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Diabetes and Psychology Article Archives

November 2014

Diabetes Health Magazine Is Giving Away A One Year Digital Subscription

As you already know, diabetes can be a burn out disease. Staying motivates takes effort, unless you are reading Diabetes Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2014

Diabetes Burn Out- Here is a Poem For You

Diabetes is on your to-do list every day. At night, you cross out all the things you did to take care of yourself. The next day you wake up to start all over again with diabetes being on the top of the list. Some days you feel like a champion.  Other days you feel hopeless. Wondering if there really is a loving God.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2014

September 2014

Bollywood Dancing- An Effective Weapon Against Type 2 Diabetes

CURE-D is the first Bollywood dance research and intervention study designed for South Asian immigrants in the United States. Success with Zumba and Latin hip-hop to manage diabetes in other populations contributed to this study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2014

August 2014

Carrying a Pancreas Outside My Body

One of the pluses of having a working pancreas is that you do not often lose it. The organ just comes along for the ride, as it were, safe inside your abdomen.

comments 4 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2014

For Diabetics And Their Devices, The Present Is Never Enough

Type 1 diabetics seem to always be living in a transitional phase. The technology we have currently is always about to be replaced with newer, better, fresher technology, It's exciting on one hand and exhausting on the other.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2014

Camp 1inspires Me to be Awesome!

Hey Campers, Staff and Alumni –

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2014

Weekly Dulaglutide Performs Well in Comparison to Daily Liraglutide

A comparison of the effects on A1c between users of once-weekly dulaglutide (made by Eli Lilly and Company) and once-daily liraglutide (sold as Victoza from Novo Nordisk) shows that both drugs have very similar effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2014

July 2014

How Do You Stay So Positive?

My class was discussing why we cannot just do pancreas transplants so we can cure diabetes,” said a dear friend that volunteers for me at work. It is a lot more complicated than that, sadly. I was touched that he and his college classmates were discussing ways to cure us. As we chatted about the challenges of diabetes and our wishes for a cure, a few other volunteers gathered. When they heard me mention that I have had Type 1 diabetes for twenty years and that I take 5 – 7 injections a day to stay alive and healthy, they all looked shocked and a silence fell over the group. My volunteer said “Wow, how do you stay so positive”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2014

Type 2 Drug Slashes Dementia Risk

A new study has surprising implications for a generic diabetes drug. Pioglitazone, which is often prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes, also appears to reduce the risk of developing dementia. The drug was not studied specifically to see if cut the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Instead, researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases combed through a giant database of German health care records. They looked at information from 2004 to 2010, with a gigantic group of subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2014

Actress S. Epatha Merkerson Brings Order to Her Diabetes

Award winning S. Epatha Merkerson, Television, film and stage actress, brings a new order to her diabetes management: Get to Your Goals Program, which encourages people with type 2 diabetes to know their A1C, set a goal and take action.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 22, 2014

Mixed Martial Arts Reveals Hidden Strengths After Type 1 Diagnosis

Rob Cooper isn’t one to shy away from a challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2014

Key Steps in Diabetes Care

Living with diabetes means you need to take extra care to stay healthy. The good news is that even small changes in your lifestyle and habits can make a big difference in managing your blood sugar, staying healthy, and preventing complications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 18, 2014

BI-Lilly Alliance Creates Formidable Drug Development Combine

Pharma giants Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) and Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly) have formed the

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

A Message From Dr. Polonsky

After reading new comments on an article we posted many years ago- http://diabeteshealth.com/read/2014/05/30/212/suicide-rate-in-men-with-type-1/?isComment=1#comments.  I felt compelled to write something-http://diabeteshealth.com/read/2014/06/06/8271/taken-hostage-by-your-thoughts/?isComment=1 - comments and reach out to an inspiring behavioral Doctor who has spent decades helping patients cope with the emotional aspect of diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2014

After 50 years, type 1 Suzi Vietti Has Mastered Her Disease

One thing most people know about 63-year-old Suzi Vietti is never to say “never” to her. It might be one of her most detested words; given the number of times she has heard it.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2014

June 2014

Diabetes Health: Insulin Manufacturer Theme for Crossword Puzzle #8

This crossword puzzle was inspired by the American Diabetes Association’s 73rd scientific session in San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2014

Taken Hostage by Your Thoughts

Many people go through times when hopelessness takes them hostage. Drudgery and hardship engulf them on a daily basis. Suicidal thoughts start creeping in. The only relief they can imagine is ending their life, quickly. They feel they can no longer bear their imprisonment. Then their mind drifts to family and friends, and to the pain their suicide may cause. The question becomes, should they continue to live in pain and hopelessness? Or do they commit suicide and create unbearable pain for their loved ones?

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 6, 2014

Diabetes and Family Bonds

Diabetes is a disease that has affected my family and me even before I was born. This chronic ailment has put my family through some scary times. Times that no one should have to face. Diseases like these affect far too many people of all ages. Seeing a loved one suffer and feeling completely helpless by not being able to take their pain away is the most disheartening experience anyone can go through. Sadly, this is a feeling I know all too well.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2014

February 2014

A Day to Forgive—as Well as Not Forget

I have always felt that Valentines is a day to say, "I love you," to my friends and family. I deliver this message with a text, or a quick face-time chat, or email, or snail mail--whatever medium I know the recipients use to communicate.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2014

January 2014

A Work in Progress

On the minds of millions these past days are what new year's resolutions we are going to aim for this coming year. Dan Diamond of Forbes.com wrote on New Year's Day 2013 that only 8 percent of resolvers actually achieve their goals by the end of the year.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2014

December 2013

Organ Trafficking or Life Saver?

I recently saw a program on HBO featuring a Turkish and an Israeli physician who discussed their role in selling kidneys on the organ trafficking market. The Turk, a surgeon, saw himself as a skilled physician who is able to extend patients' lives. The Israeli, a nephrologist, saw himself as a hero. Both work in an shady industry where some people's demands and pocketbooks operate at levels far beyond our society's comfort zone: Many people consider organ trafficking to be a nefarious thing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2013

November 2013

The Diabetes Religion

When I was diagnosed with type 1, doctors told me I needed to count my carbohydrates, weigh my food, test my glucose several times per day, keto test my urine daily, alcohol swab, rotate sites, log my numbers, exercise, (but don't exercise too hard!), monitor my feet, check with my doctor before changing my settings, etc.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 13, 2013

Embrace It. Challenge It.

I haven't always been forthright and expressive about diabetes. There were a solid 10 years of my disease which I kept under wraps, hidden from everyone I knew. I was afraid of everything-to push myself harder than I had ever before, to allow people into my dark corner of the world, to allow myself to believe I could become anything that I wanted to be. I let my fears hinder my development and stayed sedentary during major points in my life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 8, 2013

October 2013

A DH Classic: Halloween Is More Than Scary for Parents of Trick-or-Treaters with Diabetes

(Editor's Note: We originally published this article in October 2008. Laura Plunkett's observations are timeless, and her comments elicited several interesting responses from readers.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2013

July 2013

Five Big Diabetes Fears—and What to Do About Them

It's human to be afraid. As cave people, we scurried for safety at the slightest provocation- scared of wolves, and tigers, and thunderstorms. Even today, we jump when someone comes up behind us unexpectedly.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 24, 2013

June 2013

Global Survey Finds One in Five Feel Discriminated Against Because of Their Diabetes

CHICAGO, June 24, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Key results from the global Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 study (DAWN2TM) show that one in five people with diabetes feel discriminated against because of their condition, and support from the broader community is scarce. Results from the DAWN2 study were presented at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). DAWN2 represents opinions from more than 15,000 people living, or caring for people, with diabetes in 17 countries across four continents.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2013

The Other Kids

I grew up with a large family. I have a brother and sister from my parents, a brother from my mother, and two sisters plus a brother from my step-mother. There were a lot of children in both of our houses. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2013

March 2013

Exercise Improves Quality of Life, Study Shows

For a happier life, it's time to get moving. According to a new study out of Great Britain, exercise provides a big boost when it comes to living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2013

Life Without Limits: Expedition Travel Vacations With Graham Jackson

Adventure travel is a dream for many, but for Graham Jackson it's the sort of thing he's been doing all his life. Born in the country of Lesotho in southern Africa (pronounced "Leh-zoo-too"), he grew up motocross racing and building off-road buggies with his father. When he was 10 years old, he and his family took a safari in a Range Rover across the expansive Kalahari Desert where zebras, lions, and giraffes are known to roam, and summer temperatures range from 68-113 degrees F-and occasionally reach as much as 122 degrees. It was a journey that influenced the course of Jackson's life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2013

February 2013

Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself as a Newly Diagnosed Teen

The first thing I would have said to that frightened 18-year-old girl back in 1994 is, "It's not your fault." You didn't do anything wrong. You weren't out breaking mirrors, spitting on leprechauns, or walking under ladders. Your body simply turned on itself. Your immune system decided to attack the wrong guys and here we are.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2013

Diabetes-Friendly Valentine's Day Recipes (Including a Killer Chocolate Cake)

With all the heart-shaped boxes of chocolates filling every aisle of virtually every store this time of year, Valentine's Day can be treacherous for those with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2013

January 2013

Crystal Bowersox: Striving to Live Without Limitations

Nobody thought for even a second that Crystal Bowersox's second-place finish on "American Idol 2010" meant that the 26-year-old was headed back to her native Elliston, Ohio, to resume a quiet life.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 17, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

December 2012

Score With Scott M. King: A Diabetes And Life Coach

We are delighted to announce that Scott Millay King, cofounder and former editor-in-chief of Diabetes Health, is coming back to the magazine as a regular columnist.  You might remember his popular column, “My Own Injection,” in which he wrote heart-warming stories about the challenges of being a diabetic dad.  When he began the column 21 years ago, he was the only blogger giving a voice to type 1 diabetes. Many of today’s online bloggers got their start by writing for Scott and Diabetes Health (formerly Diabetes Interview).  Scott gave a stage to many voices, knowing that our readers want to hear different perspectives on how people manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2012

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years. Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips. Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town. Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2012

November 2012

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam.'

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 29, 2012

Chris Ruden Works It All Out

Chris Ruden, a college student and personal trainer, is a very inspiring young man. He was born with a disability and was diagnosed in his first year in college with type 1 diabetes. As is often the case, he was discouraged by the diagnosis, but while convalescing in the hospital, he decided to become a personal trainer and help others in similar situations. In this interview, he tells us why he considers diabetes a blessing in some ways.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2012

October 2012

Thinking Positively About Diabetes

When people with diabetes are successful and happy, their situation is often viewed as having been achieved despite the obstacle of diabetes. I am advocating for a shift in that perception. What if instead of seeing all the good in our lives as existing despite our disease, we begin to see everything that we are—the challenges and the achievements—as a direct product of all that we are made up of, diabetes included?

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2012

September 2012

Reminding Myself That My Life Is More Than Diabetes

Time after time, people without diabetes ask me how my diabetes is going. I always get a little tongue-tied because "Wow, great!" isn't really accurate, and the alternatives are complicated. Usually, something like "Uh, good, fine, hard sometimes, but um, thanks for asking" awkwardly tumbles out of my mouth.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

August 2012

Women With Diabetes Less Satisfied With Sex Life, Says Study

A University of California San Francisco study says that middle-aged and older women who have diabetes are less satisfied with their sex life than women who do not have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2012

July 2012

Score With Scott M. King: A Diabetes And Life Coach

We are delighted to announce that Scott Millay King, cofounder and former editor-in-chief of Diabetes Health, is coming back to the magazine as a regular columnist.  You might remember his popular column, “My Own Injection,” in which he wrote heart-warming stories about the challenges of being a diabetic dad.  When he began the column 21 years ago, he was the only blogger giving a voice to type 1 diabetes. Many of today’s online bloggers got their start by writing for Scott and Diabetes Health (formerly Diabetes Interview).  Scott gave a stage to many voices, knowing that our readers want to hear different perspectives on how people manage their diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 30, 2012

Diabulimia: The Illusion of Control

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 14.  Suddenly, I went from being a carefree teenager to a patient who had to be concerned with every carbohydrate in a cracker.  Not only was I dealing with the hormones and emotional adjustments of adolescence, but I was also learning to cope with and accept a disease that wanted a part of every minute of my day.  I also had to deal with the illusion that other teenagers had nothing to worry about except how to fit in, and the fact that I was no longer part of that group of carefree kids.  I was now the student who had a free pass from teachers to eat or drink during class.  The girl who left fourth period ten minutes early to go to the nurse's office to test her glucose.  The sick kid who had a doctor's appointment every two months and came late to school because of it.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2012

May 2012

Summer Pasta Salad Contest

To salute this popular side dish, Dreamfields Pasta is kicking off its second annual "Pastapalooza" Pasta Salad Contest. Each week from Memorial Day through Labor Day, one entrant will become eligible to win a free case of Dreamfields Pasta. Additionally, the 14 weekly winning recipes will be shared on Facebook and Twitter.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 30, 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

April 2012

To Love a Diabetic

To love a diabetic is to be a doctor. It means helping her to remember her medications. It means driving her for an hour to the only 24 hour pharmacy when she's gotten the flu and can't take the Nyquil in the refrigerator. Or driving her to the hospital when the simple flu turns into bronchitis and her blood turns acidic.

comments 31 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2012

February 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

Keeping Up With Baby

My son learned to crawl last month. As a part-time stay-at-home dad, I found it both exciting and terrifying. Through crawling, my son has entered a new stage in life. He might have rolled or scooted a few feet before, but now he can see something in another room and make up his mind to go there.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2012

A Children’s Diabetes Fairytale: Princess Shayna’s Invisible Visible Gift

At the age of 15 years, Sheila Glazov's son Joshua was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. "In 1985," Glazov says, "our family was living in Mammoth Lakes, California. Our little mountain town had a 15-bed hospital that was efficient if you injured yourself skiing, but not if you were looking for appropriate medical care and support for your child who was newly diagnosed with diabetes."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2012

January 2012

Too Tired for Sex

Dear DH, I'm a 47-year-old man who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008. For two years, I haven't been interested in sex. I have a demanding retail job and two teenage children. I can still perform, but I am usually so tired that I fall asleep after dinner. I don't miss sex much, but my wife does, and I don't want to lose her. By the way, my A1C usually runs around 6.8%.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

Optimizing Life With a Chronic Health Problem

A staggering 45 percent of Americans deal with chronic illness. This, of course, includes diabetes. Danea Horn, a certified life coach, speaker, author, and 30-year chronic disease patient, has just released a new report: "How to Develop a Positive Attitude When You Are Coping With Illness."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2011

November 2011

An Unexpected Grief Down Under

Anyone who has lost a close family member to type 2 diabetes understands the grief and paralysis it creates, especially when the one who died was only 53.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2011

Insulindependence

The search for a cure for diabetes is a noble pursuit, but a cure always seems to be another ten years down the road. Finding a way to be healthy in the here and now is what matters for people with diabetes. In 2005, Peter Nerothin started Insulindependence (IN), a nonprofit organization that aims to "revolutionize diabetes management" by leading experiential diabetes education expeditions for type 1 youths.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2011

The Stages of Fat Self-Acceptance: A Conversation With Carol Normadi

Carol Normadi is a licensed marriage and family therapist in Northern California who is co-founder of Beyond Hunger, Inc., a group dedicated to helping people overcome obsessive concerns with food. She has co-authored two books on the topic of food obsessions: "It's Not About Food: Ending Your Obsession With Food and Weight" (Putnam, 1998) and "Over It: A Teen's Guide to Getting Beyond Food and Weight" (New World Library 2001).

comments 10 comments - Posted Nov 4, 2011

Thanks to Technology, We Never Have to Be Alone

If you've had diabetes for a number of years, chances are that you remember when there was no Internet access and no diabetes online community.  You had no way to look up information online and no instant connection to millions of others around the world living with diabetes.  Unless you had a friend nearby with diabetes, there was no one to understand how you felt when your blood sugar numbers were less than stellar, and no one to sympathize with how hard it can be to get your A1C down.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

Scary and Sweet

October is my diagnosis month. At 14 years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few weeks before Halloween. I remember thinking, at least I'm too old for trick or treating. My younger sister had been diagnosed six months earlier, however, and at 10 years old, she still loved to trick or treat. To ease her pain, my parents got creative and shifted the emphasis of Halloween off sweets and onto scary: Haunted houses, hayrides, and parties with bowls full of smushed tomatoes for witches hearts and cold grapes for eyeballs became our annual tradition. My sister and I still said no to most of the sugary sweets, but we were the first ones to say yes when the doors of the haunted house opened.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2011

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Diabetes Education

Diabetes is a life-long, 24-hour-a-day disease that requires self-management, time, and lots of patience. Most people with diabetes know where their numbers should be, but many struggle to follow recommended behaviors. Despite the availability of new medications and treatment devices, as well as the emphasis placed on diabetes treatment adherence over the last decade, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data show that 45 percent of patients with diabetes have not achieved A1Cs lower than 7% (an average of approximately 150-170 mg/dL).

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2011

The Diabetes-Stress Connection: Five Easy Steps to Reduce Stress

Reducing stress for a person with diabetes is an absolute must. According to medical evidence, stress can increase glucose levels in people with diabetes, making them more susceptible to long-term physical complications such as eye, kidney, and nerve disorders.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2011

September 2011

Pritikin and Preventive Health

Imagine if you could keep diabetes at bay for another three or four years with lifestyle changes. Would you change what you ate? Would you commit to an exercise program, maintain a food journal, and join a support group? Imagine if you could take these simple steps and save money. How quickly would you say "Sign me up"?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2011

Together, On Our Own

"If you weren't having this conversation with me, who, other than your wife, would you be having it with?"  That question, in response to something I'd said about treating my nine-year-old daughter's diabetes, was posed to me over the phone by a friend I had made less than six months earlier. She has a daughter too, the same age as mine, who also has type 1. Their diagnosis came a couple of years before ours, so I respect her experience and opinion, and so does my wife, Franca.            

