suspends Study on Intense Blood Sugar Control After Increase in Deaths Among Type 2 Participants

After seeing an increase in deaths among type 2 participants, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has halted the intense blood sugar control portion of its years-long study on controlling cardiovascular risks to people with diabetes.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

ADA's Latest Low-Carb Stance Is Severely Flawed, Says Longtime Low-Carb Advocate Dr. Bernstein

Pioneering low-carb diet advocate Dr. Richard K. Bernstein has responded to the American Diabetes Association's recent support for low-carb diets with a critique of several of the ADA's most cherished notions.

comments 30 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2008

It's Time for "Hypo-Drills": Where I Help My Spouse Save My Life

I have been using insulin for over 29 years, and during this time I have experienced too many lows to recall. My endocrinologist informed me that insulin users who have an A1c less than 7 percent typically require emergency assistance for hypoglycemia about every six to nine months.

comments 26 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2008

Continuous Monitoring Is Here!

Dear Diabetes Health, after seeing your Web TV show where Scott King went on the Dexcom device for the first time, I have several questions.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2008

Reader Chides TV Program for Inaccuracies About Type 1

I don't know if you watched this show that aired the week of January 20 here in Rochester, N.Y., on WXXI Public TV. The program included a short segment where a 12-year-old type 1 diabetic relied upon a medical dog to avoid seizures. It was very incomplete and misleading.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2008

The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin
The Beneficial Effects of Byetta: An Interview With Amylin

SK: We’re joined on our show by Craig Eberhard, vice president of sales at Amylin Pharmaceuticals. Hey, Craig, thanks for coming on the show. Amylin has one of the most innovative products that I’ve heard of in years. It’s called Byetta.

comments 8 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2008

January 2008

Diabetes, Depression and Death
Diabetes, Depression and Death

Startling statistics are only one reason sufferers should get help and why research into this lethal combination must continue.  On the list of deadly diseases in the United States, diabetes ranks fifth. And for so many reasons: major killers like heart attack and stroke are among a slew of diabetes' potentially lethal complications.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2008

December 2007

The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?
The Debate Goes On: Carbs In or Carbs Out?

Recently on "Good Morning America," a friend of mine (and fellow A1c champion) watched author Gary Taubes talk about his new book, Good Calories, Bad Calories. My friend sent this email around: "Taubes says that exercise makes us hungry for carbohydrates and that carbohydrates cause insulin secretion, which creates fat."

comments 49 comments - Posted Dec 27, 2007

Sugar May Stick More Easily to Hemoglobin in Minorities

There's now plenty of evidence that U.S. ethnic minority groups tend to have higher A1c levels than whites. (Your A1c is the percentage of your hemoglobin cells that are glycated - have sugar stuck to them. The higher your blood sugars are, the more sugar sticks to your hemoglobin over time, and the higher your A1c is.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 24, 2007

Study Gives Kids a Personal Diabetes Trainer: It Really Helps!

In a recent study, 81 youth with type 1 diabetes, aged eleven to sixteen years, were divided into two groups. One group received care as usual, but every member of the second group got six sessions with a "diabetes personal trainer," during which they talked about self-monitoring, goal setting, and problem solving.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2007

Cord Blood May Preserve Insulin Production in Newly Diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes
Cord Blood May Preserve Insulin Production in Newly Diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Today, about four percent of Americans bank their children's cord blood just in case it might come in handy, and more are doing it every day. Now a small study announced at the 67th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association has found that infusions of umbilical cord blood may preserve insulin production.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 18, 2007

Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change
Your Insulin Pump Proposals: What You Want the Manufacturers to Change

To conclude our pump survey, we asked you how you'd like to see pumping improved. As usual, you came up with a plethora of intriguing suggestions, although some were a bit more visionary than others: One reader said, "I wish someone would invent a device that could be waved over a meal, and it would display the number of carbs in the meal."

comments 43 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2007

Byetta Dusts Insulin In Year-Long Trial

In a recent randomized study, 69 people with type 2 diabetes who were already taking metformin were given either Byetta or Lantus for a full year. When the results were in, Byetta came out ahead on several fronts.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2007

Why the Ethnic Disparity in A1c's?
Why the Ethnic Disparity in A1c's?

Hispanics and African Americans have higher A1c's than whites. That disparity contributes to the unfortunate fact that in the U.S., approximately ten percent of racial differences in mortality have been attributed to diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2007

November 2007

Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication
Losing Weight With Your Diabetes Medication

I learned that I had type 2 diabetes in February 1994. A dozen years later, I knew I had to make a change. Technically speaking, I was "morbidly obese." I'm tall - 6 feet, 2½ inches - but I tipped the scales at 312 pounds and had a body mass index (BMI) of 40.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2007

Why Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy May Be The Best Choice for Type 2 Diabetes

Many medications, both oral and injectable, exist to manage blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Even insulin has many different formulations, including fast-acting and long-acting analogs as well as various pre-mixed combinations of faster and slower acting insulins in the same vial.

comments 9 comments - Posted Nov 27, 2007

You Knew It All Along: High Blood Sugar Makes Your Kids Act Up

Parents have always said that they can tell when their children's blood sugar is high by their kids' behavior, which tends to change, and not for the better, when their sugar is high. Now a formal study has confirmed just that.

comments 6 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2007

The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It
The Crisis in Diabetes Education: Essential Care That's Riddled with Problems, and What We Can Do to Fix It

Diabetes educators are no less than a lifeline for patients, providing vital insights into the self-care behaviors that keep diabetes in check: managing blood sugar, dosing medications and insulin, exercising, and understanding all the numbers involved.

comments 30 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2007

Sitagliptin and Metformin a Useful Combo For Type 2s

A recent study has found that the combination of metformin and sitagliptin lowers A1c's better than either drug alone, apparently because their different mechanisms work together synergistically.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2007

October 2007

Making Lemonade
Making Lemonade

I am a survivor and proud of it. Not only have I lived with diabetes for 52 years, since the age of five, but I am also a breast cancer survivor for over fifteen years.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2007

A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research
A Glycemic Index Expert Responds to the Tufts Research

The take-home message from the Tufts study is that the GI value of white bread is 70. That's nothing new: The same value has been found in dozens of other studies around the world (1).

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2007

Charcot Foot: A Story of Foot Reconstruction
Charcot Foot: A Story of Foot Reconstruction

Josephine Kulman has had type 1 diabetes for 45 years, ever since she was five years old. For much of her life, her blood sugars were rarely in control.

comments 32 comments - Posted Oct 11, 2007

A1c Test Can Predict Type 2 Diabetes

Most people with diabetes are familiar with the A1c test as a measure of cumulative exposure to glucose over a period of three months.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2007

Aerobic and Resistance Exercise: Good Alone,  but Best Together
Aerobic and Resistance Exercise: Good Alone, but Best Together

A study comparing the benefits of aerobic versus resistance training has found that either is good, but both are better, when it comes to lowering A1c's in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 5, 2007

"Psychologically Dependent" Type 2s Use Too Many Test Strips?

According to Pulse, the UK's leading medical weekly, a review of the evidence has concluded that for type 2s on oral medication whose A1c's are below 7.5%, blood glucose monitoring offers "little advantage and may increase the likelihood of hypoglycemia."

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2007

September 2007

Have Type 2 Diabetes? You're Likely to Have Sleep Apnea Too
Have Type 2 Diabetes? You're Likely to Have Sleep Apnea Too

In obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the upper airway narrows or collapses during sleep, cutting off breathing. People with OSA may be aroused hundreds of times each night, just enough to start breathing again.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2007

A1c Closer to Becoming ADAG

In August, a number of august organizations agreed to report the A1c in a new way, as a number called an A1c-derived average glucose, or ADAG.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2007

Eating For Two: A Personal Story of Pregnancy and Diabetes

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes last year, my doctors and I were rather shocked. I was only 27 years old at the time, slender and in good shape. Diabetes does run in my mother's side of the family, so I wasn't completely taken aback.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2007

AYUDA: Together We Are Stronger
AYUDA: Together We Are Stronger

American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad, Inc., also known as AYUDA, is a small organization with a lofty goal: to bring the diabetes camp experience to underprivileged children and youth with type 1 diabetes around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2007

The International Diabetes Federation Announces Post-Meal Glucose Target

Until now, there were only two blood sugar numbers you had to worry about: your A1c and your fasting glucose level. The first, according to IDF guidelines, should be 6.5% or below, and the second 100 mg/dl or below.

comments 6 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2007

New Drug Might Lower Both Bad Cholesterol and Blood Sugar

In two recent studies, WelChol, a drug already approved for lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol was found to lower A1c's in patients with type 2 diabetes. The first study showed that WelChol, when added to insulin, lowered A1c's by an average of 0.5% compared to a placebo group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 26, 2007

Parents Of A Type 1 Toddler Make Peace With Their New Life

I met Perry at a neighborhood Food Co-op four years ago when he noticed my jacket's JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) emblem, introduced himself, and asked if I knew of any diabetes support groups. His three-year old son, Max, had recently been diagnosed with type 1.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 24, 2007

Machines Will Make It Happen: Is Technology The Key To Revolutionizing Diabetes Care?

As a scientist who has type 1 diabetes, Dr. Kowalski knows that the cure may be a long time coming. But he's optimistic, nevertheless, because he believes that technology will revolutionize diabetes management long before the cure raises its shy little head.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 18, 2007

Onward and Upward With Diabetes
Onward and Upward With Diabetes

Swaying in rhythm like drunk fans singing their team fight song, we campers bellowed our camp theme, clapping and banging on dining tables: "Shock, shock for Camp Firefly! We take the insulin - try not to cry!"

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2007

Confessions Of A 35-Year Diabetes Veteran
Confessions Of A 35-Year Diabetes Veteran

I've been doing a lot of flying lately, and it's given me time for reflection. While aloft a few days ago in JetBlue's comfy seat, as I took out my syringe and Humalog to dose for my snack, I realized how many things I no longer do that I was once taught to do.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 16, 2007

Research, Rivalry, and Investing in the Cure
Research, Rivalry, and Investing in the Cure

Since the 1950s, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded almost all diabetes research worldwide. From its headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland, the NIH oversees a $28 billion annual medical research budget. More than $1 billion of those taxpayer dollars go specifically toward diabetes research. Still, a cure remains frustratingly elusive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2007

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Major Advance in Blood Sugar Control
Continuous Glucose Monitoring: A Major Advance in Blood Sugar Control

Life in the trenches with type 1 diabetes is challenging. Unpredictable blood sugars can leave a person with diabetes (PWD) feeling frustrated and helpless. The acute toxic effects of abnormal blood sugars also contribute to depression, anxiety, irritability, and food cravings.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2007

Blood Glucose Meters For Type 2s: Why Aren't They More Useful?

