See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Research Archives

Diabetes Research Article Archives

April 2014

Prodigy Diabetes Care Moves Forward After FDA Concludes Regulatory Action

CHARLOTTE, N.C., April 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- On April 10, 2014 the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued a "Closeout" letter to Prodigy Diabetes Care to formally conclude the regulatory action that resulted in a Warning Letter on February 22, 2013.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2014

Mediterranean Diet Again Linked to Lower Risk Of Diabetes

While experts have long said a Mediterranean diet is beneficial for both a healthy heart and healthy weight, a recent study affirms research suggesting that it may also lower the risk of developing diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2014

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Reducing Alzheimer's Disease

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that as many as half of all Americans who are alive today will end their lives in nursing homes, although it won’t be because their bodies cease to function, but because of their brains.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2014

Inhaled Insulin to Treat Diabetes Earns FDA Committee Recommendation

The inhaled insulin Afrezza has been recommended for approval by a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2014

Diabetes and Arthritis: a Challenging Combination

For older adults dealing with type 2 diabetes, co-occurring physical problems can make disease management and healthy living a challenge. One of those most challenging-and common- diagnoses is arthritis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2014

Life With Type 2: The Power of Naming

This is not a religious essay, so please don't take the example below wrong.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2014

Obesity & Insulin Resistance

A University of Sao Paulo study of 135 individuals, half with normal weight and the other half obese, suggests there is a link between obesity and the body's inability to use insulin-insulin resistance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2014

Tracking Hospital Infections

When we visit the hospital, we don't expect to be released with more problems than when we checked in. But that's a very real possibility, according to a sobering new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2014

March 2014

Is "Fat Cell Expansion" a Cause of Obesity?

One of the last things we want to hear in a society where most of us work seated at a desk or table is our style of work may be a contributor to the current epidemic obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2014

On "Alert Day," ADA Offers Online Test for Type 2

Today is the American Diabetes Association's 26th Annual Alert Day, when the association reaches out to inform Americans about the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2014

Research Examines Damage to Hand Function in Type 2s

Damage to hands is not commonly associated with type 2 diabetes. We tend to think of the harm the disease does to feet and legs. But new research from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance found impairments in dexterity and sensory function in the hands of type 2 diabetes patients. The study marks the first time such results have been documented in that population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2014

FDA Delays Final OK for Type 2 Drug Empagliflozin

The FDA will delay allowing the type 2 drug empagliflozin to enter the U.S. market until "previously observed deficiencies" at the plant where it is manufactured are fixed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2014

Both High and Low A1c's Implicated in Longer Hospital Stays

An interesting study out of Brigham and Women's hospital in Boston ties poor glycemic control--defined as an A1c of 8% or more--to longer hospital stays for non-cardiac surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2014

Marijuana May Help Blood Sugar Control, Study Says

For residents of Colorado and Washington state, 2014 brought a profound legal and societal change. Marijuana is now available, legally, in both of those states. While the drug is cleared for medical use elsewhere, and other jurisdictions have decriminalized it, these two states have taken the profound, extra step of full legalization.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2014

Celebrating 30 years of the DCCT: Part 2

Three decades ago, the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Study was just beginning. To mark the anniversary of the most important advancement in diabetes care in most of our lifetimes, I've been recalling how the study came about and what it revealed. In short, the DCCT proved the tight control of type 1 diabetes not only was an achievable goal, but that it prevented or delayed complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 11, 2014

Celebrating 30 Years of the DCCT: Part 1

What do three decades mean to you? In absolute terms, 30 years is a serious amount of time. If you're under the age of 40, for example, it's the vast majority of your life. But in the world of medical research, where studies can take many years to complete--and even longer to affect everyday practice--three decades can go by surprisingly quickly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2014

Rare Mutation Destroys Gene Associated With Type 2

A recent New York Times article reports that researchers have found a rare mutation that reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two thirds, even in obese people.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 9, 2014

57% of Type 1s Expect a Cure by 2024

New York, NY (PRWEB)--More than half of people who have type 1 diabetes or have a family member or close friend with the disease expect a cure to be found in the next 10 years, according to a semi-annual survey conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2014

Mouth Spray Could Aid Weight Loss

Few things are better for us or more difficult to sustain than losing weight. Whatever the cause--genetics, environment, our own bad choices--human bodies can be easily turned into sugar-craving machines. Turning our bodies from that course is easy enough for a week or three, but sustaining weight loss over many months and years is notoriously difficult.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2014

Life-Prolonging Chemical Could Someday Lead to Type 2 Treatment

A recent article in Scientific American discusses a synthetic chemical that has extended the lifespan of lab mice by mimicking the effects of a low-calorie diet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 6, 2014

FDA Backtracks Over GLP-1s' Effects on Pancreas

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that its review of various animal and human studies does not show a link between GLP-1 drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes and pancreatic maladies, including acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 4, 2014

More Than 180 New Diabetes Drugs in Development

A total of 182 new drugs to treat diabetes or diabetes-related conditions are currently in clinical trials or undergoing review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a report just published by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2014

February 2014

Weekly Type 2 Drug to Be Delivered Via Needle Patch

A recent agreement between Zosano Pharma, Inc. and Novo Nordisk could lead to the introduction of a once-weekly drug for type 2s that is administered via a micro-needle patch system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2014

Weekly Potpourri

Blame The Media

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2014

Successful Clinical Trial of Type 2 Drug That Works on Intestinal Organisms

BROOMFIELD, Colo.--MicroBiome TherapeuticsTM has announced positive results from its clinical trial of a microbiome modulator, NM504, in development for type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2014

Life With Type 2: The Caveman's Gift

The Neanderthals--Homo sapiens neanderthalensis--entered popular imagination more than 160 years ago when their remains were first discovered in Germany's Neander Valley (thal in German).

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2014

FDA Approves Dexcom G4 Platinum CGM Use for Children 2-17

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the expanded use of the Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitoring System for patients with diabetes ages 2 to 17 years. The G4 Platinum System, which monitors blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, had been approved for patients ages 18 and older.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2014

Stress-Induced Hormone Imbalances Go Far Beyond Insulin in Diabetes

Virtually anything from the stress of a long checkout line to the first signs of menopause can trigger hormone imbalances, which reveal themselves through mood swings, fatigue, migraines, memory problems, and a lackluster sex drive.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2014

Skin Cream Could Treat Peripheral Neuropathy

One of the most debilitating risks of diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, which can impact millions of people each year and often leads to amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 2, 2014

January 2014

Digging into the New Blood Pressure Guidelines

For people with diabetes of all types, blood pressure is one of the most important health markers. It can be taken quickly and easily, and offers a quick glimpse at cardiovascular health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2014

FDA Proposes Separate Guidelines for Home vs. Clinical Glucose Meters

The Food and Drug Administration is proposing separate guidelines for over-the-counter blood glucose meters compared to those used at the doctor's office or in other healthcare settings.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2014

Study Strengthens Type 2-Inflammation Link

According to the results of a recent study, the onset of type 2 diabetes may be more closely related to inflammation than previous research has suggested.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2014

Google Tests "Smart" Contact Lens for People With Diabetes

Internet search engine giant Google has announced that it developing a "smart contact lens" that uses an embedded chip and antenna to monitor blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2014

Type 1 Drug Wins Orphan Status

DV-100, a drug designed to halt the body's autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that leads to type 1 disease, has won orphan drug status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2014

When Doctors Don't Listen: Tell Your Story

I recently interviewed Dr. Leana Wen, a Rhodes Scholar who is an attending physician and Director of Patient-Centered Care Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine at George Washington University in Washington, DC. She is the co-author of "When Doctors Don't Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests," a text she wrote with Joshua Kosowsky, MD. The book arose from their frustration at the number of tests modern medicine seems to require, often with no useful results or help in arriving at a diagnosis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2014

Many Type 2s Never Warned About Threats to Vision

More than half of adults with type 2 diabetes who are at risk of vision loss from their condition have not been advised by their doctors of the danger.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2014

Asian Companies to Collaborate on Type 1 Antibody Treatment

Two Asian companies--BioLineRx of Israel and JHL Biotech of Taiwan--have agreed to collaborate on the development and marketing of BL-9020, a monoclonal antibody that could become a significant means of treatment for early-stage type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 10, 2014

FDA OKs Dapagliflozin as Type 2 Drug

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the entry of dapagliflozin, a drug for treating type 2 diabetes, into the U.S. market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2014

A Daughter's Apology

My mother is a diabetic--something that shouldn't be someone's identifier, but unfortunately it has defined her life. This is my apology to her and to everyone struggling with un-understanding families. This is my account of what it is like from the outside looking in, knowing it is my potential future, and coming to terms with how I wasn't there for my mother.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 2, 2014

FDA Opens Way for Diabetic Macular Edema Device

The Food and Drug Adminsitration, reversing itself on a decision it made in October, has opened the way for a new treatment for diabetic macular edema to reach the U.S. market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2014

December 2013

AACE Says Diabetes Is Second Most Searched-for Condition

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists has released a list of the most frequently searched-for endocrine medical conditions on its patient education website at www.empoweryourhealth.org.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2013

ADA: Many at Risk for Diabetes Are Unaware

Despite evening newscasts that rarely skip talk about the increasing number of type 2 diabetes cases, and hard looks at the reasons why, many of those who run a high risk of developing diabetes are oblivious to it, according to the results of a new survey.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2013

Topical Diabetic Neuropathy Gel Enters Phase 3

Clonidine, a topical gel designed for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, will begin phase three studies early in 2014 after its maker, North Carolina-based BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc., garnered fast-track approval from the Food and Drug Administration for the trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2013

Researchers Find a Key to Healing Chronic Wounds

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Chronic wounds affect an estimated 6.5 million Americans at an annual cost of about $25 billion. Further, foot blisters and other diabetic ulcers or sores account for the vast majority of foot and leg amputations in the United States today.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 18, 2013

Protein Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Insulin Resistance

People with type 2 diabetes who use insulin to help control elevated blood sugar might be able to end their dependence on it if new research progresses.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2013

Is High Fructose Corn Syrup “the New Trans Fat"?

The non-profit consumer action group Citizens for Health earlier this month called on the Food and Drug Administration to do its part in raising awareness of the dangers of high fructose corn syrup by making an official statement recognizing the sweetener as an unsafe addition to the nation's food supply.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2013

Doctors Ask for Diabetes Patient Input Only 29% of the Time

Results from the global Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 study (DAWN2TM) presented December 5 at a symposium during the World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation in Melbourne, Australia, show that only 29 percent of people with diabetes report that their healthcare team asks for their input when making their treatment plans.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2013

Skin Disease Drug Holds Promise for Type 1s

File this news under "potential breakthrough you didn't see coming." Researchers have tried--and seem to have succeeded--in slowing the destruction of beta cells by treating recently diagnosed people with type 1 diabetes with alefacept, a drug usually prescribed to treat psoriasis, a disorder that leaves skin red and itchy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2013

"Artificial Pancreas" Could Benefit From Inhaled Insulin Therapy

For people with type 1 diabetes who follow medical research, development of a closed-loop, "artificial pancreas" has always been the Holy Grail. Such a system would combine an insulin pump with a continuous glucose monitor to provide constant control of blood glucose levels. But what if such a system was only a start? What if it might work better when combined with another therapy altogether?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2013

November 2013

If You Have Diabetes, Set Your Sight on Healthy Vision

If you have diabetes, your doctors most likely have told you to keep your blood sugar under control through diet, exercise, and proper medication. But did you know that you also need a dilated eye exam at least once a year?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2013

Less Invasive Gastric Sleeve May Benefit Type 2s

Research has already shown that gastric bypass can ease symptoms of diabetes, but according to a new study, a less-invasive sleeve may also result in benefits for those with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 29, 2013

Giving Thanks for Smart People at the Edges

One of my job as a member of the Diabetes Health staff is to manage the comments section on our website. Sometimes the comments get heated, and when they do certain patterns emerge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 28, 2013

Another Step Toward Replacing Daily Injections

Researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have are looking at nanoparticles and ultrasound as a way to do away with the need for daily injections of insulin via syringes and needles.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2013

Diabetes Tools Dominate Docs' Top 10 Patient Apps

According to researchers, applications that help patients manage their diabetes are among the top 10 apps doctors suggest to their patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2013

Promising New Type 2 Drug on Horizon

A new drug being developed by Eli Lilly Co. that duplicates the effects of a hormone may soon be added to the growing arsenal of pharmaceutical weapons available to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2013

High Serum Calcium Linked to Developing Type 2

According to results of a new study, high levels of serum calcium - the calcium that shows up in extracellular fluid or muscle tissue - could be linked to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2013

Napping May Increase Likelihood of Type 2

If you like taking an afternoon power nap as a way to recharge, make sure it's a short one.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 6, 2013

Study to See If Vitamin D Can Prevent Type 2

The National Institutes of Health is investing millions of dollars in new research to determine if vitamin D supplements play a role in preventing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2013

Life With Type 2: How (Non-Diabetic) Others See Us

It's always fun to get a different take on things. You sit for years a few rows up from first base and then one day you decide to go sit out by left field. Who knew the game could look so different?

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2013

October 2013

New Technology Could Help Type 2s Predict Hypoglycemia

Maryland-based health technology company WellDoc says it has developed a mathematical model that eventually will allow people with type 2 diabetes to predict the onset of a hypoglycemic episode.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2013

Sweet Beams Are Made of These

A German research team calls it "the sweet melody of glucose."

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2013

US Patent Office Issues Patent for Oral Insulin Delivery

The US Patent Office has issued a patent to Massachusetts-based Aphios Corporation for the oral delivery of insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2013

Life With Type 2: "Nano, Nano," as Mork Almost Said

Comedian Robin Williams got his start on TV in 1978 in the comedy "Mork and Mindy," about a wacky alien, Mork (Williams), who comes to live in a boarding house run by a cute young woman (Pam Dawber). In that popular sitcom, Mork would always greet people by saying, "Nanu, Nanu," which was "Hello" on his home planet of Ork.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2013

NIH Lists Brittle Type 1 as a Rare, Distinct Diabetes

The National Institutes of Health recently listed brittle type 1 diabetes as a rare disease, a distinct and separate form of type 1. An estimated 3,700 to 8,700 persons in the United States have the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 19, 2013

First-World Type 2 Drug Market to Reach $47 Billion by 2022

A Massachusetts-based research firm concludes that the first-world market for type 2 drugs and treatments will increase from $27 billion in sales in 2012 to $47 billion in 2022.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 18, 2013

Study Sites Announced for EndoBarrier Trial

Massachusetts-based GI Dynamics, Inc. says it is currently enrolling subjects at 17 sites across the United States for its clinical trial of the EndoBarrier for people who have uncontrolled type 2 diabetes and are obese. The company expects to enroll approximately 500 people who meet the enrollment criteria at up to 25 sites in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2013

Researchers Discover Biological Link Between Diabetes and Heart Disease

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- UC Davis Health System researchers have identified for the first time a biological pathway that is activated when blood sugar levels are abnormally high and causes irregular heartbeats, a condition known as cardiac arrhythmia that is linked with heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2013

A New Dawn for Inhalable Insulin?

Few treatments for type 1 diabetes have been as elusive and long-promised as inhalable insulin. The concept has always sounded remarkable: Instead of jabbing themselves with needles, type 1s (and insulin-using type 2s) could take a quick puff on an inhaler to get a dose of insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2013

Type 2 Beta Cells Decline Faster Than Previously Thought

People with type 2 diabetes and those heading toward that diagnosis may face a quicker decline in their beta cell function than previously understood, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. That means the progress and challenges for such patients may progress more quickly than doctors expects and need more aggressive treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 9, 2013

Experimental Drug Holds Promise for New Type 1s

One of the most intriguing areas of type 1 diabetes research focuses on newly diagnosed patients. Given that the disease occurs after an autoimmune response damages the body's insulin-producing beta cells, scientists have looked to new type 1s as fertile ground for experimentation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2013

September 2013

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Artificial Pancreas

The FDA has approved a new, automated artificial pancreas system from Minneapolis-based Medtronic, Inc.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2013

Dapagliflozin Teams Well With Metformin, Sulfonylurea

According to researchers, dapagliflozin, a diabetes drug developed jointly by two pharmaceutical companies has shown significant benefits when teamed with metformin and sulfonylurea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2013

$Millions Going to Big Diabetes Non-Profits, But With Little Accountability

When it comes to research, you would expect that the wants of those living with type 1 diabetes would be totally in line with the goals of scientists seeking a cure for the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 24, 2013

Eye Drug's Success With Diabetic Macular Degeneration

A drug traditionally used to treat age-related macular degeneration has been successful in also treating diabetic macular edema in recent trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2013

Type 2 Drugs in the Pipeline: an Update

If you Google "type 2 diabetes drugs," one website lists the names of 92 drugs that medical professionals have prescribed at one time or another to treat diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2013

Protein Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Insulin Resistance

People with type 2 diabetes who use insulin to help control elevated blood sugar might be able to end their dependence on it if new research progresses.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2013

Fruits, Proteins Can Help Thwart Kidney Disease

For those living with type 2 diabetes, kidney disease is unfortunately one of the associated risks.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 10, 2013

August 2013

FDA Clears Novo's Kid-Friendly Insulin Pen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted 510(k) clearance for the NovoPen Echo®, the first insulin injection device on the market to combine half-unit dosing with a memory function to help patients manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2013

Q&A With Dr. Richard Bernstein

Is it important to determine the exact type of diabetes you have if you're already on insulin and maintaining very good blood sugar control, and if so, why?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2013

Eye Health Program Offers Free Online Training

Community health workers who provide diabetes education often lack information on how this disease affects the eyes. In response, the National Eye Health Education Program of the National Eye Institute has developed a new interactive online training course to help CHWs better understand the eye complications that diabetes can bring.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2013

Promising Topical Nail Fungus Treatment Performs Well in Phase 3

Hard-to-treat toenail fungus is one side effect of diabetes, a condition brought by decreased circulation and increased susceptibility to infection. The condition, called onychomycosis, afflicts some 35 million people in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2013

Maryland Researchers Enrolling Type 2 Patients in Long-Term Drug Study

BALTIMORE-Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine are enrolling patients with type 2 diabetes into an NIH-funded clinical trial to evaluate the long-term benefits and risks of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2013

To the Extreme

British snowboard champion Christopher Southwell has always lived for the adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2013

The Agony of Type 1 Hope

I can only speak as a type 2. I don't for a second think that the problems I encounter managing my diabetes compare to what people with type 1 go through.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 9, 2013

Type A Type 1s May Run Lower Mortality Risk

New research suggests that type 1s' personality types could affect their mortality risk. While that might sound peculiar at first, the research results-culled from 22 years of study-make some important connections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2013

Dietary Changes Could Preserve Beta Cells

Type 1 diabetes doesn't happen all at once. Scientists have shown that it's usually a gradual process, in which the insulin-producing beta cells eventually fade out. So wouldn't it be marvelous if the function of those beta cells could be preserved, allowing people newly diagnosed with diabetes to produce some of their own insulin for a longer time?

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2013

"Bionic Pancreas" Project Sets 4-Year Goal

Could a "bionic pancreas"-a combination of insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor and predictive software-be on the market within four years? That 2017 date is the ambitious goal of a project from researchers at Boston University and Massachusetts General Hospital.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2013

Enzyme Discovery Could Predict Diabetic Neuropathy

Physicians may be able to predict if diabetic patients will develop peripheral neuropathy, thanks to results of new research.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2013

July 2013

Timing of First Solid Food Intake Linked to Type 1

New parents like British royals Will and Kate might not want to rush the introduction of solid food into their baby's diet. That's not to say they want to put it off, either.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 30, 2013

FDA Tells 15 Companies to Stop Illegal Diabetes Treatment Sales

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that it has issued letters warning 15 U.S. and foreign companies to cease sales of products that the agency has determined are being illegally marketed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 27, 2013

Type 1 Doesn't Stop Carrie Miller From Living Her Own Indiana Jones Life

Carrie Miller had one goal when she was a child-become the female counterpart to Indiana Jones. If nothing else, she wanted to live a life infused with that blockbuster's level of adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2013

Cannabis-Derived Drug for Type 2 Enters Phase 2

A British drug company is looking to medical marijuana- or at least a derivative of it-to help treat a variety of different diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 20, 2013

Study Shows Promise for Artificial Pancreas

Insulin pump maker Animas has taken another step toward perfecting (and hopefully putting on sale) the first artificial pancreas. The company doesn't call it anything that clear-cut, instead referring to the device as "a closed-loop insulin delivery system."

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 17, 2013

The Growing Number of Diabetes Therapies

While there is still no cure for diabetes, there is a growing number of therapies available to those battling the disease-and even more are in the works, according to experts who spoke at a recent symposium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2013

Obesity Drug Beloranib Shows Promise

Massachusetts-based Zafgen, a biopharmaceutical company devoted to treating obesity, may have taken a big step toward making the growing health concern obsolete.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2013

Have Boston Researchers Found Type 1's Root Cause?