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 9, 2011

Diabetes Educators Have Your Number

Don't think that you can pull one over on your diabetes educator anymore. The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) has developed an official, standard method to measure the progress made by their diabetic patients.

comments 12 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2011

August 2011

Adding Spices to High-Fat Meals Can Knock Down Triglycerides

Spices not only add zing to meals, but they may also reduce the high levels of triglycerides produced by eating high-fat meals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2011

Vitamin D May Reduce Risk for Type 2

A Boston-based study has found that vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes by improving their beta cell functioning.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2011

July 2011

A Brand-New Bottle of My Insulin Went Missing

As I write this, my nineteen-year-old son is in the intensive care unit because of a heroin addiction. He is trying to stop, and the withdrawal is wreaking havoc. His body is bruised and battered beyond belief.

comments 16 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2011

June 2011

Allergan Seeks Lap-Band Surgeries for Obese Teens

Lap-Band manufacturer Allergan has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow surgeries using the device on overweight teenagers as young as 14 years old.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2011

Flavonoid Rutin May Help Obesity and Diabetes

An Australian researcher who deliberately fed his lab rats a high-sugar/high-fat diet says that a flavonoid called rutin helped block the growth of fat cells in their abdomens and kept them from putting on weight despite their bad diet. Flavonoids are plant pigments that researchers are finding have beneficial metabolic effects because of their antioxidant capabilities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2011

People With Diabetes Protected From Discrimination

People with diabetes can breath a sigh of relief: New rules now protect them from workplace discrimination. The Obama administration has widened the definition of disability to include cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes, among other conditions.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2011

May 2011

Sexual Minority: The Invisible Diabetes Disparity

What does sexuality have to do with diabetes? A lot, according to research findings that have revealed a group of people with diabetes as large as the type 1 or gestational diabetes community. Estimates suggest that 1.3 million lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals have diabetes-at least 5 percent of the 23.6 million people with the disease in the United States.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 19, 2011

The Signs of Diabulimia

Meet Mary,* a 16-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes. When her parents ask her how her blood sugar is, she always has a good number. She keeps a tidy logbook of her blood sugars, and they look fine, although her last A1C was inexplicably high. It's been a long time since she was diagnosed, and her parents are confident that she knows how to care for herself. She has been somewhat less energetic for quite awhile, but her parents attribute that to growing pains, as Mary has grown from a chubby child into a very slender young woman. She appears a little dehydrated and flushed sometimes, but she always drinks a lot of water and goes to the bathroom frequently, so her parents aren't concerned. They have also noted a fruity odor about her, which she attributes to a new lip gloss.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 14, 2011

Moms of Children with Diabetes Tell Their Stories, Ask to Support Research For a Cure

HOLLYWOOD, FL -- They come from New York, Miami, Milwaukee and more. They have children of all ages with type 1 diabetes - and they're on a mission to find a cure. They're the "Real Moms of the DRI Foundation" and in honor of Mother's Day they're asking millions of moms - and others - to support the Diabetes Research Institute, a world leader in cure-focused research.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2011

Testosterone Replacement May Lower Death Rate Among Type 2 Men

British researchers say that testosterone replacement therapy for type 2 men with low testosterone levels could reduce their death rate significantly. Over the course of a six-year study by the University of Sheffield, only 8.6 percent of low-testosterone subjects who were given replacement therapy died, compared to 20 percent of low-testosterone subjects who did not receive the therapy.  

comments 2 comments - Posted May 2, 2011

Ryan Shafer: Pro Bowler With Type 1

Ryan Shafer is a 44-year-old professional bowler from Elmira, New York, who was 19 when he developed type 1 diabetes. For a couple of weeks, he experienced the usual symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, extreme thirst, and frequent urination, as well as vision problems.  "Being that age," he says, "I was afraid to go to the doctor. I thought it would just go away." When he finally saw his family physician and was diagnosed, he says, "I was actually relieved--not that I thought diabetes was a piece of cake, but I was glad to know what was wrong with me."

comments 3 comments - Posted May 1, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Chase Pelletier, Competitive Kart Racer

Chase Pelletier is an up-and-coming kart racer from Canada who is 14 years old. When he got type 1 diabetes just before his eleventh birthday, he recalls, "It was pretty overwhelming at first. But me and my family decided early on that we're not going to get down on diabetes in general, and we're going to try to think of positive ways to deal with it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2011

Highlights From the Barbara Davis Center's July Keystone Conference

Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Barbara Davis Center's "Management of Diabetes in Youth" conference, held every other year in beautiful Keystone, Colorado. The focus is on all of the latest and greatest in type 1, and it's a real treat to have so many of the best names in this field gathered in one place. The Barbara Davis Center (BDC) is one of the premier programs in the world focusing on type I diabetes management, and the one (Dr. Peter Chase, to be precise) who brought us the famed" Pink Panther" book, Understanding Diabetes - the reliable handbook of type 1 diabetes that many parents of newly diagnosed kids rely on.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2011

Store Your Teeth in a Stem Cell Bank

Every year four million baby teeth fall out, and 1.4 million wisdom teeth are pulled out of our collective mouth. Until recently, the only entity really interested in all those teeth was the tooth fairy. But all that changed in the year 2000, with the discovery that dental pulp contains adult stem cells. In the not-too-distant future, those stem cells might be used for growing new islet cells to cure diabetes. The problem is, how to keep the teeth nice and fresh until that hoped-for day. That's where Provia Laboratories comes in, with their Store-A-Tooth service.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 118 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

The Unique Challenges of Being a Woman With Diabetes

Three weeks out of every month, my diabetes is well controlled. But the fourth week, the one before my period, is a nightmare. My sugars are astronomically high--I can't even look at a carbohydrate without my sugar spiking.  I'm exhausted and cranky, and I can't get comfortable.       

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

It’s Fun to Fend Off Pre-Diabetes at the (New York) YMCA!

If you have pre-diabetes and live in any of the five boroughs of New York City, get ready to learn a new acronym: YDPP. The initials stand for YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership under which New Yorkers can get enroll in a comprehensive low-cost diabetes prevention program at one of  the city's 27 YMCA branches and affiliates.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Jeff and Natalie Kolok: The Definition of Parenting

Jeff and Natalie Kolok live in northwestern Vermont with their three children: Naomi, 16, and Johanna and Nicholas, each ten years old. Both Johanna and Nicholas have type 1 diabetes, Johanna since age four and Nick since age six.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2011

Be Thankful: A Letter of Gratitude

If you, like me, have diabetes, you realize upon reflection that you are, despite the constant demands of the disease, blessed.  Somewhere, sometime, you have benefited from the kindness, professionalism, and genuine concern of a medical professional, be it a nurse, pharmacist, dietitian, physician, therapist, or supporting staff.   

comments 7 comments - Posted Apr 7, 2011

Decades-Long Study Shows Second-Hand Smoke Ups Diabetes Risk

While smoking is commonly associated with a higher risk of developing a serious disease, it's not often that second-hand smoke or being an ex-smoker is considered even riskier. If the disease is type 2 diabetes, however, it is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2011

March 2011

Profiles in Type 2 Diabetes: Francisco Zepeda

Francisco Zepeda is a 54-year-old native of El Salvador who owns an insurance agency in San Francisco.  Type 2 diabetes runs in his family. He says, "My grandmother lived with diabetes for about 30 years, and my father has it as well. I heard about diabetes all that time, but I never thought that it was going to happen to me. And I still hope that I'm not really diabetic. They say that once your blood sugar goes up, then you are diabetic, but I don't want to believe that I'm diabetic, you know what I mean?"

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

Open Wide! Blood from Dental Procedures Could Be Used to Predict Diabetes

A New York University research team has won a pilot grant to see if blood from dental procedures could be used in conjunction with the A1C test to detect diabetes or pre-diabetes. The A1C test, which is becoming healthcare providers' preferred test for detecting the disease, typically uses blood extracted from finger pricks to make its analysis. The NYU team will see if the blood that flows from gum tissue during dental work can be used for the same purpose.

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

“Diabetes Belt” Stretches Across the South

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a swath of the southern U.S. as the country's "diabetes belt." In this region, made up of parts of 15 states, some 12 percent of the population has type 2 diabetes, compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2011

Type 2 Profile: Tony Flores

Tony Flores is a 50-year-old native of El Salvador who works as a construction foreman. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 12 years ago, after an eye doctor told him it would be a good idea to get his blood sugar checked. He recalls, "I did the test, and they got all freaked out and told me, ‘Oh my god, your A1C is at 12%. You have diabetes type 2. You've got to cut the sugar, you've got to stop drinking orange juice and soda."

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 15, 2011

Diabetes Education Under-used by Medicare Recipients

A paid Medicare benefit for diabetes education is rarely used by those who qualify for it, despite the fact that diabetes education provides clear health benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2011

Novo Nordisk Joins Nationwide Diabetes/Pre-Diabetes Treatment Alliance

Novo Nordisk, the world's largest insulin manufacturer, has joined the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance (DPCA), a group whose goals are to reduce people's risk of developing diabetes and to work with people who already have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 4, 2011

Diabetes: A Homeopathic Journey

Ten years ago, an astute physician diagnosed me with Type 2 diabetes. I exhibited none of the classic symptoms of rapid weight loss, extreme thirst, and frequent urination. I attributed fatigue to my job. For about a year before diagnosis, I experienced what I thought were yeast infections and treated them with over-the-counter medications. I later learned that this condition is a symptom of diabetes. I am non-insulin dependent.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2011

February 2011

Tyler Stevenson on Going Away to College with Diabetes

When a young person with type 1 diabetes leaves home for the first time, it's often a difficult adjustment for the parents as well as their child. Tyler Stevenson is 20 years old, in his second year at Florida State. This is what he told us about his life in college with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2011

Tyler's Ten Objectives for Staying Healthy

Everywhere you look, there seems to be a great tasting high carb meal, dessert, or snack staring back at you. While away at college last fall, I found a t-shirt picturing a cupcake above a skull and crossbones. For me, that image really sums up how we need to deal with being diabetic while being constantly tempted by sugary treats.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Last Patient Completes the EU Phase III Study of Diamyd® Antigen Based Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

The final patient has performed the last visit of the main study period in Diamyd Medical's European Phase III study. Treatment with the antigen based therapy Diamyd® is made to investigate whether beta cell function and thereby blood sugar control can be preserved in children and adolescents with new onset type 1 diabetes. The top line results from this study are expected to be reported as planned, in late spring 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

“Artificial Pancreas” Helps Pregnant Mothers With Diabetes

It's hard enough to be pregnant, but pregnancy with diabetes is especially challenging because it's so difficult to keep blood sugar within a normal range at a time when hormones are surging. All women try their best with the tools that they have, but even so, about half of all babies born to mothers with type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese at birth because of too much sugar in their mothers' blood. Mothers with high blood glucose levels also increase their child's risk of congenital malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm delivery, and neonatal admission.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2011

January 2011

New Spanish-Language Soap Opera Focuses on Obesity, Healthy Living

DENVER -- New episodes of a critically acclaimed, locally-produced Spanish language soap opera will focus on the obesity crisis in hopes of helping viewers better understand what causes obesity and how they can live healthier lives. The soap opera is called "Encrucijada: Sin Salud, no hay Nada" ("Crossroads: Without Health, there is Nothing").

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 31, 2011

Why We Underestimate Our Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

You'd think the world would be running through the streets in a movie-style panic. An epidemic of unprecedented proportions is inexorably advancing.  In our lifetimes, half of us may develop a devastating disease that could cause us to go blind, lose a leg, or die far too soon. But we aren't in a panic. The authorities are talking it up, of course, but most of us aren't doing much at all to prevent type 2 diabetes. We're getting fatter by the year, and we're moving less and less.  Many of us who already have type 2 diabetes are not making the changes that could keep its consequences at bay. Why not?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 24, 2011

January Fizzle

Did you make any resolutions for 2011?  How many of them have you given up on already?  Many of my Facebook friends have enthusiastically boasted of their New Year's resolutions--lose weight, spend less time online, read more, worry less. While their goals are admirable, their resolutions rarely last.  Why?  I believe it's because their aim is too high or too broad, and their enthusiasm is short-lived.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

DiabetesSisters' National Conference Addresses Unique Challenges of Women with Diabetes

RALEIGH, NC- DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce that registration for the 2011 Weekend for Women Conference in Raleigh, NC will open on January 1, 2011 at 8am.  The Conference, a revolutionary national weekend conference designed specifically for women with diabetes, will take place April 29 - May 1, 2011 at the Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh.    

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2011

President Obama Signs Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 Into Law

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 represents a major step forward in our nation's effort to provide all children with healthy food in schools. Increasingly schools are playing a central role in children's health. Over 31 million children receive meals through the school lunch program and many children receive most, if not all, of their meals at school. With over seventeen million children living in food insecure households and one out of every three children in America now considered overweight or obese, schools often are on the front lines of our national challenge to combat childhood obesity and improve children's overall health. This legislation includes significant improvements that will help provide children with healthier and more nutritious food options, educate children about making healthy food choices, and teach children healthy habits that can last a lifetime. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2011

December 2010

Divabetic's New Year Attitude: Be Healthy & Happy Too!

New York, NY - December 31, 2010 - Divabetic, one of the country's leading health and wellness nonprofits begins the New Year with an outreach jackpot of resources and tools for those affected by diabetes. With online and special events, Divabetic's mission is to provide an empowering and supportive environment so that no one living with diabetes has to cope alone or in silence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2010

February Launch of Childhood Obesity Program at R.I. YMCAs Could Set National Standard

Starting in February, Rhode Island's eight YMCAs will participate in JOIN, a 24-week research study on ways to help obese children and teenagers achieve healthier weight. If it meets its goals, it could become the prototype for a nationwide program that would have a direct effect on the treatment of pre-diabetes in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 31, 2010

Diabetes-Depression Connection

A 10-year study by Harvard University scientists found that diabetes puts people at risk for depression and that depression puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes. The two-way connection between the diseases was discovered in 55,000 nurses surveyed over the decade.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Abuse in Childhood and Teens May Set Many Women on the Path to Type 2

Women who experienced sexual or physical abuse in childhood and adolescence-whether moderate or severe-run a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who were not abused, according to results from a study recently reported online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 16, 2010

JDRF Applauds Congress for Passage of $300 Million for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Thanks Supporters for Advocacy Efforts for Special Diabetes Program Renewal

"Congress passed a multi-year renewal of the Special Diabetes Program (SDP), ensuring that studies on promising diabetes treatments and avenues toward a cure continue uninterrupted. As the father of a son living with type 1 diabetes, and as CEO of JDRF, one of the leading advocates for the renewal of this program, I applaud the U.S. government for its continued commitment to end this disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

Nick Jonas' Holiday Dog Tag Challenge

This holiday season, Nick and Bayer have issued a dog tag challenge!  You can help them reach the goal of 50,000 tags by purchasing one for yourself or giving one as a gift this holiday season.  Proceeds from each tag sold will go to the Jonas Brothers Change for the Children Foundation to help others.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2010

Health Law Cut Some Health Costs in Retirement, But Retirees Will Need Big Savings

WASHINGTON-Even though the new health reform law will reduce some health costs in retirement for many people, retirees will still need a significant amount of savings to cover their out-of-pocket health expenses when they retire, according to a report released by the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI). Women in particular will need more savings than men because they tend to live longer.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 2, 2010

November 2010

Christopher Gorham Grabs Silver and Bronze Medals At International Karate/Kickboxing Championships

Insulet Corp., the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, recognizes the outstanding achievements of Christopher Gorham, age 12, of Waterford, Michigan for bringing home both silver and bronze medals in the Sparring and Forms competitions at the 2010 World Karate/Kickboxing Council World Championships held in Albufeira, Portugal. Chris is a 2nd degree black belt in training for a 3rd degree black belt; he has been in martial arts since he was four years old, competing all over the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2010

Handle online advice with care

If you're getting information about diabetes from groups or friends on Facebook, you might want to be careful. A new study suggests that a quarter of posts in these groups are possibly ads, and not for FDA-approved treatments, either.

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2010

Abdominal Pain in Children May be Linked to Fructose Intake

It's a pretty common complaint heard in households around the country: "My tummy hurts." Parents and teachers have been battling this complaint for decades, with children insisting that they are in pain and having no explanation why.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2010

October 2010

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Tarra Robinson was afraid that she was going to lose her job. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 18 months old, Tarra had recently developed hypoglycemic unawareness, which  affects about 17% of type 1 diabetics. Tarra was passing out at work, and once she even crashed her car when her blood sugar dropped unexpectedly. She went on a pump and tried a CGM, but nothing seemed to help. She was still having frequent, dangerous lows.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2010

Look AHEAD Study Examines Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes and Weight Loss

An intensive lifestyle intervention program designed with weight loss in mind improves diabetes control and cardiovascular disease risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. These are the findings of the four-year Look AHEAD study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) is a multi-center, randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity on the incidence of major cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular-related death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 25, 2010

Trapped Underground for 70 Days with Diabetes

Imagine that you're a miner. Imagine you have diabetes (that, at least, shouldn't be too hard). Now, imagine that you have to spend two months trapped underground with other miners. How would you do?

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2010

Patient/Provider Language Barriers Linked to Worse Diabetes Control

Patients who cannot discuss their diabetes with a doctor in their own language may have poorer health outcomes, even when interpreter services are available, according to a new study by researchers at UCSF and the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2010

Vitamin D Linked to Childhood Obesity

Michelle Obama recently announced that she plans to eliminate childhood obesity in a generation. If all goes according to her plan, childhood obesity will have dropped from the current rate of 32 percent to a rate of 5 percent by 2030. That rate of 32 percent translates to over 25 million obese children and adolescents, so a lot of attention has been given to examining the direct causes of childhood obesity, the factors that contribute, and the best ways to eliminate it altogether.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 14, 2010

Let's Move Campaign

Earlier this year, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an ambitious goal: to erase childhood obesity within a generation. If she is successful, the childhood obesity rate will be only 5 percent by 2030, down from the current rate of 32 percent. Ambitious? Yes. Impossible? Not according to her plan.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 13, 2010

Employer Wellness Programs Could Benefit Families

Employers are in a potentially powerful position to help employees and their families make healthier choices, hints a new study conducted by the IBM Corporation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2010

Are You Dealing with an Ongoing Health Condition?

