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Health Research Article Archives

July 2012

Type 2: Swedes Say a Small Drop in A1C Reduces Risk of Cardiac Death

Swedish researchers report that a drop in A1C of less than one percentage point can lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease among people with diabetes by nearly half. Specifically, they found that patients who reduced their A1C from 7.8% to 7.0% decreased their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 45 percent.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2012

May 2012

Swedes Lob Dynamite Into a Controversy: High-Fat Diet Improves Blood Sugars

The slow backlash against low-fat, relatively high-carb diets as the ideal for everyone with type 2 diabetes has received a boost from a team of Swedish researchers at Linkoping University, about 100 miles southwest of Stockholm.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 20, 2012

Transplanted Gut Organisms Could Prevent Diabetes Onset

Scientists meeting recently at the International Liver Congress in Barcelona, Spain, say that microbiota-tiny organisms specific to a part of the body-transplanted from healthy people to people at risk of diabetes or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may prevent the later onset of those conditions. The procedure involves implanting small quantities of fecal matter from healthy donors into the colons of pre-diseased recipients.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 18, 2012

July 2011

Goodbye, Pyramid; Hello, MyPlate

Say goodbye to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's old Food Pyramid. The tapered food guide is giving way to MyPlate, a colorful visual aid that shows the rough proportions of fruit, vegetables, protein, grains, and that dairy people should consume at every meal.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2011

May 2011

Study Says Worker Vision Benefits Save $4.5 Billion in Healthcare Costs

A study just published by VSP® Vision Care, a 56 million-member non-profit vision benefits and services company, reports that VSP has saved its clients $4.5 billion in potential healthcare expenditures via early detection of chronic eye diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2011

April 2011

Phil Southerland’s Not Dead Yet: Memoir of a Bike Racer With Diabetes

Phil Southerland's autobiography is an inspirational coming-of-age memoir about a type 1 baby who wasn't supposed to live. But his doctor's dismal prediction didn't take into consideration his mother's indefatigable determination that her baby would thrive no matter what, and Phil's own fierce drive to conquer every single challenge he encountered, including his diabetes. It's an engrossing book, a sports adventure story with a medical subplot and a roster of dynamic characters, the most dynamic of whom is Phil himself. If we could harness his energy, our dependence on foreign oil would be a thing of the past.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 20, 2011

New Study Suggests the Effectiveness of Diabetes Education Paired With Meters With Advanced Features

A new study has proven that use of a blood glucose meter with advanced features, when paired with diabetes education, more effectively manages blood glucose than using a basic feature meter. This information was presented at the recent 46th European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

comments 4 comments - Posted Apr 18, 2011

A Miracle Technology for Type 1s: Can It Be Saved?

What if there were a technology that could make people with type 1 diabetes feel absolutely wonderful, completely healthy, better than they ever realized was possible? And what if it were about to disappear? Well, there is such a technology, and it is in serious jeopardy. It's called the implantable insulin pump, currently made by Medtronic. This is the story of four people who have been using this device for 20 years, and their desperate crusade to keep it from disappearing forever.

comments 117 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2011

Analysis of 24 Studies Shows Soy Has Negligible Effect on Blood Sugar

After comparing results from 24 studies, researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong found little evidence that increasing soy intake improves people's blood sugar levels.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 11, 2011

March 2011

Eighty Percent of Diabetes Concentrated in 20 Percent of Zip Codes

The recently launched U.S. Diabetes Index (USDI) has revealed that 80 percent of all diabetes cases are located in just 20 percent of zip codes. Dr. Gary Puckrein, USDI developer and CEO of the National Minority Quality Forum, hopes that the USDI will help   the United States direct its resources to the most affected areas.  

