See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Insulin Pump Archives

Insulin Pump Article Archives

February 2014

Pump Problems? Here Are Some Helpful Pointers

If you use an insulin pump, every now and then you may experience the unfortunate event of watching it send you the message, "No Delivery." You're no longer receiving insulin from your pump.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 13, 2014

October 2013

Please, Sir, May I Have Some More?

One might think that Tom Grossman had exhausted his need for physical challenges after participating in the Run Across America-a grueling 15-day test of endurance with runs that covered more than 25 miles a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2013

July 2013

NFL Player Reaches Out to Inspire, Empower Young Type 1

Despite living with type 1 diabetes, fourth grader Joey Balistrieri wanted nothing more than to play football. But it would require advice from a professional player, Houston Texan tight end Jake Byrne, to convince Joey's mom to let her son take the field.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2013

May 2013

The Holly Hopwood Insulin Pump Challenge

One of the surest ways to imprint a product on consumers' minds is to put it through an impressive test to show its ruggedness.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 9, 2013

April 2013

Quick and Easy Does It With New Web-Based App

Now people with diabetes can display data from their insulin pumps and supported blood glucose maters thanks to the t:connect diabetes management application from Tandem Diabetes that received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in February.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2013

November 2012

TSA Full-Body Scans Can Cause Insulin Pump, CGM Malfunctions

A report in the October 2012 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics says that airport full-body scans can cause malfunctions in insulin pumps or continuous glucose monitors.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

September 2012

Needle-Free CGM Could Be Available in 2013

Philadelphia-based Echo Therapeutics plans to introduce a needle-free continuous glucose monitoring system to the US market in 2013, pending FDA approval. The Symphony® tCGM is a two-part device that monitors blood glucose by taking readings through a user’s skin rather than via finger pricks. It is intended for use by anyone with diabetes, not just insulin pump users.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2012

August 2012

Country Star Looks Up to Children With Diabetes

Country music star George Canyon recently teamed up with Animas to do a five-day, five-city tour across Canada to reach out to people with type 1 diabetes. The "George Canyon and Friends Diabetes Heroes Tour" started on May 14 in St. John's, Newfoundland, and ended on May 18 in Prince George, British Columbia, 3,000 miles west.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2012

July 2012

My Pump Almost Killed Me... Twice

One of the greatest technological advancements in diabetes care has been the insulin pump.  For one, it gives you the illusion of being "normal" because you no longer have to inject insulin throughout the day. Instead, you "bolus" by pushing a button on the pump itself or using a remote control. It allows better glucose management because you can adjust your basal rate (the "background" insulin dose) by increments of one thousandth of a unit every hour.  Especially when you're moving from the peaks and valleys of NPH or the restraints and hazards of Lantus, the freedom of living with an insulin pump is incredible.  But pumps do not come without their kinks.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2012

June 2012

Things I Can't Stand About My Insulin Pump

As I said in my previous article on this subject, my insulin pump has changed my life. My A1C has improved, I've felt more energetic, and I've controlled my diabetes more effectively overall. It has been the biggest and best change in my diabetes treatment since I started on insulin a quarter-century ago.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2012

April 2012

Pregnancy, Parenting, Writing, and Diabetes: An Interview With Cheryl Alkon

The challenges of pregnancy are daunting on their own, but when you're diabetic, they can seem insurmountable. That's one of the reasons Cheryl Alkon wrote a book on the subject. Having type 1 diabetes herself, Alkon knew firsthand the challenges of controlling her disease during pregnancy, and of raising the kids who followed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2012

Imagining the Unimaginable

As I listen to the news of the recent Mega Millions jackpot of over $600 million, my dreams aren't about fast cars, vast mansions, or plush vacations. My thoughts revolve around my diabetes. How awesome would it be to have the best care that money can buy?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2012

March 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

January 2012

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Remote Diabetes Monitor

Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc., has announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has given it the go-ahead to market its mySentry monitor, which allows caregivers to check the blood sugar of a diabetic person sleeping in another room. The bedside monitor, which costs around $3,000, works in tandem with Medtronic's MiniMed Paradigm® REAL-Time RevelTM System, a combined insulin pump/continuous glucose monitor unit.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2012

December 2011

Behind the Scenes, Infusion Sets Thrive

Even the best known actors can't make a hit movie on their own. They need people behind the scenes. Just like those stars of the silver screen, the standard insulin pump can't do its job all by itself. No, the classic-model pump needs an infusion set to deliver its insulin to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2011

High-Tech Pump Helps Three Type 1s Swim the English Channel

On July 21, Claire Duncan was one of three people with type 1 diabetes on a six-person relay team that swam across the English Channel. The team, swimming to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, covered the 22-mile route in 13.5 hours, starting from a beach between Folkestone and Dover in England and finishing in France near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2011

Could Your Medical Device Be Hacked?

Here's the scenario: You're a famed prosecutor who happens to be on an insulin pump. One of the criminals you put away years ago has been released from prison, and he's eager for revenge. This is a particularly cunning criminal, so he hatches a subtle plan. He hacks into your insulin pump, giving you a massive dose of insulin without warning. As you drive to work one day, you begin to feel woozy. That's odd, you think, looking down to where the pump attaches to your stomach. I just ate....

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 12, 2011

November 2011

The New Girl

It's hard being the new person at work.  It's even harder when you're the new person and you have diabetes. Whenever I start a new job, thoughts race through my mind: Will I go low while I'm training?  Will I have quick access to snacks?  Will I be able to check my blood sugar without an audience?  How about taking an insulin injection at the lunch table?  It isn't easy feeling forced to expose so many personal details to people you just met.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2011

©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.