Will people with type 1 diabetes ever see an end to their need for insulin?

comments 2 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2013

June 2013

Lifestyle Change Can Lessen Sexual Dysfunction in Type 2 Women

While erectile dysfunction gets much of the attention, sexual problems as a side effect of type 2 diabetes are not limited to men.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2013

FDA Approves Invokana, a New Type 2 Drug

A new, first-in-its-class drug for type 2 diabetes has just been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Invokana works by blocking re-absorption of glucose by the kidneys and stimulating urination, which removes glucose from the bloodstream.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2013

Global Survey Finds One in Five Feel Discriminated Against Because of Their Diabetes

CHICAGO, June 24, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Key results from the global Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 study (DAWN2TM) show that one in five people with diabetes feel discriminated against because of their condition, and support from the broader community is scarce. Results from the DAWN2 study were presented at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). DAWN2 represents opinions from more than 15,000 people living, or caring for people, with diabetes in 17 countries across four continents.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 26, 2013

Are Patients Being Misled About Cholesterol-lowering Drugs

The main question that doctors---and patients---ask about a prescription drug is simple: Does it work? Does this medicine improve the condition it's prescribed for?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2013

Questions Follow Football Player’s Diabetes Diagnosis, Move to New Team

It's a nightmare scenario for a person who's been newly diagnosed with diabetes: You're fired after learning you have this chronic-yet-manageable disease. Everything the doctors told you about living a nearly normal life seems like a lie. Your visions and hopes for the future-already clouded with this scary medical news-darken.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2013

The Diabetic Parent Journals: Life With a Two Year Old

Life never stops. It's a truism that people with diabetes of all types know too well. Your responsibilities change. Your duties at your job shift. The people around you change. And you have to make the best you can of it all, racing to keep up and adjusting your treatment plan as best you can. It's exhausting.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2013

12th Q&A With Dr. Bernstein

Can Januvia Trigger Cancer Symptoms?

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 12, 2013

Despite the Fear

On some days living with a chronic disease and all its complexities for 15 years has the ability to force me into hiding.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2013

My Life as a Guinea Pig

About five years ago during a visit to a local endocrinologist, he asked if I might be interested in participating in a Phase 3 study of a new type 2 drug. It didn't take long for me to say yes, especially once he explained how being a study subject worked.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 10, 2013

FDA Panelists Vote to Ease Up on Avandia

A significant majority-20 of 26 members attending a combined meeting of FDA advisory committees-has voted to modify or remove the current restrictive label and distribution regulations affecting the type 2 drug Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2013

Ready for a Diabetes Drug Tune-Up?

People with diabetes know the score. We've all seen "revolutionary" drugs and treatments introduced with fanfare, and we know that that much of the time they're evolutionary at best. But something has changed in the world of diabetes care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2013

May 2013

Web Screener Tells If You Qualify for Type 1 Study

People who live in the San Francisco Bay Area know that the University of California San Francisco is one of the premier medical research facilities in the world. UCSF has particularly distinguished itself in the area of type 1 diabetes prevention, intervention, and islet transplantation trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2013

Two New Promising Type 2 Drugs in the Pipeline

Two new drugs originally developed by Eli Lilly are showing promise when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2013

If someone needs to restrict their protein intake because of kidney damage, is it safe to do a low carb diet?

The restriction of protein intake is an outdated thought. It was born of a study by Barry Brenner, at Harvard, back in the 1980s. He did a survey of the diabetologists in Boston asking, "At what blood sugars do you like to keep your diabetics?"  The collective answer ultimately was 250 mg/dl.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2013

April 2013

Teens’ Negative Body Images Play Role in Later Adult Obesity

If you're concerned about your teen's extra pounds, it might be a good idea to keep those concerns to yourself and enforce some healthier eating habits instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2013

Altering Gut Bacteria Could Rival Bypass Surgery Effects

Obese patients hoping to slim down with bariatric surgery may soon be able to get the weight-loss effects of gastric bypass without going under the knife, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2013

Smaller, Lighter OmniPod Earns FDA Approval

The FDA recently approved the next-generation OmniPod from Insulet, giving people with insulin-dependent diabetes an even less invasive way to manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 19, 2013

Fatigue Causes Healthcare Errors

So what do those long hours on nursing duty mean when it comes to the quality of healthcare we receive? When it comes to overworked nurses, it leads to a higher risk of mistakes, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2013

Diabetes Camp—It’s Magic! (Online Version)

Hikes to the beach, overnight camping, swimming, playing sports, an exhilarating run on the zip line, songs and skits by the campfire. Friends for life. This is the magic of camp, and diabetes camp is no exception.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 13, 2013

What meds do you recommend to control elevated cholesterol?

In my experience the most common cause of elevated cholesterol is low thyroid. High blood sugars also have an effect on LDL that can be very dramatic. If someone has elevated cholesterol, diabetic or not, the very first thing you do is check their free and total T3, and free and total T4. When you give them adequate thyroid replacement, the LDL usually normalizes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2013

Rebates Spur Healthier Eating

The key to encouraging people to choose healthier foods is to make good-for-you items more affordable, according to a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2013

Five Simple Ways to Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There's talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans.

comments 5 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2013

How do you evaluate the studies that show that strict control of A1c does not have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular events?

This person is referring to the ACCORD study, which in its initial unsophisticated scoring supposedly showed that a large group of elderly diabetics who had existing heart disease, died sooner when their A1cs were brought down.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 2, 2013

March 2013

Are very low-carb diets safe for children? Is it something you recommend?

The effect of carbohydrate on blood sugar will be multiplied in inverse proportion to childrens' weight. This means that the smaller they are, the greater effect a little bit of carbohydrate will have on them. It's been shown that children with elevated blood sugars (usually due in part to high carbohydrate intake) have diminished brain volume and lower IQs.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2013

Adult Stem Cells Could Help Thwart Amputations

New stem cell research may take a step toward preventing amputations in people with diabetes, according to a new study out of Ireland.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2013

Inflammation Linked to Eye Diseases

A protein linked to inflammation could predict the risks of two eye-related diseases common in people with diabetes, according to the results of two new studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2013

Lack of Sleep Affects Portion Size and Food Choices in Young Men

Don't get enough sleep? According to a small, new study, this may make you eat larger portions of high-calorie foods and, accordingly, increase your risk of gaining weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2013

Physicians Seem Skeptical Over ACOs, Survey Shows

Accountable Care Organizations, it seems, haven't won over 100 percent of all physicians.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 14, 2013

Good Doctor-Patient Communication Improves Health Outcomes

Although some Continuing Medical Education (CME) is aimed at helping doctors improve communication skills, more doctors should get involved.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2013

TIR-199: Potential New Heavy Weapon Against Kidney Cancer

Researchers in California may have taken a big step in the fight to end renal cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2013

Could Pig Worms Lead to the Cure for Type 1?

Research into a cure for type 1 diabetes proceeds on several fronts. One interesting approach is seeking ways to manipulate the autoimmune system to prevent the body's mistaken destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Another tack is the transplantation of pancreatic tissue, either from human cadavers or carefully isolated "clean" pigs that have been specially raised for the purpose. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2013

February 2013

Robot Transforms Team-Based Healthcare

While this robot doesn't do housework, the technological advancements of the space-age cartoon "The Jetsons" might not be as far away as we think.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2013

My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I heart carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2013

Tandem Announces Two Partnerships

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. has teamed with Dexcom to expand an existing partnership to include development of Dexcom’s latest continuous glucose monitoring system, the G4 Platinum. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new CGM in October.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2013

Hormone Could Become Basis for “Exercise Pill”

Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston report that they have discovered a naturally occurring hormone that can direct the body to burn more calories and increase its insulin sensitivity. Their results, based on lab experiments with mice, could potentially lead to therapies for diabetes, obesity, and even muscular dystrophy.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 10, 2013

Short Exercise Bursts May Be as Good as Traditional Workouts

Here's a bit of news that, if conclusively proven, could gladden the hearts of everybody who struggles to get into a regular exercise habit: British researchers say that short 30-second bursts of intense activity, adding up to only 3 minutes per week, duplicate the effects of much longer gym workout or track running routines.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2013

Type 2: FDA OKs Canagliflozin But Has Concerns About Heart Risk

In a 10-5 vote, an FDA panel has recommended that the agency approve the marketing of Johnson & Johnson's InvokanaTM (canagliflozin), an oral once-daily drug for treating type 2 diabetes in adults.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2013

January 2013

“Molecular Handshake” Key to Insulin’s Interaction With Cells

Scientists have known for almost 100 years that insulin is the key to achieving both the control of blood sugar and its metabolization by the body. But what they have not figured out is exactly how insulin interacts with the body's cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2013

Diabetes and Cancer Together: Which Disease to Address First?

You're a person with diabetes who has just learned that you've been diagnosed with cancer. Which disease should take precedence in your life?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2013

Just Don’t Do Nothing!

On September 26, 1992, my daughter Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Since that time, we have immersed ourselves in the world of diabetes with two goals: First, to ensure that Kaitlyn has the very best tools, both medical and emotional, to manage her diabetes, and second, to dedicate our unyielding efforts in pursuit of a cure. For us, it's not either/or: It's both.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2013

Metformin Bests Glipizide in Reducing Cardio Events

A Chinese research study of diabetes patients with coronary heart disease concludes that metformin is more effective than glipizide in reducing the risk of major cardiovascular events, such as stroke and heart attack.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 20, 2013

Earl’s Pearls of Wisdom for Restaurateurs

Earl "the Pearl" Monroe was one of the greatest guards in the history of the National Basketball Association, playing from 1967 through 1980 for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks. A member of the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, he was enshrined in the league's Hall of Fame in 1990. The Knicks retired his jersey number, 15, in 1986.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

December 2012

New ADA Guidelines Revise Blood Pressure Goals, Testing Frequencies

The American Diabetes Association’s newly released 2013 edition of its annual “Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes” recommends two notable changes:

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2012

Study Shows DAFNE Helps Type 1s Manage Their Diabetes

Education as part of routine care is the key to successful treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a new study from researchers in the United Kingdom.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2012

Taking Linagliptin May Protect Kidney Function

Taking linagliptin seems to help protect the kidneys in people with type 2 diabetes. The drug, usually used along with diet, exercise, and sometimes other medications, lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the blood.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2012

Paying Attention to Eating Pays Off

Mindful eating may help control weight as well as blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 5, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

The study, conducted by Pei-Chun Chen, Ph.D., of the National Taiwan University College of Public Health in Taipei, and colleagues, followed two groups: one consisting of an equal number of people with and without diabetes, and the other consisting of equal numbers of people with and without clinical depression.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

Depression and Diabetes

New research reveals that those suffering from depression might be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2012

EU OKs Insulin Delivery Device for Type 2s

CeQur SA, a Swiss company that develops insulin delivery devices, has received approval to market its PaQ® insulin delivery device in Europe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2012

November 2012

Type 1 Onset Linked to Low Vitamin D?

A report in the December issue of the journal Diabetologia says that a study of 1,000 active-duty military personnel who later developed type 1 diabetes showed that low levels of vitamin D significantly increased the chances of developing the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2012

Study Says Iron May Contribute to Type 2 Onset

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 28, 2012

Stem Cell Research Points Way to Possible Type 1 Cure

Australian researchers have released a study on stem cells that potentially could lead to type 1s being able to make their own insulin, erasing the need for regular injections.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 27, 2012

Israeli Study Says Whey Protein Helpful Against Type 2

Scientists at Tel Aviv University in Israel report that taking whey protein isolates or concentrates may help treat type 2 diabetes and prevent obesity.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 25, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms Three Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 20, 2012

Gut Bacteria Can Indicate Who Has Type 2

A Chinese study of 345 patients divided between non-diabetics and people with type 2 diabetes concludes that gut bacteria between the two groups differs substantially-so much so that the bacteria can be used to accurately determine who has or doesn't have the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 18, 2012

FDA Approves Dexcom’s G4

The FDA has approved U.S. sales of Dexcom's G4TM PLATINUM continuous glucose monitor. The San Diego-based manufacturer said it is taking orders and plans to begin shipping the device to patients within the next few weeks.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2012

Super-Tight Control of Blood Sugar After Kidney Transplant May Be Counterproductive

To see if tightly controlling blood sugar provides improved results in patients who received a kidney transplant, a group of diabetic post-transplant patients were followed for three days. A subset of the randomly assigned group had their blood glucose kept in tight range with IV insulin, while a control group received insulin as they ordinarily would, via injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2012

My Husband Tries Type 1 Diabetes for a Day

It started at 7:45 a.m., when I heard my husband's phone alarming. Since it was his scheduled virtual type 1 for a day challenge with JDRF, I grabbed the phone as he kept snoring. Sure enough, it was his first text from JDRF, reminding him to gather his testing supplies before leaving the house. I shook his leg. "Wake up, sleepy, you have a text about your diabetes." He lay there, continuing to snooze. I tried again with "C'mon, you have to get up, your diabetes needs you!" He hollered between snores, "My diabetes is fine!" Oh, how I wish I could silence my diabetes in the morning with those words.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2012

Gum Treatments Can Lower Diabetes-Related Medical Costs

People with diabetes who receive treatment for gum disease can enjoy substantial reductions in hospitalizations, doctor visits, and annual medical expenses according to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and dental insurer United Concordia Dental.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 12, 2012

Type 1 For a Day

I recently learned of a JDRF campaign to increase type 1 diabetes awareness, in which people without diabetes can sign up to experience “virtual diabetes” for a day. During that day, they receive up to 24 texts prompting actions that simulate the frequent blood sugar testing, insulin injections, and dietary choices that people with type 1 diabetes must endure. JDRF thoughtfully notes on its website that “while no virtual campaign can re-create the many needles required or the physical and financial tolls of this serious disease, T1D for a Day seeks to deepen understanding of the many heroic steps our friends and loved ones with T1D take each day.”

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 9, 2012

Study Reports That “Fat but Fit” Is Not an Oxymoron

While there is an almost constant media drumbeat about the dangers of obesity and overweight, it's a pleasure to learn that not everyone who is overweight is in bad health or runs the risk of it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2012

Lilly Says Its New Injectible Outperforms 3 Popular Diabetes Drugs

Good news for Eli Lilly & Co., as well as for type 2s who appreciate the addition of new drugs to treat their condition: Lilly says its once-weekly injectible drug, dulaglutide, has outperformed three other widely taken diabetes drugs in three just-concluded Phase III studies.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 5, 2012

Small A1c Reduction Considerably Lessens Type 2 Death Risk

A Swedish study has found that even less than a 1% reduction in A1c's lowered the mortality rate among type 2 patients by 50 percent compared to patients whose A1c's remained stable or increased. (Mortality was defined as the likelihood of dying from any cause within the next five years.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 3, 2012

Stan Bush: Managing Type 2 Diabetes Without Drugs

Stan Bush wasn't really surprised to find out he had type 2 diabetes. An unhealthy diet that regularly featured containers of ice cream before bed had left him primed for the disease. But how he handled the news was a surprise, at least to his doctor.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 2, 2012

High Blood Sugar Associated With Brain Shrinkage

Do people on the high end of the normal range of blood sugar levels develop the same brain shrinkage and tendency toward dementia that has been found in those with type 2 diabetes? According to an Australian study, the answer appears to be yes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2012

October 2012

High Levels of Transferrin Linked to the Onset of Diabetes

Danish researchers report that high levels of transferrin may contribute to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Transferrin is a glycoprotein that binds with iron and transfers it to cells.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2012

Special Diabetes Coupon Savings from Diabetes Health and CVS Pharmacy

I’m very happy to announce Diabetes Health’s partnership with CVS/pharmacy and welcome you to ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes® from CVS/pharmacy®. If you have diabetes and already have a CVS/pharmacy ExtraCare® card, ExtraCare Advantage for Diabetes offers even more benefits.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 24, 2012

Oral Agents for Lowering Blood Sugar in Type 2 Diabetes

Author’s note: Throughout this series, I will inject my own opinion, which frequently differs from that of the medical establishment in this field. Having had diabetes for more than 66 years, I place my emphasis on the well-being of fellow patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2012

Thinking Positively About Diabetes

When people with diabetes are successful and happy, their situation is often viewed as having been achieved despite the obstacle of diabetes. I am advocating for a shift in that perception. What if instead of seeing all the good in our lives as existing despite our disease, we begin to see everything that we are—the challenges and the achievements—as a direct product of all that we are made up of, diabetes included?

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 14, 2012

Cinnamon May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Like the taste of cinnamon? If you do and you have type 2 diabetes, a daily cinnamon supplement may help control your condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 12, 2012

Continuing the Glucose Revolution

When I became a type 2 diabetic, I wanted to find a way to manage my weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. I tried the high carb diet recommended by my doctor and dietitian for a time. It worked wonderfully well while my blood sugar level was high, but when my blood sugar stabilized and I was able to go off medication, I started gaining weight again. The next thing I tried was low carbohydrate dieting. I found it to be a very effective way to lose weight rapidly, but I was unable to endure the regimen for more than a short time.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 2, 2012

September 2012

New Wound Healing Process Speeds Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

A new technique using amniotic tissue harvested from a discarded placenta can heal wounds, burns and scars twice as fast as previous treatments. The tissue is extracted from the placenta, with the woman's consent, during Caesarian sections and then sent to Georgia-based MiMedX, the company that processes the material so it can then be applied to the injured area to jump-start healing. The process, known as EpiFix, demonstrated significant success in a clinical trial involving patients with diabetic foot ulcers. 92% of patients who received the treatment were completely healed in six weeks compared with only 8 percent who healed in the same time frame without the addition of the processed amniotic membrane material. The trial was so successful it was terminated earlier than anticipated. Study findings are expected to be submitted for peer reviewed journal publication shortly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2012

Needle-Free CGM Could Be Available in 2013

Philadelphia-based Echo Therapeutics plans to introduce a needle-free continuous glucose monitoring system to the US market in 2013, pending FDA approval. The Symphony® tCGM is a two-part device that monitors blood glucose by taking readings through a user’s skin rather than via finger pricks. It is intended for use by anyone with diabetes, not just insulin pump users.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 26, 2012

Gestational Diabetes, Low Income May Increase Child’s Risk of ADHD

German scientists report that gestational diabetes and/or low income may increase a child’s risk of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the study indicates, breastfed children born under those conditions may gain some protection against ADHD.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2012

UK Study Casts Doubt on Testosterone Therapy for Depressed Type 2s

A British study of type 2 men reports that although testosterone therapy had a beneficial effect on blood glucose levels and other metabolic indicators for non-depressed men, those suffering from depression experienced no benefit. In fact, reports Geoffrey Hackett, MD, at Good Hope Hospital in Sutton Coldfield, depressed men actually experienced a worsening of symptoms.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 18, 2012

When They Mean Well

Sometimes it isn’t a stranger or acquaintance giving you a hard time about your diabetes.  Sometimes it’s a family member or close friend that says something hurtful about your diabetes management. And that is far more difficult to hear than the guy at the table next to you in a restaurant or some lady sharing an office with you at work.

comments 14 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2012

Breakthrough Blood Test Predicts Need for ICDs

A new blood test can predict which patients with heart failure are likely to need an internal implantable defibrillator that can treat abnormal heartbeat and prevent sudden death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 12, 2012

FDA Approves New Neuropathy Pain Drug

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved US sales of NUCYNTA® ER (tapentadol), a twice-daily extended-release oral analgesic for the treatment of pain from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The drug, produced by New Jersey-based Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., provides around-the-clock management for moderate to severe chronic neuropathic pain. Janssen says that it is currently the only opioid on the US market that has been approved for treating the condition.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 11, 2012

Israeli Scientists Develop Promising Beta Cell Transplant Technique

Israeli researchers believe that they have found a way to increase the survival and effectiveness of insulin-producing pancreatic cells transplanted into diabetic mice. The technique, developed by scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, involves surrounding the transplanted beta cells with a three-dimensional latticework of nurturing blood vessels called "engineered tissue."

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 10, 2012

Need We Fear Exercise-induced Cardiac Arrest?