Better Choices, Better Health is the new online version of Stanford University's Chronic Disease Self Management Program (CDSMP).  This six-week, interactive workshop is designed for people with a range of chronic health conditions, including diabetes.  It is free for people in seven pilot states, thanks to a grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

September 2010

Hillary Clinton, Ban Ki-Moon Launch Global Nutrition Initiatives

NEW YORK (Sept. 21, 2010) - Millions of children's lives could be saved as a result of the long-awaited global focus on nutrition announced today, Save the Children said.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2010

From Helpless to Heroic: A Parent's Guide to Changing the Statistics One Child at a Time

I was reading the latest issue of one of my parenting magazines when I came across an article on children and food.  The author suggested offering dessert only two to three times a week instead of every day.  I laughed aloud.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2010

Insulindependence

In late July, five teenagers and five adults hiked to the summit of Mount Shavano, one of Colorado's famed 14,000-foot peaks.  For this particular group, the journey to the top of Shavano was designed to be an intensive educational experience on the topic of diabetes management.  Each teenager had type 1 diabetes, and the adults were mentors dedicated to helping the teens feel more in control of the disease. The team made it to the summit by performing countless blood sugar tests, counting carbs, and experimenting with insulin pump basal rates. The outfit behind the expedition was Testing Limits, an outdoor adventure club just for people with diabetes, operated by the non-profit Insulindependence. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

The Highs and Lows of Going Back to School

Going back to school can be a little scary for someone with diabetes. There are a lot of things to think about when it comes to making it through the school day without having problems with your blood sugar levels. In school, we strive for that all important "A" on a test; to score 100. The same is true about blood sugar/glucose levels; the closer I come to keeping my blood sugar level at "100," the better for my health and the better for my grades; high and low blood sugars aren't helpful in keeping a clear, quick-thinking mind. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2010

Bone Breakdown Helps Regulate Blood Sugar

The routine breakdown of old bone during skeletal growth has an important role to play in regulating blood sugar, according to Columbia University Medical Center researchers. The process, known as resorption, goes on throughout life. It stimulates insulin release and sugar absorption, helping healthy people maintain normal blood glucose levels. The new study, published in Cell, suggests that skeletal changes could causes diabetes for some and that possible treatments for type 2 diabetes could come from the bone-insulin connection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2010

Even Before Recession, 14 Million Kids 'Underinsured'

Even prior to the onset of the economic recession in 2008, nearly one in four American parents with health insurance reported that their coverage was so inadequate they were unable to access the medical care their children needed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2010

August 2010

NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

Doctors have long known that different populations have different risks for chronic illness. Certain ethnic groups, for instance, are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others. But why? The National Institutes of Health aims to find out. It's Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health will take a broad look at factors that influence disease and aim to make positive changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Joslin Diabetes Center 50-Year Medalist Program

Since 1970, Joslin Diabetes Center has awarded a 50-year bronze medal and certificate to recognize the remarkable achievement of a successful life with insulin-dependent diabetes for half a century or more. To date there have been approximately 2,663 50-Year Medals awarded by Joslin Diabetes Center.  Joslin Diabetes Center has awarded medals to recipients throughout the world, including individuals from Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, Hungary, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, South America, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2010

Gestational Diabetes

Women who deal with gestational diabetes in their first or second pregnancy are far more likely to develop the condition again in their third pregnancy, according to a new study from Kaiser Permanente that examined the electronic medical records of 65,132 women. The study was published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology last month.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 11, 2010

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

The Long awaited Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act 2010 (SS 3307) has passed the Senate, after a push by the ADA membership and other advocates, urging Senators to get the job done!  The Act, which passed the Senate unanimously, now moves to the House where it is expected to pass.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2010

Obesity Intervention Study Produces Mixed Results

The HEALTHY program, a three-year government-funded intervention in middle schools that was designed to lower overall rates of overweight and obesity among students, has produced mixed results.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 8, 2010

Lower-Carb Diet Better Than Low-Fat for Obese Insulin-Resistant Women

Insulin-resistant obese women lost more weight after 12 weeks on a low-carbohydrate diet than they did on a low-fat diet, according to a study conducted by the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno. (The study was funded by Jenny Craig, a company that sells diet foods.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2010

July 2010

Making an Ordinary Day Extraordinary

Now that it's summer, I'm enjoying a typical teacher's vacation: summer break. I have three months of freedom, which for many is a dream come true. However, I live in the sweltering Midwest, where it's typical to see mid-summer temperatures of one hundred degrees or more, with an even higher heat index.  These oppressive temperatures can continue into late October.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

Diabetes Heroes Come In All Ages

Last summer, I led the third annual swim-run biathlon for the Barton Center for Diabetes Education, which hosts two Massachusetts camps for children with type 1-Camp Joslin for boys and Camp Clara Barton for girls. It was at Camp Joslin that I met a memorable eight-year-old boy who exemplifies what being a diabetes hero is all about. I'll call him "Adam."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2010

New Hope for Men Troubled with Sleep Apnea and Snoring

Widely recognized evidence supports the fact that Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a very serious health risk primarily afflicting men over the age of forty, yet 80 to 90 percent of cases go undiagnosed except for the telltale symptoms of chronic fatigue and snoring. Precision diagnosis and recent developments in FDA-approved mouthpiece technology can now provide an unprecedented 78 percent reduction of the condition without surgery, and offer for the first time an effective and convenient alternative for those intolerant to using the frequently prescribed but highly rejected Continuous Positive Airway Pressure therapy.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 28, 2010

Sweet Escape

There's nothing quite like a dip in the Mediterranean Sea at sunset. The warm, clear water, shimmering clouds, and sound of families enjoying aperitifs at beachside cafes--it was the perfect start to a late-summer Italian holiday. We were visiting my boyfriend's brother, who had moved from England to Genoa a few years prior. It was my first time across the Atlantic, so my boyfriend Dunstan and I tried to make it count with 10 days filled with dinners, family celebrations, a road trip to Rome, hiking, and plenty of swimming.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Traveling With Diabetes

My diabetes and I have traveled a lot of miles together in nineteen years.  Racing Ironman triathlons in Australia, Europe, the Carribean and all over North America, climbing and camping at the top of 14,000 foot Mt. Whitney, and of course dozens of family vacations and business trips.  Packing equipment and supplies for an Ironman triathlon and 3 weeks in Australia requires a bit of planning and preparation, but when you have diabetes you feel like you do that for just a weekend out of town.  Meters, strips, insulin, syringes, infusion sets, pump supplies, snacks . . . a simple weekend trip becomes a lunar expedition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 10, 2010

Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2010

June 2010

Lonely Nights

Dear Diabetes Health, I have been married for 14 years.  I am 36 and my husband is 39, and we have a seven-year-old daughter. About six months, ago my husband found out that he has type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Getting Back to Basics When Life Gets In the Way

One day as I was multi-tasking (making dinner, washing dishes, supervising my daughter, returning phone calls), I suddenly grew very annoyed at the music we were listening to. I had recently purchased a children's CD for my daughter, and it hit me that all the songs sounded the same.  What a waste of twelve dollars, I thought, as I headed toward the CD player to shut it off.   As I reached down to hit the "off" button, I noticed a small, unfamiliar icon on the display screen. I crouched down to further examine and then laughed aloud.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2010

Judge Rules Only Nurses Can Administer Insulin Shots to California Schoolchildren

A Sacramento Superior Court judge has ruled that only school nurses can give insulin shots to children in public schools who have diabetes. The decision by Judge Lloyd Connelly overturned a 2007 California State Department of Education decision that allowed trained school staff, as well as nurses, to administer such injections.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2010

Wholly Healthy

Diabetes is often perceived as a physical disease, an issue with one's body.  But those of us with diabetes know that it affects every area of our lives, including our emotional, spiritual, and mental health. People with diabetes are more likely to experience depression than the average person, and it doesn't take a doctor to explain why. Diabetes is daunting, complicated, and confusing.  There's no one-size-fits-all explanation or treatment plan, and even when we arrive at something that works, diabetes throws us a curveball and we are forced to reinvent our treatment regimen---time, and time, and time again. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Tyler's Guide for a Successful Vacation

As a type 1 diabetic, I have found that it's a good idea to plan for the unexpected when traveling. Life is full of surprises, and so are vacations. The flight is late. The flight has been cancelled.  We had a flat tire or ran out of gas. There is an accident on the highway, and the traffic isn't moving. Who would have ever thought that airline flights would be grounded for five days in most of Eastern Europe because of volcanic ash from an erupting volcano in Iceland? If a diabetic had planned on going for a week-long vacation in England or France and had taken limited insulin, syringes, or infusion sets, he might have been in big trouble. Trying to replenish medical supplies in a foreign country could prove to be very difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2010

Medifast: Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2 Diabetes?

There are so many weight loss programs out there, sometimes it is hard just to keep track of them, let alone choose one that will work. Add in the factor of diabetes, and the path to weight loss becomes harder to navigate and often contains land mines that we never even knew existed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Diabetes Linked to High-Grade Prostate Cancer in Obese Men

A Duke University Medical Center study has concluded that obese men who have type 2 diabetes are almost four times as likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer during a prostate biopsy as men who do not have diabetes. When ethnicity is taken into account, obese white men run a five-times greater chance of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Olympic XC Skier Kris Freeman Brings Story of Spirit and Tenacity to Campers with Diabetes

One of the most inspiring personalities of the 2010 Vancouver Games, Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman sheds his skis and poles this week to kick off his 6th annual diabetes summer camp tour with Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly Diabetes). Freeman, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 10 years ago at age 19, will share his amazing comeback story from coast to coast and encourage children with diabetes to continue pursuing their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 14, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

BD Launches World's Smallest Pen Needle

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, announced today the launch of BD Ultra-FineTM Nano-the world's smallest pen needle. The BD Nano pen needle is proven to be as effective as longer needles for patients of all body types and proven to offer a less painful injection experience for the more than 5 million people in the United States who inject insulin or GLP-1 to manage their diabetes.[1]

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 10, 2010

The Other: How Spouses of Diabetics Deal

It's a cool Sunday evening, and I'm sitting in a lively Italian restaurant. My husband is across the table.  We've just placed our orders, and we're engaged in easy conversation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2010

Ironman Jay

It's early on a Thursday morning in a hotel ballroom in downtown Oakland, and attendees at a breakfast of the annual meeting of the California Dietetic Association are still working on getting fully awake. That problem is solved two minutes after Jay Hewitt, the breakfast's inspirational speaker, takes the stage. Hewitt, a 41-year-old lawyer who was diagnosed with type 1 in 1991, knows his audience is an experienced group of professional dietitians that has dealt with every type of patient and heard every kind of excuse for failure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2010

May 2010

National Plan to Improve Health Literacy

The United States Department of Health and Human Services released The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy aimed at making health information and services easier to understand and use. The plan calls for improving the jargon-filled language, dense writing, and complex explanations that often fill patient handouts, medical forms, health web sites, and recommendations to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2010

Bret Michaels - Type 1 Diabetes Patient and Celebrity Apprentice Winner

It was a great win for diabetes on Sunday night as Bret Michaels, lead singer for the rock band Poison and reality TV star, was crowned the latest Celebrity Apprentice winner after struggling with several medical scares in the past month. Just as impressive is that throughout the season, Michaels' various wins raised more than $390,000 for the American Diabetes Association, including the final challenge prize from Snapple, worth $250,000. The 47-year old Michaels has lived with type 1 diabetes since he was six years old.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Abbott Receives FDA Clearance for New, Easier-to-Use FreeStyle Lite® Test Strips

Abbott announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its new FreeStyle Lite blood glucose test strips. The new FreeStyle Lite test strips minimize interference during blood glucose testing and are designed to offer a better testing experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 27, 2010

Nick Jonas and Bayer Diabetes Care Announce 'Give Back. Simply Win'

A new contest, "Give Back. Simply Win." sponsored by Bayer Diabetes Care will shine a spotlight on people with diabetes who are making a difference in their local communities. Three grand prize winners will meet international singing sensation Nick Jonas and Bayer will donate $5,000 to three not-for-profit charitable causes, one selected by each winner.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2010

Jonas Brothers Help Raise $250,000 for Diabetes

Grammy-award-nominated teen pop sensations the Jonas Brothers helped raise more than $250,000 at the annual "Rock For Diabetes" benefit on May 16, held at the home of Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman. More than 200 people attended this year's benefit, which raised funds for the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Attending Weight Watchers® Meetings Helps Reduce the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

The 57 million Americans currently living with "pre-diabetes" could benefit from a group weight loss program, like Weight Watchers, according to a new study published in this month's American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. Researchers found that after a 6-month Weight Watchers group program, overweight or obese adults who attended at least two thirds of the weekly sessions, not only lost weight, but also significantly reduced fasting glucose and insulin levels - important indicators of diabetes risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Glucose Monitoring Medical Tattoo

Tattoos aren't just an art form or a way of making a personal statement anymore: They are beginning to save lives.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2010

$3.3 Million Grant to Study Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children

A husband-and-wife research team at the UC Davis School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to lead the first prospective, nationwide, multi-site clinical study of how to prevent the neurological injuries and, in rare cases, death caused by brain swelling in children in diabetic crisis.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2010

Ethnic Disparities Found in A1c Test

A new study released by the Children's Hospital of New Orleans has found that black children with type 1 diabetes scored higher on A1c tests than white children who had similar blood glucose levels. Such ethnic disparity has already been shown in previous studies with adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 13 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

Recruiting Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Dr. Richard Hays announced today that he is now recruiting children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes for Protégé Encore, a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III clinical trial. This is the second of two Phase III studies testing the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug called teplizumab. The first study, known as Protégé, has completed enrollment of more than 530 subjects with type 1 diabetes. There is currently no approved therapy to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2010

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

D-TREAT

Diabetes Education and Camping Association's (DECA's) young adult leadership team "DLEAD" takes on Boston at "D-TREAT" - a unique 3-day event at Northeastern University, May 28-30, 2010 - to encourage young adults with diabetes to network, share insights and meet peers during an awesome event.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 6, 2010

April 2010

SafeSittings Diabetes Babysitting Service

Are you the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes? Do you often wish that you could find a babysitter who understands the "ins-and-outs" of type 1 so that you could enjoy an evening out, assured that your child is in good hands? Or are you a teenager with type 1 who is looking for a way to help children manage their disease, while making a little extra money at the same time?  Then look no further than www.SafeSittings.com. Launched over six years ago in Manhattan by teenager Kimberly Ross, www.SafeSittings.com is a free online service that matches type 1 families with babysitters who also have the disease. 

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2010

Sex and Diabetes: Diabetes for Couples

Dear Diabetes Health, I am a 60 year old married woman who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes eight years ago.  In the last two years, I have lost interest in sex. I just don't feel like it, although I still like hugs.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 26, 2010

Bayer Diabetes Care Introduces DIDGET

Bayer Diabetes Care today announced the introduction of the DIDGETTM blood glucose monitoring system in the United States.  The DIDGET meter is unique because it is the only blood glucose meter that connects directly to Nintendo DSTM and DS Lite gaming systems to help kids manage a lifelong disease by rewarding them for building consistent testing habits and meeting personalized blood glucose target ranges. Bayer's DIDGET meter is now available for purchase in the U.S. through CVS.com, Drugstore.com and Walgreens.com.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2010

May is National Correct Posture Month: Did You Do Your Posture Exercise Today?

May is National Correct Posture Month, so take a look at how hours of computer hunching, slouching while cell phone texting and video-game slumping is affecting your posture.  It's not just kids with backpacks or cane-carrying seniors---studies show poor posture is a major cause of back and neck pain for all ages, and over time often contributes to digestive and cardiopulmonary problems.  The good news: there are easy things people can do to strengthen posture.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2010

Diabetes Drug Tied to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, adds to evidence that metformin, a generically available drug commonly used for type 2 diabetes, may have anti-cancer effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

No More Slow-to-Heal Wounds

Researchers at Loyola University have discovered a group of immune system cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells that slow the wound healing process. Their findings pave the way for potential new treatments to accelerate the healing process in slow-to-heal wounds that can occur in people with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2010

Our Kids and Camps: April/May Digital Edition Is Now Available

While the words "diabetes" and "camp" may not sound like they belong in the same sentence for most people, they sure do for thousands of kids across the country. Diabetes camp is their time to share experiences, learn, and have fun with other kids who have diabetes. You'll find the usual camping activities like hiking, arts and crafts, boating, swimming, and sitting around the campfire, but also lessons on adjusting your insulin pump to compensate for sports and how to give yourself an injection.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

Summer Fun for Kids!

The Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) mission is to "promote communication, provide education, share resources, and serve as a worldwide voice to advance diabetes education and camping programs that meet the diverse needs of individuals and families."  DECA provides an international databse of diabetes camping organizations, and "Best Practices" tools for diabetes camp management.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2010

March 2010

Developing Youngsters' Power in Diabetes Self-Care: Dr. DeLoach Talks about Campamento Diabetes Safari

Dr. Stan De Loach is a bicultural, trilingual, Certified Diabetes Educator (one of the first 13 in Mexico) and clinical psychologist, not to mention a pianist, composer, and writer. Born and educated in the U.S., he has been a resident of Mexico for decades, and his first love is the annual bilingual diabetes camp that he co-founded, the four-day Campamento Diabetes Safari in Mexico.. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2010

Tyler's Top Ten Tips for Teens

Experience is a great teacher, but sometimes it's not the best way to learn, especially when it comes to your medical needs. Smart people learn from their mistakes, but wise people learn from other people's mistakes. In my ten years with diabetes, I have found that to eliminate problems, you need to anticipate your needs. A few moments of preparation can ensure a great afternoon of fun with your friends, a better grade on a test, or participation in a sporting competition without any complications.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2010

Our Journey to Hope and Beyond

I grew up around the corner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In high school, long ago, I thought that NIH scientists were "bad guys" who mistreated animals in the name of medical research. I later moved to the West Coast and became a registered obstetrical nurse. Over the years, along with sharing the joys of new moms and new babies, I cared for patients with devastating conditions like cancer and quadriplegia, people whose lives could potentially be saved or improved by medical research., Yet it wasn't until many years later, after moving back to the DC area, that I really began to see the NIH in a new light.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Calcium May Help You Live Longer

A group of Swedish researchers has found that men who consume more than the recommended daily amount of calcium are less likely to die than their counterparts who consume little calcium. Their study, titled "Dietary Calcium and Magnesium Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Men," appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2010

Women Who Drink Moderately Appear to Gain Less Weight than Non-Drinkers

The study started out with nearly 20,000 trim middle-aged and older women. Over time, women who drank alcohol in moderation put on less weight and were less apt to become overweight compared to non-drinkers. This was true even after taking into account various lifestyle and dietary factors that might influence a woman's weight.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2010

Is Impulse Control Impaired in Type 2s?

Working with a small group of type 2 patients, Japanese scientists think that they may have found one reason why some people develop obesity that can eventually lead to diabetes: poor impulse control.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2010

Teenagers and Diabetes

Being a teenager is hard enough, but being a teenager with diabetes can be brutal (and being the parent of a teenager with diabetes can turn you into a basket case). Last month, I wrote about the challenges of being newly diagnosed.  This month, let's talk about handling diabetes during the teenage years.

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2010

February 2010

I'll Get to It... Right After My Nap

I have always felt that a little snooze in the middle of the afternoon works better for me than a jolt of caffeine. However, the guilt induced by the very thought of sleeping during the day (especially at work) has kept me drinking coffee or tea instead of crashing on my desk and drooling on my keyboard.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2010

JDRF Launches Program to Support Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

As part of an extensive program to support the needs of adults with type 1 diabetes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International announced the introduction of a key support program, the JDRF Adult Type 1 Toolkit, to meet an immediate need for resources and community for adults more recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes - a chronic autoimmune disease often first diagnosed in children.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women Conference Filling up Fast

The North Carolina-based not-for-profit DiabetesSisters (DiabetesSisters.org) is pleased to announce that registration for the first annual Weekend for Women conference to be held May 22-23rd in Raleigh is two-thirds full, and will likely close by April 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2010

Handing down the Genes. Part 3 (of 3)

This is the third - and final - installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part III: "Nutrition and Exercise Tips"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 19, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 2 (of 3)

This is the second installment of our three-part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part II: "Preventing Type 2 in Children"

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 13, 2010

California Parents of Children with Diabetes and Care Advocates Hail Isadore Hall, III Legislation to Fight Diabetes

Sacramento- February 10, 2010 -- Assistant Speaker pro Tempore Isadore Hall, III (D- Compton) today introduced AB 1802, which would clarify existing law by allowing, but not requiring, a parent/guardian-designated teacher, administrator or school employee to administer insulin to a diabetic student while on a school campus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2010

Study Suggests Extended Release Metformin May Reduce Body Mass Index in Teens

A California study that tracked 77 obese adolescents for almost two years indicates that metformin XR, an extended-release version of the popular anti-diabetic drug, may help lower body mass index in overweight teens who do not have diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

"America's Silent Killer" on The Oprah Winfrey Show

CHICAGO, IL - On Thursday, February 4, Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and more reveal the staggering human cost of the growing diabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic on a special episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show. Before a studio audience comprised of all diabetics and their families, Oprah and Dr. Oz reveal the latest facts and figures, share stories of those affected, and hold a no-holds-barred, revealing conversation about risk factors, diet and lifestyle.

comments 17 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

Handing Down the Genes. Part 1 (of 3)

This is the beginning of our three part series "Handing Down the Genes."  Part I: "When to Worry-and When Not to-About Your Child's Increased Risk for Diabetes."

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

January 2010

Meditation Medication

Living with a chronic condition like diabetes can be a challenging and stressful experience. Unfortunately, all the worry about blood glucose and the constant effort to balance insulin against food intake and exercise can itself raise blood glucose levels. But stress management can help control the stress hormones that affect blood glucose levels. Yoga practice, for example, can have a calming effect and play a major role in stress management.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 21, 2010

Diabetes Technology and Intimacy

The first time that my fiancé Richard and I got, um, "intimate," I had some explaining to do. "Er, that's for my diabetes. So's that. And this thing. Oh, and this too." Richard was a bit overwhelmed. I think his exact words were, "Are you bionic or something?"

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2010

DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women: May 22-23

DiabetesSisters is pleased to announce OPEN REGISTRATION for the Weekend for Women Conference hosted by DiabetesSisters and TCOYD on May 22-23, 2010 at Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2010

December 2009

Resolutions vs. Changes: Make 2010 Count!

I have never been one to make New Year's resolutions.  This probably stems from my life experiences.  Every year at my fitness club, the place is flooded with new faces from January until late February.  Then, as the days tick by, the club becomes less and less crowded. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2009

Etiquette for People Without Diabetes

Dr. Bill Polonsky, PhD, CDE, knows diabetes. Among other things, he has served as Chairman of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, as a Senior Psychologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is the founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute (BDI) in San Diego, California, and a member of Diabetes Health's Advisory Board.

comments 19 comments - Posted Dec 7, 2009

Cardiovascular risk in youth with type 1 diabetes linked primarily to insulin resistance

Chevy Chase, MD- According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), youth with type 1 diabetes have now been found to have abnormal insulin resistance. Having abnormal insulin resistance appears to negatively affect heart, blood vessel and exercise function in this population.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

November 2009

New GoMeals

Bridgewater, NJ, November 19, 2009 - Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today that GoMealsTM, a new iPhone application (app) designed to help people living with diabetes make healthy food choices, is now available for download at the iTunes App store.  GoMealsTM is a food tracking tool which allows users to search thousands of foods and dishes from popular restaurants and grocery stores to easily see the nutritional content of meals and snacks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2009

October 2009

Study Shows a Little Money Buys a Lot of Calories at City Corner Stores

October 12, 2009. Philadelphia, Pa. - Children in Philadelphia who attended public schools and shopped at corner stores before or after school purchased almost 360 calories of foods and beverages per visit, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics. Chips, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages were the most frequently purchased items. This is the first study to document both what foods and beverages children purchased in local corner stores on their way to and from school, and the nutritional content of those items.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2009

2010 DiabetesSisters Weekend for Women

Taking Control Of Your Diabetes TCOYD (www.tcoyd.org) and DiabetesSisters (www.diabetessisters.org) are nationwide non-profit organizations with similar missions of motivating and educating people with diabetes.  In 2010, TCOYD and DiabetesSisters are partnering to bring a unique, life-changing learning experience to women with diabetes.  The First Annual Weekend for Women Conference hosted by DiabetesSisters and TCOYD will begin at 5pm on Saturday, May 22nd (immediately following the TCOYD Conference) in Raleigh, North Carolina and end at 5pm on Sunday, May 23rd. The Weekend for Women Conference will take place at Marriott City Center in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina.  All participants will receive a single room at the hotel.  

comments 4 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2009

The Connection Between Allergies and Kidney Disease in Men with Type 2

A study coming out in the November issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology is reporting that type 2 men whose blood contained a high count of eosinophils, a sign of allergic inflammation, also had albumin in their urine, which is an early indication of kidney disease. Eosinophils are white blood cells that increase in number during an allergic reaction. Albumin is a protein in the blood that helps regulate blood volume and acts as a carrier for other molecules. Albumin is not normally found in the urine, however, because when healthy kidneys filter the blood, they retain what the body needs (like proteins) and allow only smaller "impurities" into the urine. But during diabetes, too much blood sugar can damage the filtering structures of the kidneys, causing them to thicken and become scarred. Eventually, they begin to leak, and protein (albumin) begins to pass into the urine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2009

Insulin Builds Muscle in Seniors

"Ask any of the elite who have become truly massive beasts which anabolic substance has had the most profound effect upon their physique, and the answer from the largest mammals will unanimously be insulin."  That's a quote from Iron Magazine, a publication for body builders. Apparently, injecting insulin for its anabolic properties is not uncommon among the "massive beasts," as several body-building websites actually contain instructions on how to do it and what types of insulin to use.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2009

September 2009

Exercise, Even Without Weight Loss, Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Teens

Even if they don't lose weight, a moderate aerobic exercise program can improve insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents who are sedentary.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2009

You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks

That old dog is me (thirty-seven years living with diabetes). There's a lot to be said for teaching someone who's lived with diabetes for years new ways to manage diabetes, and some new things that have come into the marketplace recently.

comments 9 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2009

Co-Workers, Families and Friends 'Step Out' to Stop Diabetes

Alexandria, VA (September 10, 2009)-This year, thousands of people in communities across the country will come together to demonstrate their support in the fight against diabetes by participating in the American Diabetes Association's Step Out: Walk to Fight Diabetes® event. Step Out is a fundraising walk that takes place in more than 160 cities to raise awareness about diabetes and to raise much needed funds to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2009

Forming a Partnership with Your Healthcare Team: Tips From a Type 1 Pharmacist

I remember it like it was yesterday. It was the night before Thanksgiving, and my family and I were driving to my parents' house for the holiday weekend. I am usually the one who drives, but this time my wife insisted on taking the wheel because I was so dizzy and light-headed that I could hardly stand upright. Over the course of the previous week, I had not been feeling well. I had been getting up frequently at night to use the bathroom, was insatiably thirsty, and had been so dizzy that I had actually fallen down several times.

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2009

Learning Self-Control is the Key for Kids to Remain Healthy

According to a recent  Pennsylvania study, kids need to learn to control themselves when it comes to food. Obviously, self-control is important for us all, kids and adults alike, when it comes to weight management. It’s equally apparent that children need to be taught by their parents to make healthy food choices. But parents who strictly forbid their children to eat many foods might be contributing to a lack of self-control in their offspring, thereby creating the very chubbiness that they were trying to avert.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2009

August 2009

New Video: Diabetes Myths Debunked

See the new video on DiabetesHealthTV with columnist Riva Greenberg.  She discusses her new book 50 Diabetes Myths That Can Ruin Your Life: And the 50 Diabetes Truths That Can Save It.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

ADA Launches My Health Advisor, a Website Aimed at Helping America's Increase in Prediabetes

Concerned by the huge number of Americans - 57 million - who are now considered to have prediabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has launched "My Health Advisor." 

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2009

Finally, a Bailout of Millions for Folks Who Actually Need It!

The American Diabetes Association estimates that about 18 million Americans have diabetes. Given that millions of people have lost their jobs during the current recession, the law of averages would suggest that at least a few hundred thousand folks with diabetes are now unemployed.  Loss of a job, unfortunately, usually means a concurrent loss of health insurance.  For those hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes, no health insurance means big trouble.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2009

Women's Monthly Cycle Affects Blood Glucose Control, But Not Consistently

Only a handful of studies have examined the relationship of a woman's menstrual cycle to her blood glucose control, but they have one finding in common: menstruation's effect on blood glucose is as varied as each individual's disease. As a result, blood glucose testing remains the only way to know how a woman's monthly cycle affects her diabetes control.

comments 11 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2009

Surfing with Type 1

Initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Rob subsequently discovered that he had type 1. Knowing that he needed to exercise more, he returned to professional surfing. Today, he is a sponsored professional athlete who uses a CGM.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2009

Knowledge Is Not Only Power: It’s Also Powerful Medicine

It's very likely that you, like most people, believe many myths about diabetes. If you do, you might actually be doing yourself harm. Learning the truth can empower you (as it did me) to make choices and take actions that increase the quality and length of your life.

comments 9 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2009

July 2009

Dealing With Your Newly Diagnosed Diabetes: First, Look for Patterns

A man who has been married for 15 years suddenly begins losing weight and buying new clothes. He starts staying late at work and taking weekend business trips, unusual behaviors for him. His wife thinks he is having an affair. Why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2009

Gay Men and Women with Diabetes Find a Voice Through the Diabetes And Gay (DANG) Foundation

Could the medical community be overlooking 2.5 million people who have diabetes? Currently, 23.6 million children and adults in the United States, or 7.8 percent of the population, have diabetes. Although an estimated 17.9 million of them have been diagnosed, 5.7 million (nearly one quarter) are unaware that they have the disease.  If lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) people comprise 10 percent of the U.S. population, then 10 percent of people with diabetes are part of the LGBT community-about 2.5 million people.*

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2009

Staying on Your Teen's Diabetes Team

Growth hormones, peer pressure, independence struggles, and mood swings: welcome to the teenage years! There's nothing like a warning glance from a fed-up teenager to make a parent retreat. As your child takes more control of his or her diabetes, it becomes ever more tempting to step back and avoid the friction that sometimes comes from being involved. Nevertheless, your teenager needs your reliable presence more than ever. The beauty, strength, and sheer courage our kids exhibit in meeting their teenage challenges can inspire us to stand up and work with them to keep their health and well-being firmly in the forefront of their minds. Each child and each situation is different, but here are a few suggestions for staying on your teen's diabetes team.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2009

Pregnant Women Who Snore Are More Likely to Develop Diabetes

Women who frequently snore-at least three nights a week-run a substantially higher risk of developing gestational diabetes during pregnancy than non-snorers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2009

Roche Works for Diabetes Behavior Change/Patient Engagement

Roche Diabetes Care Announces Unique Coaching Program for Diabetes Educators as Part of Long-Term Commitment to Fight the Disease

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 8, 2009

Celebrate

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is working hard to change people's attitudes about diabetes.  A federally funded program sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the NDEP has more than 200 partners at the federal, state, and local levels, all working together to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2009

June 2009

Parenting with Diabetes

Rachel and her husband adopted a beautiful baby girl in November of 2008. Their daughter is now seven months old. You can read Rachel's article about diabetes and adoption here.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2009

Non-compliance vs. diabetes self care: Are we still playing a blame game?

In 1993, I published an article entitled "Is non-compliance a dirty word?" in The Diabetes Educator in which I expressed my sadness that people with diabetes were actually getting blamed by their health care providers for not following treatment advice (1). I suggested that the patient's failure might really be a failure in the partnership (or lack thereof) between patient and provider.  Fifteen years ago, I challenged diabetes educators to work together with medical practitioners to change noncompliance from a dirty word to a rare occurrence. So how are we doing today?

comments 21 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2009

Just in Time for Father’s Day, a Grateful Nod to the Hardworking Parents of Kids with Diabetes

I hear voices in my surroundings as the cloud of confusion gradually begins to lift. "Curtis, can you hear me?" "Curtis, what was the score of the football game?" "Curtis, do you know where you are?"

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2009

Joslin 50-Year Medal Winner Triumphs over Diabetes

Gale Fullerton is a 65-year-old Californian who has the distinction of being a Joslin 50-Year medal winner. Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., knew that good self-management was the key to minimizing long-term diabetes complications, and the medal program was designed as an incentive for those committed to good diabetes care. In 1970, Joslin Diabetes Center expanded the program and began awarding a 50-year bronze medal. They presented the first 75-year medal in 1996.

comments 24 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2009

Diabetes: A Catalyst for Positive Change

Never underestimate the power of people with diabetes and their families. When we as a consumer group purchase more fruits and vegetables, walk or bicycle instead of taking the car, and educate ourselves about a healthy lifestyle, we are addressing global issues as well as personal ones and can have a strong, positive effect on the future.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2009

May 2009

Sex and Diabetes: From Her Point of View

Dear Sex & Diabetes, I have had type 1 diabetes since the age of ten.  When my husband and I were first married, I had no trouble with my sex drive. After the births of our three children, however, I noticed a big decrease in desire.  I have also had a hysterectomy and have gained 50 pounds since we were first married.  Do you think my weight has something to do with it?  I really don't feel it is fair to put my husband through my lack of desire. He still seems to want me.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 12, 2009

Free Type 1 Diabetes Retreat for Ages 18 to 25 Still Has Openings

Thanks to sponsorship from the Medtronic Foundation, the Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA) and the Diabetes Camp Leadership Development Council (DLEAD) are offering a diabetes retreat for young people with type 1 diabetes who are between the ages of 18 and 25. The retreat, which will take place at Villanova University from May 29th to 31st, is completely free and includes accommodations, meals, and participation in activities. All you have to provide is your own travel and incidentals. Join them for an awesome weekend!  

comments 4 comments - Posted May 8, 2009

“Global Diabetes Handprint” Awareness Campaign Selects Five Words That Exemplify Life with the Disease

Brave.  Fight.  Grandpa.  Life.  Alive.