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 30, 2011

Stem Cell Study Focuses on Reducing Amputations

Researchers at the University of California at Davis have begun a study to see if patients' own adult stem cells can be used to increase lower leg blood circulation and possibly prevent amputation  due to arterial disease or diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 27, 2011

February 2011

Gastric Bypass Bests Lap-Banding and Sleeve Gastrectomy for Resolution of Diabetes Symptoms

In two recent head-to-head year-long trials, one testing gastric bypass surgery versus lap band surgery and another pitting gastric bypass surgery against sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass came out ahead with regard to resolving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Both studies were published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 25, 2011

New Clinical Trial Needs Type 2 Patients for Gastric Bypass Surgery

In order to undergo gastric bypass surgery, you must have a BMI of at least 35. If you have type 2 diabetes and would like to undergo the surgery to alleviate your diabetes symptoms, you are out of luck unless you are also morbidly obese. A few less weighty type 2 patients have taken matters into their own hands by deliberately gaining enough weight to qualify, but now there is a less drastic way to qualify for the operation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 23, 2011

Breast Cancer and Diabetes

A new analysis from Johns Hopkins University shows that women with diabetes are 50 percent more likely to die if they have breast cancer. Why? The challenges of diabetes management play a role, as well as women's overall health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2011

Some Doctors Dispute Benefits Of Early Diagnosis

In a new book, "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health," Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that the medical establishment's embrace of early diagnosis and treatment as the key to keeping people healthy actually does the opposite.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Type 1 Diabetes Associated With Common Cold Virus

It's generally thought that a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes is not enough to develop the disease, but that an environmental trigger is required to activate it. Researchers are not sure what that environmental trigger is, but enteroviruses have been under suspicion for quite a while. Enteroviruses are the second leading cause of viral colds in children.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 8, 2011

Don't Stress Out: Super Bowl Losses Can Cause Heartbreak

A new study published in the journal Clinical Cardiology reveals that a Super Bowl loss for a home team was associated with increased death rates in both men and women and in older individuals.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2011

January 2011

Front Labels on Food Packages Are Misleading

After the American Heart Association introduced its heart healthy logo in 1995, manufacturers apparently decided that such "healthy" logos were a pretty good marketing idea. Similar logos, called front-of-the-package labels, or FoP labels, have become popular with several food manufacturers, each of which has developed its own labels using its own criteria. Now, not surprisingly, a study by the Prevention Institute has found that these labels are misleading to customers. According to the Prevention Institute's executive director, Larry Cohen, they "emphasize one healthy aspect to trick [customers] into buying something fundamentally unhealthy." Dora the Explorer Fruit Shapes, for example, prominently labels itself as "gluten free," but does not mention the fact that 58 percent of its calories come from sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 31, 2011

"The Hormone of Darkness" Won't Come Out in the Light

Keeping the lights on all night might keep away the monsters under the bed, but it also keeps away the "hormone of darkness," melatonin, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Melatonin, which is secreted into the blood by the brain's pineal gland at night, is involved in the circadian rhythm. Scientists believe that disrupting circadian rhythms can contribute to metabolic disease. Specifically, melatonin receptor genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant that may help prevent cancer.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 19, 2011

Vitamins C and E Affect Metabolic Syndrome in Ecuador

On the outskirts of Quito, the capital of Ecuador, meals are likely to be based on white rice, potatoes, sugar, and white bread. Given their reliance on high carbohydrate foods that are low in essential nutrients, many of the residents are overweight and malnourished at the same time.  The lack of vitamin C in their diet may contribute to metabolic syndrome, according to researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and the Corporacion Ecuatoriana de Biotecnologia. The researchers also concluded that vitamin E may have a protective effect against metabolic syndrome.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 18, 2011

Scientists Cook Up a Little Brown Fat

Brown fat is an entirely different animal than the white fat that we pack onto our hips to store excess calories.  Instead of storing energy, brown fat actually burns glucose to produce heat (thermogenesis). It's brown because it contains special mitochondria that produce heat from the glucose when activated by cold. Adults don't have much of it, unfortunately, just a few grams if we're lucky. If we had about 50 grams and were cold enough to activate it, it would actually burn about 500 calories a day.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2011

Taking Your Medicine Is Healthy for the Healthcare System

Taking your medicine can lead to quite a windfall in reduced medical claims, according to a study recently published in Health Affairs. Over the course of a year, patients with diabetes who took their medications as directed saved their insurance companies a handsome $3,756 compared to people who didn't, even after claiming as much as $1000 for those very medications. The money was saved because the patients spent less time at the emergency room and in the hospital, a nice benefit in itself.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 11, 2011

December 2010

Can a Fat Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes?