The media abounds with stories about the sudden collapse and death of athletes whom we assumed were in the best of health.  When such cases occur, we may become concerned about exercising ourselves.  A recent presentation describing people who had been exercising during or within one hour of a cardiac arrest may assuage these concerns to a degree.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 7, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  In this second part of our interview, I asked him about his motivations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

Mayo Clinic Says Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Forestall Type 2

The Mayo Clinic Health Letter for August 2012 has published three lifestyle changes that could stave off the progression of prediabetes to full-blown type 2 diabetes. The list isn't new, but its periodic reiteration indicates that healthcare researchers and providers have settled on a simple prescription for staying diabetes-free.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 4, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  When I caught up with Steve on a rare day when he happened to be at sea level, I asked him about his mission.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

Type 2: Intense Control May Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Older type 2s who exercise tight control over their blood sugar may run an increased risk of hip fracture, says a study from Changi General Hospital in Singapore. The researchers studied 558 elderly people with diabetes who had been treated for hip fracture between 2005 and 2010. They found that those patients had a significantly lower median A1C, 6.8%, than the control group median of 7.4%. In 59.2 percent of the hip fracture cases, the patient's A1C was less than 7%, and slightly more than three-quarters of the patients were taking sulfonylureas.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 30, 2012

US Sale of Generic Actos Gets FDA Nod

The Food and Drug Administration has approved US sale of generic pioglitazone (trade name Actos) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Actos, originally developed and trademarked by Takeda Pharmaceuticals, works by decreasing insulin resistance in type 2 patients. The prescription drug, which belongs to the class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has enjoyed great commercial success in the United States since its introduction in 1999, posting estimated sales last year of $2.7 billion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2012

A Dramatic Life Expectancy Increase for Type 1s

A 30-year study of life expectancy among people with type 1 diabetes showed a dramatic increase during the second half of the study, say researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Type 1s diagnosed between 1965 and 1980 have a life expectancy of 68.8 years—15 years more than type 1s diagnosed between 1950 and 1964. In the same period, general life expectancy for US residents increased by less than one year.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2012

The 2012 Diabetes Health Pharmacist/AADE Scholarship Winner

Amy Powell, the first recipient of the Diabetes Health Pharmacist and American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) scholarship, was honored at the 2012 AADE conference in Indianapolis. As the winner, her conference fees and accommodation costs were paid, and she received a one-year AADE membership.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2012

Social Media, Partnerships Are Top Topics at AADE12

As diabetes climbs to epidemic levels in the United States, and finding adequate resources to fund future U.S. healthcare remains in question, the need for an already existing "boots on the ground" group that can address the disease is greater than ever.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2012

An Interview With Robert Cuddihy, MD, of Sanofi US

Endocrinologist Robert Cuddihy, MD, joined Sanofi US over a year ago to be the company’s Vice President and Medical Diabetes Head in the United States. He is responsible for developing and executing the US strategy for Sanofi’s Diabetes Division, including pharmaceuticals, devices, and other technologies. He previously served as the medical director for several organizations, including the International Diabetes Center-Park Nicollet in Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 13, 2012

Lovers of Cheddar and Gouda May Have Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

If you like cheese, there may be cause for celebration. According to a new study, eating cheese may lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 8, 2012

Physical Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk in Type 2 Men With Ventricular Hypertrophy

Physically fit men with type 2 diabetes and a heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy run a considerably lower risk of  premature death than their diabetic peers who are not fit. That's the conclusion of a longitudinal study of 866 patients conducted by Veterans Affairs Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2012

Biological Clock Molecule Could Become New Type 2 Treatment

UC San Diego scientists have discovered a molecule involved in regulating the biological clock that could open a new path for treating type 2 diabetes. The molecule, dubbed KL001, controls a key protein, cryptochrome, that regulates the biological clock (circadian rhythm) in plants, animals, and humans. In doing so, cryptochrome indirectly affects the liver's production of glucose. KL001 can be manipulated to induce cryptochrome to slow the liver's glucose production, thus creating a possible new therapeutic approach to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2012

Study Shows Turmeric Is Helpful to Adults With Prediabetes

A study has found that taking curcumin extract, the main ingredient of the popular Indian spice turmeric, may help ward off type 2 in those with prediabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 4, 2012

July 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

Workers Who Take Their Medicine Are More Productive

Editor's Note: Portions of this report were taken from a press release from CVS-Caremark.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2012

Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Improves Nighttime Control in Young Type 1s

In a small study of 10 type 1 children under the age of seven years, closed-loop insulin delivery improved their nighttime glycemic control. The therapy, delivered at Children's Hospital Boston, used an algorithm-controlled pump and continuous glucose monitor to deliver insulin on an as-needed basis as the children slept.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2012

Type 2: Early Therapy Helps Retain Beta Cell Function

Immediately starting intense therapy for newly diagnosed type 2s preserved their beta cell functioning for 3.5 years, according to a University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 18, 2012

Adding Liraglutide to Insulin May Help Obese Type 1s

New York researchers have reported that obese patients with type 1 diabetes who do not respond well to insulin may be able to improve their blood sugar control by adding liraglutide to their therapy. Liraglutide (brand name Victoza) is an injectible GLP-1 analog* that was introduced to the US market in 2010 to treat people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2012

Type 2: Diabetes Recurrence After Bariatric Surgery May Depend on Diabetes Duration

Bariatric surgery, which alters or blocks portions of the digestive system, has produced long-term remission of diabetes symptoms in many type 2 patients. However, a small study of obese type 2 patients who underwent bariatric surgery shows that the longer they had diabetes, the greater the chances that their disease recurred after surgery. The retrospective study, conducted by Yessica Ramos, MD, at the Mayo Clinic Arizona, found that patients who had had diabetes for five years or longer were nearly four times as likely to experience a recurrence of the disease after the remission brought on by the surgery.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 9, 2012

Type 1: New Drug Class Could Lead to Neuropathy Relief

University of California researchers report that they have found a new class of drugs that could lead to a pain relief treatment for people who have diabetic neuropathy. The drugs, which were successfully tested on lab animals, are anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit the action of an enzyme called soluble epoxide hydrolase. The enzyme is key to the transmission of pain sensations. Previous research has shown that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase also lowers blood pressure and protects against kidney damage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2012

Diabetes: Hospital Bills Cost U.S. $83 Billion A Year

Diabetes affects nearly 25 million Americans, and that number is expected to grow substantially every year. It's the fifth leading cause of death in America, more than breast cancer and AIDs combined. And according to a report released last week from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), it's a disease that’s costing Americans $83 billion a year in hospital fees — 23 percent of total hospital spending.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jul 5, 2012

Brits Link Sleep Apnea to Diabetic Neuropathy

British scientists say that they have discovered a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. OSA is defined as having five or more events per hour of hypopnea (abnormally slow or shallow breathing). The researchers, from the University of Birmingham, UK, report that the association between the two conditions is strong despite other factors that could be used to explain the correlation. According to their findings, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the severity of the neuropathy correlates with the degree of OSA.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2012

Obesity Problems Fuel Rapid Surge Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Children

Annie Snyder figured she'd be out of the pediatrician's office in 30 minutes, tops. Then she'd head home, tuck the medical permission for YMCA summer camp in her bag and finish packing.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2012

Metformin Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

Metformin is the aspirin of the diabetes world, an almost-wonder drug that proves itself again and again the longer it's around. This time, a new study shows that postmenopausal women with diabetes who have taken metformin for several years are 25 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than nondiabetic women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2012

June 2012

Foot Problems Pervasive In The U.S., Linked To Obesity, Sedentary Lives And Diabetes, Says New New IPFH/NPD Study Foot Health Affects Overall Health

Statesville, NC - June, 26, 2012 - A staggering 78% of U.S. adults age 21+ report they have had one or more problems with their feet at some time in their lives, according to The National Foot Health Assessment 2012, a survey conducted for the Institute for Preventive Foot Health (IPFH) by The NPD Group. The most common foot maladies, plaguing both men and women, were ankle sprains (reported by roughly one in three respondents), followed by blisters, calluses, foot fatigue, cracked skin and athlete's foot.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2012

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

A small Chinese study has reported that 15 of 28 young type 1 patients, aged 14 to 30 years, who underwent an experimental adult stem cell procedure were able to stay off insulin injections for an average of 18 months. Though not conclusive, the study highlights an interesting avenue of research that could eventually dramatically reduce insulin dependence among type 1s.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2012

Patient Injection Adherence Improves Under Pharmacist Guidance

A Walgreens study during which pharmacists counseled patients about taking injectable diabetes medications improved the patients' adherence by 24 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2012

ADA Sessions Spotlight Powerful Weapons Against Diabetes

Several hopeful trends emerged from this year's ADA Scientific Sessions in Philadelphia, held June 8 through 12.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2012

When Medical Devices Fail

Medical devices aren't just any old pieces of technology. Lives depend upon them. For that reason, the government outlined a process decades ago by which manufacturers and importers were supposed to report malfunctions. But there was one problem: When malfunctions occurred, the manufacturers and importers did not admit it. According to the Food and Drug Administration, "A 1986 General Accounting Office (GAO) study showed that less than one percent of device problems occurring in hospitals are reported to FDA, and the more serious the problem with a device, the less likely it was to be reported."

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 22, 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds Dexcom Proudly Sponsors Historic Diabetes Flight Formation Trip To Raise Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Funds

SAN DIEGO - June 15, 2012 - Dexcom, the leader in continuous glucose monitoring, is proudly sponsoring the efforts of the Diabetes Formation Flight USA(DFFUSA.org) - three pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes using Dexcom's Seven Plus as part of their effort to set new transcontinental world speed records while raising funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 20, 2012

Israeli Biotech Company Takes Novel Approach to Diabetic Ulcer Treatment

An Israeli biotech company's cell therapy, designed to treat hard-to-heal diabetic ulcers, is now in phase 3 testing in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2012

Another Day, Another Battle

Last year, I gave birth to my daughter and shared my pregnancy and birthing experiences with you. The pregnancy was a very difficult but extremely rewarding experience. A few months after our daughter was born, my husband and I discussed whether we'd have another child. On one hand, I went through several insulin shock comas, severe insulin resistance, and pre-eclampsia, ending in an emergency cesarean section. Because my first pregnancy was so tough, we weren't sure if we wanted to risk another one. On the other hand, if we did have two children, we wanted them to be very close in age so that they could bond well. We figured that if the two children were around fifteen months apart, then my daughter would be too young to feel any tension about having another baby in the house. We hoped they'd be close enough in age that they would always have one another as a companion.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 17, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Cardiovascular Death Rate Among Americans With Diabetes Drops 40 Percent

Here is a statistic to warm the heart-literally: The death rate from heart disease and stroke among American adults with diabetes dropped 40 percent from 1997 to 2006, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The overall mortality rate among people with diabetes dropped 23 percent.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 9, 2012

Type 1: FDA OKs Levemir for Two- to Five-Year-Olds

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Novo Nordisk's Levemir basal insulin for type 1 children aged two to five years. The FDA decision makes Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) the only basal insulin approved for use in this age group.
Levemir, introduced to the US market in 2006, was previously approved for older children and adults with type 1 diabetes, as well as insulin-using type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2012

Short Video Shows and Tells Diabetes Basics

A short animated video narrated in a woman's reassuring tone provides a basic look at diabetes. The presentation touches on the science behind the condition and explains important terms, including "pancreas," "glucose," and "insulin." It stresses the importance of regular A1C checks and taking medication if needed, while pointing out the dangers associated with not staying on top of blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 27, 2012

Scientists May Have Found Key to Neuropathic Pain

A compound found in excessive quantities in the glucose of people with diabetes may hold the key to successful treatment of neuropathic pain, says an international team of researchers.
The compound, methylglyoxal, attacks and modifies a protein, called Nav1.8, in nerve endings.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2012

Five Ways to Rev Up Your Walking Routine

Warmer temperatures bring the opportunity to put on our walking shoes and step outside for our workouts.  But if you, like me, have been walking for many years, you may find yourself bored with the same old routine. To avoid burnout, try these five ways to rev up your walk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 20, 2012

The Raw Food Diet:  Should You Try It?

It seems that every few months, we hear about a new diet that, like all the others, promises to yield fast and tempting results. Is the raw food diet any different, and, if so, how?

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2012

Transplanted Gut Organisms Could Prevent Diabetes Onset

Scientists meeting recently at the International Liver Congress in Barcelona, Spain, say that microbiota-tiny organisms specific to a part of the body-transplanted from healthy people to people at risk of diabetes or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may prevent the later onset of those conditions. The procedure involves implanting small quantities of fecal matter from healthy donors into the colons of pre-diseased recipients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2012

Taiwanese Study Identifies Top Three Drugs for Type 2 Glycemic Control

Researchers in Taipei, Taiwan, report that they have identified the top three drugs for reducing A1C levels in type 2 diabetes: biphasic insulin, GLP-1 analogs, and basal insulin. They hedged a little on their endorsement of GLP-1 analogs, however, by saying that although they are not decisively better at controlling A1Cs than other oral diabetes drugs, they have the advantage of helping to reduce weight without adding to the danger of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 16, 2012

“Reprogrammed” Cells in Mice Reverse Late-stage Type 1 Diabetes

A successful experiment on mice with type 1 diabetes, which involved "reprogramming" their immune systems to stop attacks on pancreatic beta cells, may point the way to an eventual cure for the disease in humans.

comments 5 comments - Posted May 15, 2012

Molecular Switch Could Be Key for Type 2s

With tens of millions of American facing life with type 2 diabetes and many millions more at risk of the disease, scientists are scrambling to unravel novel treatments. The latest breakthrough could come from California's Salk Institute.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 13, 2012

Obesity Could Follow Sleepless Nights

Feeling tired? Your lack of rest may be putting you at increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. That's the conclusion of a new paper, published in The American Journal of Human Biology, that looked at evidence collected from numerous experimental and observational studies. The link was clear: People who got less than six hours of sleep a night were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI) and be obese. The connection found in the study seems stronger for children and teenagers, which is especially worrisome given the skyrocketing rates of type 2 diabetes in young people.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2012

Insulin degludec

Novo Nordisk's new variety of long-lasting insulin, insulin degludec, reduces low blood sugars while improving overall control, according to a pair of studies published in the prestigious journal The Lancet on April 27.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 8, 2012

April 2012

FDA Warns Diabetes Patients About Combining Aliskiren

On April 19, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning to diabetes patients not to combine the blood pressure medication aliskiren (Tekturna) with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The warning also applies to patients who have renal impairment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2012

Vitamin Deficiencies in People With Diabetes: the Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, "I can't have surgery because I won't heal." That is certainly not the case, however.  Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures.  

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2012

All in the Family

My oldest nephew, James, has a double whammy to deal with.  His aunt, yours truly, has type 1 diabetes, and so does his father. I was in the room when my sister had an ultrasound during her pregnancy with James, and I clearly remember the doctor asking her if anyone in her family had diabetes.  We shared a look as she informed the doctor of my diabetes and her husband's diabetes.  I know we also shared a silent prayer as the reality hit us that diabetes might be passed on to her children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2012

FDA Gives Go-ahead to Bayer’s CONTOUR® Next EZ

The US Food and Drug Administration has okayed US sales of Bayer HealthCare's CONTOUR® Next EZ blood glucose monitoring system. The new BGM, currently available in other countries as the CONTOUR XT, will be available in the US market this summer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2012

Neuropathy Device Maker Files

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a Massachusetts-based medical device company, has filed a 510(k) form with the US Food and Drug Administration for the SENSUSTM, a pain therapy device for people who suffer diabetic neuropathy. A 510(k) is a "premarket notification" of a company's intent to market a medical product. The FDA then tests the product and provides feedback to the manufacturer. Once the FDA clears the product, its maker can introduce it to the US market.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 24, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

Even 1% Weight Loss Improves Mobility in Older Type 2s

Just a 1 percent weight loss in older people with type 2 diabetes can improve their physical mobility by up to 7 percent, according to a new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2012

Sam Talbot, Top Chef

North Carolina-born chef Sam Talbot first came to national attention when he placed third in the Season 2 run of Bravo's Top Chef  TV competition. Sam, who has type 1 diabetes and wears an insulin pump, held the executive chef position at several New York City restaurants, including Black Duck, Williamsburgh Cafe, and Punch, before opening his current restaurant, the acclaimed Surf Lodge, in Montauk on Long Island.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2012

Potassium May Help Prevent Diabetes

To discover the relationship between potassium levels and type 2 diabetes, a Johns Hopkins University study looked at more than 12,000 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), performed in 1987 and 1996. The study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes among study participants went down. The more than 2,000 African Americans in the study had lower average potassium levels than the 9,000 Caucasians and were twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2012

FDA Says Levemir OK for Pregnant Women

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that Levemir is safe for use by pregnant women and does not increase the risk of harm to children in the womb.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 4, 2012

March 2012

Type 1 Diabetes Researchers Reach Important Milestone

Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international network of researchers exploring ways to prevent and delay the progression of type 1 diabetes, has reached an important milestone: screening 100,000 people to detect who among is at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This is a major achievement because it has helped researchers better predict who will develop diabetes and when it will require treatment. Earlier diagnosis helps patients avoid a severe, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2012

Keep Your Fingers Crossed: FDA Approves Artificial Pancreas Outpatient Trial

The FDA has approved the start of outpatient trials of a smart phone-based monitoring device that functions as an artificial pancreas. If the device, which automatically measures blood glucose levels and adjusts them with insulin, is successful, several million type 1 patients could enjoy a whole new level of convenience.

comments 9 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2012

Metformin Shines Again: Long-Term Use Helps Prevent Type 2

Long-term use of metformin as a weight loss aid is both safe and effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, says the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Type 1s May Produce Insulin for Decades After Diagnosis

Massachusetts researchers have found that even years after they are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, some people continue to possess functioning beta cells. This finding departs from the conventional thinking that in type 1 diabetes beat cell activity inevitably ceases--the result of attacks on the cells by the body's immune system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2012

Self-Monitoring Benefits New Type 2s in the First Year

If you are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and don't take insulin, a new study says that you are likely to have better A1Cs if you have access to blood glucose testing supplies and use them. The finding comes from a large Cochrane review of previous studies that took place in many countries.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 17, 2012

Study Shows Vitamin D Wards Off Stroke

Everyone needs vitamin D to be healthy and maintain strong bones, but a new study has found that it may also protect against stroke. In the study, 21,000 people aged 45 and older answered a food questionnaire. According to the findings, presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference, there was an 11 percent reduction in stroke among those who consumed the most vitamin D.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 16, 2012

Diabetes Camp: What You Should Know

There are more than 200 diabetes camps in North America, offering more than 400 programs to more than 30,000 youths and young adults with diabetes and their families. One in 400 children has type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in children, once rare, is increasingly common due to obesity. Education and motivation are vital to healthy management of the disease. Diabetes camps empower children and their families to meet the rigorous demands of diabetes, allowing them to be healthy, active, and motivated to reach their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2012

Newly Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes? Be Sure Your Doctor Prescribes a Generic First

According to a study of patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 35 percent of the time their physicians did not follow the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guideline that calls for prescribing a generic drug first. The study, conducted by researchers from CVS Caremark, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, reviewed the pharmacy claims of 254,000 patients who were started on a diabetes medication in January 2006 and December 2008. One-third of the treatment regimens did not adhere to the ADA guideline.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 13, 2012

Unnecessary, Expensive Tests Performed for Diabetic Neuropathy

One quarter of patients with diabetic neuropathy undergo unnecessary, expensive tests, according to a study by Brian Callaghan, MD, of the University of Michigan Medical School. When Dr. Callaghan and his team looked at 1996-2007 Medicare claims of patients diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy, they found that the most common test performed was an MRI of the brain or spine. There were far fewer instances of glucose tolerance tests. Other tests that were done, but much less often, included fasting glucose levels, A1Cs, vitamin B12 levels, and serum protein electrophoresis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2012

Please Don’t Imply That I Caused My Diabetes.

When it comes to diabetes, people often blame the patient instead of the disease. I cannot think of another chronic illness for which this is the case. Much of the public seems to believe that we bring diabetes on ourselves. When people with diabetes are diagnosed with complications, uninformed observers often insist that it happened because they were "bad diabetics." Comments like "She didn't take care of herself" make me instantly defensive and angry. How can anyone know what that person went through on a day-to-day basis with her diabetes?

comments 11 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2012

New Wound Test Could Cut Diabetes Amputation Rate

For people with diabetes, elevated blood sugar adversely affects the ability to heal. Their slow-healing wounds invite hard-to-treat infections that can eventually lead to amputation. In fact, they are 15 times more likely to undergo limb amputations than people without diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 7, 2012

Little Diabetes Warriors

Sometimes I feel like an idiot. It usually happens when I read a blog by one of my favorite "D" parents telling about how their children are handling life with type 1 diabetes. These brave kids put up with the same things that adults with diabetes do, and some are literally too young to even understand what's going on. Reading about these little warriors makes me regret even more the fact that I wallowed in self pity all afternoon just because my blood sugar didn't cooperate flawlessly during my daily walk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2012

ACP Guidelines Say Metformin Is the Best Starter Drug for Type 2s

The latest clinical guidelines for treating type 2 diabetes from the American College of Physicians (ACP) indicate that when diet, exercise, and weight loss fail to control blood sugar levels in early type 2 patients, physicians should prescribe metformin as the first drug therapy.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2012

February 2012

Hear Me, Doctor

During my 14 years with type 1 diabetes and my time spent interacting with the diabetes online community, I constantly hear the same theme: Doctors aren't listening to their patients, and their bedside manners are deteriorating. Every day, it seems, I hear about people who have been treated as if they are simply a number or dismissed as uneducated in their own health conditions.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2012

Metformin Could Protect Women Against Endometrial Cancer

British researchers say that metformin, the drug most often used to treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, could provide potential protection against endometrial cancer in women.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 24, 2012

Women and Diabetes: A New Book with Fresh Insight

As a woman with diabetes, you may have noticed that you face unique challenges, from where to place your insulin pump, to pregnancy, to hormone fluctuations.   Many diabetes books offer general diabetes advice, but few focus on women beyond just a short chapter.  That is, until now.   

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 20, 2012

Routine Tests Can Identify Risk of Gestational Diabetes Years Before Pregnancy

Up to seven years before she becomes pregnant, a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy can be identified based on routinely assessed measures of blood sugar and body weight, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the online issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2012

How Far Would You Go to Help Cure Diabetes?

Try doing this at the age of 64:

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 18, 2012

An Update on Bydureon

You've heard of the blockbuster drug Byetta, a daily injection for type 2 diabetes? Byetta's sister product, Bydureon, which is injected just once a week, has just been approved by the FDA and is available in pharmacies.

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2012

Diabetes and Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact.

comments 3 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

The Blood Sugar Blame Game

Wiped out and dejected, that's my state of mind this morning. I had a really low blood sugar, and it's left me feeling like I've been in a fight. My arms and legs feel heavy, and my "low" headache lingers, but I remind myself that it could be worse. I'm fine, I treated it, and my day will go on.