We recently wrote about a study which concluded that blood glucose meters are a waste of time for people with type 2 diabetes who are not using insulin ("Is Using a Meter a Waste of Time for Type 2s?"). Our readers vehemently disagreed with that conclusion.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 6, 2007

Lower A1c Means Lower Risk of Heart Surgery Complications

In the August 2007 edition of The Lancet, Argentinian researcher Dr. Diego Lowenstein reported that the higher your A1c, the higher your risk of major complications after heart bypass surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2007

August 2007

The Exhaustion of Chronic Illness, or When Bad Things Happen to Good People

I've generally been a "good" person. I try to do those ten things on Dalai Lama's list. You know, be kind, not hurt others, let people know you love them, hear a tree when it's falling even if you're not there...

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 30, 2007

For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play
For Heart Health, Make Your Type 1 Child Go Out and Play

The possibility of heart disease is a nagging worry when you have a child with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-nine percent of type 1 children have at least one cardiac risk factor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2007

More News of the Epidemic: Diabetes Devastates Poor New York Neighborhoods

Five hundred thousand New Yorkers have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 200,000 have diabetes and don't know it yet - that's a total of one out of every eight adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2007

Metformin Is Still Tops for Diabetes, Says Study Review
Metformin Is Still Tops for Diabetes, Says Study Review

That old standby, metformin, is still your best bet. In fact, there is no benefit in taking the newer oral medications unless you can't tolerate the older ones.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2007

A Good Night's Sleep With Diabetes

Parents of newly-diagnosed children with diabetes have something in common - they don't sleep soundly through the night. Anxiety soars in the darkness. When our son Danny was diagnosed at age seven, my husband Brian and I barely closed our eyes, and we set our alarm to check on him at least once every night.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2007

What Were They Thinking?  How Doctors Choose Your Type 2 Medicine
What Were They Thinking? How Doctors Choose Your Type 2 Medicine

It's a complex mental process that your doctors go through when they choose your medicines, according to a recent survey of several hundred physicians.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2007

July 2007

Good News For Once: Americans Are Managing Diabetes Better

In 2001, just over a third of Americans had their diabetes well controlled, based upon an A1c of seven percent or lower. In 2006, however, more than half of them had their diabetes well controlled. These are the results of a study of nearly 5 million patients performed from 2001 to 2007 by Quest Diagnostics Inc. and analyzed by Dr. Francine Kaufman of the University of Southern California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2007

Presto Chango! The A1c Is Being Transformed Into The AG

An A1c assesses glycated hemoglobin; that is, it tells you how many of your red blood cells have glucose stuck to them. The higher the percentage of hemoglobin cells that are sugared up, the higher your average BGs were over the preceding three months.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 16, 2007

Prevent Birth Defects: Don't Get Pregnant Until Your Sugar Is Controlled

Two-thirds of pregnancies in women with diabetes are unplanned. How long after conception do those women realize they're pregnant? They may be eight weeks into their pregnancy before they know it's happened.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2007

Once-Weekly Byetta LAR (exenatide long-acting release): So Far, It Works
Once-Weekly Byetta LAR (exenatide long-acting release): So Far, It Works

It's a fact that Byetta reduces A1c's, post-meal and fasting glucose levels, and weight in people with type 2 diabetes. The drawback is that it's another injection twice a day. In response, Amylin, the maker of Byetta, has developed exenatide LAR, a form of Byetta that is injected only once a week.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2007

Carolyn Gridley:  A Farm Girl Grows Up With Diabetes
Carolyn Gridley: A Farm Girl Grows Up With Diabetes

Born on the family dairy farm in New York, the second of five children, Carolyn Gridley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after her grandmother noticed sugar crystals on her diaper that attracted the bees and flies around the farm.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 11, 2007

In Case You Had Any Doubts: Exercise Is Tops For Blood Sugar Control
In Case You Had Any Doubts: Exercise Is Tops For Blood Sugar Control

An overview of 103 research reports comprising 10,455 subjects has found that it's better to stick to exercise than to spread yourself too thin by trying to change your activity level, diet, and medication all at the same time.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2007

June 2007

Bariatric Surgery: The Operation Diet
Bariatric Surgery: The Operation Diet

Bariatric Surgery isn't just for weight loss anymore. It's been shown to be possibly curative of type 2 diabetes even in the absence of major weight loss following the surgery. Here's the rundown on how it works.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes
Kevin Powell: Triathlete Triumphs Over Type 1 Diabetes

Kevin Powell is an athlete, first and foremost. Twice a year, he competes in an Ironman event, a grueling test of endurance that entails a 2.4-mile swim and a 112-mile bike ride, topped off by a full marathon of 26.2 miles.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2007

The Washington Boys and Their Activist Family Create a Diabetes Comic Book Superhero
The Washington Boys and Their Activist Family Create a Diabetes Comic Book Superhero

Kamaal Washington was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was nine. He's thirteen now. In those four years, he's become an advocate for diabetes and the author, with his brother Malcolm and help from his parents, of a diabetes educational superhero comic book that's swept the nation beyond their wildest expectations. But it all started when he began to be really, really thirsty.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 27, 2007

Gestational Diabetes Often Leads to Type 2 Diabetes

Gestational diabetes affects about 5% of all women in late pregnancy. About a third of those women will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within five years, says a recent study in the Post-Graduate Medical Journal, and it'll most likely be the women who had the highest A1c's during their gestational diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2007

Watching TV Directly Correlated to Higher A1c's in Kids with Type 1 Diabetes
Watching TV Directly Correlated to Higher A1c's in Kids with Type 1 Diabetes

Every hour that type 1 children spend watching cartoons, sitcoms, and even, alas, public television, correlates to an increase in A1c, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2007

Recent Research on Chromium Supplements: Some Work and Some Don't
Recent Research on Chromium Supplements: Some Work and Some Don't

In a recent Dutch study, researchers gave either a placebo or a daily dose of 400 micrograms of chromium in the form of chromium yeast to 57 obese, insulin-requiring type 2 patients with A1c’s above eight percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2007

After Forty Years on Insulin, Operating Room Nurse Still Goes Motorcycle Camping
After Forty Years on Insulin, Operating Room Nurse Still Goes Motorcycle Camping

Anne Williamson has had type 1 diabetes for forty years, since the age of seven. But because of the Easter basket incident, she still vividly remembers her time in the hospital. Anne was alone in her hospital room when a volunteer insisted on leaving a candy-filled Easter basket by her bed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2007

Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk of Diabetes and Heart Attack
Sleep Apnea May Increase Risk of Diabetes and Heart Attack

Two new research reports, presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference, indicate that obstructive sleep apnea ups your risk of type 2 diabetes and increases your risk of heart attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2007

New Test Uses Light to Detect Type 2 Diabetes

If you want to brown meat really nicely, add sugar and then fry it up. If you want insides as inflexible as burnt barbeque, years of elevated blood sugar will do the job in much the same manner.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2007

Made From Gymnema Sylvestre: A pill that kills your taste for sugar, and an extract that reportedly cuts high blood sugar

A company called Sugarest has developed a pill made from the Indian herb Gymnema sylvestre that purports to deaden your ability to taste sugar, thereby rendering sweets tasteless.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2007

Creating a Family Culture of  Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time
Creating a Family Culture of Healthy Eating, One Step at a Time

Several years ago, my husband Brian and my son Danny were eating at the Food Court of a local mall. "Dad, when someone gets three wishes from the genie in the lamp, why don't they just wish for more wishes?" Danny asked. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2007

Team Type 1 Races Across America to Raise Diabetes Awareness
Team Type 1 Races Across America to Raise Diabetes Awareness

Twenty-five years ago, at the age of seven months, Phil Southerland was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the time gave his mother very dismal predictions about his prospects, but he blew all those right out of the water.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 13, 2007

Pay a Little, Save a Lot: Improving Diabetes Care Proves a Sound Investment
Pay a Little, Save a Lot: Improving Diabetes Care Proves a Sound Investment

A University of Chicago research team reports that spending less than $500 per patient to improve care could reduce patients' risk of diabetes complications, including blindness, kidney failure, and coronary artery disease, which can cost $44,000 per patient annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2007

Cochrane Review Finds NPH Equal to Lantus and Levemir for type 2's

The Cochrane Library recently conducted a review of studies to see if NPH is as good as Lantus and Levemir when used as a basal insulin for people with type 2 diabetes. Six studies comparing insulin glargine (Lantus) to NPH (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn) were examined, as well as two studies comparing insulin detemir (Levemir) to NPH.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2007

Men With Heart Disease and Diabetes Get Better Care Than Women
Men With Heart Disease and Diabetes Get Better Care Than Women

A study just published by the RAND Corporation, a well-known think tank, has found that routine care received by women for their heart disease and diabetes isn't as good as that received by men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2007

Chromium Doesn't Help Control Type 2 Diabetes in Western Populations
Chromium Doesn't Help Control Type 2 Diabetes in Western Populations

In a recent Dutch study, researchers gave either a placebo or a daily dose of 400 micrograms of chromium to 57 obese, insulin-requiring type 2 patients with A1c's above eight percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 3, 2007

May 2007

Updated: Analysis Associates Avandia With Greater Risk of Heart Attack

Analysis of several recent studies indicates that Avandia (rosiglitazone), a type 2 diabetes medication that's been taken by more than six million people worldwide, is associated with a 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and with a borderline-significant increased risk of heart attack-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2007

Misreading Avandia

The recent ruckus over the drug rosiglitazone (Avandia) has been portrayed as another case of Big Pharma foisting a dangerous drug on the public while the overworked FDA can't keep up.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2007

What's the Best Meter? It's the One that You'll Use
What's the Best Meter? It's the One that You'll Use

Meters have come a long way since 1969, when the first meter went on the market. The meter measured the amount of light reflected off a Dextrostix, a paper strip that turned various shades of blue, depending on blood glucose level, after a large drop of blood was placed on it and then washed off.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2007

The Sad State of Diabetes Complications in America

A report released at a recent meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), called “The State of Diabetes Complications in America,” has revealed some pretty depressing facts about the consequences of diabetes today.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2007

Gastric Bypass Surgery Being Considered as Treatment for Type 2
Gastric Bypass Surgery Being Considered as Treatment for Type 2

Bariatric surgery, formerly used only for treating obesity, is being explored as a cure for type 2 diabetes in normal weight or moderately overweight people.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 19, 2007

One Less Worry: Hypos Don't Damage Brain Power
One Less Worry: Hypos Don't Damage Brain Power

Aggressive management of diabetes can lead to more episodes of severe low blood sugar, but a new study has found that these episodes apparently don’t impair cognitive (thinking) function.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2007

Cinnamon Sunk in Latest Type 1 Diabetes Study
Cinnamon Sunk in Latest Type 1 Diabetes Study

Back in 2003, a study in Diabetes Care showed that in thirty people with type 2 diabetes, one to six grams of cinnamon daily for forty days resulted in a drop in blood sugar levels, triglycerides, and LDL (bad cholesterol)...

comments 4 comments - Posted May 17, 2007

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Drops A1c
Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Drops A1c

A drug initially designed to treat the autoimmune disease of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis has been found helpful in treating type 2 diabetes.  The drug is an “interleukin-1-receptor antagonist” that goes by the name of anakinra (Kineret).