For those trying to eat a healthy diet, whole-fat dairy and trans fats are usually not on the menu - at least, not yet. Scientists have narrowed in on a trans fat component found mainly in dairy fat that may ward off type 2 diabetes and protect cardiovascular health. While the research is far from conclusive and requires much further study, it suggests fats may play a more complex role in human health than previously thought.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 24, 2010

Alarming Study Regarding Oral Health Care of Those With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes means a lot of change in your daily life. From blood glucose monitoring to watching what you eat to losing weight, it's hard to keep track of the changes you need to make to keep diabetes under control. One aspect of diabetes care that sometimes falls through the cracks is oral health care, which, if ignored, can lead to serious health complications.

comments 2 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2010

One-Third of UAE Residents Could Have Diabetes or Pre-diabetes by 2020

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates-- One in three United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents could have diabetes or prediabetes by the end of the decade, according to a new analysis from international health and well-being company UnitedHealth Group, released at the World Health Care Congress Middle East meeting in Abu Dhabi.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2010

October 2010

Reducing Health Costs Through Lower Food Prices

Reducing the cost of low-carbohydrate foods for people with diabetes could significantly reduce medical costs associated with the disease that affects more than 23 million Americans, according to a recent study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2010

Pre-Diabetes Doubles Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A meta-analysis* of 87 studies  involving  951,083 patients, performed by a Canadian research team, shows that the pre-diabetic condition known as metabolic syndrome increases the risk of heart disease or stroke in patients by a factor of more than two.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2010

September 2010

International Diabetes Summit

Event Description: The human and economic costs of this epidemic are enormous, diabetes increases the risk for heart disease and other health problems, and therefore it is important to give this disease more attention. The purpose of this forum is to bring together international experts from International health organizations, national health authorities, local diabetic associations, academics, and local, regional and global media to:

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2010

International Diabetes Summit: Important Meeting for the Global Epidemic of the 21st Century

Recognising Diabetes as the Global Epidemic of the 21st century and looking at the high prevalence of debilitating diabetes in the region, the First International Diabetes Summit will be Hosted in United Arab Emirates in Dubai on the 8th and 9th of October with the support from the GCC Health Ministers Council and The Council of Nursing and Nursing Specialization for Cooperation Council States.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 28, 2010

UCSF Diabetes Symposium Marks Decade of Research Advances

Diabetes research is on the cusp of new advances in treatment options and in understanding the underlying causes of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among those are potential treatments using stem cells to regenerate a patient's ability to produce insulin, as well as upcoming clinical trials of a vaccine that potentially could prevent type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Sep 27, 2010

New Blood Markers for Type 2 Diabetes May Help to Identify Patients at Risk

For the first time, scientists have found that blood levels of some ribonucleic acids (microRNAs) are different among people with type 2 diabetes and those who subsequently develop the disease compared to healthy controls, according to research reported in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Kids and Diabetes Risk: Do Chromosomes Hold New Clues?

Children who have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes might be identified earlier by way of tell-tale genetic indicators known as biomarkers. Some of those new biomarkers might be pinpointed in research led by Nancy F. Butte and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's National Institutes of Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 22, 2010

Rogue Protein May Trigger Diabetes

The presence of amyloid protein may produce a chain reaction which destroys vital insulin-producing cells. Researchers based in Dublin, writing in the journal Nature Immunology, say future drugs could target this process. Amyloid is implicated in many other diseases - most notably Alzheimer's.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 17, 2010

Joslin 50-Year Medalists Give Clues to Cures

In type 1 diabetes, the body relentlessly attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. But a study by Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now has firmly established that some of these cells endure for many decades in a small group of people with the disease-offering clues to potential treatments for preserving and even restoring the crucial cell population.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 14, 2010

Immune System Genes Show Links to Type 1 Diabetes

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but international researchers have found a link between the blood sugar disorder and a network of immune system genes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2010

Long-term Weight Loss may be Harmful to Health

Long-term weight loss may release into the blood industrial pollutants linked to illnesses like diabetes, hypertension and rheumatoid arthritis, researchers said on Tuesday. These compounds are normally stored in fatty tissues, but when fat breaks down during weight loss, they get into the blood stream, said lead researcher Duk-Hee Lee at the Kyungpook National University in Daegu in South Korea.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 8, 2010

Type 2 Diabetes Raises Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are two distressing, but increasingly common, diseases seen in our aging population. At some point in the future, they may well overwhelm the healthcare system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 5, 2010

August 2010

Blocking Progress

On Monday, August 23rd, a federal court blocked federal funding of embryonic stem cell research; ruling that the Obama Administration's policy violates federal law.   