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2012

Keeping Up With Baby

My son learned to crawl last month. As a part-time stay-at-home dad, I found it both exciting and terrifying. Through crawling, my son has entered a new stage in life. He might have rolled or scooted a few feet before, but now he can see something in another room and make up his mind to go there.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2012

Diabetic Amputations Down Significantly Since 1996

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that foot and leg amputations decreased dramatically between 1996 and 2008. Over those 12 years, amputations dropped from 11 out of every 1,000 diabetic adults to only four-a decrease of almost 64 percent. Over the same period, however, the number of people officially diagnosed with diabetes tripled.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2012

The Seasons of Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't confine itself to a single week or month. It's a year-round condition, and each season offers its own challenges and opportunities for those of us with the disease. We should be prepared to change and evolve as the seasons shift--not only to stay healthy, but also to enjoy all the fun that our dynamic world offers.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 7, 2012

An Inside View of Barley Beta Glucan

Barley has more beta glucan fiber than any other grain, and it has repeatedly established positive clinical results with regard to diabetes control. It not only boosts immune function by supporting macrophages and neutrophils, lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and helps control obesity, but also attenuates postprandial glucose levels, improves insulin sensitivity, and promotes a feeling of satiety.

comments 6 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2012

FDA Gives Long-Awaited Nod to Amylin’s Bydureon

After several years of delays and setbacks, Amylin Pharmaceuticals has received FDA approval to begin US marketing of BydureonTM. The first once-a-week type 2 therapy to be offered in the US market, Bydureon is expected to be available by February. Amylin says that its wholesale price will be about $4,200 a year.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 3, 2012

The Badge of Courage

Two years ago, I was a different woman. I was just beginning to come out of my diabetes shell, assessing my confidence with strangers by testing in public and telling friends about my disease. I can still feel the panic rising in my throat as I told people that I have diabetes and need to take injections multiple times per day. I was afraid of rejection, afraid that they would treat me like a sick person. But after eleven years of fighting for my life with type 1 diabetes, I was tired of being afraid. The more people I told, the easier it got.

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2012

January 2012

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2012

Animas Receives Warning Letter From the FDA

Animas Corporation, a division of Johnson & Johnson that manufactures insulin pumps, has been reprimanded by the FDA for not reporting serious problems resulting from use of its equipment. The parent company was warned that it could face fines and more for selling faulty insulin pumps and failing to disclose serious injuries to diabetic patients who used the OneTouch Ping and 2020 insulin pumps. According to reports, J&J continued to sell the pumps even after the company knew that some had failed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 29, 2012

Diagnostic Tool Uses Light to Determine Diabetes Risk

Until now, drawing blood has been an unavoidable component of being tested for prediabetes and diabetes. Nobody enjoys the process, and it probably makes many people shy away from undergoing diagnosis at all.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 28, 2012

Roche’s New Nano SmartView Meter Doesn’t Need Coding

The FDA has given Roche the go-ahead to market its Accu-Chek® Nano SmartView blood glucose monitoring system. The Nano, which uses Accu-Chek SmartView test strips, will be available to US consumers within the first half of this year. It is part of the same product line as the Accu-Chek Aviva Nano and Accu-Chek Performa Nano systems, which Roche has already launched in several overseas markets.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 22, 2012

The Diabetes Epidemic in India

A young man in his early thirties struggles through traffic on his small Honda motorbike. As he enjoys a short break at a traffic signal, one foot on the road, his eyes are attracted to a billboard picturing a succulent burger. While he gazes, fantasizing about lunch, his vision starts to blur.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2012

After Shock

I wake in the morning with the taste of sour milk on my tongue. I'm sweating, extremely weak and disoriented. My muscles ache at the thought of moving. I have a sick feeling in my stomach, and it's threatening to come up my throat. I'm not sure what day it is. Nausea hits in a wave, sending chills down my spine.

comments 28 comments - Posted Jan 17, 2012

“Grip, Rip, and Sip”

Ethan Lewis, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12, founded GlucoBrands only 11 years later. The company produces a portable, inexpensive, tasty, fast-acting glucose gel that people can take to quickly restore healthy blood sugar levels when they experience hypoglycemia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2012

New LifeScan Meter Alerts Users About Blood Sugar Patterns

LifeScan has introduced the OneTouch® VerioTM IQ, a meter that not only tracks and displays blood sugar patterns, but also announces them with messages, such as "Looks like your blood sugar has been running LOW around this time."

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2012

Aussie Scientists Say a Complex Sugar Is Key to Beta Cell Protection

Australian scientists have discovered that when a complex sugar crucial to the survival of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells is degraded by the body's immune system, the beta cells die.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2012

There’s No Shame in Taking Insulin Injections in Public

Recently, there has been a great deal of discussion on the subject of testing your blood sugar and taking insulin shots in public. A shocking number of people on social networks have commented that their family members don't want them to test their blood sugar or take their shots in public. They report having to inject in restrooms or even through their clothing to avoid drawing attention or offending their families. One hypersensitive husband even objected when his recently diagnosed wife took a shot in the relative privacy of their car.

comments 40 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

Dietary Supplements: Know Before You Swallow

A dietary supplement, also known as a food supplement or nutritional supplement, contains a "dietary ingredient" intended to supplement the diet by providing an element that might not otherwise be consumed. "Dietary ingredients" include vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and substances such as enzymes, organ tissues, and metabolites. Dietary supplements, which may be extracts or concentrates, come in many forms, including tablets, capsules, soft gels, gelcaps, liquids, powders, and bars.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2012

Even if They Don’t Add Pounds, Sugary Drinks Up Heart, Diabetes Risks

Some women who drink two of more sugary beverages daily are lucky: their consumption of sweetened drinks doesn't put on extra weight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 5, 2012

Instructional Video Available for Spring Universal Infusion Set

Spring Health Solutions, Inc., has released an instructional video describing its Spring Universal Infusion Set, recently approved by the FDA and Health Canada. The video, at www.SpringUniversal.com, is designed to help consumers properly use the product.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 4, 2012

Just 30 Minutes Per Week of Intense Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar

Canadian researchers report that just 30 minutes of intense exercise per week can reduce blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours after each exercise session and help prevent post-prandial spikes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Birthing Options

Throughout pregnancy and all the way up until labor, I was adamant that I was not having a cesarean section. I was terrified of being cut open because I know that my healing time is longer due to my lowered immune system. In 2009, I had to go to the emergency room for an infection caused by cutting my leg while shaving, so how could I possibly heal after being opened up to birth a baby?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2011

Yeast, Diabetes, and Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What's the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections?

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2011

Support on the Diabetes Journey

Diagnosed with diabetes at age 15, Brandy Barnes went on to a successful career as a pharmaceuticals salesperson, but she deeply missed having other diabetic women in her life to whom she could relate. Finally, after a difficult pregnancy, long thought, and prayer, she founded DiabetesSisters (www.diabetes.sisters.org), a North Carolina-based nonprofit organization that provides education and support to women of all ages with all types of diabetes. DS offers conferences, websites, blogs, and a "sister match" program, all designed to lessen feelings of isolation and deepen bonds of connection among women with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2011

Complications in the Third Trimester

Editor' Note: This article continues Katherine Marple's series on pregnancy with diabetes as a complicating factor. For previous articles, enter her name in the search feature at the top right-hand of this website. The next installment, "Birthing Options," will appear on December 30.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2011

Coming Soon: A New and Better Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage to blood vessels of the retina. Almost everyone who has had diabetes for thirty years or more has some sign of the condition. Now, retinopathy researchers have come up with a device that will be implanted behind a patient's eye to deliver medication on demand. "We wanted to come up with a safe and effective way to help diabetic patients safeguard their sight," said lead author Mu Chiao, a mechanical engineering associate professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, in Science Daily. "This new device offers improvements upon existing implantable devices for drug delivery."

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 26, 2011

As Diabetes Increases Among Hispanics, Prevention Program Shows Promise

An article in an Indiana newspaper documents an alarming rise in diabetes among Arizona's Hispanics, especially along the US border with Mexico. The Republic, published in Columbus, Indiana, reports that 13.5 percent of residents in Arizona's Yuma County had diabetes in 2010. Almost 60 percent of the border county's nearly 200,000 residents are Hispanic.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2011

3 Drugs on the Horizon Could Help the Fight Against Obesity

Health experts are unanimous that obesity or being overweight are major factors in the onset of type 2 diabetes. So it's no surprise that researchers here and abroad are working to develop weight-loss drugs that can help people shed pounds and lessen their susceptibility to diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 23, 2011

Diabetes Diva Amanda Lamb’s “Christmas In Love” Arrives on YouTube

Diabetes Health readers who are Amanda Lamb fans can watch her first-ever Christmas single, "Christmas In Love," on YouTube.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2011

Standing Up For Sugar, the Hypoglycemia Alert Dog  

We are a tight-knit community.  I'm not talking about my neighbors in my hometown of Chicago.  I'm talking about my worldwide neighbors in the diabetic online community.  Anyone dealing with diabetes knows the bond that it brings.  When a person with diabetes is wronged, the rest of us feel the sting.  Most of us living with diabetes have stories about people badgering our diet choices, saying inappropriate or insensitive things, and, sadly, crossing the line even further.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2011

High-Tech Pump Helps Three Type 1s Swim the English Channel

On July 21, Claire Duncan was one of three people with type 1 diabetes on a six-person relay team that swam across the English Channel. The team, swimming to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, covered the 22-mile route in 13.5 hours, starting from a beach between Folkestone and Dover in England and finishing in France near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

A Single Healthy Choice Slashes Type 2 Risk

Here's good news for people who love nuts and Greek yogurt! Replacing even one serving of red meat with these tasty foods can substantially lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 11, 2011

New Type 2 Drug Targets Blood Sugar and Cholesterol

Drug company Merck aims to give people with type 2 diabetes two treatments for the price of one. The new therapy, called Juvisync, was just approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. It's not a radical new treatment, but instead a helpful combination of two familiar standbys: Juvisync unites the active ingredients in blood sugar-lowering Januvia and cholesterol-lowering Zocor in a single tablet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 10, 2011

Diabetes Shouldn’t Be Top Secret

Many people with diabetes admit to keeping their diabetes a secret.  Less than two years ago, I was one of them.  I hated the way people treated me when they found out about my diabetes.  I hated being told that I wasn't allowed to eat things by people who didn't have a clue about diabetes.  I hated the horror stories people told about their acquaintances with diabetes.  I hated people asking me if I had the "bad" kind of diabetes.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2011

JDRF Says FDA Threatens Artificial Pancreas Technology

Will the federal government kill the artificial pancreas? The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) is raising the alarm over FDA guidelines that could stifle the technology necessary for the development of an artificial pancreas.

comments 11 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2011

Big Differences in How Men and Women Cope with Type 2 Diabetes

Women are better at coping with problems than men, right?  Not when it comes to being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to a new survey, that diagnosis had a greater negative impact on women's emotional outlook and adherence to diet and exercise than the same diagnosis given to men. The survey was conducted in September 2011, and included 831 completed responses from 458 women and 373 men.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 6, 2011

Dog Sense

Forensic scientist Mark Ruefenacht, who has type 1 diabetes, tells Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie how he realized that dogs can be a major defense against life-threatening episodes of hypoglycemia. That insight led him to found Dogs for Diabetics ("D4D"), a Concord, California-based organization that trains dogs to alert their masters when they sense low blood sugar. D4D's website is located at www.dogs4diabetics.com/

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2011

Nick Jonas Receives DREAM Award From Disability Rights Legal Center

This year's DREAM Award, presented by the Disability Rights Legal Center (DRLC), was given to Nick Jonas, the musician and actor best known as one of the three Jonas Brothers. He was among the special recipients at the DRLC's annual Franklin D. Roosevelt Dinner, held this year on November 17, 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 3, 2011

Is It Possible to Tame Type 2 Diabetes?

Jeff O'Connell is the author of "Sugar Nation: The Hidden Truth Behind America's Deadliest Habit and the Simple Way to Beat It."  I discovered his book while browsing the shelves of my local library, and I could hardly put it down. Though I have type I diabetes and O'Connell's book focuses on type 2, I found many of his thoughts applicable to my own health. His book is no doubt controversial, so I wanted to delve deeper into his daring claims and share his responses with the diabetic community. After reading my interview with Jeff, please leave a comment below to let Diabetes Health know what you think.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2011

A Scary Prediction: Half of American Adults Obese

Just take a look around. It's pretty clear that many of us are carrying more weight than we used to. Obesity has skyrocketed in recent years, and it's not about to stop. Roughly one in three adults is obese today, and researchers now predict that 164 million adults will be obese by 2030. That's half of all adults in the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2011

November 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

Study Suggests Hearing Loss Is More Common Among People With Diabetes

People with diabetes may want to have their hearing checked, based on a study that found hearing problems twice as common among them as among people without diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 19, 2011

Heather Shields Raises Diabetes Awareness in the Miss California Pageant

Heather Shields was thrilled when she got the opportunity to dance with the famous Joffrey Ballet School in New York City. At 11 years old, she dreamed of one day becoming a professional ballerina, and this trip would bring her dream a little closer. A long way from home for this California girl, Heather traveled with her family to the "Big Apple" for the month of July. During that month she remembers dancing six to seven hours a day in the heat of the summer. She began losing weight, but shrugged it off, assuming she'd caught her mom's stomach bug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2011

What Not to Say to the Newly Diagnosed

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I recall the numerous comments that people blurted out in an attempt to make me feel better about my situation.  But the truth was that I just needed to be treated like everyone else.  I was in the midst of a confusing, depressing, and life-altering diagnosis.  The last thing I needed was a pat on the back that felt more like a slap in the face.

comments 11 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2011

Three Questions That Can Predict a Type 2 Diagnosis

Want a simple way to find out if you or someone you know is likely to develop type 2 diabetes? Just answer these three simple questions!

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2011

The Final Weeks of Pregnancy- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Final weeks of pregnancy! The third trimester brings about many more ultrasound scans and measurements taken to judge the growth and health of your child. You'll likely be visiting your OB/GYN or maternal fetal medicine office twice per week for non-stress tests to ensure that your baby is healthy and active.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2011

Insulindependence

The search for a cure for diabetes is a noble pursuit, but a cure always seems to be another ten years down the road. Finding a way to be healthy in the here and now is what matters for people with diabetes. In 2005, Peter Nerothin started Insulindependence (IN), a nonprofit organization that aims to "revolutionize diabetes management" by leading experiential diabetes education expeditions for type 1 youths.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2011

Blood Sugar Extremes Can Affect Young Brains

Sometimes it feels like diabetes is driving you crazy. But what if the disease is actually changing your brain? That's the disturbing suggestion of a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study suggests that both high and low blood sugars affect the brain development of young people with diabetes, but in different ways.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

Four Tips for a Happier Life With Diabetes

When doctors hand out a diagnosis of diabetes, I wish they'd give you a list of tips that can make life happier living with the illness.  After my diagnosis, I felt ashamed of my diabetes, ashamed of my inability to control it with diet and exercise even though I literally worked out every single day for nine months straight.  I skipped nearly all carbohydrates and didn't eat meat at the time, so all I ate was nuts, cheese, eggs, and vegetables.  The doctor didn't put me on insulin right away because I was eighteen, and she wasn't sure if I had type 1 or type 2. But nothing I did was working. It was soon apparent that I was type 1 and that insulin injections were unavoidable.  I had no idea that it wasn't my fault.  I felt hopeless, hungry, exhausted, and alone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

Thanks to Technology, We Never Have to Be Alone

If you've had diabetes for a number of years, chances are that you remember when there was no Internet access and no diabetes online community.  You had no way to look up information online and no instant connection to millions of others around the world living with diabetes.  Unless you had a friend nearby with diabetes, there was no one to understand how you felt when your blood sugar numbers were less than stellar, and no one to sympathize with how hard it can be to get your A1C down.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

Scary and Sweet

October is my diagnosis month. At 14 years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few weeks before Halloween. I remember thinking, at least I'm too old for trick or treating. My younger sister had been diagnosed six months earlier, however, and at 10 years old, she still loved to trick or treat. To ease her pain, my parents got creative and shifted the emphasis of Halloween off sweets and onto scary: Haunted houses, hayrides, and parties with bowls full of smushed tomatoes for witches hearts and cold grapes for eyeballs became our annual tradition. My sister and I still said no to most of the sugary sweets, but we were the first ones to say yes when the doors of the haunted house opened.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2011

The Night I Needed a Glucagon Injection

The one time I needed a glucagon injection, I didn't have any. I had never been given a prescription for it, had no idea how to use it, and was absolutely clueless about what it did.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 29, 2011

What Are Ketones, and Why Are They Important to Diabetes Self-Management?

All blood tests are tools. Some are to diagnose diabetes, some are to help you manage your diabetes on a daily or long term basis and some are to keep you safe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2011

For People With Diabetes, Contacts With a Twist

Technology now under development would allow people with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar through their contact lenses. Researcher Babak Parviz of the University of Washington in Seattle invented the lenses, which monitor the amount of glucose in tear fluid. That fluid tracks blood glucose levels closely, and Parviz hopes to have the lenses communicate wirelessly with some sort of auxiliary meter.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 23, 2011

My Quest for a Smaller Jean Size and A1C

Trying to lose weight as an insulin-injecting person with type 1 diabetes couldn't be more frustrating. It gets on my last nerve that exercise can trigger mind-numbing lows, lows that cause me to inhale a portion of those recently burned calories. That said, I don't skip exercise to avoid lows. I just check my blood sugars more often, use caution with my insulin dosing, and follow the advice of my doctors.

comments 22 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2011

Diabetes Rock Bottom: How It Led Me to the Greatest Gift of All

I'm just going to come out and say it, the way people do in addiction meetings when they have hit "rock bottom." Hi, my name is Meagan. I was a very uncooperative diabetic for a great many years. I felt lonely, and I hated being different. I rarely checked my blood sugars. In fact, there were times where I didn't even know where my meter was.

comments 12 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2011

Scientists Use Rats’ Own Stem Cells to Cure Their Diabetes

Using stem cells that they extracted from the brains of diabetic lab rats, and turning them into insulin-producing pancreatic cells, Japanese scientists may be on the road to a virtual cure for diabetes that comes from people's own brains.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2011

Novo Nordisk Files for FDA Approval of New Insulin

A brand new insulin will soon be on pharmacy shelves in the United States if Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk has its way. The company has filed for approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell insulin degludec, an original formulation that lasts an extra-long time. Insulin degludec is injected only once a day. Once under the skin, the dose of insulin is absorbed slowly and consistently, allowing for better nighttime control, according to Novo. Most importantly, test subjects had a low rate of hypoglycemia on the drug.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2011

Celebrating Caregivers

My mother died unexpectedly this summer. While her loss was sad and sudden, I have many reasons to celebrate her life and the guidance she offered me. When I was diagnosed with diabetes as a child, she took it upon herself to learn the ins and outs of diabetes care. For most of the next decade, she oversaw my treatment.

comments 6 comments - Posted Oct 6, 2011

September 2011

Nordstrom Will Donate Money for Type 2 Diabetes Tests for Hispanics

The Seattle-based Nordstrom department store chain will donate $5, up to $75,000 total, for each Diabetes Risk Test taken as part of the American Diabetes Association's Hispanic Heritage Month through October 15, 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 30, 2011

A Type 1 Diabetes Cure in the Pipeline?

What if we could stop the body's immune system from attacking the pancreas in the first stages of type 1 diabetes? What if we could keep the pancreas producing insulin, all the while helping it recover from the autoimmune barrage?

comments 7 comments - Posted Sep 29, 2011

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock in the First Trimester of Pregnancy With Diabetes

A couple of factors lead to increased risk of insulin shock comas during the first trimester.  For many, insulin sensitivity increases and the pancreas isn't yet producing the hormones associated with insulin resistance.  In addition, many type 1s will be taken off of their current basal insulin if it is not yet approved for use during pregnancy.

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2011

Reproductive Cells May Eventually Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Imagine if there were a cure for diabetes that could be found inside your own body? Wouldn't it be nice if instead of depending on durable medical equipment, we could one day heal ourselves?

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 24, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2011

More Than Just a Number: Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

So, you're pregnant!  Many who are in your shoes have worked very hard and diligently to begin this excursion.  Others have reached this milestone unintentionally.  Either way, you are about to embark on a journey that will completely challenge everything you know about your type 1 diabetes management.  These next few months will challenge your motives, your emotions, your determination, and everything that makes up who you are. So sink your heels in. Take each step one at a time.  