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2007

Become a Champion for Diabetes Patients: Help Others Manage Their Diabetes

Sanofi-aventis and the Patient Mentor Institute are looking for people with diabetes to become patient mentors with the A1C Champions® program – a unique, patient-to-patient approach to diabetes education.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 12, 2007

Positive Perceptions Predict Pleased Pumpers

A study recently published in Diabetes Care has found that people with type 1 who become happy pumpers share characteristics in common. They actively participate in self-care, have realistic expectations of pump performance, and clearly remember how they felt when they were first diagnosed. The researchers believe that these characteristics may help predict who will be a successful pumper.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 11, 2007

In the Know with Continuous Glucose Monitors: The Latest in Diabetes Care
In the Know with Continuous Glucose Monitors: The Latest in Diabetes Care

Continuous Glucose Monitors Are Revolutionary - I’ve always believed that if I could give myself insulin conveniently and constantly knew my blood glucose, I could control my blood sugar almost as well as a non-diabetic person. Nine years ago, an insulin pump made the first condition come true. Since then I have been waiting for the magic blood sugar machine.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 10, 2007

After All These Years: Betty Adamski Schunke Recalls Diabetes Icons

On March 28, 1950, nine-year-old Betty Adamski Schunke entered the hospital with a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. She remembers the date vividly. She also remembers the words of her pediatrician, one of the first women in the field: “You can do anything you want to do as long as you remember you have diabetes and plan accordingly.” A feisty, stubborn little girl who strove for perfection and never backed down, she took it for her motto.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2007

April 2007

Type 1 Pop Star, Nick Jonas Tells His Story
Type 1 Pop Star, Nick Jonas Tells His Story

Nick Jonas is a personable boy of fourteen who happens to be a member of the Jonas Brothers Band, a group of three brothers with a devoted following of very passionate young fans. In November 2005, Nick Jonas found out that he had type 1 diabetes.

comments 1470 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2007

Joslin Diabetes Center Offers Quick Tips for Summer Eye Care
Joslin Diabetes Center Offers Quick Tips for Summer Eye Care

The crack of the bat on Opening Day at Fenway Park is a sure sign that summer is on its way. From the Green Monster seats to the dunes of Cape Cod, summer means bright sun, ultraviolet rays and of course, sunglasses. But did you know that people with diabetes need more than sunglasses to protect their eyes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2007

Nearly Five Decades With Type 1
Nearly Five Decades With Type 1

At 63 years old, I've coped successfully with insulin-dependent diabetes for 46 years.  Education and acceptance are the keys, but it took me years (and the support of loving family and friends) to achieve them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2007

Why the Vegan Diet is Best
Why the Vegan Diet is Best

Remember the big picture: Populations that stick to traditional high-carbohydrate diets (for example, Asian rice-based diets) typically have low rates of obesity and diabetes. When they abandon traditional rice-based diets in favor of meatier Western fare, carbohydrate intake falls, but weight problems and diabetes increase.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

Why the Low Carb Diet is Best
Why the Low Carb Diet is Best

When I developed diabetes in 1946, physicians thought that the high illness and death rate of diabetics was due to dietary fat and the supposedly resultant elevation of serum cholesterol. Since the DCCT trial, the scientific literature overwhelmingly supports the role of elevated blood sugar in all long-term diabetic complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2007

58 Healthy Years with Diabetes, and He Remembers Every Low Blood Sugar: Hypoglycemia - Sometimes Humorous, Sometimes Not
58 Healthy Years with Diabetes, and He Remembers Every Low Blood Sugar: Hypoglycemia - Sometimes Humorous, Sometimes Not

Dismal Predictions - In 1949, at the age of 13, I was diagnosed with diabetes. I was told that I would have to take shots for life and that my life would probably last only 25 years longer. Furthermore, I could eat no candy, and all my children would be diabetic.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2007

Lifting Depression Lowers Blood Sugar
Lifting Depression Lowers Blood Sugar

It’s well known that depression is not good for your sugar numbers and that alleviation of depression is accompanied by improved glucose control. The question has been whether the improvement is due to body weight reduction and better self-care, or whether it might be partially due to healing of the depression condition itself, independent of the aforementioned two factors.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2007

NovoLog Approved for Pregnant Type 1's

On January 30, 2007, the FDA upgraded NovoLog (a fast-acting insulin analog from Novo Nordisk) from Category C to Category B, thereby indicating that NovoLog is safe and effective for pregnant women with type 1 and their unborn children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2007

Making Book: What to Read
Making Book: What to Read

3 Great New Books reviewed: Cheating Destiny, The Ultimate Guide to Accurate Carb Counting and Know Your Numbers, Outlive your Diabetes

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2007

Byetta Approved for Use with TZDs
Byetta Approved for Use with TZDs

In December 2006, the injected medication Byetta was approved by the FDA for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking a thiazolidinedione (TZD), but don’t have good control of their blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2007

Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave
Diabetes Burnout: When To Leave "Good Enough" Alone

There's an ancient Greek myth about a man named Sisyphus who was cursed to roll the same rock up a hill, then see it roll down, then roll it up again, for eternity.  There's something a bit like diabetes self-care in that myth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2007

Tai Chi To the Rescue: Research Supports Efficacy of Tai Chi As An Exercise for Everyone
Tai Chi To the Rescue: Research Supports Efficacy of Tai Chi As An Exercise for Everyone

You may have seen a group of senior citizens practicing the slow, rhythmic reaching and deliberate stretching movements known as tai chi. Tai chi is considered a soft style martial art, applied with deep relaxation or "softness" in the musculature. Young or old, sick or healthy, even wheel-chair bound:  everyone can take up tai chi. And oddly enough, tai chi’s gentle motions burn more calories than surfing and nearly as many as downhill skiing.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2007

A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady
A Leading Pediatric Endocrinologist Talks About Kids: Keeping BGs Steady

What’s the most important goal for kids and families dealing with diabetes? Learn all you can, and then strive for the best possible blood glucose levels without excessive hypoglycemia. This is a tough goal to attain. Our tools, food, insulin, and monitoring, while the best they have ever been, are still imprecise. And although optimal glucose control is critical for immediate and long-term health, one must always be wary of severe and recurring hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2007

Pig Islets Still Producing Insulin After Ten Years In Diabetic Man
Pig Islets Still Producing Insulin After Ten Years In Diabetic Man

Ten years ago, Michael Helyer, a New Zealand man with type 1 diabetes for eighteen years, received a transplant of pig islets. Much to the surprise of researchers, the pig cells are still putting out insulin at this late date. In fact, it was Mr. Helyer who alerted scientists at Living Cell Technologies (LCT) that the cells were still functioning.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2007

Tips for Successful Blood Sugar Monitoring
Tips for Successful Blood Sugar Monitoring

Here are some useful tips to help you choose a meter that’s right for you - and continue to use it successfully.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2007

After All These Years
After All These Years

Dr. David Reiss had never heard of diabetes until age 16, when he found out he had type 1 during his college physical exam. He rebelled and refused injections for a year, but by then there were ketones in his urine and he had no choice. That was 42 years ago, when people gave themselves just one injection a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2007

March 2007

Medtronic Gets FDA Approval of CGMs For Kids and Launches a New Guardian
Medtronic Gets FDA Approval of CGMs For Kids and Launches a New Guardian

Medtronic has received FDA approval for pediatric models of both of its REAL-Time continuous glucose monitors, the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System and the Guardian REAL-Time System. Previously approved only for adults, both pediatric models will be appropriate for kids ages 7-17.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2007

Diabetes Alert Day is March 27, 2007: Joslin Diabetes Center Reminds People with Diabetes to Schedule Annual Eye Exams to Preserve Vision
Diabetes Alert Day is March 27, 2007: Joslin Diabetes Center Reminds People with Diabetes to Schedule Annual Eye Exams to Preserve Vision

BOSTON - March 23, 2007 - Did you know that diabetes is the number one cause of preventable vision loss and blindness? Did you also know that an annual eye exam can lead to early detection of diabetic retinopathy and other eye disease, a frequent complication of diabetes?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2007

Dr. White Answers Your Medication Questions

Q: Are there any long-term side effects of the popular drugs to treat type 2 diabetes?

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2007

Eight Ways to Improve Your Family’s Eating Habits: Laura Plunkett speaks about her son Danny at the UCSF Type one conference March 3, in San Francisco
Eight Ways to Improve Your Family’s Eating Habits: Laura Plunkett speaks about her son Danny at the UCSF Type one conference March 3, in San Francisco

When my seven-year-old son, Danny, was diagnosed with type 1diabetes, I had to take a serious look at his diet. He had always been our “picky” eater, and I had gone along with his demands to keep the peace. As a result, his favorite foods at the time of his diagnosis were pancakes with syrup, grilled cheese sandwiches, macaroni and cheese, cookies, juice, and the only vegetable he ate—cucumbers. These foods became the centerpiece of the meal plan constructed by the hospital nutritionist.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2007

Galvus (vildagliptin) is “not inferior to” Avandia (rosiglitazone) in Treating Type 2 Diabetes
Galvus (vildagliptin) is “not inferior to” Avandia (rosiglitazone) in Treating Type 2 Diabetes

A 24-week study compared the effectiveness and safety of Galvus (vildagliptin), a DPP-4 inhibitor, with Avandia (rosiglitazone), a thiazolidinedione, in a double-blind, randomized, controlled, multi-center study. Both drugs had similar effects on A1c’s: Galvus reduced A1c by 1.1 %, and Avandia reduced A1c by 1. 3%. Most notably, patients did not gain weight with Galvus, but gained an average of 3.4 pounds with Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2007

Diabetes Camp Is More Than Cool
Diabetes Camp Is More Than Cool

Often kids with type 1 diabetes feel isolated. Even a sleepover is problematic, because other parents are often afraid to take on the care of a diabetic youngster. And finding a friend with diabetes is a challenge because it’s rare that anybody else in town has it: Only about one of every 600 children is affected.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2007