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 31, 2010

Controlling a Fat-Regulating Protein Dramatically Increases Insulin Sensitivity

PPARy is a protein that regulates the body's production of fat cells. However, obesity can modify how PPARy works, leading to decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of metabolic syndrome. (Metabolic syndrome is the cluster of factors, including insulin resistance, overweight, high blood pressure, and abnormal blood sugar levels, that is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.)

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2010

Evolution May Have Pushed Humans Toward Greater Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Gene variants associated with an increased risk for type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis may confer previously unknown benefits to their human carriers, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. As a result, the human race may have been evolving in the recent past to be more susceptible, rather than less, to some complex diseases, they conclude.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2010

July 2010

FDA Freezes Long-Term Study on Diabetes Drug Avandia

A long-term study on the safety of a popular diabetes drug was put on hold Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, while the FDA considers whether it's too dangerous to continue.  Several large studies have linked the drug, Avandia, to a higher risk of heart attacks and other heart problems. While other studies have not found the same risk, last week an FDA advisory panel recommended that the drug not be sold without a stronger warning label or possibly limits on who could receive it.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2010

Hepatitis C and Insulin Resistance

We have known for several years that Hepatitis C, a common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, also makes people three to four times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. In studying the insulin resistance of 29 people with Hepatitis C, Australian researchers have confirmed that they have high insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. However, almost all insulin resistance occurs in muscle, with little or none in the liver, a very surprising finding given that Hepatitis C is a liver disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2010

Moderate Alcohol Intake Lessens Chance of Developing Type 2, Says Dutch Study

While teetotaling is the surest way to avoid abusing alcohol, it turns out that moderate alcohol intake may be one way to stave off the development of type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2010

Avandia and the FDA Panel: Scientific Leaders Urge Diabetes Patients to Talk with their Doctor before Making Changes to their Medication Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee has completed their evaluation of the scientific research available on the safety of rosiglitazone. The deliberations of the panel reflected the complexity of the issues, with several members voting to add additional warnings or to withdraw the drug from the U.S. market. Ultimately, the final recommendation was to allow Avandia to remain on the market. Now that the expert panel has concluded its meeting, the FDA will review their recommendations and make the final decision on whether the drug remains available to patients.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Johns Hopkins Team Discovers Sweet Way to Detect Pre-Diabetes

Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple, routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2010

Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 7, 2010

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2010

June 2010

Do You Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

It raises fasting blood sugars. It increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. Millions of people suffer from it. And many don't even know they have it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 30, 2010

Malfunctioning Pancreatic

A malfunction in the pancreas's "circadian clock*," the built-in timer found in all living things that regulates major biological processes, may be one of the reasons that people develop diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 29, 2010

Scientists Have Found the Peptide Trigger for Type 1 Diabetes in Animal Tests

Researchers from the National Jewish Health and University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found a specific protein fragment, or peptide, that stimulates an immune system attack resulting in diabetes. Their experiments in mice contradict conventional wisdom about such peptides and support work by scientists studying autoimmune diseases.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2010

Diabetes and Cancer: A Consensus Report

The American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society have issued a joint consensus statement that acknowledges some links between diabetes and cancer but also notes there are numerous questions that have yet to be answered.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 23, 2010

Academia, Biotech and the Pharmaceutical Industry Have Joined Forces to Fight Diabetes

IMIDIA ("Innovative Medicines Initiative for Diabetes"), a public private consortium funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), announced today the launch of a project focusing on pancreatic islet cell function and survival. Academia, biotech and pharma industry have joined forces to develop biomarkers and tools to pave the way for improved disease management and ultimately provide a cure for diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Dieting to Reduce Diabetes Risk May Not Work in People With Low Muscle Mass