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 20, 2011

Building Block of Glucose Uptake Identified for Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists have found a protein that plays an important role in allowing our bodies to absorb glucose from our blood. What's more, lower levels of that protein may contribute to type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 19, 2011

Southern States Have Highest Obesity, Says CDC Report

A recent report from the US Centers for Disease Control says that 12 states now have adult obesity rates of 30 percent or higher. Seven of those states are in the South. The CDC data are from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System, a 2010 phone survey of 400,000 US adults. Obesity is defined as a body mass index of 30 or more.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 15, 2011

Comments to-There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

I want to thank you all for the many comments that you have posted.   As I said in the article, it does bother me that so many promises have been made and not kept regarding a cure. This has resulted in people just giving up hope and coming to believe that there will never be a cure for diabetes.   Such promises are still being made today.

comments 20 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2011

The State of Insulin Injection

What's Being Researched Now

comments 4 comments - Posted Sep 11, 2011

August 2011

Bayer HealthCare Recalls 10- and 25-Count Contour Test Strip Vials in U.S. Market

US Action Follows Stop-Ship That Began in June

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 27, 2011

There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

Will there be a cure for diabetes?  Is an artificial pancreas a cure?  Was insulin a cure?  Let's begin on the correct platform.  You may have an opinion on what a cure is that completely differs from mine, and that's okay.

comments 41 comments - Posted Aug 24, 2011

There Will Be a Diabetes Cure

Will there be a cure for diabetes?  Is an artificial pancreas a cure?  Was insulin a cure?  Let's begin on the correct platform.  You may have an opinion on what a cure is that completely differs from mine, and that's okay.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2011

Drug Combo Slows Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

Low doses of metformin and rosiglitazone seem to delay the onset of type 2 in prediabetic people who have impaired glucose tolerance, according to a Canadian study. However, although the drug combination was effective over the first year of the study in helping to control glucose levels and insulin resistance, it was not effective subsequently in delaying the onset of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell deterioration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 7, 2011

Vitamin D May Reduce Risk for Type 2

A Boston-based study has found that vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes by improving their beta cell functioning.

comments 3 comments - Posted Aug 3, 2011

July 2011

NYT Article Says Older Diabetes Drugs Are Often the Best

A recent article in the New York Times says that such old prescription diabetes drugs as metformin and generics such as glimepiride are often as effective as or even more effective than newer, more expensive drugs.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2011

“Good” Brown Fat Might Help People Lose Weight

Body fat is like two twins: one evil and one good.  In this case, white fat-the kind that likes to cluster around the abdomen and hang on to calories-is the bad stuff. The "good" fat is brown, and it has been found to assist the body in burning calories, thus helping keep weight down.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2011

RPI Hopes to Create a Vital Artificial Pancreas Component

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate New York is working on a new approach to blood sugar monitoring that could open the door to an artificial pancreas. The plan is to develop an automated monitoring system so sophisticated that it can take into account the often great differences in blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity among people with type 1 diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2011

Counterfeit Diabetes Medications

The Internet allows consumers to shop for deals on anything imaginable, even prescription drugs. The economic struggles that many currently face, paired with the increasing cost of healthcare and prescription drugs, have created an environment in which counterfeit drug makers can prosper.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 7, 2011

Roger Hurdsman Making Diabetes A Family Affair

Roger Hurdsman lives in Roy, Utah, surrounded by women. His wife of four years, Hilary, is there, along with his two young daughters, Bonnie and Tess.  He seems to be handling the estrogen well though, perhaps because he devotes his days  to designing software for the Department of Defense. He is able to spend time with computers and gadgets before being inundated with tea parties and dress-up when he gets home.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 4, 2011

Goodbye, Pyramid; Hello, MyPlate

Say goodbye to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's old Food Pyramid. The tapered food guide is giving way to MyPlate, a colorful visual aid that shows the rough proportions of fruit, vegetables, protein, grains, and that dairy people should consume at every meal.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2011

Continuous Glucose Monitoring:  The Joys and Pains

"Good news," my diabetes nurse educator says to me. "Your new insurance covers continuous glucose monitoring supplies!" I give her a half-smile as my brain screams at me, "CGM?  Really?  Something else to deal with on top of this damn disease, an insulin pump, exercise, and nutrition?"  But I comply, and a CGM is added to the rest of my paraphernalia.

comments 28 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2011

June 2011

Looking at Cannabis Based Type 2 Treatment

One of the classic effects of cannabis on people is raging hunger-the "marijuana munchies." The drug has been used to good effect on people with diseases that diminish appetite, helping them to regain a healthy interest in food. So it is a bit ironic that British drug maker GW Pharmaceuticals has created a cross-bred cannabis plant whose appetite-suppressing qualities could be used to treat type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 30, 2011

Pew Report Says Consumers Turning to Internet to Track Their Health

A new report shows that increasing numbers of consumers are using the Internet to track medical information that they can apply to their own health. The report, "The Social Life of Health Information," was issued by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project and the California HealthCare Foundation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2011

Allergan Seeks Lap-Band Surgeries for Obese Teens

Lap-Band manufacturer Allergan has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow surgeries using the device on overweight teenagers as young as 14 years old.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2011

Flavonoid Rutin May Help Obesity and Diabetes

An Australian researcher who deliberately fed his lab rats a high-sugar/high-fat diet says that a flavonoid called rutin helped block the growth of fat cells in their abdomens and kept them from putting on weight despite their bad diet. Flavonoids are plant pigments that researchers are finding have beneficial metabolic effects because of their antioxidant capabilities.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2011

Type 2 Diabetes: From Old Dogmas to New Realities

Over the last decade, dramatic changes have occurred in our understanding of the onset and progression of prediabetes. Lightning speed changes have also occurred regarding the therapies available to achieve optimal blood glucose control. Even with all of this change, however, many old dogmas hang on. It's time to become aware of the new realities.  In this article, I focus on two common old dogmas and the new realities.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 16, 2011

Diabetes Seen as Biggest Driver in Increased Spending on Drugs

Statistics from the 2011 Medco Drug Report show that diabetes drugs accounted for 16.1 percent of the overall increase in U.S. spending on therapeutic drugs in 2010. The report states that the increase is due to the growing number of Americans who have diabetes.

comments 5 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2011

FDA Moves to Restrict Access to Three GSK Diabetes Drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has said that starting on November 18, 2011, it will restrict retail pharmacy sales of three diabetes drugs manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline: the stand-alone Avandia (rosiglitazone) and the combination drugs Avandamet (rosiglitazone and metformin) and Avandaryl (rosiglitazone and glimepiride).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2011

Survey Shows Cost Catching Up to Taste in Food-Buying Decisions

As prices rise, Americans are beginning to pay almost as much attention to the cost of food as they do to its taste. That's one of the findings of the 2011 Food & Health Survey, recently published by the International Food Industry Council Foundation (IFICF).

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2011

Amylin, JDRF Team to Test Symlin/Insulin Combo for Type 1

Amylin Pharmaceuticals has announced that it will collaborate with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to test a combination of Symlin and insulin in injectible form as a type 1 therapy.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 3, 2011

May 2011

New App Shows Which Prescriptions Can Drain Nutrients

"Nutrient Depletions" is a new smart phone app that allows users to see which of their prescription medications may be draining nutrients from their body. The app, available at iTunes stores for $1.99, works on Apple's iPhone, iTouch, and iPad products.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 31, 2011

Monitor Linked to Mobile Device Helps Lower Blood Pressure in Type 2s

A monitor attached to a mobile device helps people with type 2 diabetes lower their blood pressure more than simply having a blood pressure monitor available in the home. That's the conclusion of a year-long study conducted by the University Health Network in Toronto, Canada. The study showed that type 2 patients whose blood pressure was actively reported to their doctors via a Bluetooth-enabled device enjoyed lower blood pressure than patients whose readings were not passed on to doctors.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 26, 2011

Maple Syrup-A Sweet Surprise

Meet the latest superfood: maple syrup.  Wait a minute...maple syrup? The super-sugary stuff poured on pancakes and waffles and used to glaze hams? That maple syrup?

comments 9 comments - Posted May 24, 2011

Sanofi Says Late-Stage Trial of Type 2 Drug a Success

French drug maker Sanofi-aventis says that results from a Phase III trial of its experimental type 2 diabetes drug lixisenatide show that the drug successfully lowered patients' blood glucose levels and body weight, but did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 23, 2011

Is Sex Good for Your Heart Health?

Dear Diabetes Health,

comments 2 comments - Posted May 21, 2011

Eight Tips for Super Blood Sugar Control

You're heard the doctors. You've read the articles. You know all about tight control.

comments 25 comments - Posted May 20, 2011

N.J. Hospital Teams With Ricordi to Find Cure for Type 1

New Jersey's Hackensack University Medical Center has announced that it will partner with Dr. Camillo Ricordi to test a surgical procedure that could hold the key to a cure for type 1 diabetes.

comments 10 comments - Posted May 18, 2011

Study Says Worker Vision Benefits Save $4.5 Billion in Healthcare Costs

A study just published by VSP® Vision Care, a 56 million-member non-profit vision benefits and services company, reports that VSP has saved its clients $4.5 billion in potential healthcare expenditures via early detection of chronic eye diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2011

Danish Study Reports Three Diabetes Drugs Best for Lowering Cardiovascular Risk

A Danish study of 107,806 adults taking various diabetes medications has found that three drugs are the most effective at lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease and death: metformin, gliclazide (not marketed in the US), and repaglinide (Prandin). Other common diabetes medications, including glimepiride, glibenclamide (glyburide), glipizide, and tolbutamide, were linked to a higher risk of death both from all causes and from heart attack and stroke.  

comments 1 comment - Posted May 13, 2011

Prediabetes Sweet Tooth Doesn’t Always Lead to Weight Gain

A new study says that people who consume a "moderate" amount of candy per day have a slightly lower body mass index than people who don't eat candy.  They also run a 15 percent lower risk than the general population of developing metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 11, 2011

Moms of Children with Diabetes Tell Their Stories, Ask to Support Research For a Cure

HOLLYWOOD, FL -- They come from New York, Miami, Milwaukee and more. They have children of all ages with type 1 diabetes - and they're on a mission to find a cure. They're the "Real Moms of the DRI Foundation" and in honor of Mother's Day they're asking millions of moms - and others - to support the Diabetes Research Institute, a world leader in cure-focused research.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 8, 2011

FDA Approves Indian Drug Maker’s Diabetes Drug Trial

The drug discussed below is for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted May 6, 2011

Medtronic Responds to "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?"

Recently, we published an article about the implantable pump "A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?" Following the appearance of this article on the Diabetes Health website, over 100 readers commented, most of them expressing a heartfelt desire for access to this technology in the U.S.A. To read the original article click on link below:
A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

comments 35 comments - Posted May 5, 2011

Good News: Diabetes-Related Amputation Rate Falls

The rate of foot and leg amputations among people with diabetes fell by as much as 36 percent in one four-year period, according to a study of patients at Veterans Affairs clinics. Taking patients' age and sex into account, amputations-major and minor-dropped from about seven per 1,000 patients in 2000 to between four and five per 1,000 by 2004. The latter figure is a reduction of around 36 percent, with the biggest decrease coming in above-the-knee amputations.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 4, 2011

An Early Warning for Type 2? It’s Possible

Imagine knowing that you're likely to develop type 2 diabetes a decade from now. What would you do?

comments 3 comments - Posted May 3, 2011

Testosterone Replacement May Lower Death Rate Among Type 2 Men

British researchers say that testosterone replacement therapy for type 2 men with low testosterone levels could reduce their death rate significantly. Over the course of a six-year study by the University of Sheffield, only 8.6 percent of low-testosterone subjects who were given replacement therapy died, compared to 20 percent of low-testosterone subjects who did not receive the therapy.  

comments 2 comments - Posted May 2, 2011

April 2011

Substance in Tangerines Blocks Diabetes in Mice Fed High-Sugar, High-Fat Diets

Canadian scientists have found that nobiletin, a substance found in high concentrations in tangerines, thwarted obesity and the onset of diabetes in lab mice. The researchers at the University of Western Ontario fed the mice a high-sugar, high-fat diet that mimicked the diet of many people in Western societies. One group of animals became obese, developing fatty livers and elevated levels of cholesterol and insulin-typical precursors to type 2  diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But a second group of mice, given the flavonoid nobiletin, did not develop the symptoms of the first group. The nobiletin prevented fatty buildup in the liver by blocking the genes that control the production of fat.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 30, 2011

Safflower Oil Cuts Heart Disease Risk for People With Type 2 Diabetes

We all know by now that fat isn't necessarily a bad thing. Enough advertisements and recommendations for fish oil and omega-3 supplements have appeared over the past few years to make that clear. But what if "good fat" isn't just about eating fish or a taking a fishy-tasting supplement? What if that good fat can be found in a common cooking oil?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2011

Salt: Its History and Hazards

What is it about salt that brings out so many powerful flavors and strong feelings? Simple sodium chloride, or salt, as it's known to everyone but chemistry teachers, has been applied to food as a seasoning since the beginning of civilization. Unfortunately, the sodium in salt has proven dangerous both to diabetics and to healthy people who have a propensity toward heart disease.
 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 26, 2011

Highlights From the Barbara Davis Center's July Keystone Conference

Recently I had the pleasure of attending the Barbara Davis Center's "Management of Diabetes in Youth" conference, held every other year in beautiful Keystone, Colorado. The focus is on all of the latest and greatest in type 1, and it's a real treat to have so many of the best names in this field gathered in one place. The Barbara Davis Center (BDC) is one of the premier programs in the world focusing on type I diabetes management, and the one (Dr. Peter Chase, to be precise) who brought us the famed" Pink Panther" book, Understanding Diabetes - the reliable handbook of type 1 diabetes that many parents of newly diagnosed kids rely on.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 25, 2011

Store Your Teeth in a Stem Cell Bank

Every year four million baby teeth fall out, and 1.4 million wisdom teeth are pulled out of our collective mouth. Until recently, the only entity really interested in all those teeth was the tooth fairy. But all that changed in the year 2000, with the discovery that dental pulp contains adult stem cells. In the not-too-distant future, those stem cells might be used for growing new islet cells to cure diabetes. The problem is, how to keep the teeth nice and fresh until that hoped-for day. That's where Provia Laboratories comes in, with their Store-A-Tooth service.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 24, 2011

Researcher Looks Into Protein That May Prevent Type 2 in Obese People

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $1.15 million grant to a researcher at Eastern Virginia Medical School to investigate a protein that may prevent obese people from developing type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

New Study Suggests the Effectiveness of Diabetes Education Paired With Meters With Advanced Features

A new study has proven that use of a blood glucose meter with advanced features, when paired with diabetes education, more effectively manages blood glucose than using a basic feature meter. This information was presented at the recent 46th European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 116 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

Diabetes Linked to Higher Risk for Parkinson’s

Researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health have found that people with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Despite that finding, they say that there are too few data to support a causative link between diabetes and Parkinson's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2011

Fitness the New-Fangled Way

Greetings from Philadelphia International Airport!  Airports are fascinating places...great for seeing what people look like and how they act under unusual circumstances.  At this moment, I see a lot of truly overweight people. Most folks are treating the moving walkway like a ride at Disney World–just standing there, inching slowly along and staring blankly at the passing drywall.  I don’t know…maybe the two sights are related.  Have we really become this lazy?  Have we “convenienced” our way out of being in shape?  Have electronic toilet flushers, soap dispensers, and water faucets taken away our last opportunity to burn any calories at all?

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 14, 2011

It’s Fun to Fend Off Pre-Diabetes at the (New York) YMCA!

If you have pre-diabetes and live in any of the five boroughs of New York City, get ready to learn a new acronym: YDPP. The initials stand for YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, a public-private partnership under which New Yorkers can get enroll in a comprehensive low-cost diabetes prevention program at one of  the city's 27 YMCA branches and affiliates.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

European Researchers Say Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Italian and Greek researchers conducting a meta-analysis* of the diets of more than 500,000 people have concluded that the Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that are common precursors to type 2 diabetes. Those factors include overweight or obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, high blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and high "bad" cholesterol.
The Mediterranean diet is high in fruit, vegetables, whole grain foods, and low-fat dairy products. Proteins include fish, legumes, poultry, tree nuts, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids from olive oil. Alcohol intake is moderate and almost always in conjunction with meals. Red meat is only an occasional menu item.
The scientists looked at 50 studies that involved more than 500,000 people, then extrapolated the effects of a Mediterranean diet from them. Although the meta-analysis pointed to the usefulness of the Mediterranean diet in fending off metabolic syndrome, its authors said that their conclusion is tentative, given the need for more research on the topic.
The study was published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
* A meta-analysis looks at a number of similar studies and tries to derive new and useful results from them by detecting common patterns among them.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

Taiwanese Study Shows New Technology Nearly Three Times Better at Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Taiwanese researchers say that a technology that uses sound waves to stimulate healing in diabetic foot ulcers is almost three times more effective than conventional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The technology, called dermaPACE®, is manufactured by SANUWAVE Health Inc., a medical device company located in Alpharetta, Ga.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 10, 2011

Oklahoma Billionaires Pledge $20 Million for Diabetes Center

An Enid, Oklahoma, billionaire and his wife have pledged another $20 million on top of the $10.5 million they had previously contributed to his namesake diabetes center at the University of Oklahoma.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2011

Can Beta Blockers Encourage Weight Gain? Aussie Study Says Yes

Beta blockers, which many people with diabetes take to control high blood pressure, may be one of the reasons why type 2s often tend to gain and keep weight. That's the conclusion of a study from St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2011

Decades-Long Study Shows Second-Hand Smoke Ups Diabetes Risk

While smoking is commonly associated with a higher risk of developing a serious disease, it's not often that second-hand smoke or being an ex-smoker is considered even riskier. If the disease is type 2 diabetes, however, it is.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 5, 2011

Las Vegas Will Host 2nd Annual Native American Healthcare Conference in Late May

The Second Annual Native American Healthcare Conference will take place May 23 through 24 at the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The conference will be held in conjunction with the Native American Diabetes Workshop at the same site.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 4, 2011

The EndoBarrier Is Approved for Sale in the EU

As we wrote back in 2008, the EndoBarrier is a very clever way to simulate the effect of a gastric bypass without the unpleasant scalpel part. It looks like a long clear plastic stocking, and it's simply threaded through the patient's mouth and stomach, down to the small intestine, where it lines the intestine's upper section (the same part that is bypassed in traditional surgery). Food slips right through it, but digestive enzymes are trapped on its other side. The two don't get to join forces until a couple of feet further downstream, so the effect on diabetes is a lot like that of a bypass: It resolves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 1, 2011

March 2011

Eighty Percent of Diabetes Concentrated in 20 Percent of Zip Codes

The recently launched U.S. Diabetes Index (USDI) has revealed that 80 percent of all diabetes cases are located in just 20 percent of zip codes. Dr. Gary Puckrein, USDI developer and CEO of the National Minority Quality Forum, hopes that the USDI will help   the United States direct its resources to the most affected areas.  

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2011

Pre-Diabetes Glossary

This List defines terms that people with prediabetes commonly encounter as they learn more about the condition.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 29, 2011

Stem Cell Study Focuses on Reducing Amputations

Researchers at the University of California at Davis have begun a study to see if patients' own adult stem cells can be used to increase lower leg blood circulation and possibly prevent amputation  due to arterial disease or diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2011

Open Wide! Blood from Dental Procedures Could Be Used to Predict Diabetes

A New York University research team has won a pilot grant to see if blood from dental procedures could be used in conjunction with the A1C test to detect diabetes or pre-diabetes. The A1C test, which is becoming healthcare providers' preferred test for detecting the disease, typically uses blood extracted from finger pricks to make its analysis. The NYU team will see if the blood that flows from gum tissue during dental work can be used for the same purpose.

comments 5 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2011

We Have Met the Enemy

Now that a few months have passed since the New Year, what is the state of your resolution to lose weight? If it is a just a painful memory, you might be pondering the strength of your willpower and concluding that it is shamefully weak. In fact, it's not, according to Daniel Akst, the author of We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess. Although a full two-thirds of us are overweight, our willpower is no weaker than that of the slim generations that preceded us. It's just that we're up against temptations that we never evolved to resist, in an environment that seduces rather than sustains us.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 24, 2011

FDA Accepts Application to Review Dapagliflozin, a Type 2 Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted an application to review dapagliflozin, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 22, 2011

Did We Evolve to Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Evolution works in strange ways. What serves as an advantage at one point in time can sometimes prove a problem later, when the world has changed. It looks like that might be the case with type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from San Diego, California.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2011

“Diabetes Belt” Stretches Across the South

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a swath of the southern U.S. as the country's "diabetes belt." In this region, made up of parts of 15 states, some 12 percent of the population has type 2 diabetes, compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2011

Should States Let Inmates Donate Organs?

If a prisoner on death row wants to donate his organs, should he be allowed to do it?

comments 19 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2011

The Nutrisystem D Plan for Safely Losing Weight With Diabetes

Weight loss can help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and avoid potential health risks associated with the disease.  Did you know that losing even seven percent of your body weight can lower blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels1?
  
"Consider diabetes as a disease that has different phases--with the central feature a disorder of insulin production and insulin use," said Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD,CSSD,CDE. Anding is a clinical dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Baylor College of Medicine, as well as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.  "To better control and lose weight safely with type 2 diabetes, it is important to consider the type and amount of food on your plate."

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2011

Garlic Oil May Protect Against Diabetes-related Heart Disease

A new report recently published in the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry adds a new punch to the power of garlic in the fight against heart disease. The report concludes that garlic has "significant" potential for preventing cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease that is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 5, 2011

Novo Nordisk Joins Nationwide Diabetes/Pre-Diabetes Treatment Alliance

Novo Nordisk, the world's largest insulin manufacturer, has joined the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance (DPCA), a group whose goals are to reduce people's risk of developing diabetes and to work with people who already have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 4, 2011

February 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

Statins May Prevent Diabetic-Related Blindness

New University of Georgia research has found that a statin drug that is often known by the brand-name Lipitor may help prevent blindness in people with diabetes. In a study using diabetic rats, lead author Azza El-Remessy, assistant professor in the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, and her colleagues found that statins prevent free radicals in the retina from killing nerves important to maintaining vision. The results of the study are published in the March edition of the journal Diabetologia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

New Clinical Trial Needs Type 2 Patients for Gastric Bypass Surgery

In order to undergo gastric bypass surgery, you must have a BMI of at least 35. If you have type 2 diabetes and would like to undergo the surgery to alleviate your diabetes symptoms, you are out of luck unless you are also morbidly obese. A few less weighty type 2 patients have taken matters into their own hands by deliberately gaining enough weight to qualify, but now there is a less drastic way to qualify for the operation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Does Coffee Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

Folks who need that morning cup of coffee to get going may be protecting themselves from type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. UCLA researchers wrote in the journal Diabetes last month that drinking four cups of coffee a day reduced women's chance of developing type 2 by a bit less than half. What's more, the scientists point to a specific reason why all that java has a beneficial effect: a protein known as sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Scientists have suspected for some time that SHBG was connected to diabetes development.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 19, 2011

Mouse Study Eliminates Need for Insulin by Eliminating Glucagon

Can't make insulin? That might not be a problem, according to Dr. Roger Unger, the lead researcher on a mouse study out of UT Southwestern Medical Center. As Dr. Unger stated in a press release, his findings "suggest that if there is no glucagon, it doesn't matter if you don't have insulin....In adulthood, at least with respect to glucose metabolism, the role of insulin is to control glucagon. And if you don't have glucagon, then you don't need insulin...If diabetes is defined as restoration of glucose homeostasis to normal, then this treatment can perhaps be considered very close to a ‘cure.' "

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 16, 2011

Last Patient Completes the EU Phase III Study of Diamyd® Antigen Based Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

The final patient has performed the last visit of the main study period in Diamyd Medical's European Phase III study. Treatment with the antigen based therapy Diamyd® is made to investigate whether beta cell function and thereby blood sugar control can be preserved in children and adolescents with new onset type 1 diabetes. The top line results from this study are expected to be reported as planned, in late spring 2011.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Vascular Complications of Diabetes: Due to One Missing Enzyme?