February 2007

Joslin Study Finds Increased Use of Insulin Pumps, New Insulin Types Give Teens More Tools to Better Manage Diabetes

BOSTON - Feb. 27, 2007 - It is widely recognized that the teenage years are often a challenging time for youth with diabetes to maintain good blood glucose control. Hormonal changes, peer pressure, food temptations, and resistance to following good health practices are among the factors that make it difficult for many youngsters. Unfortunately, poor diabetes control places youth at increased risk of developing complications from diabetes later in life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2007

Nancy Found Her Problem and Her Solution
Nancy Found Her Problem and Her Solution

Nancy was totally blindsided when she found out she had diabetes. A 56-year-old lab technician at the time, Nancy was doing some work in the lab. She tested her own A1C and found a reading of 7.3%.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 7, 2007

Ode to a CGM

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 11 months old, and I have struggled for almost 46 years to keep control of it. With diabetes, you never get a break.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Kids Who Stay on the Pump Are Rewarded With Good Control

Kids who discontinue pump therapy become “less adherent” and achieve poorer BG results than kids who remain on the pump, according to Joslin researchers who followed a group of type 1 youth starting the pump between 1998 and 2001.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Pump Therapy at Type 1 Diagnosis May Prolong 'Honeymoon'

Researchers in New York are saying that insulin pump therapy at the time of type 1 diagnosis “provides a positive experience … with excellent clinical outcomes and apparent prolongation of the honeymoon period.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Phone Support Does Not Improve BGs in Type 1 Kids

If your child has diabetes, researchers say that scheduled bimonthly phone support does not improve A1C level, admission rates, diabetes knowledge, psychological function, or self-management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Almost 10% of Poorly Controlled Type 1 Kids Are Depressed

Type 1 children who suffer from depression and come from lower socioeconomic backgrounds tend to have worse blood glucose control. Adding to that, Texas researchers say, “The probability of depression increases as glycemic control worsens. Screening for depression should be routinely carried out in patients with type 1 diabetes, targeting patients with deteriorating glycemic control.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

The Oral Exam: Staying Up-To-Date with Type 2 Medications

It’s not easy to navigate the crowded waters of type 2 oral medications. There are dozens of them, and their names have a lot in common with tongue twisters. They’re hard to pronounce, and harder to remember. But they’re necessary. Of the 20 million Americans with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2. Although some people with diabetes are able to manage their condition through diet and exercise alone, the majority cannot control their blood sugar without medication. According to the CDC, among adults diagnosed with diabetes, 57% take oral medication; 16% take insulin; 12% take both insulin and oral medication; and only 15% take neither insulin nor oral medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Why One Woman Stopped Cooking: The Raw Story
Why One Woman Stopped Cooking: The Raw Story

As a type 1 interested in nature’s ability to heal, I ask, What is causing this so-called diabetes epidemic? Why is it expanding from Western countries to developing countries at the same rate that fast food and junk food are spreading?

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

December 2006

Moderate Weight Loss Good for the Arteries

University of Pittsburgh researchers say that moderate weight loss improves arterial stiffness in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

November 2006

Ten Good Things About Having Diabetes
Ten Good Things About Having Diabetes

The idea for this article came to me one night after attending a diabetes support group at a local hospital. During the meeting, the discussion of serious complications became so graphic that there was an air of melancholy and hopelessness permeating the entire room. I thought, "What we really need is the good news." I tried to imagine whether I would miss any part of having diabetes if I could be cured today.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2006

Why People Quit Exercising
Why People Quit Exercising

Like so many others, Kris Berg, EdD, an exercise physiologist at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, has observed the rapid-fire increase in obesity that has recently been labeled an “epidemic.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2006

October 2006

Are Type 1 Kids Slow to Grow?
Are Type 1 Kids Slow to Grow?

Sudanese researchers have found that conventional therapy of children with type 1 is associated with impaired physical growth and delayed sexual maturation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

Vegan Diet Lowers BGs and Lipids in Type 2s
Vegan Diet Lowers BGs and Lipids in Type 2s

A low-fat vegan diet was found to improve blood glucose and lipid control in type 2 diabetics, according to researchers at George Washington University School of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

Ray Finds the ‘Tools’ to Control His Diabetes
Ray Finds the ‘Tools’ to Control His Diabetes

‘You wouldn’t believe how much I ate. Every night, besides dinner, I ate one of those big poppers full of popcorn with lots of butter and salt on it.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2006

September 2006

Oral Meds Research

Starlix Found to Reduce Liver Fat

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Vitamins & Supplements Research
Vitamins & Supplements Research

CAM Therapy Popular With Diabetics

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Technology Research
Technology Research

Real-Time Pump and CGMS Technology Given the Go-Ahead by the FDA

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Insulin Research
Insulin Research

Levemir Improves BGs and Maintains Weight

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Type 2 Research
Type 2 Research

Reducing Inner Body Fat Is the Key to Metabolic Improvement After Weight Loss

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Types 1 & 2 Research
Types 1 & 2 Research

Women With Diabetes Suffer Worse Neuropathy Symptoms

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2006

In Her Own Words

As I get older, I get more calls from friends and family members telling me about their recent diabetes diagnosis. A little over a year ago, my first cousin Jeannie called to announce her inclusion in the growing type 2 club.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

The DexCom Continuous Sensor
The DexCom Continuous Sensor

DexCom’s real-time continuous sensor—the DexCom STS—burst on the scene in March 2006.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

Sleep Apnea
Sleep Apnea

Ron Mason was a workaholic. He spent six, sometimes seven days a week crafting and installing high-quality cabinets and furniture in and around Santa Cruz, California, where he owned and managed a small, homegrown woodworking business. Mason, who describes his product as “high-end, low-volume,” said that for a number of years, putting in a 70-hour workweek was not atypical—it was merely life as usual.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

August 2006

Me and My Byetta
Me and My Byetta

Byetta, which came on the market last year, was developed to help people with type 2 diabetes who weren’t getting adequate blood glucose control using other drugs. Any associated weight loss was only incidental.

comments 16 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

Type 2 Youth Have More Protein in Urine Than Type 1 Youth

Another red flag about the obesity epidemic in young people has been raised after researchers found that youth with type 2 have significantly higher rates of microalbuminuria (protein in the urine) and high blood pressure than youth with type 1. They say this is the case even though type 2 youth have lower A1Cs and a shorter diabetes duration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

Bariatric Surgery Was the Answer for Annie
Bariatric Surgery Was the Answer for Annie

“I can bend over and paint my own toenails now,” says Annie, who had bariatric surgery on February 5, 2005.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

New LifeScan Software Gets You In ‘Touch’ With Better Diabetes Control
New LifeScan Software Gets You In ‘Touch’ With Better Diabetes Control

As a user of LifeScan glucose meters, I was eager to take a look at their diabetes management software. I installed the software, hooked up the data cable, grabbed my trusty UltraSmart glucose meter and started up the software with a double-click on the OneTouch icon.

comments 8 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

Fifteen Questions and Answers About Oral Medications
Fifteen Questions and Answers About Oral Medications

1. How do these oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) work?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2006

July 2006

Ed and the School of Hard Knocks
Ed and the School of Hard Knocks

For Ed, diabetes wasn’t only a wake-up call—it was an alarm clock.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2006

A ‘Gadget Guy’ Embraces Diabetes
A ‘Gadget Guy’ Embraces Diabetes

David Kliff is the editor of The Diabetic Investor. In 1994 he was diagnosed with type 2.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 1, 2006

June 2006

What Value Do You Place on Your Privacy?
What Value Do You Place on Your Privacy?

If you live in New York City and have diabetes, your right to privacy is gone. A mandatory registry of all diabetics is in effect.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2006

The Ever-Changing Insulin Landscape
The Ever-Changing Insulin Landscape

In 1998, Eli Lilly & Co.’s rapid-acting insulin analogue lispro (Humalog) appeared on the U.S. market, followed in 2000 by Novo Nordisk’s rapid-acting counterpart aspart (NovoLog). Joined now by sanofi-aventis’ glulisine (Apidra), these rapid-acting insulins offer both convenience and improved blood glucose control to people who require bolus insulin.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2006

May 2006

Rachel Is Ready for Her Makeover
Rachel Is Ready for Her Makeover

This month, we hear from Rachel, who will tell us about the process she is going through right now.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

New Long-Acting Insulin Now Available

My life depends entirely on getting little squirts of insulin into my bloodstream on a regular basis. Too little, and high blood glucose hijacks my moods—tired and cranky are the watchwords here. Too much insulin makes my BGs plummet—and shakiness and confusion take over until I eat something containing sugar.

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

Shouting Out About Federal Funding for Medical Research

One good thing about having diabetes—you quickly learn the importance of numbers. And you are about to read some numbers that should bother you as much as a bad A1C.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

Dudley Shoots to Help Kids With Diabetes
Dudley Shoots to Help Kids With Diabetes

When retired NBA center Chris Dudley was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1981, the high school sophomore’s first concern was whether he would be able to continue playing sports.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2006

April 2006

Alan Moses, MD, is the medical director for Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals
Alan Moses, MD, is the medical director for Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals

With the new basal-bolus insulin landscape, what is the most important thing that endocrinologists and primary care physicians need to know so that their insulin-using patients can follow the best possible regimen?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night
The 30-Day Challenge: Oral Meds During the Day, Lantus at Night

Mary is a 64-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for 14 years. She is obese at 220 pounds. Mary has been treated with a sulfonylurea (a medication that stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, such as glypizide and glyburide) for the past 10 years. Her glucose control for the past three or four years has not been good. A recent A1C was 9.5% (normal range is 4% to 6%, with a goal of 7%). Metformin (Glucophage) and rosiglitazone (Avandia) were added to her sulfonylurea. Both her pre-meal and post-meal glucose values improved and her A1C came down to 7.8%. However, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the upper 100 mg/dl to low 200 mg/dl range. She was afraid of “the needle” and did not want to start on insulin. In addition, Mary was recently diagnosed with early diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) and nerve disease (neuropathy).