One of the factors that increases the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes is excess body fat. So it makes sense that losing weight has always been one of the first lines of defense against the disease. Yet people who are slender -skinny, even- sometimes develop type 2. Why is that? Does the fact that a slender person can acquire type 2 negate the need for weight control?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2010

Italian Scientists Find a Viral Link to Type 1 Diabetes

Italian researchers have found a link between a common virus and type 1 diabetes that may open the door to answers about what triggers the disease in children.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2010

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Benefit Younger Diabetes Patients

New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and two other major medical associations advise not prescribing low-dose aspirin therapy for women under 60 or men under 50 who have diabetes but no other risks for heart disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 12, 2010

Blue Cross and Blue Shield Expand Pediatric Partnership to Combat Childhood Obesity

WASHINGTON - In collaboration with Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) launched the Good Health ClubSM Physician Toolkit - unique educational materials designed to foster better communication between pediatricians and their patients on childhood obesity and diabetes prevention.  The toolkit will be available to pediatricians in communities across the country.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2010

Safe Chemicals Act of 2010 and You

We all know that certain chemicals in everyday products are harmful:  mercury and lead, just to name a couple. But how harmful, and what can we do about it?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 9, 2010

U.K. Study Links Metformin to B-12 Deficiency

If you take metformin to control your type 2 diabetes, ask your doctor to take a look at your vitamin B-12 levels when you get a chance. A recent British study shows that metformin may cause a deficiency in the vitamin, which is necessary for the regeneration of red blood cells and the maintenance of nervous system health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 5, 2010

Chocolate May Cut Cholesterol - But Only in Some People

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 4, 2010

May 2010

Environmental Factors In Diabetes

Both genetic components and environmental factors play a role in most chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. In the same way that researchers use a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) to evaluate the role of genetic factors in disease, scientists at Stanford University have used an Environmental-Wide Association Study (EWAS) to evaluate environmental factors on diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 29, 2010

Skimping on Sleep Linked to Diabetes and Higher Mortality Rates

As awareness of pre-diabetes grows, the list of conditions that can lead to it seems to be growing. Along with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, researchers may start listing lack of sleep as another danger signal. Two recently published studies conclude that sleep deprivation can lead to insulin resistance-a precursor for diabetes-and even increase the risk of early death.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 26, 2010

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 25, 2010

$3.3 Million Grant to Study Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Children

A husband-and-wife research team at the UC Davis School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to lead the first prospective, nationwide, multi-site clinical study of how to prevent the neurological injuries and, in rare cases, death caused by brain swelling in children in diabetic crisis.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 19, 2010

Why Drugstore Genetic Tests Upset the FDA

On Tuesday, Pathway Genomics announced that their personal genetic testing kit (InsightTM Saliva Collection Kit) would soon be available at the pharmacy chain Walgreens. The next day, the FDA released a letter it had sent to Pathway Genomics on Monday saying hold on, there was no approval on record for Pathway's Genetic Health Report. By Thursday, Wallgreens announced that it was delaying the sale of the genetic testing kits.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

Pain Is Worst Late at Night for People With Diabetic Neuropathy

Most people who have diabetes quickly learn that one of the worst side effects of the disease is pain caused by damage to the hands and feet. High blood sugar inflames nerves, leading to tingling and numbness, and often, severe pain. Researchers at the Comprehensive Pain Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland have learned that onset of nerve pain may have a daily rhythm, with the worst occurring late at night around 11 p.m. Their study, which they characterized as "preliminary," tracked 647 people with diabetic neuropathy. The results showed that the typical pattern for people with the condition was to experience the greatest pain from it after sunset, peaking at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 14, 2010

Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

Osiris Therapeutics announced that it has been granted Orphan Drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Prochymal as a treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. The FDA instituted the Orphan Drug Act to promote the development of treatments for underserved patient populations. To be eligible for Orphan Drug designation, the treatment must target a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 new patients per year in the United States.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 7, 2010

Surprise! Metformin Works Differently Than Thought

CINCINNATI - The popular diabetes medication metformin works in different fashion than the current widely accepted view. This new finding could lead to wider use of the drug-particularly in people with cancer.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 4, 2010

Cutting Fats While Upping High Glycemic Index Carbs Does Your Heart No Favors, Says Danish Study