Many tragic complications of diabetes, including amputations, heart attack, stroke, and blindness, are due to blood vessel damage. According to Xiaochao Wei, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, all that vascular damage may be caused by a shortage of one enzyme: fatty acid synthase, or FAS.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 11, 2011

“Artificial Pancreas” Helps Pregnant Mothers With Diabetes

It's hard enough to be pregnant, but pregnancy with diabetes is especially challenging because it's so difficult to keep blood sugar within a normal range at a time when hormones are surging. All women try their best with the tools that they have, but even so, about half of all babies born to mothers with type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese at birth because of too much sugar in their mothers' blood. Mothers with high blood glucose levels also increase their child's risk of congenital malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm delivery, and neonatal admission.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2011

Some Doctors Dispute Benefits Of Early Diagnosis

In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does the opposite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Type 1 Diabetes Associated With Common Cold Virus

It's generally thought that a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes is not enough to develop the disease, but that an environmental trigger is required to activate it. Researchers are not sure what that environmental trigger is, but enteroviruses have been under suspicion for quite a while. Enteroviruses are the second leading cause of viral colds in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Don't Stress Out: Super Bowl Losses Can Cause Heartbreak

A new study published in the journal Clinical Cardiology reveals that a Super Bowl loss for a home team was associated with increased death rates in both men and women and in older individuals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

Lilly and the JDRF Partner to Fund Regenerative Medicine Research in Type 1 Diabetes

INDIANAPOLIS and NEW YORK - Eli Lilly and Company and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) today announced that they have signed an agreement to fund early-stage research that could enable patients with type 1 diabetes to regenerate insulin-producing cells destroyed by the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

January 2011

Front Labels on Food Packages Are Misleading

After the American Heart Association introduced its heart healthy logo in 1995, manufacturers apparently decided that such "healthy" logos were a pretty good marketing idea. Similar logos, called front-of-the-package labels, or FoP labels, have become popular with several food manufacturers, each of which has developed its own labels using its own criteria. Now, not surprisingly, a study by the Prevention Institute has found that these labels are misleading to customers. According to the Prevention Institute's executive director, Larry Cohen, they "emphasize one healthy aspect to trick [customers] into buying something fundamentally unhealthy." Dora the Explorer Fruit Shapes, for example, prominently labels itself as "gluten free," but does not mention the fact that 58 percent of its calories come from sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2011

New Jersey - Florida Partnership to Speed Diabetes Research: A Cure for Diabetes is One Step Closer

The MOLLY and LINDSEY Diabetes Research Foundation at Hackensack University Medical Center (HUMC) and the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have joined forces to find the cure for Type 1 Diabetes.  Together they will form the Hackensack-Miami DRI Federation Project, a think tank of East Coast specialists who will fast-track the best research ideas coming out of the labs and put them to the test in clinically meaningful ways, thus shortening the path to a cure for those with type 1 diabetes.  

comments 5 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

New Primary Care Physicians Haven't Learned Enough About Diabetes

Your young primary care doctor may not know a lot about diabetes, according to a study led by Stephen Sisson, MD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  "When I graduated from residency here, I knew much more about how to ventilate a patient on a machine than how to control somebody's blood sugar, and that's a problem," said Sisson in a press release.  "The average resident doesn't know what the goal for normal fasting blood sugar should be. If you don't know what it has to be, how are you going to guide your diabetes management with patients?"

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 26, 2011

Kombiglyze Komes to a Pharmacy Near You

The kuriously named Kombiglyze XR, a combination of Onglyza (saxagliptin) and the old reliable metformin, has arrived at pharmacies and is available by prescription to people with type 2 diabetes. It's similar to Janumet, an older medication that's a combination of Januvia (sitagliptin) and metformin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 25, 2011

"The Hormone of Darkness" Won't Come Out in the Light

Keeping the lights on all night might keep away the monsters under the bed, but it also keeps away the "hormone of darkness," melatonin, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Melatonin, which is secreted into the blood by the brain's pineal gland at night, is involved in the circadian rhythm. Scientists believe that disrupting circadian rhythms can contribute to metabolic disease. Specifically, melatonin receptor genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant that may help prevent cancer.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2011

Vitamins C and E Affect Metabolic Syndrome in Ecuador

On the outskirts of Quito, the capital of Ecuador, meals are likely to be based on white rice, potatoes, sugar, and white bread. Given their reliance on high carbohydrate foods that are low in essential nutrients, many of the residents are overweight and malnourished at the same time.  The lack of vitamin C in their diet may contribute to metabolic syndrome, according to researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and the Corporacion Ecuatoriana de Biotecnologia. The researchers also concluded that vitamin E may have a protective effect against metabolic syndrome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2011

Scientists Cook Up a Little Brown Fat

Brown fat is an entirely different animal than the white fat that we pack onto our hips to store excess calories.  Instead of storing energy, brown fat actually burns glucose to produce heat (thermogenesis). It's brown because it contains special mitochondria that produce heat from the glucose when activated by cold. Adults don't have much of it, unfortunately, just a few grams if we're lucky. If we had about 50 grams and were cold enough to activate it, it would actually burn about 500 calories a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

Taking Your Medicine Is Healthy for the Healthcare System

Taking your medicine can lead to quite a windfall in reduced medical claims, according to a study recently published in Health Affairs. Over the course of a year, patients with diabetes who took their medications as directed saved their insurance companies a handsome $3,756 compared to people who didn't, even after claiming as much as $1000 for those very medications. The money was saved because the patients spent less time at the emergency room and in the hospital, a nice benefit in itself.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 11, 2011

Sitagliptin (Januvia) Lowers Blood Sugar in People With Type 1 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (Januvia) has long been used to reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, but a new study indicates that it can do the same for those with type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a DPP-4 inhibitor; that is, it inhibits, or temporarily prevents, the enzyme DPP-4 from destroying a helpful hormone called GLP-1. GLP-1, which is released by the gut when food arrives there from the stomach, lowers blood sugar by causing the release of insulin, reducing the secretion of glucagon, and slowing stomach emptying and nutrient absorption.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2011

A Personal Journey to the New York Historical Society's Diabetes Exhibit

My trip began as I flew from Dallas to my home town of Philadelphia and then caught an early Amtrak train to New York City.  Growing up in the Philadelphia area had given me an appreciation for U.S. history, but today I was going to learn something new: the history of diabetes.  My daughter, Sarah, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2003, yet I didn't know much about the history of the disease. Living every day with the stress and worry that many parents have, I felt I had no time to spend learning how we got to the modern treatments we have today.  I had focused only on doing my job as caregiver and supporter of my daughter.  I was looking forward to learning something new.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jan 3, 2011

December 2010

Einstein College of Medicine Receives $600,000 Grant to Study Resveratrol's Impact on Pre-Diabetes

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City has received a $600,000 grant from the American Diabetes Association to study the effects of resveratrol on lowering impaired glucose tolerance in older adults.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2010

Combining exenatide with insulin may be ‘best result ever' for diabetes patients

A new study finds that combining the newer diabetes drug exenatide with insulin provides better blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes than insulin alone and helps promote weight loss.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

Alarming Study Regarding Oral Health Care of Those With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes means a lot of change in your daily life. From blood glucose monitoring to watching what you eat to losing weight, it's hard to keep track of the changes you need to make to keep diabetes under control. One aspect of diabetes care that sometimes falls through the cracks is oral health care, which, if ignored, can lead to serious health complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2010

One-Third of UAE Residents Could Have Diabetes or Pre-diabetes by 2020

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates-- One in three United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents could have diabetes or prediabetes by the end of the decade, according to a new analysis from international health and well-being company UnitedHealth Group, released at the World Health Care Congress Middle East meeting in Abu Dhabi.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Diabetes-Depression Connection

A 10-year study by Harvard University scientists found that diabetes puts people at risk for depression and that depression puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes. The two-way connection between the diseases was discovered in 55,000 nurses surveyed over the decade.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 17, 2010

Abuse in Childhood and Teens May Set Many Women on the Path to Type 2

Women who experienced sexual or physical abuse in childhood and adolescence-whether moderate or severe-run a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who were not abused, according to results from a study recently reported online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 16, 2010

Almonds May Help Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

With nearly 16 million Americans living today with pre-diabetes, a condition that is the precursor to type 2 diabetes, and half of all Americans expected to have some form of diabetes by the year 2020, healthy eating is more important than ever (1,2).  But here is some good news: a recent scientific study shows that incorporating almonds into your diet can help treat and possibly prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 15, 2010

Stem cells used to make pancreas, gut cells

(Reuters) - Stem cells can be transformed into the pancreatic cells needed to treat diabetes and into complex layers of intestinal tissue, scientists demonstrated in two experiments reported on Sunday.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

JDRF Applauds Congress for Passage of $300 Million for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Thanks Supporters for Advocacy Efforts for Special Diabetes Program Renewal

"Congress passed a multi-year renewal of the Special Diabetes Program (SDP), ensuring that studies on promising diabetes treatments and avenues toward a cure continue uninterrupted. As the father of a son living with type 1 diabetes, and as CEO of JDRF, one of the leading advocates for the renewal of this program, I applaud the U.S. government for its continued commitment to end this disease.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 13, 2010

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Alter Brain's Perception of Sweet Taste

Obese lab rats that have undergone gastric bypass surgery to induce weight loss show a reduced desire for sugar water compared to obese rats that have not had the operation. Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine who observed that outcome also reported that the rats' preferences for salty, sour, or bitter tastes did not change. Lean rats who were given gastric bypass surgery as a control showed no changes in any of their taste preferences.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 11, 2010

Special Infant Formula May Protect Babies from Type 1 Diabetes

If you have a new infant in your family and a family history of type 1 diabetes, feeding your baby a special formula when weaning off breastfeeding may protect against the development of the antibodies associated with type 1 diabetes, thus potentially shielding your child from developing the disease itself. This is the finding of a new study, conducted by Finnish researchers, that was published in the November 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2010

A Gift of Love. A Gift of Hope...For the Holidays.

Celebrate the season with an eCard and help support the Diabetes Research Institute! Send your family, friends or business colleagues A Gift of Love...A Gift of Hope. They will feel special knowing you are supporting research to find a cure for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 3, 2010

November 2010

Recession Weighs Heavily on People With Diabetes

The economic recession has hammered people with diabetes, according to a new survey. Many say that their health has been harmed by the crisis, and more expect their health to suffer in the future. What's more, most don't expect the government's health reform bill to improve their situation.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 28, 2010

A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes

A new drug for type 2 diabetes started showing up in drugstores this week, according to manufacturer Santarus. The FDA-approved drug, called Cycloset, takes an distinctive -- and not well understood -- approach to reducing blood sugar levels. The pill apparently works by increasing dopamine activity in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain. Dopamine is a brain chemical that plays a big role in people's behavior, mood, and ability to sleep. Scientists theorize that glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may in part result from abnormal activity of this chemical, and that upping dopamine activity may iron out these problems.That's the theory, at least: the drug's exact workings aren't known.  But it seems to do the trick.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 24, 2010

Be Part of the Cure

Hundreds of people like you are choosing to Be Part of Cure. They are sharing their personal experiences - both heartbreaking and inspiring - of how diabetes has touched their lives.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 13, 2010

JDRF Clinical Panel Recommends Next Steps for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Testing

WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 10, 2010 --- Diabetes experts at a meeting convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) took the next step in advancing efforts toward the development of an artificial pancreas: putting forth clinical recommendations to ensure the safe and effective testing of artificial pancreas technology in real-life situations. We are pleased at today's meeting there was a strong consensus among leading clinicians, researchers and industry leaders regarding the path toward outpatient studies for both low-glucose suspend and artificial pancreas systems. 

comments 5 comments - Posted Nov 10, 2010

October 2010

Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose in Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia.

comments 2 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2010

Surgeons Create Functional Artificial Pancreatic Tissue

In a proof-of-concept study presented at the 2010 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons, the researchers note that the matrix not only helps to understand the micro-architecture of the pancreas, but also prolongs the survival and preserves the function of the islets. Islets survived longer in the bio-artificial matrix than in conventional transplantation sites, and they produced significantly more insulin when challenged with glucose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 30, 2010

Diabetes Risk May Fall as Magnesium Intake Increases

Getting enough magnesium in your diet could help prevent type 2 diabetes. Dr. Ka He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have found that people who consumed the most magnesium from foods and vitamin supplements were about half as likely to develop diabetes over the next 20 years as people who took in the least magnesium.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2010

Reducing Health Costs Through Lower Food Prices

Reducing the cost of low-carbohydrate foods for people with diabetes could significantly reduce medical costs associated with the disease that affects more than 23 million Americans, according to a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2010

Transplanted Feces from Thin People Improve Insulin Sensitivity in People with Pre-Diabetes

European researchers have reported that when they transplanted fecal matter from healthy thin people into obese people with pre-diabetes, the latter group's insulin sensitivity notably increased. (Insulin sensitivity is the body's ability to properly use the insulin hormone to regulate the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Pre-diabetes exists when increasing resistance to insulin creates higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, a precondition to the onset of full-blown type 2 diabetes.)

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 19, 2010

Pre-Diabetes Doubles Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A meta-analysis* of 87 studies  involving  951,083 patients, performed by a Canadian research team, shows that the pre-diabetic condition known as metabolic syndrome increases the risk of heart disease or stroke in patients by a factor of more than two.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2010

Early Research Reveals New Clues to Origin of Diabetes

University of Michigan scientists have identified events inside insulin-producing pancreatic cells that set the stage for a neonatal form of non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and may play a role in type 2 diabetes as well. The results point to a potential target for drugs to protect normally functioning proteins essential for producing insulin.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2010

Sleep Loss Limits Fat Loss

Cutting back on sleep reduces the benefits of dieting, according to a study published Oct. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2010

Link Between Diabetes and Air Pollution Discovered

A national epidemiologic study finds a strong, consistent correlation between adult diabetes and particulate air pollution that persists after adjustment for other risk factors like obesity and ethnicity, report researchers from Children's Hospital Boston. The relationship was seen even at exposure levels below the current EPA safety limit.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 1, 2010

September 2010

International Diabetes Summit

Event Description: The human and economic costs of this epidemic are enormous, diabetes increases the risk for heart disease and other health problems, and therefore it is important to give this disease more attention. The purpose of this forum is to bring together international experts from International health organizations, national health authorities, local diabetic associations, academics, and local, regional and global media to:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2010

International Diabetes Summit: Important Meeting for the Global Epidemic of the 21st Century

Recognising Diabetes as the Global Epidemic of the 21st century and looking at the high prevalence of debilitating diabetes in the region, the First International Diabetes Summit will be Hosted in United Arab Emirates in Dubai on the 8th and 9th of October with the support from the GCC Health Ministers Council and The Council of Nursing and Nursing Specialization for Cooperation Council States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2010

UCSF Diabetes Symposium Marks Decade of Research Advances

Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient's ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

FDA Significantly Restricts Access to the Diabetes Drug Avandia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it will significantly restrict the use of the diabetes drug Avandia (rosiglitazone) to patients with Type 2 diabetes who cannot control their diabetes on other medications. These new restrictions are in response to data that suggest an elevated risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients treated with Avandia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 23, 2010

New Blood Markers for Type 2 Diabetes May Help to Identify Patients at Risk

For the first time, scientists have found that blood levels of some ribonucleic acids (microRNAs) are different among people with type 2 diabetes and those who subsequently develop the disease compared to healthy controls, according to research reported in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Kids and Diabetes Risk: Do Chromosomes Hold New Clues?

Children who have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes might be identified earlier by way of tell-tale genetic indicators known as biomarkers. Some of those new biomarkers might be pinpointed in research led by Nancy F. Butte and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Rogue Protein May Trigger Diabetes

The presence of amyloid protein may produce a chain reaction which destroys vital insulin-producing cells. Researchers based in Dublin, writing in the journal Nature Immunology, say future drugs could target this process. Amyloid is implicated in many other diseases - most notably Alzheimer's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Diabetes and Autoimmunity

The JDRF is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. A lot has changed in the past four decades. One change has to do with the organization's name. JDRF stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Years ago we called what we now know as type 1 diabetes, Juvenile Onset Diabetes Mellitus (JODM). We called it that because we knew (or thought we knew) it was the kind of diabetes that occurred in children. We now know that type 1 diabetes occurs in people of all age groups. There was a lot we didn't know 40 years ago, one of which was that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 16, 2010

Joslin 50-Year Medalists Give Clues to Cures

In type 1 diabetes, the body relentlessly attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. But a study by Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now has firmly established that some of these cells endure for many decades in a small group of people with the disease-offering clues to potential treatments for preserving and even restoring the crucial cell population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Immune System Genes Show Links to Type 1 Diabetes

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but international researchers have found a link between the blood sugar disorder and a network of immune system genes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2010

Long-term Weight Loss may be Harmful to Health

Long-term weight loss may release into the blood industrial pollutants linked to illnesses like diabetes, hypertension and rheumatoid arthritis, researchers said on Tuesday. These compounds are normally stored in fatty tissues, but when fat breaks down during weight loss, they get into the blood stream, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee at the Kyungpook National University in Daegu in South Korea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2010

Type 2 Diabetes Raises Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are two distressing, but increasingly common, diseases seen in our aging population. At some point in the future, they may well overwhelm the healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2010

As the Quest for an Artificial Pancreas Continues, Europeans Look at a Novel Approach

The Holy Grail pursued by all diabetes researchers is a complete cure for both the type 1 and type 2 forms of the disease. But until then, the "artificial pancreas," a combination of glucose monitoring and insulin dosing technology, may be as close as they get to a final breakthrough in treating diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 3, 2010

Brain Surgery Results Could Portend New Approach to Treating Type 2

Results of brain surgery on a small group of type 2 diabetes patients point the way to a possible new approach for treating the disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2010

August 2010

Blocking Progress

On Monday, August 23rd, a federal court blocked federal funding of embryonic stem cell research; ruling that the Obama Administration's policy violates federal law.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 31, 2010

MannKind Corporation Providing AFREZZA to JDRF for Artificial Pancreas Project

MannKind Corporation announced that the company will supply its novel, ultra rapid acting insulin AFREZZATM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) for use in a study being conducted by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) as part of its Artificial Pancreas Project. The planned two-year study in patients with type 1 diabetes will leverage the unique rapid action of AFREZZA for use in a closed-loop blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery system, termed the "artificial pancreas" by the JDRF. The study will be managed in conjunction with the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 29, 2010

NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

Doctors have long known that different populations have different risks for chronic illness. Certain ethnic groups, for instance, are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others. But why? The National Institutes of Health aims to find out. It's Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health will take a broad look at factors that influence disease and aim to make positive changes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 25, 2010

Controlling a Fat-Regulating Protein Dramatically Increases Insulin Sensitivity

PPARy is a protein that regulates the body's production of fat cells. However, obesity can modify how PPARy works, leading to decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of metabolic syndrome. (Metabolic syndrome is the cluster of factors, including insulin resistance, overweight, high blood pressure, and abnormal blood sugar levels, that is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2010

Evolution May Have Pushed Humans Toward Greater Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Gene variants associated with an increased risk for type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis may confer previously unknown benefits to their human carriers, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. As a result, the human race may have been evolving in the recent past to be more susceptible, rather than less, to some complex diseases, they conclude.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2010

Gene testing could have saved weight-loss drug

(Reuters) - Genetic testing might have helped identify people who would become depressed or suicidal while taking Sanofi-Aventis' weight loss drug Acomplia, which might have helped keep the drug on the market, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2010

The Sanford Project Launches Research Study to Find a Cure

"The objective of this clinical trial (research study) is to determine if the medications can rescue the few beta cells that remain soon after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; and whether new beta cells can even be regenerated," commented Alex Rabinovitch, MD, Principal Investigator of the trial and Associate Director of The Sanford Project. "The investigational combinations of these medications could possibly allow patients to decrease or no longer need to inject insulin to keep their blood levels under proper control."

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 12, 2010

Wouldn’t it be Great if You Could Pop a Pill and Lose Weight?