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

The Case for Insulin and Insulin Pens
The Case for Insulin and Insulin Pens

Several months ago, I met Sophia, a woman in her mid-40s who had been struggling to manage her type 2 diabetes for years. Her blood glucose levels were typically well above 300 mg/dl, and she had an equally high A1C of 12.5%. She made it clear that the last thing she wanted was insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Actos and Lifestyle Changes Made All the Difference
Actos and Lifestyle Changes Made All the Difference

Last fall, Bob was surprised when his primary care doctor called to tell him that his recent blood tests showed that he had type 2 diabetes. The doctor immediately put Bob on 15 milligrams of Actos each day and advised him to stay away from sugar and to come back in three months for more blood work.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Life Before and After Starting Pump Therapy
Life Before and After Starting Pump Therapy

At age 25, Dee was initially diagnosed with gestational diabetes in 1972. After giving birth, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Insulin was started with a daily injection of morning NPH and progressed to twice-daily doses. Dee did not have good control with either regimen.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Specialist vs PCP Care Makes a Difference in A1Cs

Diabetics who visit a diabetes care specialist have better A1Cs than those who visit a primary care physician.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Elevated A1C and C-Reactive Protein—A Bad Combination for Carotid Atherosclerosis
Elevated A1C and C-Reactive Protein—A Bad Combination for Carotid Atherosclerosis

High blood glucose coupled with inflammation is a one-two punch that researchers say is associated with an “advanced early carotid atherosclerosis progression and increased risk of new vascular events in diabetic as well as nondiabetic subjects.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diovan Found to Reduce High Blood Pressure and Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2
Diovan Found to Reduce High Blood Pressure and Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2

Valsartan (Diovan) significantly reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure at dosages of 60 mg/dl and has a “significantly greater effect” in reducing micro- and macroalbuminuria in people with type 2 who have albuminuria.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Adding Amaryl to Insulin Therapy Gets BG Control on the Right Track
Adding Amaryl to Insulin Therapy Gets BG Control on the Right Track

Adding the sulfonylurea glimepiride (Amaryl) to insulin therapy results in “sustained improvement of glycemic control in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes,” according to researchers at the department of endocrinology and metabolism at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Patients Taking High Doses of Insulin May Benefit From the Pump
Patients Taking High Doses of Insulin May Benefit From the Pump

A group of Buffalo, NY, researchers recommend that patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes who take extremely high doses of insulin give the insulin pump a try.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Pump Therapy Called Safe for Toddlers

Pump therapy in preschool children, according to researchers at Texas Children’s Hospital, is “feasible and safe.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Pump Therapy Safe and Effective for Pediatric Patients
Pump Therapy Safe and Effective for Pediatric Patients

Spanish researchers claim that in most studies of small children with diabetes, insulin pump therapy resulted in improved A1Cs and a decreased rate of hypoglycemia without an abnormal increase in body mass index (BMI) and without adversely affecting psychosocial outcomes in young people with type 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

10 Tests a Day Recommended for Pregnant Patients With Diabetes

Dutch researchers say that treatment of diabetes in pregnant women should be aimed at achieving A1C levels within the range of 6% or less. They add that “a minimum of 10 self-monitored blood glucose determinations daily is necessary to obtain adequate information of all daily glucose fluctuations.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Lantus Combined With Oral Meds Can Save Your Patients Money

For people with type 2, Lantus in combination with oral medications can be a cost-equivalent alternative to conventional insulin therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Fatty Liver Disease Called Heart Risk in Type 2s

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is significantly associated with a moderately increased cardiovascular disease risk among type 2s, according to Italian researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Some 'Adherence Aids' Work Better for Your Type 2 Patients

Although people with diabetes use many different approaches to help them adhere to treatment regimens, researchers say that there is little evidence that they are effective. However, in a study they conducted, they found that some “adherence aids” do work and lead to better diabetes control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Levemir, Apidra and Lantus—Oh My! How Do the New Insulin Analogues Affect the Care of Your Patients?

In 1998, Eli Lilly & Co.’s rapid-acting insulin analogue lispro (Humalog) appeared on the U.S. market, followed in 2000 by Novo Nordisk’s rapid-acting counterpart aspart (NovoLog). Joined now by sanofi-aventis’ glulisine (Apidra), these rapid-acting insulins offer both convenience and improved blood glucose control to your patients who require bolus insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Use of Insulin Pumps in Patients With Type 2: An Endocrinologist’s View
Use of Insulin Pumps in Patients With Type 2: An Endocrinologist’s View

Recent developments in the treatment of diabetes mellitus have shown that “tight” control and intensive therapy are necessary to prevent complications, increased morbidity and mortality. We are all familiar with the findings of the DCCT and various UKPDS studies and sub-studies. The importance of these “landmark” studies does not need any further discussion at this time.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diabetic Patients With Kidney Disease Should Be Treated Aggressively From the Get-Go

Italian researchers say that kidney disease is a “significant predictor” of death, and that people who have kidney problems at the time of their diabetes diagnosis should be treated aggressively from the onset.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

The Importance of Changing Ernest
The Importance of Changing Ernest

Ernest had high triglycerides and his blood glucose was rising. He thought he was doing all right, so you can imagine what he thought when I recommended that he increase the amount of fat and protein in his diet and decrease his carbohydrate intake.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Blood Glucose Imbalances and Atkins Induction
Blood Glucose Imbalances and Atkins Induction

As I discussed in the February 2006 issue, the Atkins Nutritional Approach has four phases, ranging from the most restrictive Induction phase to the Lifetime Maintenance phase.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Letters to the Editor

Readers Respond to Insulin Article

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

What Pump Users Should Know About Pramlintide
What Pump Users Should Know About Pramlintide

Pramlintide (Symlin) is a synthetic amylin analogue. First described in 1987, amylin is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by beta cells, which also produce insulin. This hormone is absent in type 1 diabetes and decreased in type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

March 2006

Finding a Friend

Have you ever thought, “No one understands me or my problems”? You felt alone. You felt overwhelmed. You struggled intensely.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2006

Aida Turturro Puts a Hit Out On Her Diabetes

For six seasons, actor Aida Turturro has played the role of Tony Soprano’s sister Janice on the award-winning and critically acclaimed HBO series “The Sopranos.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2006

February 2006

OSS Publishing has released a new and improved version of its WeeklyTrack logbook.
OSS Publishing has released a new and improved version of its WeeklyTrack logbook.

The book, which includes all aspects of self-care for people with diabetes, is for both type 1s and 2s. According to OSS Publishing of White Plains, New York, patients can log their carb intake and A1C test results, chart their weight, keep track of their foot and eye care and more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

Deb’s Story
Deb’s Story

For Deb it was a vicious circle. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 33 years ago at age 20. It was four weeks before her marriage. You can imagine the stress she endured at that time. “I have lived on a diabetes rollercoaster ever since, until about eight months ago,” she says.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

Kris Freeman Skis for Olympic Gold in Italy
Kris Freeman Skis for Olympic Gold in Italy

Kris Freeman, 25, is a three-time national champion and the number one cross-country skier in the United States. In the history of American cross-country skiing, Freeman is the second most successful skier of all time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

And Then There Were Some

Since his type 1 diagnosis 20 years ago, Doug Frazer of Forest Knolls, California, had been using Lente as his basal insulin. His regimen of Humalog at mealtimes coupled with Lente at bedtime provided him with what he considered great control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2006

January 2006

Intensive Control Plus Nicotinamide Improves Control in Newly Diagnosed Type 1s

For people who have been newly diagnosed with type 1, Italian researchers suggest that intensive insulin therapy (ITT) coupled with nicotinamide for two years improves metabolic control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

Byetta Matches Lantus for Type 2 Control

Exenatide (Byetta) and insulin glargine (Lantus) achieve similar improvements in overall blood glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes who were not being controlled sufficiently on oral combination therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

Scott Verplank
Scott Verplank

For Scott Verplank, staying on top of his diabetes with frequent blood glucose testing means staying on top of his game for the Professional Golf Association (PGA) Tour.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

December 2005

Can a Type 2 Drug Improve Type 1 Control?

Japanese researchers say that adolescents and young adults who have poor blood glucose control can add one more weapon to their control arsenal: a type 2 drug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

DiabetesWatch
DiabetesWatch

Most of the products reviewed in this column over the past few months have come from glucose meter and insulin pump manufacturers and independent software companies. This month, we will take a look at an offering from one of the major insulin manufacturers: DiabetesWatch, a Web-based product from Aventis Pharmaceuticals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

Letters to the Editor

Lilly Leaves Us With Fewer and Fewer Options

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

Scott Dunton
Scott Dunton

Scott Dunton, 20, is a world-class professional surfer, currently ranked 220th in his first year on the professional circuit.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2005

November 2005

Letters to the Editor

Readers Respond to Scott’s September Column

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

Ready for a Makeover
Ready for a Makeover

At the August 2005 American Association of Diabetes Educators Conference in Washington, D.C., BD Diabetes Care announced the results of its D.C. Diabetes Makeover.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

‘Ala-Ala’-Lujah!

Diabetes researchers from Columbia University, the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) and the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases studied the effects of Ala-Ala—a humanized Fc-mutated anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody—on the progression of type 1 diabetes in patients with recent-onset disease. The study was a follow-up to an article by a team that included UCSF’s Jeffrey Bluestone, MD, and Columbia University’s Kevan Herold, MD, that appeared in the May 30, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

Lantus a Suitable Option for Type 1 Tykes

“The use of flexible multiple daily insulin [FMDI] therapy with glargine [Lantus] among preschool-aged children with type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated with improved overall glycemic control and decreased frequency of severe hypoglycemia.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

October 2005

Letters to the Editor

August Was a Good Read From Cover to Cover

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Free Software Works With Meter and Pump
Free Software Works With Meter and Pump

This month, we take a look at the Medtronic CareLink Therapy Management System for Diabetes. This is an online diabetes management program from the folks who make the Medtronic MiniMed insulin pumps.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Baby on Board
Baby on Board

I have some exciting news: As of January 2006, there will be another human being in our household.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Cross Takes Diabetes to New Heights
Cross Takes Diabetes to New Heights

Will Cross has taken diabetes to new heights—literally. The Pittsburgh-based expeditioner and former high school principal became the first person with diabetes to reach the South Summit of Mount Everest, with a successful summit on May 31.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Less Is More
Less Is More

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) effectively raised the bar on diabetes control by lowering the level of the A1C standard.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Be Good to Your Teeth—and Your BGs
Be Good to Your Teeth—and Your BGs

Improving the health of your teeth and gums can also improve your diabetes control, according to Turkish researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Inhaled Insulin Improves Control in Type 2s
Inhaled Insulin Improves Control in Type 2s

For people with type 2 diabetes, inhaled insulin may be an effective therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Considering an Insulin Pump for a Young Child?
Considering an Insulin Pump for a Young Child?