A Danish analysis of data from 21 research studies on the effects of saturated fat intake has concluded that swapping refined carbohydrates, such as pasta and white bread, for fat causes spikes in blood sugar that are harmful to the heart. However, cutting down on saturated fats while increasing consumption of whole-grain breads and vegetables-low glycemic index* foods-had a discernible positive impact on heart health.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 2, 2010

Combination Drug-Laser Therapy Shows Great Promise in Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Clinical studies at 52 different sites nationwide have shown that combining standard laser treatments with injections of the drug ranibizumab (Lucentis) offers substantially better results for treating macular edema than laser treatments alone. The research showed that almost 50 percent of patients treated with the combination therapy showed substantial improvement in their vision after one year, compared with 28 percent of patients who had been treated solely with laser.

comments 1 comment - Posted May 1, 2010

April 2010

Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Specially Bred Pigs

NEW YORK, April 27, 2010 - The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation announced today that it is partnering with Living Cell Technologies (LCT), a New Zealand-based biotechnology company focused on developing cell based therapeutics, in a Phase II clinical trial to study the safety and effectiveness of transplanting encapsulated insulin-producing cells from pigs as a treatment for type 1 diabetes with significant hypoglycemia unawareness.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 28, 2010

Diabetes Drug Tied to Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, adds to evidence that metformin, a generically available drug commonly used for type 2 diabetes, may have anti-cancer effects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 22, 2010

Smoking May Erase Heart Benefits of Light Drinking

(HealthDay News) - If you indulge in moderate drinking, you've probably heard that it might reduce your risk for heart trouble, including stroke.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2010

Sea Urchin Proteins Might Lead to Eventual Treatment for Rare Form of Diabetes

A gene that mutated half a billion years ago and now shows up in modern sea creatures could hold the key to understanding a rare form of diabetes. The disease, called diabetes insipidus (not to be confused with diabetes mellitus), causes sufferers to urinate more than three-fourths of a gallon every day. An estimated 41,000 U.S. patients suffer from diabetes insipidus.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 13, 2010

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis for Type 1 Therapy

The idea of parasitic worms causes a shudder in most people. The very thought of some wriggly segmented thing latching onto an internal organ and ransacking it for nourishment is not pleasant. But the scientists who study the creatures may be on to a whole new tack in the fight against type 1 diabetes. It turns out that people who suffer from parasitic worms experience an unexpected beneficial side effect: the worms exert control over the human immune system that seems to protect against several inflammatory diseases, including asthma, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, allergies, and... type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 12, 2010

Insulin-Producing Beta Cells Can Be Reborn

Healthy, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas have a relatively long life and typically do not replicate under normal conditions. Any loss of beta cells, therefore, is usually permanent. In the case of type 1 diabetes, for example, the destruction of beta cells by the body's own immune system is permanent.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 9, 2010

The "Obesity Paradox": Bigger Girth Means Lessened Risk of Cardiac Death

After generations of warnings that obesity is one of the biggest risk factors for heart failure and cardiovascular disease, a University of Rochester study says that it's actually skinny people who run a higher risk of sudden death from cardiac failure. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that non-obese patients who suffered heart failure had a 76 percent greater risk of sudden cardiac death than obese patients.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 3, 2010

March 2010

A Diagnosis of Pre-Diabetes Isn’t Enough to Motivate Many Patients

In a study that tracked 1,402 people with pre-diabetes, researchers found that only about half of them responded to the diagnosis by trying to shed weight or increase their level of exercise.

comments 7 comments - Posted Mar 18, 2010

Starting Treatment Early Doubles Chance of Success for People with Diabetes

The sooner people with diabetes start taking metformin, the longer the drug remains effective, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 12, 2010

Insulin Used to Treat Diabetes May Be Linked to Increased Cancer Risk, Review Suggests

The benefits of using insulin to treat diabetes far outweigh the risks, but a review just published online by IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, suggests that commonly used diabetes therapies may differ from each other when it comes to their influence on cancer risk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 5, 2010

February 2010

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Approves New Diagnosis for Diabetes

In addition to diagnosing type 2 diabetes based on fasting blood glucose levels or a glucose tolerance test, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) have now approved the use of A1c as an additional diagnostic criterion for type 2 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Feb 5, 2010

Death by TV?