And wouldn't it be great if that pill weren't something advertised on late-night TV, but rather a legitimate treatment? A drug called rimonabant, introduced in Europe, seemed to fit the bill at first, but it was pulled from the market in late 2008 due to concerns about psychiatric side effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 10, 2010

Health Leaders Announce Initiative Bringing Diverse Voices Together to Tackle Critical Healthcare Innovation Issues

The Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC) - a coalition of chief executives representing all sectors of American healthcare - announced the formation of the National Dialogue for Healthcare Innovation (NDHI), a forum in which leaders from private sector healthcare, government, academia and patient and consumer organizations can work toward consensus on the most important issues affecting healthcare innovation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 6, 2010

Victoza® Achieved Improved Blood Sugar Control in African-Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk presented results demonstrating that once-daily Victoza® (liraglutide [rDNA] injection) achieved significantly greater improvements in blood sugar control compared to placebo among African-American patients with type 2 diabetes. The meta-analysis of phase 3 data from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) trials were presented at the 2010 National Medical Association Annual Convention & Scientific Assembly.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 5, 2010

July 2010

Implanted Glucose Sensor Works for More than One Year

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and GlySens Incorporated have developed an implantable glucose sensor and wireless telemetry system that continuously monitors tissue glucose and transmits the information to an external receiver. The paper, published in the July 28, 2010 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, describes the use of this glucose-sensing device as an implant in animals for over one year. After human clinical trials and FDA approval, the device may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 31, 2010

New York Historical Society Brings to Life the Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin

NEW YORK, NY, July 26, 2010 - Recalling the desperate fight for life that used to be waged by juvenile diabetes patients, and commemorating the events of 1921 that inaugurated a new era of hope for them and their families, the New York Historical Society will present the exhibition Breakthrough: The Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin from October 5, 2010 through January 31, 2011. Exploring the roles of science, government, higher education and industry in developing and distributing a life-saving drug, the exhibition will bring to life the personalities who discovered insulin and raced to bring it to the world and will tell the story of one extraordinary New York girl-Elizabeth Evans Hughes, daughter of the leading statesman and jurist Charles Evans Hughes-who was among the very first patients to be saved.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2010

FDA Freezes Long-Term Study on Diabetes Drug Avandia

A long-term study on the safety of a popular diabetes drug was put on hold Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, while the FDA considers whether it's too dangerous to continue.  Several large studies have linked the drug, Avandia, to a higher risk of heart attacks and other heart problems. While other studies have not found the same risk, last week an FDA advisory panel recommended that the drug not be sold without a stronger warning label or possibly limits on who could receive it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

Hepatitis C and Insulin Resistance

We have known for several years that Hepatitis C, a common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, also makes people three to four times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. In studying the insulin resistance of 29 people with Hepatitis C, Australian researchers have confirmed that they have high insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. However, almost all insulin resistance occurs in muscle, with little or none in the liver, a very surprising finding given that Hepatitis C is a liver disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2010

Nutraceuticals and Natural Supplements for Treating Type 2 Diabetes: An Overview

From environmentally friendly hybrid cars and heating with solar power to organic or natural foods, our culture is increasingly embracing green strategies. "Using natural dietary supplements to support healthy blood sugar levels and minimize the impact of glycation is a rational continuation of this green philosophy," says Steven Joyal, MD, vice president of Scientific Affairs and Medical Development for the Life Extension Foundation in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida (www.lef.org). He is also author of the book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 20, 2010

U.S. Advisers Reject Vivus' Fat Pill

(Reuters) - The first new prescription weight-loss pill in more than a decade failed to win backing from U.S.health advisers, who said safety concerns about the drug outweighed its ability to help obese patients shed pounds.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2010

Moderate Alcohol Intake Lessens Chance of Developing Type 2, Says Dutch Study

While teetotaling is the surest way to avoid abusing alcohol, it turns out that moderate alcohol intake may be one way to stave off the development of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Johns Hopkins Team Discovers Sweet Way to Detect Pre-Diabetes

Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple, routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Pump and Sensor Combo Beats MDI Decisively in Medtronic’s STAR 3 Study

A massive study involving 485 people with type 1 diabetes at 30 locations across North America shows that the combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor helps patients achieve significantly lower A1c levels than multiple daily insulin injections.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 13, 2010

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 9, 2010

Study Says Byetta and Januvia Do Not Pose Extra Risk for Pancreatitis

A study released in late June has brought some welcome news to the makers of Byetta and Januvia: Users of the two diabetes drugs run no greater risk of developing pancreatitis than people with diabetes who take other drugs. In fact, both drugs seem to put users at slightly less risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2010

Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2010

AFREZZA Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy with Type 2s

AFREZZA TM (insulin human [rDNA origin]) Inhalation Powder, a well-tolerated, investigational ultra rapid acting mealtime insulin, as part of a diabetes treatment regimen, provides long-term glucose control comparable to usual insulin therapy but with a significantly reduced incidence of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a two-year study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 70th Scientific Sessions.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 6, 2010

Vitamin D Deficiency Common in People With Poor Diabetes Control

In a recent study of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and glucose intolerance in people with type 2 diabetes, more than 90 percent of the type 2 diabetes patients were found to be deficient in vitamin D, with their control over the disease worsening as their deficiency increased.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 4, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

GLUMETZA: Extended Release Metformin

Depomed, Inc. and Santarus, Inc. announced new data suggesting that patients previously intolerant of metformin may be able to tolerate higher doses of metformin when treated with GLUMETZA® (metformin HCl extended release tablets).  The finding will be presented at the 70th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in Orlando. GLUMETZA is a once-daily, extended release formulation of metformin, and is approved for use in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is promoted in the U.S. by Santarus.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2010

June 2010

Do You Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

It raises fasting blood sugars. It increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. Millions of people suffer from it. And many don't even know they have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 30, 2010

Malfunctioning Pancreatic

A malfunction in the pancreas's "circadian clock*," the built-in timer found in all living things that regulates major biological processes, may be one of the reasons that people develop diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Harvard Study Says Brown Rice Twice Weekly Can Reduce Diabetes Risk by 10 Percent

White rice and brown rice are reminiscent of those old dramas about identical twins, wherein one turns out to be angelic and the other turns out to be bad news.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2010

Double Transplantation Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

City of Hope researchers have found that bone marrow transplantation with islet cell transplantation shows promise as a treatment for late-stage type 1 diabetes. This combination may enable patients to make their own insulin again.  Results from laboratory research led by Defu Zeng, MD, associate professor in the departments of Diabetes Research and Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope, were published online this month in the journal Diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 25, 2010

Scientists Have Found the Peptide Trigger for Type 1 Diabetes in Animal Tests

Researchers from the National Jewish Health and University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found a specific protein fragment, or peptide, that stimulates an immune system attack resulting in diabetes. Their experiments in mice contradict conventional wisdom about such peptides and support work by scientists studying autoimmune diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Diabetes and Cancer: A Consensus Report

The American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society have issued a joint consensus statement that acknowledges some links between diabetes and cancer but also notes there are numerous questions that have yet to be answered.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2010

Academia, Biotech and the Pharmaceutical Industry Have Joined Forces to Fight Diabetes

IMIDIA ("Innovative Medicines Initiative for Diabetes"), a public private consortium funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), announced today the launch of a project focusing on pancreatic islet cell function and survival. Academia, biotech and pharma industry have joined forces to develop biomarkers and tools to pave the way for improved disease management and ultimately provide a cure for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Dieting to Reduce Diabetes Risk May Not Work in People With Low Muscle Mass

One of the factors that increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes is excess body fat. So it makes sense that losing weight has always been one of the first lines of defense against the disease. Yet people who are slender -skinny, even- sometimes develop type 2. Why is that? Does the fact that a slender person can acquire type 2 negate the need for weight control?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Italian Scientists Find a Viral Link to Type 1 Diabetes

Italian researchers have found a link between a common virus and type 1 diabetes that may open the door to answers about what triggers the disease in children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2010

Diabetes Linked to High-Grade Prostate Cancer in Obese Men

A Duke University Medical Center study has concluded that obese men who have type 2 diabetes are almost four times as likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer during a prostate biopsy as men who do not have diabetes. When ethnicity is taken into account, obese white men run a five-times greater chance of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

Metformin-Avandia Combo Slows Progression to Type 2 in Two-Thirds of At-Risk Patients

A Canadian study that tracked 207 patients suggests that a low-dose combination of metformin and Avandia can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes by 66 percent in people at high risk for the condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 15, 2010

DKA and Infection Risk

Diabetic ketoacidosis poses enough of a threat on its own. But in a small number of cases, it leaves sufferers open to a potentially fatal infection called mucormycosis.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Benefit Younger Diabetes Patients

New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and two other major medical associations advise not prescribing low-dose aspirin therapy for women under 60 or men under 50 who have diabetes but no other risks for heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

Safe Chemicals Act of 2010 and You

We all know that certain chemicals in everyday products are harmful:  mercury and lead, just to name a couple. But how harmful, and what can we do about it?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2010

MACUGEN® Improved Vision in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

Results from a Phase 3 study demonstrate MACUGEN® (pegaptanib sodium) significantly improved vision in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), a complication of diabetes that is a leading cause of blindness in people of working age.¹ In the study, 37 percent of patients treated with MACUGEN gained two lines, or 10 letters, of vision on the ETDRS eye chart at 54 weeks, compared to 20 percent of patients who received a sham (placebo-like) procedure which consists of anesthesia and a simulated injection in the eye (p=0.0047). The data were presented at the World Ophthalmology Congress in Berlin by Frank G. Holz, an investigator in the trial and director of the University Eye Hospital at the University of Bonn in Germany.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2010

U.K. Study Links Metformin to B-12 Deficiency

If you take metformin to control your type 2 diabetes, ask your doctor to take a look at your vitamin B-12 levels when you get a chance. A recent British study shows that metformin may cause a deficiency in the vitamin, which is necessary for the regeneration of red blood cells and the maintenance of nervous system health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

May 2010

Knowledge Is Power

Investigate. Inform. Inspire. This statement is not only our commitment to you, the readers of Diabetes Health, but also a call to action. In our June/July print issue (available online June 1 under the Digital Edition tab), we've done some investigating. We tracked down educational agencies, websites, software, and applications, and we've listed them for you in our 2nd Educational Resource Guide.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 31, 2010

National Plan to Improve Health Literacy

The United States Department of Health and Human Services released The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy aimed at making health information and services easier to understand and use. The plan calls for improving the jargon-filled language, dense writing, and complex explanations that often fill patient handouts, medical forms, health web sites, and recommendations to the public.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2010

Environmental Factors In Diabetes

Both genetic components and environmental factors play a role in most chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. In the same way that researchers use a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) to evaluate the role of genetic factors in disease, scientists at Stanford University have used an Environmental-Wide Association Study (EWAS) to evaluate environmental factors on diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Skimping on Sleep Linked to Diabetes and Higher Mortality Rates

As awareness of pre-diabetes grows, the list of conditions that can lead to it seems to be growing. Along with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, researchers may start listing lack of sleep as another danger signal. Two recently published studies conclude that sleep deprivation can lead to insulin resistance-a precursor for diabetes-and even increase the risk of early death.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2010

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2010

Nick Jonas and Bayer Diabetes Care Announce 'Give Back. Simply Win'

A new contest, "Give Back. Simply Win." sponsored by Bayer Diabetes Care will shine a spotlight on people with diabetes who are making a difference in their local communities. Three grand prize winners will meet international singing sensation Nick Jonas and Bayer will donate $5,000 to three not-for-profit charitable causes, one selected by each winner.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 24, 2010

Jonas Brothers Help Raise $250,000 for Diabetes

Grammy-award-nominated teen pop sensations the Jonas Brothers helped raise more than $250,000 at the annual "Rock For Diabetes" benefit on May 16, held at the home of Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman. More than 200 people attended this year's benefit, which raised funds for the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 22, 2010

Glucose Monitoring Medical Tattoo

Tattoos aren't just an art form or a way of making a personal statement anymore: They are beginning to save lives.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2010

$3.3 Million Grant to Study Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children

A husband-and-wife research team at the UC Davis School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to lead the first prospective, nationwide, multi-site clinical study of how to prevent the neurological injuries and, in rare cases, death caused by brain swelling in children in diabetic crisis.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2010

Why Drugstore Genetic Tests Upset the FDA

On Tuesday, Pathway Genomics announced that their personal genetic testing kit (InsightTM Saliva Collection Kit) would soon be available at the pharmacy chain Walgreens. The next day, the FDA released a letter it had sent to Pathway Genomics on Monday saying hold on, there was no approval on record for Pathway's Genetic Health Report. By Thursday, Wallgreens announced that it was delaying the sale of the genetic testing kits.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Pain Is Worst Late at Night for People With Diabetic Neuropathy

Most people who have diabetes quickly learn that one of the worst side effects of the disease is pain caused by damage to the hands and feet. High blood sugar inflames nerves, leading to tingling and numbness, and often, severe pain. Researchers at the Comprehensive Pain Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland have learned that onset of nerve pain may have a daily rhythm, with the worst occurring late at night around 11 p.m. Their study, which they characterized as "preliminary," tracked 647 people with diabetic neuropathy. The results showed that the typical pattern for people with the condition was to experience the greatest pain from it after sunset, peaking at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 14, 2010

Beware the Perils of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: "Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him."  Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can "ruin," or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death.

comments 12 comments - Posted May 13, 2010

Recruiting Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Dr. Richard Hays announced today that he is now recruiting children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes for Protégé Encore, a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III clinical trial. This is the second of two Phase III studies testing the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug called teplizumab. The first study, known as Protégé, has completed enrollment of more than 530 subjects with type 1 diabetes. There is currently no approved therapy to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2010

New Agents That Keep Insulin Working Longer

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have developed a molecule that can block the breakdown of insulin. Their discovery could lead to development of a new class of drugs to help treat diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted May 10, 2010

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

Osiris Therapeutics announced that it has been granted Orphan Drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Prochymal as a treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. The FDA instituted the Orphan Drug Act to promote the development of treatments for underserved patient populations. To be eligible for Orphan Drug designation, the treatment must target a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 new patients per year in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Decreased Sleep Means Increased Insulin Resistance

A new study to be published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) says that a single night of too little sleep can induce insulin resistance. 

comments 2 comments - Posted May 6, 2010

Surprise! Metformin Works Differently Than Thought

CINCINNATI - The popular diabetes medication metformin works in different fashion than the current widely accepted view. This new finding could lead to wider use of the drug-particularly in people with cancer.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 4, 2010

Cutting Fats While Upping High Glycemic Index Carbs Does Your Heart No Favors, Says Danish Study

A Danish analysis of data from 21 research studies on the effects of saturated fat intake has concluded that swapping refined carbohydrates, such as pasta and white bread, for fat causes spikes in blood sugar that are harmful to the heart. However, cutting down on saturated fats while increasing consumption of whole-grain breads and vegetables-low glycemic index* foods-had a discernible positive impact on heart health.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2010

Combination Drug-Laser Therapy Shows Great Promise in Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Clinical studies at 52 different sites nationwide have shown that combining standard laser treatments with injections of the drug ranibizumab (Lucentis) offers substantially better results for treating macular edema than laser treatments alone. The research showed that almost 50 percent of patients treated with the combination therapy showed substantial improvement in their vision after one year, compared with 28 percent of patients who had been treated solely with laser.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2010

April 2010

Oy! Cutting Calories May Actually Make You Put on Pounds

-SIGH- A pessimist might say that the following news is another sign that Mother Nature sometimes has one mean sense of humor: Reducing your caloric intake in order to lose weight may, ironically, lead to weight gain.

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 29, 2010

Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Specially Bred Pigs

NEW YORK, April 27, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation announced today that it is partnering with Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand-based biotechnology company focused on developing cell based therapeutics, in a Phase II clinical trial to study the safety and effectiveness of transplanting encapsulated insulin-producing cells from pigs as a treatment for type 1 diabetes with significant hypoglycemia unawareness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2010

Smart Insulin

A team of researchers from Case Western University published an article revealing their invention of a "smart" insulin molecule that binds considerably less to cancer receptors and self-assembles under the skin. To provide a slow-release form of insulin, the compound self-assembles under the skin by "stapling" itself together with zinc ions. Zinc staples connect the pieces of the insulin puzzle together to create a functional protein.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 23, 2010

Diabetes Drug Tied to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, adds to evidence that metformin, a generically available drug commonly used for type 2 diabetes, may have anti-cancer effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

No More Slow-to-Heal Wounds

Researchers at Loyola University have discovered a group of immune system cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells that slow the wound healing process. Their findings pave the way for potential new treatments to accelerate the healing process in slow-to-heal wounds that can occur in people with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2010

Artificial Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Works in Clinical Trials

The first human trials of the latest design of an artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes found the device worked without causing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

comments 8 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2010

Smoking May Erase Heart Benefits of Light Drinking

(HealthDay News) - If you indulge in moderate drinking, you've probably heard that it might reduce your risk for heart trouble, including stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2010

Four

Four risk factors-all of them preventable-reduce life expectancy among U.S. men by 4.9 years and among U.S. women by 4.1 years, according to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. (According to U.N. figures, current U.S. life expectancy is 75.6 years for men and 80.8 years for women.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 15, 2010

Sea Urchin Proteins Might Lead to Eventual Treatment for Rare Form of Diabetes

A gene that mutated half a billion years ago and now shows up in modern sea creatures could hold the key to understanding a rare form of diabetes. The disease, called diabetes insipidus (not to be confused with diabetes mellitus), causes sufferers to urinate more than three-fourths of a gallon every day. An estimated 41,000 U.S. patients suffer from diabetes insipidus.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2010

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis for Type 1 Therapy

The idea of parasitic worms causes a shudder in most people. The very thought of some wriggly segmented thing latching onto an internal organ and ransacking it for nourishment is not pleasant. But the scientists who study the creatures may be on to a whole new tack in the fight against type 1 diabetes. It turns out that people who suffer from parasitic worms experience an unexpected beneficial side effect: the worms exert control over the human immune system that seems to protect against several inflammatory diseases, including asthma, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, allergies, and... type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2010

It’s All in the Genes: New Study Links Low Birth Weight and Type 2 Diabetes

The first concrete evidence of a genetic link between low birth weight and the potential for developing type 2 diabetes has been published in the April 6 issue of the journal Nature Genetics. Scientists previously believed that lower birth weight babies were more at risk, but the cause remained unclear.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2010

Insulin-Producing Beta Cells Can Be Reborn

Healthy, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas have a relatively long life and typically do not replicate under normal conditions. Any loss of beta cells, therefore, is usually permanent. In the case of type 1 diabetes, for example, the destruction of beta cells by the body's own immune system is permanent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2010

Nanoparticle Vaccine Stops the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes in Mice

Using a sophisticated nanotechnology-based "vaccine," researchers were able to successfully reverse type 1 diabetes in mice and slow the onset of the disease in mice at risk for the disease.  The study, co-funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, provides new and important insights into understanding how to stop the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes, and could even have implications for other autoimmune diseases.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2010

Synthetic Molecule That Stops Diabetic Inflammation Could Become a Type 2 Therapy

Tests of an experimental drug called CPSI-1306 at Ohio State University were so successful at lowering inflammation and blood sugar levels in lab mice with type 2 diabetes that scientists consider it a prime candidate to become a new therapy for the disease. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 8, 2010

The "Obesity Paradox": Bigger Girth Means Lessened Risk of Cardiac Death

After generations of warnings that obesity is one of the biggest risk factors for heart failure and cardiovascular disease, a University of Rochester study says that it's actually skinny people who run a higher risk of sudden death from cardiac failure. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that non-obese patients who suffered heart failure had a 76 percent greater risk of sudden cardiac death than obese patients.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2010

March 2010

If You Can Taste the Fat, You Don't Eat So Much of It

Common knowledge says that humans have the ability to perceive five tastes:  sweet, salt, sour, bitter, and umami (protein-richness). But now, researchers have discovered that humans can detect a sixth taste as well: fat. And apparently, people with higher sensitivity to the taste of fat are less likely to eat fatty foods and become overweight.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2010

Texas Researcher Poised to Test Leptin as a Replacement for Insulin Among Type 1s

A University of Texas researcher who genetically modified mice with type 1 diabetes to control their disease with leptin instead of insulin is now ready to extend his experiment to human test subjects. Dr. Roger Unger, a researcher at the UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, will begin the tests as soon as leptin manufacturers can assure him of a steady supply of the hormone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2010

Intestinal Bacteria May Contribute to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

According to researchers at the Emory University School of Medicine, obesity and metabolic syndrome may be partially brought on by intestinal bacteria that increase appetite and insulin resistance. The two can lead to overeating and high blood sugar levels - both important factors in the eventual onset of type 2 diabetes. Perhaps even more interesting, the scientists found that the bacteria can be transferred from one mouse to another, creating increased appetite and insulin resistance in an animal that had previously experienced neither.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 26, 2010

The Story of GAD

You may not have heard of GAD, but it's a hot topic in the world of type 1 diabetes research. GAD, which stands for glutamic acid decarboxylase, is an enzyme in the brain and the pancreas that plays several roles in the body. As an enzyme, it converts the excitatory amino acid glutamate into the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, which nerve cells use to communicate.  But it also has a less helpful role, as an autoantigen (an element of self that provokes the generation of antibodies) in autoimmune diabetes.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 23, 2010

Valsartan (Diovan) Delayed Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Cardiovascular Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Results from a landmark study involving more than 9,000 people showed that the high blood pressure medicine valsartan (Diovan) delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a common pre-diabetic condition.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Our Journey to Hope and Beyond

I grew up around the corner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In high school, long ago, I thought that NIH scientists were "bad guys" who mistreated animals in the name of medical research. I later moved to the West Coast and became a registered obstetrical nurse. Over the years, along with sharing the joys of new moms and new babies, I cared for patients with devastating conditions like cancer and quadriplegia, people whose lives could potentially be saved or improved by medical research., Yet it wasn't until many years later, after moving back to the DC area, that I really began to see the NIH in a new light.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 20, 2010

Mutation That Affects Response to Smell and Taste Could Lead to Type 2 Diabetes

According to Duke University researchers, a mutation that causes the lack of an insulin-controlling molecule may be a factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The molecule, ankyrin B, is activated in response to the smell and taste of food and leads to the production of insulin in preparation for food intake.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 19, 2010

A Diagnosis of Pre-Diabetes Isn’t Enough to Motivate Many Patients

In a study that tracked 1,402 people with pre-diabetes, researchers found that only about half of them responded to the diagnosis by trying to shed weight or increase their level of exercise.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Calcium May Help You Live Longer

A group of Swedish researchers has found that men who consume more than the recommended daily amount of calcium are less likely to die than their counterparts who consume little calcium. Their study, titled "Dietary Calcium and Magnesium Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Men," appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2010

Dolphins' Ability to Switch Diabetes On and Off Could Point to a Similar Knack in Humans