There’s no argument that an insulin pump is the best choice for diabetes management for a very young child. Many articles have appeared in the past five years that support this opinion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

Soy-Based Meal Plans Improve a Host of Factors in Type 2s

According to a recent study, soy-based meal replacement plans (MRs) yield greater weight loss and better blood glucose control than American Diabetes Association-recommended individualized diet plans (IDPs).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2005

How to Deal With the ‘Diabetes Police’
How to Deal With the ‘Diabetes Police’

There here, they’re there, they’re everywhere! It’s the Diabetes Police—your family, friends and others who criticize your diabetes behaviors. They disapprove of your food choices, point out your weight gain, accuse you of skipping your medication and nag you to exercise more. These well-meaning individuals care about you, but they make life with diabetes more difficult and can create tension in a relationship. Here are some examples of ways that the Diabetes Police operate in our lives:

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2005

September 2005

Time for a Dialogue

I lean heavily on the feedback I receive from all of you because it helps me to shape the direction of this magazine. Many times, readers alert me to debates about hot topics taking place in the diabetes community, and other times I like to start discussions myself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff
Conference Gives Researchers the Opportunity to Strut Their Stuff

Diabetes professionals from all over the world descended on San Diego, California, this past June for the 65th Annual American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions. Some brought with them the latest drugs, meters, pumps and software. Others came armed with research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Levemir’s Approval Means One More Long-Acting Insulin Option for Diabetics
Levemir’s Approval Means One More Long-Acting Insulin Option for Diabetics

On June 17, 2005, Novo Nordisk received word from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that their long-acting insulin analog, Levemir (insulin detemir), had received approval. Levemir will join Lantus (insulin glargine) as a basal insulin option for people with diabetes who take insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Avandia May Benefit Overweight Type 1s
Avandia May Benefit Overweight Type 1s

Overweight type 1s may improve their blood glucose control without increasing their insulin dosage by supplementing their control regimen with the type 2 insulin-sensitizing drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), say Dallas, Texas, researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Overweight Type 1s More Susceptible to Complications Than Normal-Weight Type 1s

Diabetes duration and A1C remain the gold standard for determining whether you may develop retinopathy and neuropathy. However, if you are a type 1 with a weight problem, you may not be slowing down the progression to these microvascular complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Actos May Improve Heart Safety in Type 2s

Actos, an insulin sensitizer in the glitazone class of type 2 oral diabetes medications, was found to reduce carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) as well as insulin resistance in a German study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Low-Carb Improvements

By following a low-carbohydrate diet for two weeks, obese patients were able to reduce calorie intake, lose weight and improve their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

Studies Demonstrate Benefits of Pumping
Studies Demonstrate Benefits of Pumping

Type 1 Kids Do Well on Pumps

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2005

August 2005

Keeping Well With Diabetes
Keeping Well With Diabetes

Most of the products reviewed in this column over the past few months have come from glucose meter and insulin pump manufacturers and from independent software companies. This month, we will take a look at an offering from one of the major insulin manufacturers: Keeping Well With Diabetes, a Web-based product from Novo Nordisk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

Physicians Are Slow to Step Up Treatment for Type 2s With High A1Cs
Physicians Are Slow to Step Up Treatment for Type 2s With High A1Cs

A recent Canadian study examined administrative records of diabetic patients to see if specialists or primary care physicians gave them better care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

The Gifts of Experience
The Gifts of Experience

There is no doubt that living with type 1 diabetes is a fulltime job. But like any job, the more knowledgeable and skilled you become, the better your chances of success.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

Ironman Jay Hewitt
Ironman Jay Hewitt

He trains about 22 hours during the average week—not counting the additional seven hours of workouts on weekends. Through his twice-daily workouts, he totals nearly 120 miles of bicycling, about 10 miles of swimming and between 50 to 100 miles of running each week. For Ironman triathlete Jay Hewitt, training and diabetes have something in common: Working at them every day is critical to achieve his goals.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2005

July 2005

More Feedback on Scott's Regimen

This is another letter in response to Scott King’s column that ran in the February 2005 issue (“Random Shots”).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

Stress Management for People With Diabetes
Stress Management for People With Diabetes

Stress, anxiety, burnout—whatever you choose to call it, it’s clear that Americans have it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

The Diabetes Awareness Message

We are all accustomed to seeing nice, safe, uplifting public service advertising about diabetes on television, featuring cute kids, compassionate parents and diabetes fighters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

FDA Approves Symlin
FDA Approves Symlin

On March 16, 2005, Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., of San Diego, California, announced it had received FDA approval for Symlin (pramlintide acetate) injections to be used in conjunction with insulin to treat diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

Tip for Type 1s: Consider Lantus

Type 1s who switch from NPH to Lantus (insulin glargine) in multiple daily injection (MDI) regimens significantly reduce severe hypoglycemic episodes without significant weight gain.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2005

Basal Bolus Dosing

When insulin first became available in 1922, the treatment goal in diabetes management was to minimize ketoacidosis and high blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

The GlycoMark Test Option
The GlycoMark Test Option

If you want to know how well you are controlling your diabetes, you have had only two options. You can check your current blood glucose level with a meter, or you can check your average over the past two or three months with an A1C test. Now there’s a third and quite promising option—the GlycoMark test.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2005

May 2005

Lights, Camera, Action . . . . . . dLife!

• A grandmother in Tampa, Florida, who knocked her A1C down two percentage points
• A female bodybuilder on an insulin pump
• A 12-year-old who estimates that he has tested his blood glucose more than 100,000 times in the past three years

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

Help! I Love My Pump, but I Hate the Weight I’ve Gained!

Improved glucose control helps you metabolize food more efficiently. Prior to pump use, you may have lost glucose in the urine. If so, those were calories you did not have available to maintain a normal weight. Was your A1C higher before pump therapy? If your A1C has improved, then you are using the nutrients in your food and losing less of them.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

Letters to the Editor

A1C Author Did Not Prepare or Endorse A1C Chart

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

Are You a Candidate for an Insulin Pump?
Are You a Candidate for an Insulin Pump?

The following is excerpted and adapted from the book “Taking Control of Your Diabetes,” by Steven Edelman, MD, and friends, 2001.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

Insulin and Blood Glucose Control

Although most adults with insulin-treated diabetes usually follow their prescribed insulin regimen, experiencing A1Cs higher than 7% suggests that an individual’s insulin use, regimen or both are inadequate to achieve optimal blood glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2005

April 2005

Insulin Calculating
Insulin Calculating

“Errors in calculation of insulin dosage by adolescents occur frequently,” write U.C. Davis researchers in a recent study. “Consistent use of an insulin dosage calculation device may help to improve metabolic control in adolescents using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps (CSII).”

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

Gastric Bypass Surgery
Gastric Bypass Surgery

People with type 2 and obesity who are considering gastric bypass surgery first need to learn what exactly is a gastric bypass operation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

For Your Eyes Only
For Your Eyes Only

I am devoting this month’s column to the most important sight-saving information that you should know as a person living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2005

March 2005

A Pill for Everything

A while back, a friend of mine who is very overweight went to see his doctor and was found to have an A1C of over 9%. He also had high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels and arthritic knees.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 1, 2005

What Is A1C  And What Does It Measure?
What Is A1C And What Does It Measure?

In the simplest terms, hemoglobin A1C (known as HbA1c or A1C) is measured in people with diabetes to provide an index of average blood glucose for the previous three to four months.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Asian Ginseng and American Ginseng
Asian Ginseng and American Ginseng

Ginseng is a root that has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries. There are two different forms that have been used for diabetes: Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) as well as American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Video Game Improves One Teen’s Diabetes
Video Game Improves One Teen’s Diabetes

It’s pretty much a truism that video games are bad for children’s health. They hold their minds hostage, promote sedentary behavior and can even desensitize them to violence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Low-Carb Lifestyle’s Effect on Diabetes Control
Low-Carb Lifestyle’s Effect on Diabetes Control

Caution: Consult your diabetes care team before starting a lower-carbohydrate meal plan. Diabetes medications such as insulin or oral drugs that stimulate insulin production (sulfonylureas or meglitinides) will need adjustment to prevent hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when carbohydrate intake is decreased. In addition, blood glucose levels need to be checked more often.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

Is Dieting Bad for You?
Is Dieting Bad for You?

Last year, Stacey Martin, a 41-year-old real estate agent from East Hampton, New York, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. At 270 pounds, the medical community considered her “morbidly obese.”

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2005

February 2005

Great Expectations
Great Expectations

Not even 20 years ago, it was uncommon for a woman with diabetes to choose to have children of her own. Many doctors discouraged attempting pregnancy based on the high incidence of complications that both a mother and an infant could suffer due to poor blood glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

Letters to the Editor

Reader Asks About Long-Term Safety Data

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

Walnuts Improve Lipid Values in Type 2s
Walnuts Improve Lipid Values in Type 2s

Taken with a low- or modified-fat diet, Australian researchers say that 30 grams of walnuts per day improve the lipid profile of patients with type 2.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

Soybean-Derived Pinitol Improves a Host of Problems in Type 2s
Soybean-Derived Pinitol Improves a Host of Problems in Type 2s

Pinitol, isolated from soybeans, may be beneficial in reducing cardiovascular risk in type 2s, according to Korean researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

OneTouch Diabetes Management Software
OneTouch Diabetes Management Software

As a user of LifeScan glucose meters, I was eager to take a look at their diabetes management software.

comments 20 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

Hypoglycemia Risks in Type 1 Children Still a Major Problem

Although severe hypoglycemia is a definite problem for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, newer therapies may improve control without increasing the risk of severe hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

January 2005

Dan Stephens Tackles Success
Dan Stephens Tackles Success

Dan Stephens has mastered his game. The University of Pittsburgh football player is a star on and off the field as he steps up to the challenges he loves: balancing athletics, academics—and diabetes control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

The Biggest Diabetes Busts of All Time
The Biggest Diabetes Busts of All Time

It seemed that every time we gave something a try and it didn’t quite work out, Mom and Dad always had a cliché at the ready to cushion the blow.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

Baseline A1C Level Is the Key
Baseline A1C Level Is the Key

In people with higher A1Cs, rapid-acting insulin analogs NovoLog (insulin aspart) and Humalog (insulin lispro) are more effective in achieving optimal blood glucose control when administered with insulin pumps rather than via multiple daily insulin injections (MDII), according to University of Toronto researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

On the Horizon

Exenatide (synthetic exendin-4) significantly reduced A1C in patients with type 2 diabetes who were failing maximum doses of a sulfonylurea, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and the Veterans Medical Center at the University of California San Diego. Exenatide was well tolerated and associated with weight loss.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

Fenugreek
Fenugreek

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is a plant product that has been used for a variety of medicinal and other purposes, and may be used in the treatment of diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

The Congressional Diabetes Caucus
The Congressional Diabetes Caucus

Representative George R. Nethercutt, Jr. (RWash.), formed the Congressional Diabetes Caucus in 1996 with only 22 supporters.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

Bob Guezuraga is the president of Medtronic MiniMed
Bob Guezuraga is the president of Medtronic MiniMed

What are the biggest challenges facing the insulin pump market today?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2005

December 2004

Letters to the Editor

My Two Cents on Hospital Stay Feature

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Apidra - The Newest Rapid-Acting Insulin

In combination with intermediate-acting NPH insulin, twice-daily injections of Apidra (insulin glulisine)—a rapid-acting insulin analog— can provide small improvements in blood-glucose control compared with Regular human insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

How often should I check my blood glucose?
How often should I check my blood glucose?