Those words are some of the answers to the question "What would people living with diabetes or with somebody who has it tell you is the one word that sums up their own experience with the disease?"

comments 3 comments - Posted May 7, 2009

Diabetes and Smoking

The connection between smoking and cancer is well documented.  Less well known, however, is the fact that smoking exacerbates complications for people with diabetes. Smokers with diabetes are eleven times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than people who don't have diabetes and don't smoke.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 5, 2009

April 2009

Women with Diabetes Can Win the Self-image Battle

Women hate their bodies. At least, an overwhelming collection of statistical data suggests as much. Consider the following facts compiled by Liz Dittrich, Ph.D, at About-Face.org, which aims to combat negative and distorted images of women:

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2009

Joy Pape’s New Book: Living with Diabetes Day-to-Day

Long before Joy Pape, RN, BSN, CDE, WOCN, CFCN, served a stint as the clinical editor and contributing columnist for Diabetes Health Professional, she was a seasoned diabetes expert who knew her way around almost every aspect of the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2009

Grandparents Play an Important Role in Coping with Diabetes

Two-and-a-half years ago, my seven-year-old granddaughter, Liliana, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In less than a day, I was on an airplane to Portland so that I could be there to support my daughter and son-in-law.  The week that followed was a heart-wrenching experience for all of us.  I stayed with Liliana as much as possible so that her parents could go through extensive education and instruction on what would be in store for them.  I wanted to learn more about type 1, but I felt that there was time for that.  It was more important that they became the experts, and I became the shoulder on which to lean.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2009

Sex and Diabetes

Welcome to Diabetes Health's new column on sex and diabetes, by David Spero RN and Aisha Kassahoun. Once a month, we'll publish questions submitted by our readers, along with David and Aisha's responses. Send your questions to love@diabeteshealth.com and watch for their answers to appear in this column. 

comments 9 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2009

Living with Diabetes: Diabetes Doesn't Define Me

My whole childhood, I was a bit of a pudgy girl.  At the age of eight, I weighed over 110 pounds, wore a woman's size 8, and stood a mere five feet tall.  I wasn't grossly obese, by any means, but it was enough to keep me off the cheerleading squad and out of the popular crowd at school.  I didn't really have any health issues besides the weight.  

comments 27 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2009

March 2009

Living Well Program in Vermont Promotes Healthy Weight Loss for Type 2s

The following is a Q&A with Judith Waldrop, who participated in Living Well, a week-long residential program designed for women with type 2 diabetes. The program is a joint effort of the healthy weight loss pioneers at Green Mountain at Fox Run and the Joslin Diabetes Center. This year, Living Well will take place April 19-25, 2009. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Living with Diabetes: A Tribute to Moms and Dads

I hear voices in my surroundings as the cloud of confusion gradually begins to lift. "Curtis, can you hear me?" "Curtis, what was the score of the football game?" "Curtis, do you know where you are?" 

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2009

Many Factors Make Type 2 Diabetes a Challenge

There's a perception out there that people with type 2 could control their disease if they just tried hard enough. But self-control and will power are not the whole story. A new study published in this month's Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness includes "eating out, lack of social support and high-risk lifestyles" as just a few of the roadblocks that stop patients with type 2 diabetes from controlling their condition. 

comments 8 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2009

Welcome to the Diabetes (R)Evolution

This marks the beginning of a new era of living with diabetes!  The time has come to end the limited way in which we view, address, and manage diabetes.  The perspective that diabetes is solely a medical condition is archaic and is limiting our progress toward improving the lives of all those who live with diabetes.  One's experience with diabetes is not determined exclusively by one's medical care. As those who live with diabetes know all too well, diabetes affects nearly every area of their lives.  To date, there have been virtually no concerted efforts made to assist people with the array of "non-medical" components that come along with living with diabetes: that is, until now.

comments 15 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2009

Living With Diabetes: New Hope for Health

New cases of adult type 2 diabetes have increased by more than 90 percent in the past 10 years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease and Prevention.(1) Equally troubling is the dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes among children. Recent reports reveal a 200 percent increase in hospitalizations for children with type 2 diabetes, a condition that was rarely diagnosed in children decades ago.(2) In the words of the CDC, "Diabetes is common, disabling, and deadly."(3)

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2009

February 2009

Show Me the Love

Cards, gifts, chocolates, flowers, and romantic gestures. Isn't that what Valentine's Day is supposed to be about? My husband Brian and I had been going on that theory until 2002, when the holiday had the audacity to come around again one month after our son Danny was diagnosed with diabetes. That year, we woke up, wished each other Happy Valentine's Day and started talking about blood sugar levels, carbohydrates, insulin, exercise and pharmacies. We hit those same topics during the day by phone, and although we vaguely planned to go out for dinner, by evening Danny wasn't feeling well, and we spent part of the night on the phone to Children's Hospital. We did remember to kiss goodnight before we collapsed into a restless sleep, but were poised for the alarm to wake us, so we could test Danny's blood sugar levels again at midnight.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2009

Show Me The Love

Cards, gifts, chocolates, flowers, and romantic gestures. Isn't that what Valentine's Day is supposed to be about? My husband Brian and I had been going on that theory until 2002, when the holiday had the audacity to come around one month after our son Danny was diagnosed with diabetes. That year, we woke up, wished each other Happy Valentine's Day, and started talking about blood sugar levels, carbohydrates, insulin, exercise, and pharmacies. We hit those same topics during the day by phone, and although we vaguely planned to go out for dinner, by evening Danny wasn't feeling well, and we spent part of the night on the phone to Children's Hospital. We did remember to kiss goodnight before we collapsed into a restless sleep, but were poised for the alarm to wake us so we could test Danny's blood sugar levels again at midnight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2009

January 2009

Got Gas?

It's estimated that 20 percent of the United States population, or 60 million people, suffer from one or more medical disorders that cause flatulence. That's a lot of scented candles and extra-strength Febreze®.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 6, 2009

December 2008

Resolve and Evolve!

Here at Diabetes Health, we've learned the hard way that specific resolutions are the way to go. General plans like "I'll watch my weight" or "I'll check my blood glucose more often" tend to be less successful than the more specific: "I'll eat x number of carbs each meal" and "I'll check my BG before and after every meal." 

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2008

Woman Loses 134 Pounds in One Year

About a year ago, Cheryl Tooke found herself in the last place she ever wanted to be. She weighed 268 pounds, and her doctor had just diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes.

comments 85 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2008

Mind-Shifting: A Valuable Tool To Control Diabetes

The day I heard "Diabetes is not the leading cause of heart attack, blindness, kidney disease, and amputation," my life changed. I had believed the opposite to be true for the 32 years I'd been dealing with diabetes. Complications had always hung like a knife over my head.

comments 14 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Share Some Happiness This Season
Share Some Happiness This Season

People's happiness depends upon the happiness of others in their lives, says research published recently on bmj.com, a publication of the British Medical Association. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 22, 2008

Top 10 Patient Gripes
Top 10 Patient Gripes

Most people with diabetes will tell you this: Everything about having it is a hassle, an annoyance and sometimes utterly overwhelming. Endless worrying over meal plans, carbohydrate counting, finger-stick checks, pills, injections, lab tests, prescriptions, supplies and doctors’ appointments are nobody’s idea of fun.

comments 7 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2008

Testosterone and Diabetes—An Important Link?
Testosterone and Diabetes—An Important Link?

Until fairly recently, low testosterone in men (I call it "low T") was treated only in patients with severe and obvious T deficiencies, such as men with congenital hormonal conditions that affected their pituitary gland or those who had lost both testicles to trauma, tumors, or infections.  However, as the medical community has learned more about the benefits of T therapy for men with less obvious causes of low T (e.g., improved sexual desire and function, energy, and body composition), there has been concomitant interest in how T relates to other medical conditions, including diabetes.  It turns out that the relationship between low T and diabetes is quite involved, although the final chapter on the ultimate nature of the relationship is still to be written.  

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 15, 2008

My Son Has Diabetes! Woo Hoo!
My Son Has Diabetes! Woo Hoo!

How does a mother keep her sense of humor when her 12-year old son has just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? Well, it's not easy, but...

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2008

The Joke’s on You: Laugh Yourself Healthier
The Joke’s on You: Laugh Yourself Healthier

A doctor is trying to get his patient, an overweight man with diabetes, to lose some weight. "I want you to eat what you always do for two days, then skip a day, then repeat this for two weeks. When you come back, you should have lost five pounds." A month later when the patient returns, he's lost 20 pounds. The doctor is amazed. "Was it hard to follow my instructions?" he asks. "Well, on the third day, I thought I'd die," the man replied. The doctor nodded. "From hunger? " "No," the man replied, "From the skipping."

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 8, 2008

A Father of A Child with Type 1 Child Warns: Be Prepared for Hypoglycemia
A Father of A Child with Type 1 Child Warns: Be Prepared for Hypoglycemia

My daughter Lauren was five days shy of her twelfth birthday when she was diagnosed with type 1. We were blessed with a child who could and did take the lead in her recovery and care. She never had any "teen diabetic rebellion" and never adopted a "why me?" mentality. Her health has been great, and her last A1c was 6.7%. With all the hormonal changes that can affect a teenage girl's body and thus change her insulin requirements, Lauren has always stayed on top of her care and never lost her fantastic personality.

comments 24 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2008

November 2008

Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Young Athlete
Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Young Athlete

I'll never forget the afternoon of January 22, 2003. I was just leaving my classroom when my phone lit up, alerting me to a new voicemail. My heart stopped when I listened to the message. It was my son's pediatrician, asking me to call him back as soon as possible.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Young People With Diabetes Urgently Need Social and Psychological Support

According to a global survey studying children with diabetes, current healthcare systems are failing to give adequate social and psychological support to young people with diabetes. This lack of support often leads to poor control of their disease, resulting in long-term health complications. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2008

Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes
Thinking of Kids? Here’s Some Tips for Handling Pregnancy & Diabetes

Becoming pregnant for the first time can be overwhelming for any woman, especially if that woman has diabetes. When my husband and I decided we were ready to have children, the first thing I did was make an appointment with my endocrinologist. Diagnosed when I was fourteen, I've had type 1 diabetes for twenty-four years. My doctor explained that I would need to be in tight control for three months before I could even think about babies, so I got right to work. Learning everything I could about diabetes and pregnancy, I was pleased to discover that with education, support, and practice, a woman with diabetes has every opportunity for a healthy pregnancy.

comments 7 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

The Revised Village People Lyric May Soon Be “It’s Fun to Exercise at the YMCA,” Thanks to Its Diabetes Prevention Program
The Revised Village People Lyric May Soon Be “It’s Fun to Exercise at the YMCA,” Thanks to Its Diabetes Prevention Program

With more than 2,500 facilities serving 10,000 communities that run the gamut from big-city downtowns to small rural sites, the YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association) could turn out to be a powerful tool in the fight to prevent diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 17, 2008

Living with Diabetes: It’s Never One and Done
Living with Diabetes: It’s Never One and Done

As a child, I had an obsessive, irrational fear of going blind. At night, I lay in bed and kept opening my eyes every few minutes as I fell asleep to make sure I could still see, searching for outside lights filtering through the curtains of my bedroom window.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2008

Living with Diabetes: The Journey From Type 1 Diagnosis To Stability Is Rough
Living with Diabetes: The Journey From Type 1 Diagnosis To Stability Is Rough

I have been reading a lot about diabetes on the Internet ever since I was diagnosed less than a year ago, and I wanted to share my experiences.

comments 8 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2008

October 2008

Letter of the Week: Mother Discusses Advocacy in Schools
Letter of the Week: Mother Discusses Advocacy in Schools

I read with interest the article by Cynthia Heinz in which she spoke to her local school board, describing a worst case scenario for a child with severe hypoglycemia. As a veteran parent with 15 years of dealing with diabetes in our local public school, I have a few things to add to the discussion.

comments 9 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives
Living with Diabetes: Ryan Clauson Thrives

I have had type 1 diabetes for 16 years and, after a long path with many ups and downs, I have finally achieved optimal diabetic health. I have discovered the special lifestyle and diet mix that works and have brought my A1c from 11.4% to 5.2% while increasing my energy and overall health. I'm an elite athlete who plays professional ice hockey, and I currently run marathons. 

comments 19 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

LifeScan Launches Diabetes Handprint Project

LifeScan, the maker of OneTouch blood glucose meters, recently announced Global Diabetes Handprint, a new collaboration with the Diabetes Hands Foundation.  The project encourages people with diabetes to post an image of their hand, decorated with words and graphics depicting their personal expressions about living with diabetes (or decorate a virtual hand online). The project is designed to help people with diabetes use self-expression to connect with each other and feel less isolated.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Increasing Diabetes Prevention and Control in African American Communities

The National Diabetes Education Program has developed a curriculum designed to provide program leaders with the tools they need to increase diabetes prevention and control within African American communities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 27, 2008

Halloween Is More Than Scary for Parents of Trick-or-Treaters with Diabetes

Halloween scares me. It scares me even after seven years of helping my 14-year-old son with diabetes enjoy the holiday. We have created a comfortable tradition. Our neighbors get Danny non-food items. We go to a neighborhood bonfire and tell scary stories, and my husband Brian buys back most of Danny's candy and brings it to his office. Through experience, I am no longer afraid of the possible highs and lows, and, thanks to the blessing of cell phones, even Danny's teenage wandering feels okay. If you were a spider on our wall, we'd all appear excited and happy about Halloween.

comments 7 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes
Hard Work and Determination Pay Off for Student Athlete with Diabetes

I'll never forget the afternoon of January 22, 2003, and the phone call that came from Derek's pediatrician. I was just leaving my classroom that day when I noticed the light on my phone lit up, alerting me to a new voicemail. My heart stopped when I listened to the message.  The doctor asked me to call him back as soon as possible.  

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

Creating Harmony With Diabetes

I awake at 1:00 am with a feeling of sickness in my stomach. I wonder if it's from anxiety created by a weird dream, hormonal imbalances, and/or high blood sugar. Or did I go to bed angry? The deep-sunken feeling of thick stagnant sludge in my stomach begins to settle into my consciousness. My Mini Mag flashlight illuminates the blood sugar meter, which reads 357. I remember in my high blood sugar fogginess that my blood sugar was 140 before I went to sleep, and I did nothing out of the ordinary. Now, only a few hours later, I am rudely awakened and have to force myself to gather my senses to correct the situation. Fluctuations in blood sugar are mind boggling and frustrating, not to mention the feelings of irritability, anger, fatigue, victimization, and depression that come along in daily life with diabetes. It can create a sense of failure if one does not get a handle on creating a healthy mind, body, and spirit.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2008

September 2008

How You Wake Up Makes a Big Difference
How You Wake Up Makes a Big Difference

Sleep disorders are very common in modern society. Mild forms are familiar to everyone, and up to 10 to 20 percent of adults suffer from organic sleep disorders. Diagnosing sleep disorders, however, often requires extensive and expensive sleep recording at a sleep laboratory. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2008

What Should We Do with Our Feelings?
What Should We Do with Our Feelings?

We all have feelings, but what should we do with them, especially when we're upset? Should we analyze them, or should we ignore them?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 29, 2008

August 2008

AADE Survey: Taking Insulin Is a Hardship on Many—and They’re Reluctant to Talk About It With Caregivers

Results from a Harris survey commissioned by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) show that people with diabetes who must take insulin often struggle with dread and negative impacts on their lives because of it. But more than half of them—52 percent—are reluctant to share their concerns with their healthcare providers.

comments 10 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2008

Stephen R. Covey of “7 Habits” Fame Joins with Diabetes Coaching Organization Fit4D

Bayer Diabetes Care previewed a new partnership at the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting this month in Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2008

Following Dr. Bernstein on Holiday

At the beginning of 2007, we began studying guidebooks and making reservations for a long-anticipated trip to New Zealand and Australia. With limited funds and so much we wanted to do, we decided our budget would go farther if we stayed at hostels. At the same time, we were concerned about Al’s rising blood sugar scores. After visiting relatives during Christmas and celebrating the New Year, Al’s morning scores were as high as 154 mg/dl.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2008

Researchers Scrutinize Genes, Lifestyles as Incidence of Type 1 Doubles Among Finnish Children Over a 25-Year Period
Researchers Scrutinize Genes, Lifestyles as Incidence of Type 1 Doubles Among Finnish Children Over a 25-Year Period

Since the 1950s, Finland has recorded the world’s highest incidence of type 1 diabetes as a percentage of its population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2008

July 2008

“I Can’t Get Divorced, It’s Bad for My Glucose Levels!”

Hostility and anger are associated with higher blood glucose levels in non-diabetic single men, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2008

16-Year-Old Turns Type I Diagnosis into an Opportunity to Create Hip ID Bracelets
16-Year-Old Turns Type I Diagnosis into an Opportunity to Create Hip ID Bracelets

Before diabetes, I was a normal teenager whose greatest worry was whether I’d get an A or a B on a test. I was strong and healthy. Somehow, I took for granted all the freedoms that diabetes took away from me. Last year, at the age of fifteen, I learned that every day, even every breath, that we are given is a true gift.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2008

Parents Beware: 89 Percent of Children's Food Products Aren’t Healthy, But 62 Percent Claim They Are

Nine out of ten regular food items aimed specifically at children have a poor nutritional content because of high levels of sugar, fat or sodium, according to a detailed study of 367 products published in the July issue of the UK-based journal, Obesity Reviews.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2008

Children’s Nutrition and Fitness Education Program Scores

WakeMed Health & Hospitals Children’s Diabetes ENERGIZE! program has won the coveted NOVA Award from the American Hospital Association (AHA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2008

Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls
Metformin May Aid in Weight Loss for Obese Pre-Diabetic Teen Girls

Metformin, combined with dietary changes and exercise, seems to help obese pre-diabetic adolescents, especially girls, lose weight, says a report in the June 2008 Journal of Pediatrics.

comments 8 comments - Posted Jul 11, 2008

Amputee Coalition of America Enjoys Record Attendance at its National Conference
Amputee Coalition of America Enjoys Record Attendance at its National Conference

The 2008 Amputee Coalition of America’s annual national conference in Atlanta June 19 through 22 set new attendance records, driven by interest in the proposed federal prosthetic parity law and other issues of importance to amputees.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

Nick Jonas Sings Out About Diabetes
Nick Jonas Sings Out About Diabetes

The Jonas Brothers have a new album coming out August 12 on Hollywood Records. The album Little Bit Longer takes its title from a song Nick Jonas wrote about his struggle with diabetes. Nick told Entertainment Weekly that he wrote the song on a day when he was feeling down and out. He went into an empty hotel ballroom and walked out with a song. Talk about making lemonade when life gives you lemons! Thanks, Nick, we can’t wait to hear your new tunes.

comments 15 comments - Posted Jul 10, 2008

Bon Voyage: You CAN Take that Trip You’ve Been Dreaming About… Just Plan Ahead
Bon Voyage: You CAN Take that Trip You’ve Been Dreaming About… Just Plan Ahead

I’ve always been a pretty good traveler. I simply checked the weather at my destination and packed accordingly. Easy. Then I learned that I had diabetes, and suddenly even weekend trips required an intense amount of additional preparation.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2008

June 2008

Stacking the Deck: Carb Cards Make Counting Carbs a Cinch

This year Carb Cards™ have added calorie and fat gram information to the 3rd edition of the carbohydrate counting flashcards. Twelve new cards with information on such foods as oatmeal, beans, and fish have been added to the revised 55-card deck to encourage healthier choices and more variety in meal planning.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 26, 2008

Diabetes Getting You Down? Women Can Improve Their Inner Care by Focusing on Their Outer Beauty for a Day
Diabetes Getting You Down? Women Can Improve Their Inner Care by Focusing on Their Outer Beauty for a Day

How would you describe a minor hiccup in your daily care that  just happens out of the blue, especially when just moments before, you felt fine and everything seemed perfect? That’s a ‘diabetes bad hair day’ according to Divabetic, a national nonprofit diabetes outreach organization, currently on tour with its free national diabetes outreach program, ‘Novo Nordisk Presents: Divabetic – Makeover Your Diabetes.’