A scientist's discovery that dolphins have a genetic ability to turn diabetes on and off, depending on the availability of food, could lead to research into whether humans might have a similar-although dormant-gene.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 13, 2010

Starting Treatment Early Doubles Chance of Success for People with Diabetes

The sooner people with diabetes start taking metformin, the longer the drug remains effective, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2010

Naps Among Older People Linked to Higher Diabetes Rate

A university study of 20,000 Chinese adults aged 50 and older says that people who nap four to six days a week have a higher rate of type 2 diabetes than people who either never take a daily snooze or do so less often.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 10, 2010

Northern California's Biggest County Sues Glaxo Over Avandia

Santa Clara County, the largest county in Northern California (nearly 1.9 million people), has filed a federal lawsuit against pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, alleging that Glaxo knowingly sold its type 2 diabetes drug Avandia for several years despite indications the drug causes heart attacks and strokes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 8, 2010

Insulin Used to Treat Diabetes May Be Linked to Increased Cancer Risk, Review Suggests

The benefits of using insulin to treat diabetes far outweigh the risks, but a review just published online by IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, suggests that commonly used diabetes therapies may differ from each other when it comes to their influence on cancer risk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 5, 2010

Money Money Money: Diabetes Research Funding

The demand for diabetes research funding clearly exceeds the funds available. In the United States, 23.6 million children and adults (7.8 percent of the population) have diabetes, and we spent $174 billion on diagnosed diabetes alone in 2007 (the most recent year for which data are available). It is imperative that we take action, but where is the research funding coming from? Can it possibly be sufficient, and how is it being spent? 

comments 3 comments - Posted Mar 3, 2010

Discovery of a Suspect Enzyme in Humans Could Lead to Powerful Type 1 Therapy

An enzyme that destroys pancreatic beta cells in lab mice has now been observed in human beta cells. Because scientists already know how to delete the mouse gene that produces the enzyme, they are hopeful that the same therapy can eventually be applied to people with type 1 diabetes. If so, it would be one of the most powerful therapies yet for addressing the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells that causes type 1.

comments 4 comments - Posted Mar 1, 2010

February 2010

GSK rejects conclusions of Senate Committee on Finance Staff Report on Avandia

The Staff Report of the Senate Committee on Finance draws conclusions on the safety of Avandia (rosiglitazone) that are based on analyses that are not consistent with the rigorous scientific evidence supporting the safety of the drug. In addition, the report cherry-picks information from documents, which mischaracterizes GlaxoSmithKline's comprehensive efforts to research Avandia and communicate those findings to regulators, physicians and patients. In fact, the safety and effectiveness of Avandia is well characterized in the label approved by the FDA.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 23, 2010

JDRF-Funded Research Advances Potential for Regeneration as a Possible Cure for Type 1 Diabetes

A hormone responsible for the body's stress response is also linked to the growth of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, according to JDRF- funded researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California. The findings are the latest advances to underscore the potential for regeneration as a key component of a possible cure for type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

U.S. Senate Report Says Glaxo Knew that Avandia Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

A U.S. Senate Finance Committee report released on February 20 says that Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline's drug for type 2 diabetes, may have caused as many as 83,000 heart attacks between 1999, when the drug was introduced, and 2007. The Senate report, culminating a two-year inquiry into the drug, also says that Glaxo knew about the drug's potential risks years before suspicions began to form regarding a connection between Avandia and heart problems.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 22, 2010

Newly Found Protein and Enzyme Duo May Hold Key to a Cure for Retinopathy

Thwarting a protein that carries an otherwise benign enzyme into the nuclei of cells in the retina, where the enzyme kills the retinal cells, may hold the key to preventing blindness in patients with diabetes. That's the conclusion of a two-year study by researchers at Michigan State University seeking a way to treat retinopathy, the disease that often leads to blindness in people with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 16, 2010

Researchers Discover Protein that Triggers Islet Cell Rejection

Researchers at RIKEN and Fukuoka University have pinpointed the mechanism responsible for early rejection of transplanted pancreatic islet cells in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. A new system based on this mechanism has been shown to vastly increase transplant efficiency, setting the stage for the development of powerful new treatment techniques.

comments 5 comments - Posted Feb 9, 2010

Cutting Off the Blood Supply to Fat Cells Could Become a New Obesity Therapy

White fat is the "bad" gut fat associated with obesity and enlarged abdomens. When a pound of new white fat forms in the body, it requires a full mile of new blood vessels to nourish and sustain it. That's because white fat is much like a tumor in requiring a steady blood supply. To build the new blood vessels, it depends on a process called angiogenesis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

Death by TV?

Australian researchers who tracked the TV viewing habits of 8,800 people over a six-year span have some sobering statistics for people who love the tube too well: (1) If you watch TV more than two and up to four hours a day, your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease increases by 19 percent. (2) If your viewing habit is more than four hours a day, your risk of death from cardiovascular disease skyrockets by 80 percent.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

January 2010

Skin cells transformed directly into nerve cells: Are beta cells next?

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Researchers have transformed ordinary mouse skin cells directly into neurons, bypassing the need for stem cells or even stemlike cells and greatly speeding up the field of regenerative medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 29, 2010

Novo Nordisk's Victoza Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Novo Nordisk announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the new drug application for Victoza (liraglutide injection), the first once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Victoza is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jan 28, 2010

Newly identified genes influence insulin and glucose regulation

An international research consortium has found 13 new genetic variants that influence blood glucose regulation, insulin resistance, and the function of insulin-secreting beta cells in populations of European descent. Five of the newly discovered variants increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 23, 2010

Diabetes Ups Risk of Dementia for Mildly Impaired

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diabetes may hasten progression to dementia in older people with mild thinking impairment, new research shows.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2010

Pancreas Transplant Program Opens at Montefiore Medical Center

NEW YORK, Jan. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Montefiore Medical Center continues to expand its portfolio of options for patients in need of organ transplantation. The new Pancreas Transplant Program will treat patients with severe, end-stage diabetes. As the only Pancreas Transplant Program in the Bronx and Westchester, and one of only several in Greater New York, patients will be able to receive world-class care close to home. The program currently has nine patients medically approved and waiting for a pancreas transplant.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 16, 2010

JDRF Forms Partnership with Animas to Develop First-Generation Automated System for Managing Type 1 Diabetes

NEW YORK, January 13, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation today announced an innovative partnership with Animas Corporation to develop an automated system to help people with type 1 diabetes better control their disease - the first step on the path to what would be among the most revolutionary advancements in treating type 1 diabetes: the development of an artificial pancreas, a fully automated system to dispense insulin to patients based on real-time changes in blood sugar levels. 

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 15, 2010

ProtoKinetix Anti-Aging Glycopeptides Show Promise Against Diabetes

One potential avenue for the treatment for type 1 diabetes is to transplant insulin-producing islet cells into the body. The Edmonton Protocol is a method of implanting pancreatic islets into the liver for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The protocol is named for the islet transplantation group at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, where the protocol was first devised in the late 1990s.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed Due to Flaws in Screening

MADISON, Wis. - Using one of the two major national diabetes screening guidelines misses about one-third of those with diabetes, consequently putting them at risk for serious health complications, according to surprising research findings at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

Insulet and Ypsomed Sign International Distribution Agreement for the OmniPod Insulin Management System

BEDFORD, Mass. and BURGDORF, Switzerland, Jan. 5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Insulet Corporation (Nasdaq: PODD), the leader in tubing-free insulin pump technology with its OmniPod® Insulin Management System, and Ypsomed AG (SIX Swiss Exchange: YPSN), a leading independent diabetes specialist and technology provider of innovative injection systems for self-medication in Europe, today announced an exclusive agreement for the distribution of the OmniPod Insulin Management System in nine countries across Europe, as well as China and Australia.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 7, 2010

December 2009

American Diabetes Association Revises Diabetes Guidelines

December 29, 2009 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) revised clinical practice recommendations for diabetes diagnosis promote hemoglobin A1c (A1c) as a faster, easier diagnostic test that could help reduce the number of undiagnosed patients and better identify patients with prediabetes. The new recommendations are published December 29 in the January supplement of Diabetes Care.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 31, 2009

Relieving Stress on Insulin-Producing Cells May Prevent Diabetes

BOSTON, Mass. - Dec. 23, 2009 - Cells in your body are constantly churning out poisonous forms of oxygen (oxidants) and mopping them up with a countervailing force of proteins and chemicals (anti-oxidants). This balancing act of oxidative stress is particularly likely to go haywire in beta cells, the insulin-producing cells that malfunction and then start to die off in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 29, 2009

Amylin Shares Drop after FDA Requests New Studies

BOSTON/NEW YORK, Dec 23 (Reuters) - The shares of Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc (AMLN.O) fell nearly 10 percent on Wednesday after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that the company conduct additional safety studies on its diabetes drug, Byetta.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 28, 2009

Evidence Deepens That Breastfeeding Helps Moms Avoid Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2

A 20-year study that tracked 704 women from before their first pregnancy onward suggests that the first year mothers breastfeed, they reduce their risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes within the next 15 years by 15 percent. Each subsequent year of breastfeeding further reduces the risk by 15 percent. For example, a mother who has two children and breastfeeds each for a year could enjoy a 30 percent reduction in her risk of type 2 over a 15-year period.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 25, 2009

Good Fat, Bad Fat

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks tend to carry around less of a particularly unhealthy type of abdominal fat than whites, even though they suffer more from obesity-linked illness, researchers report.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 23, 2009

Cancer Drug May Slow Body's Rejection of Beta Cells in Type 1

Rituxamab, a drug that treats lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis, may soon be used to help combat the destruction of pancreatic beta cells in newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes. Researchers at Indiana University have found that the drug, originally developed and sold by Genentech as Rituxan, temporarily slows or stops the destruction of the 10 or 20 percent of beta cells that type 1s typically have remaining when they are first diagnosed.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 21, 2009

JDRF Announces Diabetes Research Program with Johnson & Johnson

NEW YORK, Dec. 17, 2009 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide, said today that it will begin working with The Johnson & Johnson Corporate Office of Science and Technology, and its affiliates, to speed the development of drug targets and pathways to promote the survival and function of insulin-producing cells in people who have diabetes.  The program will look to fund research at academic centers around the world that could eventually lead to novel drug targets and industry collaborations for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 19, 2009

Airman Injured in Afghanistan Receives Unprecedented Islet Cell Transplant

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A 21-year old Airman severely wounded in Afghanistan is recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center after several surgeries and an unprecedented transplant.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2009

Type 2 diabetes gene predisposes children to obesity

A gene named HHEX/IDE, which has already been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes (see research article), may also contribute to childhood obesity. While the gene does not appear to affect birth weight and does not necessarily predispose an adult to become obese, it may set the stage for obesity in some children. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2009

Coffee, Tea, or Type 2 Diabetes?

CHICAGO - Individuals who drink more coffee (regular or decaffeinated) or tea appear to have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis of previous studies reported in the December 14/28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. A previously published meta-analysis suggested drinking more coffee may be linked with a reduced risk, but the amount of available information has more than doubled since.

comments 4 comments - Posted Dec 14, 2009

Review of Clinical Trials of Oral Insulin: Oral-lyn

WORCESTER, Mass., Dec 3, 2009 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX News Network) -- Published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, an independent review of clinical trials of Generex Oral-lyn(TM) shows that the oral insulin spray has a faster onset of action and shorter duration of action than insulin delivered subcutaneously.

comments 6 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2009

Statins Might Slightly Raise Diabetes Risk, But Are Still Worthwhile

We'd all prefer it if there were no nasty side effects to our treatments, but that isn't always the case. Sometimes it is worth risking a side effect for the greater good of our health. On that note, researchers continue to emphasize that the benefits of cholesterol-lowering statins on heart disease far outweigh any risk that they might slightly increase the chance of developing diabetes. More studies needs to be done in this area, but in light of the fact that cardiovascular disease is responsible for nearly two-thirds of deaths in people with diabetes and is the number one killer of women in the United States, it seems better to stick with the statins.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 8, 2009

One in Five Type 2s Is Morbidly Obese - 100 or More Pounds Overweight

Researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago report that 20.7 percent of all American adults who have type 2 diabetes are "morbidly obese," a description that applies to people who are 100 or more pounds overweight. The researchers said that the figure for African Americans is even higher, with one out of three type 2s in that group falling under the definition of morbidly obese.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

IBsolvMIR®, a Drug That Prevents Islet Transplantation Rejection, Receives FDA -Orphan Drug- Status

A Swedish biotechnology company, TikoMed AB, has received notice that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is granting orphan drug designation to its IBsolvMIR® drug for preventing the rejection of transplanted pancreatic islet cells in type 1 patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2009

It's All in the Cooking: Omega-3 Fatty Acids are Good for Your Heart When Cooked Properly

It's been known for some time that omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of heart disease, but no one has really known if one dietary source is better than another. For that reason, Lixin Meng, MS, a PhD candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, designed a study to compare sources, types, amounts, and frequencies of omega-3 in diets, while taking into account gender and ethnic groups. The study was presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 2, 2009

Young People Can Decrease Belly Fat by Consuming More Fiber

"Fat is better in the butt than in the gut," in the words of Nancy Bohannon, MD, FACP, FACE, Director of the Clinical Research Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program in San Francisco. Dr. Bohannon explained in a recent CA-AADE conference that  fat is supposed to be subcutaneous. But when you have too much fat, your body has nowhere to put it, so it starts parking it where it doesn't belong-in the muscles or around the heart. This visceral fat, or belly fat, is the bad kind of fat, and it puts stress on the body and organs, including the heart.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2009

November 2009

Pancreatic Islet Autoantibodies as Predictors of Type 1 Diabetes

Many autoimmune diseases, such as lupus erythematosis and type 1 diabetes, are caused by autoantibodies. An autoantibody is an antibody (a protein) produced by the immune system of an individual, which is directed against a different protein of the the same individual.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2009

Hey, I'm not Fat!

A study presented at the American Heart Association's 2009 Scientific Sessions said that eight percent of obese people misunderstand their body size and don't feel they need to lose weight.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 30, 2009

Food Insulin Index Predicts Insulin Demand of Mixed Meals

Dr. Jennie C. Brand-Miller, from the University of Sydney stated that, "The food insulin index (FII) may provide a better way to adjust insulin dose in Type 1 diabetes.... In time, it may also enable us to design diets to prevent diabetes."

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 26, 2009

In patients on statins, raising good cholesterol with niacin (Niaspan), but not reducing bad cholesterol with ezetimibe (Zetia), decreases plaque build-up

ORLANDO, Fla. Nov. 16, 2009 - In combination with statins, adding a medication that raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was more effective in reversing artery wall plaque buildup and in reducing heart disease risk than adding a drug that lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, researchers reported today at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 19, 2009

Powerful Imaging Technology Helps to Uncover Important Interaction Involved in Tolerance

The body's immune system is supposed to "tolerate" itself and distinguish "self" from "non-self."  Autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes result from the breakdown of this system, causing immune cells to attack and destroy insulin-producing beta cells or "self."  In the November issue of Nature Immunology, Brian Fife, PhD and collaborators including senior author Jeffrey Bluestone, PhD share how they have uncovered a basic process that helps control immune cell activation and tolerance. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2009

Genetic Information and Discrimination

The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was signed into law by former President George W. Bush on May 21, 2008, and is set to become effective Nov. 21, 2009. The law covers all employers with 15 or more employees. It prohibits employers from considering a person's genetic background in promotions, hiring, or firing. It also prohibits health insurers from using genetic information to deny coverage.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 16, 2009

Endocrinologists Recommend Describing Dramatic Reversals of Diabetes Symptoms As

How careful should healthcare workers and patients be in describing a total remission of diabetes as a "cure?" That's a question that has taken on increasing urgency in the wake of reports about dramatic reversals of type 2 symptoms after gastric bypass surgery and the cessation of symptoms in people with type 1 diabetes after pancreatic islet replacement. To answer it, a group of endocrinologists met earlier this year to come up with descriptions and definitions that accurately describe what happens when people with diabetes experience a reversal of symptoms.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 14, 2009

To Heal Diabetic Foot Ulcers, A New Drug Harnesses Stem Cells Inside Us All

Princeton, NJ - November 10, 2009 -- Diabetic foot ulcers are the primary cause of hospital admissions for diabetics. Foot ulcers that heal improperly are at risk for infection, which can lead to amputation.  According to the American Diabetes Association, one in four patients with diabetic foot ulcers will eventually require lower-limb amputation.  Now science has found a way of mobilizing stem cells within the body to treat this health issue, which affects more than three million Americans annually.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 11, 2009

AACE Releases New Algorithm for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the College of Endocrinology (ACE) released online a one-page resource for physicians and healthcare providers for the management of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2009

October 2009

Novocell is the Recipient of a Disease Team Award for $20 Million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to Develop a Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetes

San Diego, CA (October 28, 2009) - Novocell, Inc., a preclinical stage diabetes company, today announced that it will receive a Disease Team award totaling $20 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).  The Disease Team includes a group of scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), led by Dr. Jeff Bluestone, which is contracted to receive $2.8 million. The funding will advance Novocell's development of a first in kind cellular therapy for the treatment of diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2009

Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

While the relationship between Alzheimer's and diabetes is far from clear, there does seem to be an interesting connection. And that connection just became a little more complicated according to a French study published in the October 27th issue of the journal Neurology

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 29, 2009

Grapefruit and Metformin May Have Ill Effects on the Body's pH Levels

A South African university pharmacologist has found that simultaneous consumption of metformin and grapefruit juice raises lactic acid to dangerous levels in rats (and conceivably in people) with type 2 diabetes. Too much acid in the blood can cause low pH levels that interfere with the body's metabolic functions. Conceivably, says Dr. Peter Owira, a pharmacologist at the University of KawZulu-Natal, such low levels could be fatal.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 26, 2009

Chinese herbs show promise for diabetes prevention

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A number of traditional Chinese herbs may help control blood sugar levels in people at high risk of diabetes, a new research review suggests.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 22, 2009

People Who Receive Diabetes Education Incur Lower Healthcare Costs

A study of healthcare claims by 8.75 million health plan members and 632,000 Medicare patients has shown that healthcare costs for the serious consequences of diabetes are significantly lower for people who have been referred to diabetes educators. The savings accrued not at the level of primary or preventive outpatient services, but in the realm of acute inpatient services. In the commercial group, for example, insurees with diabetes education actually had higher outpatient claims than those who had not received education. Their claims for acute inpatient services, however, were considerably lower, indicating that diabetes education had allowed them to avoid some of the disease's harsher outcomes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 22, 2009

The Heart of the Matter: Women with Diabetes are More at Risk

A large Kaiser Permanente study, published this month in Diabetes Care, has found that women with diabetes are 26 percent more likely to develop the very rapid and irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation (AF) than women without diabetes. Although not a killer on its own, AF is a serious condition that requires medical treatment and can cause complications. In addition to fatigue, the poor circulation that results from AF can lead to blood pooling and clotting, ultimately causing a stroke.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2009

Metabolic Syndrome in Early Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Preterm Birth

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) Oct 13 - Women with metabolic syndrome in early pregnancy have a higher risk for preterm birth, according to study findings reported in the October 1st issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2009

Study Shows a Little Money Buys a Lot of Calories at City Corner Stores

October 12, 2009. Philadelphia, Pa. - Children in Philadelphia who attended public schools and shopped at corner stores before or after school purchased almost 360 calories of foods and beverages per visit, according to new research published in the journal Pediatrics. Chips, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages were the most frequently purchased items. This is the first study to document both what foods and beverages children purchased in local corner stores on their way to and from school, and the nutritional content of those items.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 15, 2009

Circadian Rhythm and Blood Sugar Control

The human body is an amazing machine. The biological clock that ticks inside us to keep the machine running efficiently not only prompts us to sleep and eat on regular basis, but also apparently regulates blood sugar.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 15, 2009

Never a

"Self-monitoring blood glucose" (SMBG), a staple in the lives of most people with diabetes who take insulin, involves consistently monitoring and recording blood glucose levels before and after specific activities, such as eating, exercising, sleeping, and taking insulin. By observing the effects of certain foods and activities on their blood glucose levels, patients can learn exactly what works to raise or lower them. Thus, SMBG affords a kind of "fine tuning" approach to diabetes that empowers patients to adjust their medicine, modify their behavior, and manage their disease without always needing expert intervention. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 13, 2009

Magneto-encephalography

Hyperglycemia is known to cause microvascular damage, which then creates complications such as proliferative retinopathy. However, this microvascular damage may also affect cognitive functioning even before it is reflected by more easily observed complications such as retinopathy. A study carried out by Eelco van Duinkerken and colleagues in the Netherlands found that "functional connectivity", which is "an indicator of functional interactions and information exchange between brain regions," was different in type 1's as compared to controls.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 10, 2009

Afresa: Waiting to Inhale

So close, and yet so far.  It looks like there will be no marketing partnership for MannKind's ultra rapid-acting insulin product Afresa anytime soon.  The company had planned to enter into a deal with a large pharmaceutical company by the end of this year, but now approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for their inhaled insulin won't be until January 2010, at the earliest.

comments 3 comments - Posted Oct 8, 2009

Phentermine the Phoenix Rises Again

The demise of Fen-phen dealt a body blow to hopes for an obesity pill that is actually effective. Unfortunately, the fen in Fen-phen, fenfluramine, caused grave pulmonary hypertension and heart valve problems. The phen part of the drug, though, was apparently just an innocent bystander. And now phen (phentermine) has resurfaced in a new pill that has posted some amazing results in Phase III clinical trials. Patients who were treated for 56 weeks with the new drug, Qnexa, lost an average of 14.7 percent of their weight, or 37 pounds.

comments 8 comments - Posted Oct 7, 2009