Check with your doctor or diabetes educator for a recommendation about how often and what times a day are best for you to check blood glucose levels. In general, the more often you check, the better. Most diabetes specialists recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes who are on oral agents check their blood glucose one or two times per day, often varying the times between the morning, before supper and two hours after a meal. Patients who inject insulin may need to test four or more times per day. Checking your blood glucose provides information about how well the treatment of your diabetes is working, as well as about how things you do during the day affect your blood glucose levels. Paying attention to the results can help you learn how to keep your diabetes under control. I take pills for my diabetes, while my friend uses insulin to treat her type 2 diabetes. Is her diabetes “worse” than mine?

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Inhaled Insulin

Inhaled insulin offers the same blood glucose control as conventional subcutaneous insulin for people with type 2 diabetes that was previously managed with at least two insulin injections a day. It’s also as effective and is well tolerated and safe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

NHL’s Boynton Scores on Diabetes Control
NHL’s Boynton Scores on Diabetes Control

Hockey players often joke about the rugged nature of their sport by touting the popular mantra, “Give blood, play hockey.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

Developing a Diabetes Warranty Program
Developing a Diabetes Warranty Program

One of the most powerful and simple methods to take control of your diabetes is to follow a “diabetes warranty program.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2004

November 2004

A Foot Owner's Care Guide

Foot disorders are the number one reason that people with diabetes spend time in the hospital.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2004

Cinnamon
Cinnamon

There is growing interest recently in the potential benefits of using cinnamon for treating diabetes.

comments 30 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2004

October 2004

What Are the Keys to Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease?

Annual screening for microalbuminuria (low levels of protein in the urine, indicating early signs of kidney disease) in type 1 diabetes should begin with puberty and/or after five-year disease duration of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

Smoking Increases Diabetes Risks

Swedish researchers say that smoking is associated with both poor blood glucose control and microalbuminuria (protein in the urine) that indicates early kidney disease and increased heart disease risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

What Are the Keys to Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease?

Annual screening for microalbuminuria (low levels of protein in the urine, indicating early signs of kidney disease) in type 1 diabetes should begin with puberty and/or after five-year disease duration of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

Smoking Increases Diabetes Risks

Swedish researchers say that smoking is associated with both poor blood glucose control and microalbuminuria (protein in the urine) that indicates early kidney disease and increased heart disease risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2004

September 2004

Summaries of studies presented at the June 2004 ADA Scientific Sessions
Summaries of studies presented at the June 2004 ADA Scientific Sessions

The following are summaries of studies presented at the June 2004 ADA Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2004

Supplement of the Month
Supplement of the Month

As part of our Food for Thought section, we will begin profiling a nutritional supplement every month.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2004

You’re Never Too Old for Resistance Training

If you are type 2, elderly and have peripheral neuropathy, resistance training may be just what you need to improve your health, say Kentucky researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2004

August 2004

Heart-Smart Supplements

Diachrome, a patented combination of chromium picolinate and biotin, significantly lowers coronary risk factors in type 2s. According to a small study presented at an American Heart Association meeting, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB), held in May in San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

July 2004

Timing Is Everything

A Spanish study found that in type 1s, pre-breakfast and pre-dinner blood glucose levels have more influence on A1C levels than at other times of the day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

All Systems Operational

Gastroparesis is a form of neuropathy that causes damage to the autonomic nervous system, which regulates the normal automatic functioning of the stomach. This difficult-to-treat complication of diabetes results in the incomplete or delayed digestion of food, leading to nausea, vomiting and bloating, and makes blood glucose levels unpredictable and difficult to control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

Dick Clark America’s Oldest Teenager…and Diabetes Educator?
Dick Clark America’s Oldest Teenager…and Diabetes Educator?

Dick Clark has had diabetes for at least 11 years—but he only made it public this past spring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

Hypoglycemia: Don't Let It Be a Barrier to Diabetes Control

It’s always a case of Murphy’s Law for me. Whenever I am without my glucose tabs or other quick-acting carbohydrate , I seem to have a low blood glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Type 2 Diabetes and Simvastatin

A South Carolina study indicates that simvastatin (Zocor), an oral “statin” lipid-lowering drug is a potentially beneficial treatment for the inflammatory reaction associated with atherosclerosis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Continuity of Care Improves Outcome Quality

If you want the best quality care for your type 2 diabetes, see the same physician at each visit to your diabetes outpatient clinic (DOC), especially if that physician specializes in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Why ACE Inhibitors Are Necessary for All Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated that ACE inhibitors such as Vasotec, Altace and lisinopril are the antihypertensive drugs of choice in all patients with diabetes and high blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

May 2004

A Good Argument for Free Test Strips?

If you provide them they will test…

comments 15 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

Why You Should Consider an Insulin Pump

The number of people opting for insulin pump therapy grows. Worldwide, the number is approximately 300,000.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

A Whiff of Success

A 12-week Scandinavian comparison study involving 107 nonsmoking patients with type 2 diabetes concluded that inhaled insulin administered via the AERx system achieved the same blood glucose control as insulin injected into the skin.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

April 2004

Finally! A Guide For BG Tesing in Type 2s!

One of the largest physician organizations in the country has developed a new guide for self-testing of blood glucose levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Action About A1Cs

When your last A1C registered at more than 7 percent, did your primary care physician take action to lower it?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Case Management Improves Blood Glucose Control for Low-Income Minorities

“Diabetes case management can help reduce disparities in diabetes health status among low-income ethnic populations,” writes Lois Jovanovic, MD, endocrinologist and researcher at Sansum Medical Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

A Chat With Robert Guillaume

Robert Guillaume is best known for his work in television, where he earned two Emmy Awards and four NAACP Image Awards for his role as Benson DuBois on “Soap” and “Benson.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Lantus Stands Out in Study

Nighttime relief is on the way.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

March 2004

CGMS Recognizes Ups and Downs in Kids' Control

Medtronic MiniMed’s Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) improved kids' control by providing them with accurate data—for adjustment of insulin treatments—and by promoting better communication and motivation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Study Attempts to Create New Beta Cells

Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals is sponsoring a new study on the safety and efficacy of INGAP-peptide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Glyburide/Metformin Combination Tablet Delivers Surprising Results

Who would have guessed that taking two diabetes drugs combined in one tablet would offer greater glucose-lowering benefits than taking the same two drugs in separate but still co-administered tablets?

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

Low-Carb Guru Weighs In On Controversy

I struggle to understand why you are publishing information recommending low-or no-carb meals for people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2004

February 2004

Lose 97 Pounds and Control Your Type 2 Diabetes

Have you had type 2 diabetes for less than five years? Do you want to lose approximately 30 percent of your body weight?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

Golden Anniversaries

In the United Kingdom, the national organization Diabetes UK awards medals to individuals who have lived with type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

January 2004

Polishing the Gold Standard

The landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that the risk of complications such as eye disease, kidney disease and nerve damage in people with type 1 diabetes is closely related to blood glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

Get Pumped

Who is a “typical” pumper? To find the answer, we went to insulin-pumpers.org, the not-for-profit Web-based Insulin Pumpers Organization (IP) of Milpitas, California. In the “About Insulin Pumpers” section of this Web site, executive director Michael Robinton has collected and compiled data from the more than 4,000 members who choose to fill out a survey.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

In 1978, after prolonged hospitalization, my father died from consequences of diabetes associated with abnormal lipids and high blood pressure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2004

May 2003

Setting Sail

John Dennis, 58, says that self-monitoring to control his type 2 diabetes comes naturally because he is used to "going it alone." After all, taking care of himself is as much a solo responsibility these days as sailing his 50-foot boat around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Does Diabetes Affect Your Child’s Grades?

A University of Iowa study indicates that socioeconomic status and behavioral problems are more likely than poor metabolic control to affect grades in children with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Setting Sail with John Dennis

John Dennis, 58, says that self-monitoring to control his type 2 diabetes comes naturally because he is used to "going it alone." After all, taking care of himself is as much a solo responsibility these days as sailing his 50-foot boat around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Letters to the Editor

Thanks for the Type 1.5 Article. I just received my February 2003 issue of Diabetes Health and was pleased and excited to read the article "What's Your Type? Diabetes Isn't Always Easy to Classify" (p. 40).

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

April 2003

Get Pumped

Linda McNeely, a retired registered nurse, remembers her first insulin pump.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Humalog Before Lunch Provides Later Benefits

A recent study by French researchers demonstrated that taking an injection of Humalog (insulin lispro) before lunch can lower dinnertime blood-glucose levels in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Boys in particular also saw improved overall blood-glucose control after adding the lunchtime Humalog.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

Letters to the Editor

Piercing Thoughts

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

March 2003

Letters to the Editor

In Defense of Non-Western Medicine. I was disappointed with Ron Zacker's editorial in the December 2002 issue ("Keep Your Eyes on the Prize," p. 46). It seemed that Zacker lost sight of the prize with his statement, "Too much information and too many options can distract us from what's really important."

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

Sailing on Smooth Waters

I can't wait to see what my next A1C will be! My last one was 7.3%, with my blood glucose up, down and all around. I was low, I was high, and just way out of control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

Now No Prescription Needed

The A1cNow monitor, which can provide an at-home A1C test, is now available for sale without a prescription.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2003

February 2003

Whats Your Type?

Q: I was wondering whether you could have someone discuss "type 1.5."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Meters, Meters Everywhere

Reasons for choosing a particular blood-glucose meter are as varied as the users. Some users want it simple, some want all the bells and whistles and many want something in between—as long as the meter and strips are affordable and accurate. Not to mention fast!