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 19, 2008

Adult Teeth May Come in Early for Children with Diabetes
Adult Teeth May Come in Early for Children with Diabetes

Children with diabetes may develop their permanent teeth earlier than normal, which could increase their risk of dental problems, according to findings published in the medical journal Pediatrics.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2008

"Erase Your Mistakes With Exercise" and Other Secrets to Living a Long Life With Diabetes

Sheri Colberg, PhD, who has type 1 diabetes, is an exercise physiologist at Old Dominion University who specializes in research in diabetes and exercise.  She has co-authored an inspirational and relevant book called, “50 Secrets of the Longest Living People with Diabetes.”

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2008

Sign Up to Join Diabetes Health's Visionary Plan

Dear friends of Diabetes Health,

We value your hard-earned diabetes wisdom and we want you to share it with the world! Please join us as a professional or lay diabetes advisor in one of our Diabetes Health website content Rooms.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2008

May 2008

Living Healthily with Diabetes Requires The Right Attitude as Well as the Right Actions
Living Healthily with Diabetes Requires The Right Attitude as Well as the Right Actions

While none of us would have asked for diabetes, and it's a semi-regular (OK, almost constant) pain in the butt, and I go from highs to lows both in my blood sugar and my frustration level, I still try to remain focused on my blessings: the good in my life and what diabetes gives me.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 30, 2008

Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission
Letter of the Week: Teenage Weight Loss and Insulin Omission

Dear Diabetes Health,

I appreciated Jamie Bailes’ (April/May 2008) article on helping overweight kids. To me, it illustrated the complexity of weight regulation and the folly of linking it to one factor (fat).

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Still Healthy After 54 Years Living With Type 1
Still Healthy After 54 Years Living With Type 1

I was diagnosed with type I insulin-dependent diabetes 54 years ago at the age of 22 months. A dear family friend suggested my parents take me to our family doctor and have me checked for diabetes after I showed some of the more common symptoms. I was unusually cranky and always hungry, but had a stomach that was hard to the touch as though food was not digesting properly. I was also always thirsty, drinking a lot and urinating frequently. Our doctor tested my blood sugar, and the result was high enough to indicate diabetes. He put me on 60 units of insulin per day and told my parents to take me to the hospital 30 miles from the little Western Kansas town where we lived to get a shot of insulin once a day.

comments 17 comments - Posted May 8, 2008

April 2008

Blast From the Past: A Doctor's Pre-Viagra-Era Sex Advice For Men Still Holds a Lot of Water

Do men with diabetes have special problems when it comes to sex? If so, are there special solutions as well? Bernie Zilbergeld, PhD, renowned sex psychologist and author of “Male Sexuality,” shares with us his extensive knowledge on the subject of male sexuality.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2008

Delores "Dee" Brehm, Age 77: Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 58 years
Delores "Dee" Brehm, Age 77: Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 58 years

When Dee Brehm was diagnosed in 1949 with type 1 diabetes, her prospects were not bright: a permanent chronic condition, a reduced life span, potentially devastating complications and perhaps no children. She married Bill Brehm in 1952, and they began a partnership knowing that together they would have to manage her disease. Dee subsequently defied the dim outlook for her life: She has two children and six grandchildren, and she has surpassed the half-century mark with this disease having been spared the ordeal of complications.

comments 23 comments - Posted Apr 2, 2008

February 2008

"Omission" Re-Emerges As a Distressing Trend Among Type 1 Teen Girls

About 10 years ago Diabetes Health began reporting on "omission," the practice among some type 1 teen girls of deliberately stopping their insulin intake to produce drastic - and fast - weight loss.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 29, 2008

Gertrude 'Blondie' Fram, Age 93: Living With Type 2 Diabetes For More Than Forty Years
Gertrude 'Blondie' Fram, Age 93: Living With Type 2 Diabetes For More Than Forty Years

Blondie Fram has been living well with type 2 diabetes for at least four decades, and probably many more before she was diagnosed. She attributes her long life with diabetes first and foremost to solid family ties. "I have had wonderful support from my children and their spouses," she says.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2008

Bigger Breasted Women More Vulnerable to Diabetes, Says Canadian Study

A Canadian study asserts that girls and young women with big breasts run a 68-percent greater chance of acquiring diabetes by middle age than their smaller-breasted peers.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2008

January 2008

Survey Says U.S. Healthcare System Stinks

A survey of people's experience with healthcare in seven countries - Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States - shows that we Americans don't stack up very well.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2008

Sponsor a Pig Now, Help Insulin Cell Transplants Later
Sponsor a Pig Now, Help Insulin Cell Transplants Later

Sponsor a pig and you can help a unique collaboration between Spring Point Project and the University of Minnesota to begin transplanting insulin-producing islet cells from pigs to humans within the next two years.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jan 24, 2008

Education Project Will Try to Slow Epidemic Level of Diabetes in India
Education Project Will Try to Slow Epidemic Level of Diabetes in India

Project HOPE, an international health education and humanitarian assistance organization, has launched The India Diabetes Educator Project. The four-year program will train 5,000 healthcare professionals to help counter the near epidemic level of type 2 diabetes in India.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2008

December 2007

Cruise the Caribbean With Olympian Gary Hall, Jr.
Cruise the Caribbean With Olympian Gary Hall, Jr.

Sometimes having diabetes offers saving graces and pleasurable moments. That's certainly the intent of the Gary Hall, Jr. Foundation, which has just announced that it will offer a five-day Caribbean cruise, starting December 1, 2008, for people with diabetes and their loved ones.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2007

Study Gives Kids a Personal Diabetes Trainer: It Really Helps!

In a recent study, 81 youth with type 1 diabetes, aged eleven to sixteen years, were divided into two groups. One group received care as usual, but every member of the second group got six sessions with a "diabetes personal trainer," during which they talked about self-monitoring, goal setting, and problem solving.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2007

November 2007

People Would Rather Tell You Your Spouse is Cheating Than Discuss Your Diabetes

In a recent survey of over 1000 adults, 82 percent knew someone with a chronic illness. Only 34 percent, however, were willing to offer advice to their chronically ill friend about handling their self-care.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2007

October 2007

Cruising With the King of Low Carb and Diabetes
Cruising With the King of Low Carb and Diabetes

On most cruises, a low-carb diet is the last thing on people's minds. In fact, stuffing yourself 24/7 is pretty much the order of the day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2007

After All These Years: Al Lewis, Age 73, Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 69 Years
After All These Years: Al Lewis, Age 73, Living with Type 1 Diabetes for 69 Years

Anyone who knows Al Lewis of Vancouver, BC, understands why he wouldn't switch to an insulin pump until a waterproof model became available in 1977: His whole life has revolved around water.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2007

September 2007

AYUDA: Together We Are Stronger
AYUDA: Together We Are Stronger

American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad, Inc., also known as AYUDA, is a small organization with a lofty goal: to bring the diabetes camp experience to underprivileged children and youth with type 1 diabetes around the world.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2007

Living with Type 1 Diabetes for Over Eighty Years
Living with Type 1 Diabetes for Over Eighty Years

If ever there were a diabetic trailblazer, the honor should go to James William Quander, the longest-living African-American with type 1 diabetes on record. Born in 1918 in Washington, D.C., he was diagnosed with diabetes in early 1924, shortly before the age of six.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 21, 2007

Young Type 1's Suffer More From Skin Problems

In a recent study comparing 212 type 1 youngsters with 196 healthy controls, researchers found that 67 percent of the type 1's had at least one skin disorder, as opposed to only 26 percent of the control group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2007

All California Schools Have To Help Kids With Diabetes

Until today, California schools have insisted that only nurses could administer insulin and give other diabetes-related care to school children. Unfortunately, California only has one school nurse for every 2,257 students.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 2, 2007

August 2007

Virginia Non-Medical School Personnel Help Care For Diabetic Students

In 1999, Virginia passed a law requiring non-medical school personnel to help students with their type 1 diabetes whenever a school nurse isn't around. A recent study looked at who was filling in for the missing nurses and whether they were doing a good job of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2007

July 2007

After All These Years:  Robert
After All These Years: Robert "Bob" Cleveland, Age 87, Living With Type 1 Diabetes for 82 Years

Not to be outdone by his older brother Gerald (the oldest living person with diabetes most of his life), Bob Cleveland is believed to be the longest-living person with type 1 diabetes to date after Gladys Dull, who beats him by less than a year.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2007

After All These Years:  Gerald Cleveland, Age 91, Has Had Type 1 Diabetes for 75 Years
After All These Years: Gerald Cleveland, Age 91, Has Had Type 1 Diabetes for 75 Years

A life-time resident of the Syracuse, New York, area, Gerald Cleveland has had a history of not quite coming out on top - at least until now.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2007

Diabetes Death Rates Drop, But Not For Women

Apparently death doesn't have a glass ceiling. After examining data from 20,000 people who were followed from the seventies through the nineties as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, researchers have found that diabetic men are dying less, but diabetic women aren't.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2007

June 2007

The Washington Boys and Their Activist Family Create a Diabetes Comic Book Superhero
The Washington Boys and Their Activist Family Create a Diabetes Comic Book Superhero

Kamaal Washington was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was nine. He's thirteen now. In those four years, he's become an advocate for diabetes and the author, with his brother Malcolm and help from his parents, of a diabetes educational superhero comic book that's swept the nation beyond their wildest expectations. But it all started when he began to be really, really thirsty.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 27, 2007

Is Your Diabetic Child Prepared for a School Emergency?
Is Your Diabetic Child Prepared for a School Emergency?

These days, it doesn't take much imagination to envision a weapon, bomb, chemical, or biological threat occurring at school. Such a situation, although unlikely, is a possibility in today's world. Consequently, parents must consider whether their diabetic child is properly prepared for a crisis. An examination of your child's school emergency plan may be well worth your time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2007

After All These Years:  Maureen Murray
After All These Years: Maureen Murray

When Maureen "Moe" Murray was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1954, she was told that she probably wouldn't live to adulthood. If she did, she wouldn't be able to get pregnant, and if by some miracle she did conceive, she would certainly miscarry. Fifty-two years later, she's a dynamo of a woman who's disproved every one of those dire predications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 8, 2007

May 2007

After All These Years: 83 Years of Living Well With Diabetes: Gladys C. Lester Dull
After All These Years: 83 Years of Living Well With Diabetes: Gladys C. Lester Dull

In November 1924, three years after the discovery of insulin in 1921, six-year-old Gladys Dull began her long life of insulin injections. To our knowledge, she is the longest-living person with diabetes to date.

comments 10 comments - Posted May 29, 2007

After All These Years: Betty Adamski Schunke Recalls Diabetes Icons

On March 28, 1950, nine-year-old Betty Adamski Schunke entered the hospital with a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. She remembers the date vividly. She also remembers the words of her pediatrician, one of the first women in the field: “You can do anything you want to do as long as you remember you have diabetes and plan accordingly.” A feisty, stubborn little girl who strove for perfection and never backed down, she took it for her motto.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2007

April 2007

After All These Years
After All These Years

Dr. David Reiss had never heard of diabetes until age 16, when he found out he had type 1 during his college physical exam. He rebelled and refused injections for a year, but by then there were ketones in his urine and he had no choice. That was 42 years ago, when people gave themselves just one injection a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2007

March 2007

Diabetes Health Sex Survey

Diabetes Health would like your help in addressing the lack of information about women, sex, and diabetes. To that end, we've set up a survey on our website, packed with questions about how having diabetes affects your sex life and how you overcome the hurdles that diabetes raises.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2007

February 2007

Joslin Study Finds Increased Use of Insulin Pumps, New Insulin Types Give Teens More Tools to Better Manage Diabetes

BOSTON - Feb. 27, 2007 - It is widely recognized that the teenage years are often a challenging time for youth with diabetes to maintain good blood glucose control. Hormonal changes, peer pressure, food temptations, and resistance to following good health practices are among the factors that make it difficult for many youngsters. Unfortunately, poor diabetes control places youth at increased risk of developing complications from diabetes later in life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 28, 2007

A Pony for A Cure
A Pony for A Cure

On January 27, in Phoenix, Arizona, ten-year-old Andrew gave up his beloved miniature horse, Zig Zag, to raise money for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). He had to think about it hard; they’d been together since he was six. But he swallowed his sorrow and donated his pony to the JDRF’s gala auction because he believed “Zig Zag could help find a cure.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2007

Fighting Diabetes at the Hottest Place on Earth
Fighting Diabetes at the Hottest Place on Earth

Death Valley is hardly a common place to be raising awareness of diabetes. This past fall, however, several hundred people with diabetes, healthcare professionals, and other bicyclists passionate about improving diabetes care rode 105 miles at upwards of 90 degrees to raise money for diabetes research in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) “Ride to Cure Diabetes 2006.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

Kids Who Stay on the Pump Are Rewarded With Good Control

Kids who discontinue pump therapy become “less adherent” and achieve poorer BG results than kids who remain on the pump, according to Joslin researchers who followed a group of type 1 youth starting the pump between 1998 and 2001.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2007

January 2007

Divabetic is Bringing Sexy Back!
Divabetic is Bringing Sexy Back!

Hundreds of women affected by diabetes across the country are feeling great about themselves and learning to stay that way, thanks to an innovative diabetes outreach campaign presented by a world leader in diabetes care, Novo Nordisk.┬áCalled “Novo Nordisk Presents Divabetic—Makeover Your Diabetes,” the program combines personalized diabetes education with free salon and spa services in a crash course designed to help every woman’s “inner diva” take charge of her own and her family’s health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2007

December 2006

Hypos Decreased During Exercise When Basal is Discontinued

“Discontinuing basal insulin during exercise is an effective strategy for reducing hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes,” say researchers from Tampa, Florida, “but the risk of hyperglycemia is increased.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

Program Aimed to Bring Out Your Diabetes ‘Diva’
Program Aimed to Bring Out Your Diabetes ‘Diva’

Started as a t-shirt fundraiser, the Divabetic phenomenon is beginning to take on a life of its own. Max Szadek, personal assistant to the late Luther Vandross, once decided to begin selling t-shirts with the word “Divabetic” on them to empower and educate women living with, at risk of, or affected by diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2006

November 2006

Toll-Free Hotline Launched

The holidays, although fun and festive, are stressful for many Americans; however, people with type 2 diabetes face a battle far more difficult than gaining a few extra holiday pounds.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2006

September 2006

Type 1 Kids Consume Fewer Carbs and More Fat than Nondiabetic Kids

Type 1 adolescents consume fewer calories from carbohydrates and more calories from fat than adolescents without diabetes, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, who say this is a concern given the risk that type 1 diabetes poses for cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2006

July 2006

Teen’s Book Offers Advice on Living With Type 1
Teen’s Book Offers Advice on Living With Type 1

In “The Diabetes Game: A Teenager’s Guide to Living Well With Diabetes” (Rewarding Health, 2006), 17-year-old Nora Coon offers teenagers advice on how to cope with juvenile diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2006

April 2006

10 Tests a Day Recommended for Pregnant Patients With Diabetes

Dutch researchers say that treatment of diabetes in pregnant women should be aimed at achieving A1C levels within the range of 6% or less. They add that “a minimum of 10 self-monitored blood glucose determinations daily is necessary to obtain adequate information of all daily glucose fluctuations.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Erectile Dysfunction Can Affect Quality of Life in Type 2s

For men with type 2 who suffer from erectile dysfunction, quality of life can decrease over the course of three years, according to the results of a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Diabetes Teen Talk Launches
Diabetes Teen Talk Launches

Diabetes Teen Talk is a new online community aimed at educating and inspiring teens with diabetes. The site, www.diabetesteentalk.com, launched in January 2006, and it will offer interviews, articles, a message board and a chat room where teens can learn more about diabetes and connect with others.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Type 2 Women at Greater Risk for Urinary Incontinence

[Type 2 diabetes] independently increases risk of urinary incontinence in women,” report researchers. “Because risk of incontinence appeared associated with longer duration of [type 2 diabetes], even delaying the onset of diabetes could have important public health implications.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

Women Who Consume Alcohol May Lower Their Type 2 Risk

There is a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in women who consume alcohol. That was the finding of researchers in the Netherlands investigating the relationship between alcohol consumption and type 2 in older women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2006

November 2005

Smoke Exposure Predicts Heart Disease and Type 2 in Kids

Exposure to tobacco smoke is associated with metabolic syndrome in young people, according to New York researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2005

October 2005

How to Deal With the ‘Diabetes Police’
How to Deal With the ‘Diabetes Police’

There here, they’re there, they’re everywhere! It’s the Diabetes Police—your family, friends and others who criticize your diabetes behaviors. They disapprove of your food choices, point out your weight gain, accuse you of skipping your medication and nag you to exercise more. These well-meaning individuals care about you, but they make life with diabetes more difficult and can create tension in a relationship. Here are some examples of ways that the Diabetes Police operate in our lives:

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 2005

August 2005

Youthful Relationships

Dietary glycemic load may predict the level of HDL cholesterol in younger people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2005

July 2005

How to Get Reliable Diabetes Information
How to Get Reliable Diabetes Information

Healthcare Professionals
Look for the “CDE”
The Certified Diabetes Educator designation is the gold standard for diabetes educators. Professionals with the “CDE” credential have achieved a level of expertise that is recognized by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. They have completed a required number of patient care hours, passed a comprehensive written exam and participate in continuing education opportunities. Different health professionals including physicians, psychologists, nurses, dietitians, podiatrists and pharmacists can earn the “CDE”. A “CDE” should provide reliable information.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2005

June 2005

Medtronic Web Site Offers Resource for Free Diabetes Management Classes

Medtronic, Inc., now has an event finder at their Web site (www.minimed.com) to help patients locate free diabetes management classes in their communities. Patients can simply enter their zip codes to learn the dates, times, locations and directions for free local classes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

Good News for Diabetic Men

Diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer, but only several years after diagnosis of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2005

February 2005

‘The Secrets of Living and Loving With Diabetes’
‘The Secrets of Living and Loving With Diabetes’

Editor’s note: The following review contains content that may be unsuitable for our younger readers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2005

September 2004

Type 1 and the Teenage Years

Young people with type 1 diabetes, like other people with diabetes, want to lead a normal life without making diabetes their top priority. Their philosophy is, "I’ll do what it takes to keep from going too low and embarrassing myself in front of my friends, but I don’t want to be too ‘nerdy’ about it."