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Diabetes Care Varies Among States

If you are a Medicare recipient with diabetes and you live in New England, the upper Midwest or the Pacific Northwest, you're more likely to get A1C tests and eye exams than people in other parts of the country. For lipid testing, however, you'd be better off living in the mid-Atlantic states or some Southern coastal states. Those who live in the Ohio Valley, the lower Mississippi Valley or the Southwest are least likely to have their A1C levels measured and eyes examined. Lipid testing was least likely to occur in the Rocky Mountain states and parts of the lower Mississippi Valley.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

C-Reactive Protein Is a Better Predictor of Heart Problems Than Cholesterol

Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a protein produced by the liver that is present only during episodes of inflammation, better predict the risk of having a cardiovascular event than levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Self-Testing Improves A1C Levels

People with type 2 diabetes who do not take insulin saw their A1C levels improve after testing their blood glucose, keeping a diary of their results and their eating habits and receiving counseling on self-testing, say researchers in Germany and Austria. Control subjects were given counseling on diet and lifestyle only.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Planned Care Enhances Quality of Both Diabetes Care and Control

When a "planned care" system of healthcare delivery was instituted in three primary-care practices in Wisconsin and Minnesota, it resulted in better care by physicians and in better diabetes control for their patients, according to researchers from the Mayo Health System Diabetes Translation Project.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Planned Care Enhances Quality of Both Diabetes Care and Control

When a "planned care" system of healthcare delivery was instituted in three primary-care practices in Wisconsin and Minnesota, it resulted in better care by physicians and in better diabetes control for their patients, according to researchers from the Mayo Health System Diabetes Translation Project.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

The Dating Game: How to Bring Your Diabetes Along Without Making it a Third Wheel

You're out on a date. Things are going smoothly, and you are surprisingly at ease. Is it time to introduce your diabetes, or should you keep it hidden?

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Whats Your Type?

Q: I was wondering whether you could have someone discuss "type 1.5." I am especially interested in how diabetes "type" and C-peptide numbers are related. I was 28 when I first started having symptoms of diabetes (thirst, weight loss, fatigue). Two years later, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. After a year or two, some confusion arose about what type of diabetes I had. (I needed a rather low total daily insulin dose of 25 units for my weight of 140.) A C-peptide test was run. My blood sugars were kind of high at the time, and the C-peptide came back as 0.2. The doctor told me I was definitely type 1. I am still requiring rather low doses of insulin (a daily total of 30 units for a weight of 170).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

January 2003

Glucose Sensor Reveals Glucose Patterns Around the Clock

If you test your blood glucose regularly, you probably think you have a pretty good idea of how high or low your numbers rise and fall during a typical day and night. However, what if you had 288 blood-glucose readings every 24 hours, instead of only a handful?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Medications Help Control Lipid Levels and High Blood Pressure

A campaign aimed at educating people with diabetes about their increased risk of heart disease and stroke is called "Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes"—in other words, control your A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Triple Therapy for Type 2 Approved

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new indication for Glucovance (glyburide and metformin tablets), allowing the type 2 diabetes medication to be taken in combination with thiazolidinediones (TZDs) when adequate control is not achieved with diet and exercise.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Researchers Mull Criteria for Diagnosing Pre-Diabetes

Measuring body mass index and setting cutoff values for fasting glucose levels and A1Cs may be enough to determine whether an individual has pre-diabetes without having to administer an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), say researchers in Maryland—including one at the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

The Renal/Retinal Link

Renal (kidney) function declines more rapidly in people with type 2 diabetes who have both retinopathy and proteinuria (protein in the urine).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

ARB Drug Controls Blood Pressure and Protects Kidneys

Irbesartan (Avapro), an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), reduces 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as albumin excretion rate (AER) in people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Gone To Guam

I have just had the best trip of my entire life! It all started when Carl Butler asked me to be a keynote speaker at a diabetes conference he was organizing. The first surprise was the location—Carl lives in Guam and is part of a group of wonderful, dedicated individuals who planned this educational conference for Guam and its surrounding islands.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

December 2002

Questions and Answers

Is BMI the Gold Standard?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Urinary Tract Infections

Postmenopausal women who have diabetes and take oral diabetes medications or insulin are more likely to have acute, symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) than women who don't have diabetes, women who manage their diabetes by lifestyle changes—or even women with untreated diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

A1C Levels Improve When a Stomach Bacteria Is Eliminated

Elimination of infection by the gastric organism Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in people with type 1 diabetes might be associated with better control of blood glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Prandin Versus Glucophage

When combined with NPH insulin taken at bedtime, Glucophage (metformin) provides slightly better glucose control with less weight gain and improved satisfaction with diabetes treatment than Prandin (repaglinide) plus NPH, say researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Unsafe at Any Level

At our house, we have avoided trans fats since 1993. This was the year Diabetes Health first printed a report about the dangers of eating margarine, which is often made from hydrogenated oil. Our 1993 article cited a study done in 1974, which indicates that scientists have been aware of the hazards of trans fats for quite some time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

You Can Go Home Again

You know the routine: Go to the lab, have somebody stick a needle the size of a telephone pole in your arm and draw up a test tube full of blood. Then you wait for the doctor to tell you how your average blood-glucose levels have been over the past three months or so.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

"Perfect" Comments

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Urinary Tract Infections: Postmenopausal Women Who Take Diabetes Medications are at Greater Risk

Postmenopausal women who have diabetes and take oral diabetes medications or insulin are more likely to have acute, symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) than women who don't have diabetes, women who manage their diabetes by lifestyle changes - or even women with untreated diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Prandin Versus Glucophage

When combined with NPH insulin taken at bedtime, Glucophage (metformin) provides slightly better glucose control with less weight gain and improved satisfaction with diabetes treatment than Prandin (repaglinide) plus NPH, say researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

You Can Go Home Again: Testing A1Cs Now an Option Outside the Lab

You know the routine: Go to the lab, have somebody stick a needle the size of a telephone pole in your arm and draw up a test tube full of blood. Then you wait for the doctor to tell you how your average blood glucose levels have been over the past three months or so.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Toeing the Line or Taking a Holiday?

Guilty pleasures are certainly in abundance between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. However, if you are a person with diabetes, too much guilty pleasure may make your A1C resemble something less pleasant than a picture print by Currier and Ives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Habla Español?

"Si Tiene Diabetes, Cuide Su Corazón" (If you have diabetes, take care of your heart) is a campaign launched in late July 2002 by the U.S. National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to call attention to the fact that Hispanic and Latino Americans with diabetes are at higher risk for heart disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Weighing the Evidence

A shift in fat distribution from visceral (the internal abdominal area) to subcutaneous (under the skin) could be the reason the insulin sensitizer Actos (pioglitazone) helps to lower blood-glucose levels in people with insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

It’s No Secret

Untreated celiac disease in children can stunt growth and cause lower A1Cs. However, researchers conducting a longitudinal study of children with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease say that following a gluten-free diet can restore normal growth and contribute to even lower A1Cs—and might also mitigate the blood-glucose deterioration commonly present during puberty.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Weighing the Evidence: Blood Glucose Levels Decrease with Insulin Sensitizer Despite Weight Increase

A shift in fat distribution from visceral (the internal abdominal area) to subcutaneous (under the skin) could be the reason the insulin sensitizer Actos (pioglitazone) helps to lower blood glucose levels in people with insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Toeing the Line - or Taking a Holiday? Readers Discuss Their Eating Habits During the Holiday Season

Guilty pleasures are certainly in abundance between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. However, if you are a person with diabetes, too much guilty pleasure may make your A1C resemble something less pleasant than a picture print by Currier and Ives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

No Surprise—Cost of Strips Limits Testing

Researchers in Canada studying barriers to self-monitoring of blood glucose discovered that—surprise!—people who were given free strips tested more often than those who had to pay for them. An added benefit of more frequent testing was better blood-glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

‘Health Literacy’ Linked to Diabetes Complications

Researchers are discussing yet another risk factor for diabetes-related complications: health literacy, defined as the measure of a person's "ability to read, comprehend and act on medical instructions."

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Animal or Vegetable?

Should you skip eating animal protein in favor of vegetable protein if you have type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria (a sign of kidney disease)?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

September 2002

Perfect Control

Vicki Abbott, a 65-year-old medical transcriptionist from Portland, Oregon, has taken the idea of tight diabetes control to heart. She adheres to a control regimen that is almost militaristic in its method, and her goal is perfect blood glucose.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Plug It In!

Imagine being able to pop a blood-glucose testing device into your personal digital assistant (PDA), put blood on the strip and store the results in the PDA. Now you can do just that, thanks to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of two such devices in mid-June 2002.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

What Can You Do to Prevent Kidney Disease?

1) Control Your Blood Pressure

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

When Should You Test?

Researchers in Spain who wrote a letter to Diabetes Care report studies showing that pre-meal blood-glucose averages better predict A1Cs in people with type 1 diabetes than after-meal readings do. But they add that if after-meal blood-glucose averages are more predictive of heart disease, as some studies suggest, it could mean that A1C results do not accurately reflect the harmful effects of high blood-glucose levels on diabetes-related cardiovascular complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Lantus Reduces Nighttime Lows in Pregnant Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

A 37-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes who was pregnant with her second child was able to eliminate frequent severe hypoglycemic episodes after being switched from NPH insulin to Lantus (insulin glargine), report two doctors and a nurse practitioner in a letter to Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Hearty Advice

People who have a heart attack but have not been previously diagnosed with diabetes should be checked for pre-diabetes—formerly called impaired glucose tolerance—or even diabetes itself.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Letters to the Editor

Reaction to Type 2 Feature

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Nobady's Perfect

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

When Should You Test?

Researchers in Spain who wrote a letter to Diabetes Care report studies showing that pre-meal blood glucose averages better predict A1Cs in people with type 1 diabetes than after-meal readings do. But they add that if after-meal blood glucose averages are more predictive of heart disease, as some studies suggest, it could mean that A1C results do not accurately reflect the harmful effects of high blood-glucose levels on diabetes-related cardiovascular complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

August 2002

A Research Extravaganza

Once again, Diabetes Health has read through more than 2,500 abstracts of research presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual Scientific Sessions and selected a few of the more interesting ones to pass along to you as part of our annual "Research Extravaganza" feature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Making the Grade

On June 3, 2002, Metrika, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, announced that its disposable A1cNow diabetes monitor, which can provide an A1C test result in a doctor's office or a patient's home, has obtained certification from the National Glyco-hemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP).

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Would You Like Your Insulin Pump on the Inside or the Outside?

An implantable insulin pump may provide better blood-glucose control and help lower A1Cs, say researchers who compared the control provided by continuous peritoneal insulin infusion from an implantable pump to that offered by continuous subcutaneous infusion using a standard (external) insulin pump.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Study Shows Women With Diabetes More Likely to Experience Sexual Problems

The topic of sexual problems among women with diabetes has been highly underreported, says Lois Jovanovic, MD, from the Sansum Medical Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California. While nearly 2,000 studies addressing sexual dysfunction among men with diabetes have been published in the past five years, Jovanovic observes that a "paltry" 13 articles about sexual dysfunction among women with diabetes appeared during that same period.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Morning Highs

If you have type 2 diabetes and don't take insulin, it's possible your mid-morning blood-glucose levels are high.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Get Pumped!

Both short-term and long-term quality of life are improved in people with type 1 diabetes who use an insulin pump.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

July 2002