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2004

June 2004

Lifestyle Center of America

Imagine going to a spa-like resort to spend 19 days focusing on your health and diet and learning how to cook tasty foods for weight loss. Throw in some massages, nearly countless hours of physician attention and a guaranteed improved lifestyle when you return home.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Alternate-Site Testing for Diabetic Children Gets Thumbs Up

United Kingdom researchers argue that testing blood glucose at the forearm “is an acceptable alternative to finger-prick testing for blood glucose measurement in children and adolescents.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

May 2004

Thunder Thighs Versus Love Handles

Larger leg fat mass is associated with lower glucose levels and may be protective against disturbed glucose metabolism, particularly in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

April 2004

Women, Diabetes and Heart Disease

Researchers have long believed that pre-menopausal women with type 2 may lose the protection against cardiovascular disease provided by estrogens to non-diabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

Bayer Diagnostics Announces Ascensia Winner

In November 2003, Bayer Diagnostics announced that Colleen McCarthy LaPierre, 35, was named the first official winner of the Ascensia Dream Fund Contest.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2004

February 2004

Researchers Analyze Teenage Diets and the Risk of Type 1

Icelandic researchers who investigated the relation of food to the incidence of type 1 diabetes among adolescents from 11 European countries report some unexpected findings…

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

May 2003

Online Workshop Offered as Part of Study

Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, is seeking participants for a study that involves a six-week online workshop teaching self-management skills for people with heart disease, lung disease or type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

Diabetes Incidence Lower in Women Receiving Hormone Therapy

In women with heart disease, hormone therapy reduced the incidence of diabetes by 35 percent, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2003

April 2003

Web-Based School Provides Info About Your Kidneys

Kidney School is a new, free interactive learning resource on the Web. It offers educational materials designed to teach kidney patients about kidney disease, treatment options and day-to-day coping skills.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

To Treat or Not to Treat? That Is the Question

Having bacteria in the urine without exhibiting symptoms is common among women with diabetes, say researchers investigating the issue of whether to treat this condition with antibiotics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2003

February 2003

Network to Focus on Type 1 Prevention

Fourteen entities have joined forces to form Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, a collaborative effort to test new approaches to understanding, preventing and treating type 1 diabetes. Recruitment for the first trials is expected to begin in early 2003.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Babies Sought for Diabetes Prevention Study

A multinational 10-year study, known as the Trial to Reduce Insulin-Dependent Diabetes in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR), is enlisting the participation of newborns who have a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

Grassroots Diabetes Programs for Latinos Receive Support

In an effort to help fight the diabetes epidemic among the Latino population in the United States, organizations in four states have received $10,000 each from the Aventis Adelante! Diabetes Community Excellence Awards. The Spanish word "adelante" means "to preserve" or "to move forward."

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

'Significant' Increase in Type 1 Reported in Denmark

Children born in Denmark after 1985 are at increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, say researchers involved in the Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood, who evaluated trends in age-specific incidence rates between 1970 and 2000.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2003

January 2003

High Blood Pressure in Kids Predicts Insulin Resistance

If your teenager has high blood pressure, researchers in the Czech Republic suggest taking steps to ward off insulin resistance. They add that high blood pressure is also associated with low folate levels and a high homocysteine level.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

Inflammation Marker More Likely to Predict Diabetes in Women

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammation marker that has been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians (see "A New Buzzword," November 2002, p. 66). However, a new study has found that, among Mexicans, CRP is likely to predict type 2 diabetes in women but not in men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2003

December 2002

Urinary Tract Infections

Postmenopausal women who have diabetes and take oral diabetes medications or insulin are more likely to have acute, symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) than women who don't have diabetes, women who manage their diabetes by lifestyle changes—or even women with untreated diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Erectile Dysfunction Common With Diabetes

Warning: This article contains language of an adult nature and is not recommended for our young readers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Urinary Tract Infections: Postmenopausal Women Who Take Diabetes Medications are at Greater Risk

Postmenopausal women who have diabetes and take oral diabetes medications or insulin are more likely to have acute, symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) than women who don't have diabetes, women who manage their diabetes by lifestyle changes - or even women with untreated diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

Shedding Light on Recurrent Miscarriages: Insulin Resistance a Possible Culprit for Some

Women who have repeated miscarriages are likely to be insulin-resistant, according to researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

High Overnight Blood Pressure Leads to Kidney Disease

A five-year study measuring overnight blood pressure in 75 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes revealed that high nighttime blood pressure can lead to kidney disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2002

November 2002

Vacuum Therapy Device for ED Now Available

Despite the widespread publicity their condition has received, a high percentage of men suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED) have failed to seek treatment with prescription therapies. This failure to seek treatment is primarily attributed to the great difficulty men have discussing ED with their doctors.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Habla Español?

"Si Tiene Diabetes, Cuide Su Corazón" (If you have diabetes, take care of your heart) is a campaign launched in late July 2002 by the U.S. National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to call attention to the fact that Hispanic and Latino Americans with diabetes are at higher risk for heart disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Longer Duration of Type 2 Impairs Erectile Function in Men

For men over the age of 50, increasing duration of type 2 diabetes is positively associated with increased risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) when compared to men without diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Getting a Leg Up

Obesity and weight gain before diagnosis of diabetes are associated with future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among women with type 2 diabetes, say Harvard researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

Getting a Leg Up: Controlling Weight Early Pays Off

Obesity and weight gain before diagnosis of diabetes are associated with future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among women with type 2 diabetes, say Harvard researchers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2002

October 2002

Which Comes First?

The risk of heart disease begins about 15 years before a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in women, and it is nearly as high before the women develop diabetes as it is after diagnosis, say researchers who have been studying 117,629 female nurses since 1976. None of the women studied had signs of heart disease at baseline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Female Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Prone to Eating Disorders

With the necessary emphasis on food, is it any wonder that many people with diabetes have eating disorders? Female adolescents who have type 1 diabetes but do not have a supportive family are particularly vulnerable to practicing unhealthy weight control habits, say researchers from Minnesota who studied 70 adolescent females and 73 adolescent males with type 1.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

Which Comes First? Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke Begins Before Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

The risk of heart disease begins about 15 years before a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in women, and it is nearly as high before the women develop diabetes as it is after diagnosis, say researchers who have been studying 117,629 female nurses since 1976. None of the women studied had signs of heart disease at baseline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2002

September 2002

Developing Solutions

With the World Health Organization estimating that 70 percent of all new cases of diabetes are expected to appear in developing nations, Novo Nordisk has committed $60 million over the next decade to the World Diabetes Foundation (WDF). Funding for the WDF also will be sought from other sources.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Birth Control Pills May Also Help Prevent Diabetes

Combination oral contraceptives may do more than prevent unwanted pregnancies—they also may help prevent diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

Z-z-zs Tell All: Snoring Shown to Be a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes in Women

Women who snore are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a study conducted by doctors at Harvard.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2002

August 2002

RX Costs Too High

Can't afford the prescription drugs you need?

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 1, 2002

A Research Extravaganza

Once again, Diabetes Health has read through more than 2,500 abstracts of research presented at the American Diabetes Association's annual Scientific Sessions and selected a few of the more interesting ones to pass along to you as part of our annual "Research Extravaganza" feature.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

Study Shows Women With Diabetes More Likely to Experience Sexual Problems

The topic of sexual problems among women with diabetes has been highly underreported, says Lois Jovanovic, MD, from the Sansum Medical Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California. While nearly 2,000 studies addressing sexual dysfunction among men with diabetes have been published in the past five years, Jovanovic observes that a "paltry" 13 articles about sexual dysfunction among women with diabetes appeared during that same period.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2002

June 2002

Case of Mistaken Identity: Teacher Accused of Harassing Student Wearing an Insulin Pump

The West Boca Raton, Florida, school district has decided not to reprimand an assistant principal accused of harassing a student who was wearing an insulin pump, according to an April 24 South Florida Sun-Sentinel article.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2002

May 2002

Wear a Pump in Style

Pump Wear, Inc., of Latham, New York, is offering clothing and accessories for children with type 1 diabetes that allow them to wear their insulin pumps in style.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

No Strong Consensus Among Greek Doctors About Birth Control for Young Women with Type 1 Diabetes

There is no strong consensus among doctors in Greece about what type of birth control young women with type 1 diabetes should use, according to a recent study. In addition, Greek gynecologists have limited experience in counseling and training young women about their diabetes. These findings were published in the December 2001 issue of the European Journal of Gynecology and Reproduction.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

Is There an Insulin Pump in the Classroom?

Are you planning to start your child on an insulin pump during summer vacation? While this may be a great time to get comfortable with a pump, the next challenge will come when the child returns to school.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 1, 2002

March 2002

Discount Cards for Pfizer Medications Available to Low-Income Seniors

Low-income senior citizens can buy a 30-day supply of Pfizer prescription medicines for $15 per prescription using the Pfizer Share Card, the drug manufacturer announced on January 15. Beginning March 1, the new card will cover more than 80 Pfizer medicines, including drugs for diabetes. Pfizer said the program will last until the government designs a longer-term solution.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2002

February 2002

Better Life and Better Control

Children with diabetes who have a better quality of life also maintain better control of their blood-glucose levels, according to worldwide statistics. Twenty-one research centers across 15 European countries, Canada and Japan participated in the study, which was published in the November 2001 issue of Diabetes Care.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2002

October 2001

Women with Type 1 are More Likely to Experience Early Menopause

Having type 1 diabetes can cause women to experience early menopause, say researchers in Pennsylvania. Janice S. Dorman, PhD, from the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues found that the women with type 1 diabetes started menstruation later, experienced more irregular periods before the age of 30 and reached menopause at an earlier age. As a result, women with type 1 also had a lower number of reproductive years (30 years compared to the 37 years of their non-diabetic sisters and 35 years in the control group). In evaluating all risk factors, researchers also found that bearing no children and the removal of one ovary were also associated with earlier menopause.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

Not Thinking Ahead

Only half of women with type 1 diabetes begin taking folic acid before they get pregnant, according to the results of a survey taken in England. The failure of a significant number of women with diabetes to take this critical supplement is due to "lack of awareness of its importance," say researchers. C.J. Wills, MRCP, of the Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, UK, and colleagues reported their findings in the May issue of Practical Diabetes International.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2001

September 2001

The Majority of Adolescents Display Risk Factors for Developing Type 2 Diabetes

The majority of middle school-aged students are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, according to researchers in Santa Barbara, California. What's more, those who watch more television have higher amounts of body weight and fat. David J. Pettitt, MD, of the Sansum Medical Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California and colleagues, studied the behaviors and risk factors for developing diabetes of 126 boys and 128 girls in the 6th and 7th grades at two Santa Barbara County schools.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2001

August 2001

Help Is Just a Call Away

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) is offering a tool to help people with diabetes find educators in their area. The "Find an Educator" feature on the AADE Web site provides links to diabetes educators in towns and cities within all 50 states. The listings include the names and phone numbers of local educators who can provide diabetes self-management training, including blood-sugar testing, advice on medications and meal and exercise planning. Both patients and health-care professionals can also contact the AADE by phone to receive the information. The AADE Web address is www.aadenet.org. The phone number is (800) 832-6874.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2001

July 2001

It’s Payback Time

Diabetes can seem like a thankless job—all work and no pay. That's why the Joslin Diabetes Center and the Eli Lilly Company give out awards to people with diabetes who have lived with the condition for long periods of time.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

New Therapy for Kids

Not much strikes fear into the hearts of the parents of a type 1 child than one who is sick and cannot hold his or her food down or who refuses to eat. But researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, have found a solution.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2001

June 2001

Who Says Little Kids Should Have All the Fun?

There is no doubt that camps are an educational and fun experience for kids with diabetes. But what about the big kids? Diabetes camps for adults age 17 and older do exist, and like camps for kids offer similar experiences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

New Technologies Improve Kids' BG Control

Many new technologies have recently become available to help manage type 1 diabetes. Among these, insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors are proving to have great benefit, even in young children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

What I Did Last Summer

"Camps offer a support system that isn't available in other places because [kids] are meeting other kids with diabetes," says Suzanne Apsey, program director for Triangle D Camp of Northern Illinois.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

Putting on the Breaks

Because of the obesity epidemic in this country, the disease formerly called "adult-onset" diabetes is no longer given that label. Type 2 diabetes, we have learned, is fair game for people of all ages.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

More Reason to Eat Your Fruit and Veggies

Eating fruits and vegetables may help reduce the risk of diabetes, especially among women and people with higher education levels, according to a recent study published in the January issue of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2001

Diagnosis: Control

Carla Elliot liked to keep busy. A bright and outgoing 14-year-old girl, Carla involved herself in as many activities as she could. Whether it was swimming, cheerleading, softball, 4-H club meetings or simply running around the neighborhood, Carla was there.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

A Father's Day Gift

Father's Day is a good time to reflect upon the gift fathers give to their children and families when they assume an active role in the management of diabetes. Fathers play a pivotal role in helping the child and family cope effectively with the diagnosis and daily challenge of living with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

Boy's Father Takes Part in His Diabetes Management

Carlos's HbA1c had been above 10.2% for the last three clinic visits. We were frustrated because he was 16 years old, had a great personality and knew a lot about diabetes management. Every time he came to clinic without his blood-sugar records, he would promise to bring them next time and also promised to get his HbA1c down. It was hard not to believe him because he was such a nice guy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2001

May 2001

A Side Effect Worth Noting

Heart disease medicine may protect people from diabetes, say researchers in the January 23 issue of Circulation: The Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2001

March 2001

Hearing is Believing - Braille Institute Offers Free Tapes to Visually Impaired People with Diabetes

According to a press release from the Braille Institute of America, people with diabetes who have lost their vision now have access to a free program that helps maintain their motivation and independence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2001

February 2001

Diabetes and the Young

Rising rates of type 1 diabetes may be primarily confined to children and teenagers, a British study shows (Diabetologia, vol. 43, suppl. 1, p. A27).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2001

October 2000

Dosing For a High BG: What to Do When Your Bolus Goes Down a ‘Black Hole’

Q: My 11-year-old son is using an insulin pump. Sometimes, especially at night, I will give him a bolus correction for an unexpected "high" BG number. For example, for a BG of 200, I would give him a bolus of one unit, aiming for a BG of around 100 to 120. Oftentimes, however, his BGs are the same, or even higher, two hours later, even after the bolus. Sometimes this problem persists through two such corrections, and then, suddenly, the next bolus will work as expected. At the next set change, the cannula looks fine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2000

September 2000

Pump Use Can Help Young Children

Parents who are concerned about the insulin pump's relative complexity but relish the possibilities of the increased control it can offer children may finally have the solution to their problem. A recent study suggests that part-time pumping can offer improved control for younger children without requiring them to operate the pump on their own.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

June 2000

Climbing Toward Better Control—How to Get Through Being a Young Person With Diabetes

Getting lost in the Amazon rain forest without a backpack is bad news for a person with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Finding the Right Training Program for Kids

Study after study has spotlighted the ever-growing trend of physical inactivity among today's youth. The Surgeon General's Report (1996) identified that nearly 50 percent of youths, aged 12 to 21, are not active on a regular basis. Physical education programs are fading from school curricula and parents are scrambling to find time and energy to be physically active with their children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

He Makes No Excuses—Having Diabetes Has Made Dusty Hubbard a Better Person

I know a young man. He is only 17. He appears to be a typical, everyday, run-of-the-mill teenager. He wears pants that are a size too big. His hair is in a crew cut. He drives a 1986 Nissan pickup with the windows down and the stereo blasting. He winks at the girls while sitting at the red lights and has a charming half-grin when he smiles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Exercise Leads to Longevity — Type 2 Men Who Exercise Live Longer

Researchers discovered that type 2 men who exercise have a lower overall risk of dying than diabetic men who lead a sedentary lifestyle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

Correlation Between BG Control and Menstruation in Diabetic Adolescents

A review of the charts of diabetic girls aged 10 to 18 revealed that better BG control can help regulate their menstruation. Of 47 girls studied, those who had menstrual problems had a higher mean HbA1c (11.4%) than those who had regular menstruation (9.7%).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2000

May 2000

An Epidemic of Type 2 Diabetes in Kids

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatrics are calling the alarming rise of type 2 diabetes among children an epidemic.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2000

January 2000

Diabetes Self-care Tasks—What Can a Kid Do?

For all children, the time between 6 and 12 years of age is marked by dramatic growth in many areas. For this reason, these years have been called the "I can do anything years."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 6, 2000

Just Say No to Insulin and Meformin?

If you have a child with type 2 diabetes, South Carolina researchers suggest the possibility of getting him or her off of insulin and metformin and onto a very low calorie diet (VLCD) with medical supervision.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2000

November 1999

How Low Can a Pregnant Woman Go?

I am 28 years old and I've had juvenile diabetes for 21 years. I want to try for a family. I'm concerned about my frequent dropping out with low blood sugars at any given time, for a hundred different reasons (hormone levels is one). My big question is, how low can your blood sugars go before it starts to harm a fetus? Or, is it a matter of how long you have a low blood sugar?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

Virtual Quilt Memorializes Diabetes Victims

While the AIDS Quilt travels around the country, the Diabetes Memorial Quilt hangs in cyberspace. The quilt remembers all those who have died of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1999

October 1999

Normal HbA1cs Greatly Reduce Complications Risk—Why Are Only 20 Percent Getting Tested?

For 30 years, diabetes specialist John Hunt, MB, BS, FRCP, has been trying to get his patients at the University of British Columbia to understand the importance of good control. Nothing worked, until six months ago, when Hunt hung this sign in his office:

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 1999

July 1999

Should Our 11-Year-Old Keep Pumping Through Summer?

Q: Our son is 11 years old, and has been on the pump for six months now. He told us that he is having problems with the pump because all the other kids ask him so many questions. He also says that he wants to go back to shots this summer so he can wear shorts and go swimming.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Common Psychological Issues That Factor Into a Patient Not Following a Treatment Regimen

Testing hurts my fingers. No one will want to marry me. My skin looks bumpy at injection sites Insulin makes me look fat It's not fair that I have to think about diabetes all the time I'll have a bad insulin reaction, especially at nighttime High (or low) blood sugars make me moody Each high blood sugar reading is a nail in my coffin Complications are "time bombs" waiting to explode I'm sick and tired of taking care of my diabetes I have to keep my diabetes a secret or I'll lose friends I feel as if my doctor is judging me My insurance won't cover diabetes supplies, treatment or education -Courtesy of Alan Jacobsen, MD, Joslin Diabetes Center

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

Osteoporosis in Type 1 Women Starts After Teen Years

Bone mineral density is lower in type 1 girls, and starts to decline sometime after the teen years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1999

June 1999

Pump Girl Power! Four Girls Prove That Diabetes Can’t Keep Them From Rockin’ and Rollin’

In February 1998, Brittany Rausch, 12, and her mother came up with an idea for a skit that she could perform at a diabetes camp in Southern California sponsored by the Pediatric Adolescent Diabetes Research and Education Foundation (PADRE). With a group of other girls she met at the camp, Rausch put together a song and dance routine to the "The Barbie Song," and it was a big hit with the other campers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

Teens Taught Coping Skills Can Lower Blood Sugar

Researchers found that teaching coping skills significantly improves an adolescent's metabolic control over diabetes, as well as his or her overall quality of life.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 1999

April 1999

Viagra Proven to Treat Erectile Dysfunction in Men with Diabetes

Erectile dysfunction is a complication that affects 35 to 75 percent of men with diabetes. It is most often associated with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease. According to the February 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), erectile dysfunction occurs at a younger age in men with diabetes than in men without the disease.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 1, 1999

January 1999

Parent Support Groups

Both the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation and American Diabetes Association have regional offices in every state that keep an updated list of all support groups in their particular geographic areas. You can call either organization for the office nearest you that offers support groups specifically for parents of children with diabetes. Many regional affiliates also keep a referral list of professional counselors familiar with diabetes and family issues. Both organizations also have excellent Web sites.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1999

A Nutring Family Equals Better BGs
A Nutring Family Equals Better BGs

Most parents never consider the possibility that their child will develop diabetes. Yet every year over 13,000 children are diagnosed with diabetes, more than all forms of childhood cancer combined. Every year 13,000 children struggle to learn diabetes control while 13,000 families fight against diabetes' control over their lives.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 1999

December 1998

Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Diabetes

The emergence of Viagra on the drug market has spurned several studies directed at sexual function in men with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 1, 1998

November 1998

Teens Taught Coping Skills - Lowers Blood Sugar

A team of researchers from Yale University was recently awarded the Applied Nursing Research Award for its study on teaching coping skills to adolescents with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1998

October 1998

A New Era for Impotence?

This story is intended for adult readers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1998

September 1998

Viagra Users Cautioned

Viagra, the wonder drug for men suffering from impotence, may be contraindicated for individuals taking nitrate-based heart medications, such as nitroglycerin for chest pains.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 1998

July 1998

How to Bridge the Pumpless Gap

Jeremy, who was attending summer football practice, did not want to wear his pump while playing. He had a morning basal rate of 1.0 units (Humalog) per hour. Halfway through practice, he would do a finger stick test. If his glucose was any higher than when he started, he would reconnect to his pump long enough to deliver a 1.0 unit bolus. However, he found this was not working. Practice lasted up to four hours and his afternoon glucose levels were frequently high.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

Does Type 1 Play a Role in Pubertal Growth?

The role that type 1 diabetes may or not play in the growth of kids with type 1 diabetes has been studied for some time. According to a study in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the timing of the pubertal growth is normal in type 1 children, but the magnitude of this growth is reduced in girls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

Teen Smoking: Gateway to Kidney Disease

In addition to the host of health risks that smoking presents to all people, studies have shown that adult type 1 smokers are at increased risk to develop macrovascular and microvascular diabetic complications, especially retinopathy and nephropathy. A recent study from Germany shows that markers of microvascular complications are also found in teen smokers with type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1998

May 1998

The Sexes Differ in Diabetes

The incidence of diabetes in men is slightly greater than in women, according to a study of 11,654 Norwegian men and women ages 35 to 52. Over the course of 12 years, 87 men and 75 women with diabetes were studied.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

First Impotence Pill Approved by FDA

Viagra, the first oral medication for impotence, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March. In clinical studies, 64 to 72 percent of the patients successfully completed intercourse after taking Viagra.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1998

April 1998

The Difference Between Boys and Girls - Study Finds More Adolescent Girls Hospitalized Than Boys

Adjusting to diabetes can be tough. But for teenage girls with diabetes it can be potentially fatal. Researchers have found that societal influences on teen boys and girls can affect their diabetes, and that in most cases girls suffer the most from these influences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

NBC Turns Down Impotence Ad

During the expensive and highly coveted Super Bowl commercial air-time viewers saw everything from Jerry Seinfeld hanging with Superman to chameleons hawking Budweiser beer. One thing viewers didn't see, however, was a commercial on impotence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1998

February 1998

United We Pump - Finding a Support Group that Works for You

If you have just started on the pump, or if you feel like you need to catch up with technological advancements in pump therapy, a support group could be the best place for you to begin. Undoubtedly, the advice of a peer who has experienced the challenges of going on a pump can be the best help for a pumper just starting out.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1998

January 1998

You’re Not Alone: Women, Diabetes and Sexual Health

Developing intimacy involves trusting and learning to understand the other person. Unfortunately, sexual issues, especially for women with diabetes, are often kept in the dark.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 1, 1998

December 1997

Immunization Timing May Increase Type 1 Diabetes

The number of cases of type 1 diabetes occurring before age 15 might be greatly reduced by immunizing children with common pediatric vaccines at birth, rather than waiting until eight weeks of age, according to a new study from LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City and Classen Immunotherapies in Baltimore, Md.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1997

October 1997

Life's Not So Sweet: Yet Another Student Suspended for Glucose Tablets

Last May, DIABETES HEALTH ran a story about 13-year-old Eric Carr who was suspended and branded a drug dealer by his Missouri middle school for passing out glucose tablets. We received many letters and phone calls from readers shocked by the school's ignorance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1997

September 1997

These "Magic" Questions Promote Behavioral Change

The following is the behavior change protocol presented by Funnell and Anderson. These questions are intended to be asked of patients by health care professionals, but they can be used individually and can be helpful to keep in mind when trying to make significant lifestyle changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1997

August 1997

Hungry for Help

Many young women with diabetes are putting looks before their health, even going so far as to stop taking insulin to lose weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

Type 1, Your Cycle, and Your Heart

Women with type 1 diabetes are more prone to experience premature menopause and, as a result, are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1997

May 1997

The Skinny on Teens with Type 2

Researchers find a growing number of children and adolescents in the U.S. are developing type 2 diabetes, a condition that usually develops in people over 30. A possible cause: Obesity in young people is on the rise.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1997

April 1997

New Insulin Has Campers Marching to a Different Drummer

Vivian Murray, RD, a type I for 32 years, is a camp director for children with diabetes. She was recently anticipating the possible problems she might encounter this summer supervising 230 enthusiastic kids.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1997

March 1997

Catch the Wave

I see the swell rising towards me. My instructor, Ed Guzman, says, "Catch this one!" I turn the surfboard towards the distant beach. "Get down and start paddling!" yells Ed. Stroking forward, I feel the swell of the wave begin to lift and propel my ten-foot surfboard. "Stand up and ride it!" Ed says with a big smile. In one smooth (well, somewhat smooth) action, I go from prone position to standing on my board as it begins to accelerate. I'm surfing! I feel a sense of euphoria and complete relaxation at the same time. This is the beginning of a series of surfing lessons from "Club Ed" in Santa Cruz, California.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1997

February 1997

Women, Sex and Diabetes

Last month Diabetes Health reported on men, sex and diabetes. In this issue, we look at some of the concerns women with diabetes may have about sex.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 1997

A New Ally Against Impotence

Now impotence sufferers have another valuable ally. VIVUS Inc. has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its new product MUSE (Alprostadil), a urethral suppository for the treatment of impotence.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 1997

October 1996

Support Groups Come of Age

If you're looking for encouraging words and education, but the very words "support group" bring forth images of half-naked men pounding bongos in the forest, don't despair. With over 800 groups in the United States for people with diabetes and a whole host of computer-based discussion groups springing up on the internet every day, there's really something for everyone.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 1996

August 1996

Hard News For Impotency Sufferers

Hope may be in store for men who experience one of the most common side-effects of diabetes: impotence. In the past, men have relied on mechanical devices and injections to boost their sex lives, but a new drug called sildenfil may offer aid without the need for pumps or sharp needles. Pfizer Inc. from Sandwich, England, was testing a drug for angina, the chest pain preceding a heart attack, when the subjects of the study reported an unexpected bonus: improved erections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1996

May 1996

Type 1 Girls More Overweight Than Non-diabetic Peers

Girls with type I diabetes are more overweight than their peers, a study in Finland recently reported. This indicates that a more effective prevention of obesity is now needed in the treatment of diabetes, the researchers claim.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1996

March 1996

Diabetes Support Groups—Cajun Style

When people think of New Orleans, the first thing that comes to mind may be Mardi Gras or red-hot jambalaya. Faye Dyer Englade has made it her job to change people's perceptions of New Orleans-within the diabetes community at least-through the Lakeview Diabetes Wellness Program.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

Children Frequently Get Inaccurate Insulin Doses

Because children receive such small doses of insulin compared to adults, accurate measurement is crucial. But doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital reported in the January 1996 Diabetes Care that caregivers overdraw insulin by an average of 0.22 U.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1996

February 1996

A Return To Normal, Pos-T-Vac Helps Me Over Come Erectile Dysfunction

The Pos-T-Vac is a simple device intended to help men overcome erectile dysfunction. According to its manufacturer, Pos-T-Vac, Inc., it is "easy to use, non-invasive... even those with severe arthritis can have a return of normal sexual activity with a very user-friendly system along with the most comfortable constriction band available."

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 1, 1996

January 1996

The Portland Area Family Support Group—An Oregon Treasure

When Ruth Struck's five-year-old son was diagnosed with diabetes in 1992, she dialed the phone numbers of some local support groups and discovered that all of the groups in her area had closed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Study Shows Sex Hormones Linked To Diabetes Complications

A recent study reported in the September 1995 issue of Diabetes Care by David S.H. Bell, MB, at the University of Alabama, may have answered a question long debated by diabetes researchers. It has been known for some time that long-term diabetes complications rarely occur before puberty. Whether this is a result of the short duration of diabetes before puberty or because pre-puberty diabetes simply does not cause complications has remained a controversial question.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

Support Group For Parents & Kids

Two years ago Julie Farabee's four-year-old daughter was diagnosed with diabetes. Farabee not only had to deal with the worry and fear of having a chronically ill child, she had to suffer in what seemed like solitude.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1996

December 1995

Living With Diabetes Returns To Cable

The popular medical news magazine show, Living With Diabetes, has returned to television. Kaleidoscope, the Americans with Disabilities Channel, airs the program every Monday at 8:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, and on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. EST. Living With Diabetes is available in 15 million homes across the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 1995

November 1995

So You Want To Start A Support Group?

It's a big step, but it may be one you'll be glad you took. The ADA promotes the role of support groups in diabetes care.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 1, 1995

A Book Review Just for Teens: "In Control: A Guide For Teens With Diabetes" by Jean Betschart, MN, RN, CDE, and Susan Thorn, RD, LD, CDE

Whom do you turn to for your changing needs as a teen with diabetes? Jean Betschart and Susan Thom have produced a great book that is sure to bring independence to the lives of many young adult readers.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1995

October 1995

Hormones And Hemoglobin: Special Issues For Women

Female hormones are both a blessing and a curse. They make us feminine and fertile, but they upset our diabetes control. With each monthly cycle, insulin needs are influenced heavily by changing hormone levels.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 1, 1995

September 1995

Myth: Breast Cancer More Fatal Than Diabetes - Diabetes Twice As Deadly

In 1994, Universal Press Syndicate published a report stating that diabetes is twice as deadly as breast cancer in women. Linda Geiss, a researcher in Atlanta, wanted to find out if this statistic was accurate.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1995

August 1995

Cornstarch Cuts Kids' Nighttime Hypos By 73%

According to a study performed at a diabetes camp, kids with type I diabetes should eat uncooked cornstarch before bedtime.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 1995

May 1995

DI has Acquired Real Living with Diabetes

Now Diabetes Health will begin serving the subscribers of the journal Real Living with Diabetes. Real Living ceased publication with its March/April issue, and Diabetes Health has agreed to fill their remaining subscriptions.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 1995

March 1995

Studies Show How Adolescents Struggle to Control Diabetes

As if the adolescent experience is not traumatic enough, a number of teens must also carry the burden of diabetes through those difficult years.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1995

November 1994

Women's Woes Worsen With Poor Blood Sugar Control

Menstrual irregularities are more common in adolescent girls who have type I diabetes, according to research done at John Radcliffe Hospital and published in Diabetes Medicine (June, 1994).

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1994

High Blood Sugars Increase Chance Of Miscarriage

In a recent study published in Obstetrics and Gynecology (Oct. 1994) it was found that women with type I diabetes have an increased risk of miscarriage or having infants with birth defects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1994

Over 31% Of Women With Diabetes Skip Their Insulin On Purpose

As many as 40.2 percent of women with type I diabetes between the ages of 15 and 30 intentionally take less insulin than they need. This is according to a study that took place at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and was published in Diabetes Care (October 1994).

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1994

November 1993

IUDs Are Safe For Women With Type1

A new study from Düsseldorf, Germany shows that modern IUDs (Intrauterine Devices) are as safe and effective in women with type I diabetes as in women without diabetes (from Diabetes Care, Sept. '93). Concerns about IUDs in type I women arise from studies using older model devices which indicate a higher rate of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) than in nondiabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 1993

April 1993

Excercise Lowers Cholesterol

In a study of children with type I diabetes, researchers have found for the first time that higher levels of physical fitness are associated with lower levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels (LDL). This is a significant finding because lower levels of cholesterol and LDL reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The study, performed at the Diabetes Center of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, measured the levels of physical fitness, cholesterol, and LDL of 77 high school-aged boys and girls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 1993

March 1993

Males At Greater Risk For Type 1

A study from Turin, Italy, has found a higher incidence of type 1 diabetes in males than in females in the age group of 15-29 years old. The report of the study, published in Diabetes Care, January 1993, recalls previous studies from Sweden and Spain in similar age groups that found males to be a greater risk of developing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 1993

September 1991

The Pump: It Changed Their Lives

Tamara Norris and Cyndie Flores are insulin pump users who started their own business selling pump accesories. In talking with DIABETES HEALTH, Tamara and Cyndie discuss their first experiences using the insulin pump, and their decision to go into business.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

Women, Sex And Diabetes

Few studies have looked closely at female sexuality and diabetes. What are the special issues that arise? In this interview, Eileen Walko, MD, and Daryn Stier, MSW, LCSW, poignantly discuss what all women with diabetes should know.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

Men, Sex, And Diabetes

Do men with diabetes have special problems when it comes to sex? If so, are there special solutions as well? Bernie Zilbergeld, PhD, renowned sex psychologist and author of Male Sexuality, shares with us his extensive knowledge on the subject of male sexuality.

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 1, 1991

January 1991

A Helping Hand

On August 17, Animas Corporation and the Diabetes Trust Fund announced the creation of The Diabetes Trust Fund Insulin Pump Plan, valued at $200,000. The program will be aimed at offering insulin pumps and supplies to type 1 children and teens in financial need.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1991

January 1970

A Good Relationship with Your School Nurse Pays Off in Dividends

Because we have good health insurance, my son sees his endocrinologist twice a year, his diabetes health educator twice a year, and his nutritionist once a year. Meanwhile, he sees his school nurse one to three times a day. As you know, this relationship can make a difference for the rest of a child's life.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jan 1, 1970

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