Australian researchers who tracked the TV viewing habits of 8,800 people over a six-year span have some sobering statistics for people who love the tube too well: (1) If you watch TV more than two and up to four hours a day, your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease increases by 19 percent. (2) If your viewing habit is more than four hours a day, your risk of death from cardiovascular disease skyrockets by 80 percent.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 4, 2010

January 2010

Diabetes Goes Undiagnosed Due to Flaws in Screening

MADISON, Wis. - Using one of the two major national diabetes screening guidelines misses about one-third of those with diabetes, consequently putting them at risk for serious health complications, according to surprising research findings at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 13, 2010

December 2009

Amylin Shares Drop after FDA Requests New Studies

BOSTON/NEW YORK, Dec 23 (Reuters) - The shares of Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc (AMLN.O) fell nearly 10 percent on Wednesday after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that the company conduct additional safety studies on its diabetes drug, Byetta.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 28, 2009

One in Five Type 2s Is Morbidly Obese - 100 or More Pounds Overweight

Researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center near Chicago report that 20.7 percent of all American adults who have type 2 diabetes are "morbidly obese," a description that applies to people who are 100 or more pounds overweight. The researchers said that the figure for African Americans is even higher, with one out of three type 2s in that group falling under the definition of morbidly obese.

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 5, 2009

August 2009

High Fat Hangover

Everyone knows that eating only high fat food is unhealthy way down the road, but we don't really worry that eating a burger will hurt us by next week. Unfortunately, however, it turns out that a high fat diet damages our health (and our brain functioning) a lot sooner than we would like to think. In fact, new research shows that the effects are felt within only ten days. As far as I'm concerned, this was already shown conclusively in the film "Super Size Me," in which director Morgan Spurlock personally examined the effects of fast food on the human body. For one month, he ate only at McDonald's, ordering everything on the menu and "super-sizing" his order whenever asked. Right before our eyes, Spurlock began looking sicker and sicker.

comments 12 comments - Posted Aug 28, 2009

June 2009

International Committee Urges Adoption of A1c as the Standard Test for Diagnosing Diabetes

The A1c test (also called the HbA1c test), which establishes average blood sugar levels over a three-month period, should replace fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests as the standard for diagnosing diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2009

May 2009

Plastic Fantastic: Protective Device Fends Off Immune System Attacks on Transplanted Precursor Cells

Significant relief for people with type 1 diabetes could soon come in the form of a device made from a thermoplastic resin commonly used as a coating for cookware, gaskets, and hoses.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 20, 2009

April 2009

Hypoglycemic Episodes Connected to Higher Risk for Dementia in Type 2s

Although researchers reporting the phenomenon can't quite put their fingers on how it works, a newly released study says that severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring hospitalization among older people with type 2 diabetes create a greater risk - 32 percent - for developing dementia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 29, 2009

People with Diabetes Should Be Tested for Heart Fibrillation, Study Says

In an Australian study that tracked 11,140 people with diabetes, researchers found a strong relationship between the presence of atrial fibrillation-abnormal heart rhythm-and an increased risk of cardiovascular problems and death.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2009

Formerly Fat Elders Wear Out Earlier

Well, it's official: If you're elderly and fat, you're more likely to have problems getting around than if you're thin and elderly. A new study proves it.  But here's the real kicker: If you're thin and elderly, but you used to be fat, you're more likely to develop problems getting around than people who were never fat.  As a matter of fact, you're almost as likely to have mobility problems as people who are fat and elderly. Apparently, you just can't win for losing. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Apr 21, 2009

Maybe “Normal” BG Levels Aren’t So Normal After All

The need to investigate and determine normoglycemia in Mexican children under the age of six begins with a lack of relevant published data.  Another motive for reviewing the currently recommended glycemic goals for children and adolescents with type 1 stems from the well-known observation that children and adolescents who do not have type 1 do not develop microvascular diabetic complications.  Today, thanks to insulin analogs and basal/bolus therapy regimens, children with type 1 have the option of achieving true euglycemia and of potentially benefiting from its advantages.

comments 14 comments - Posted Apr 17, 2009

Scientists Ponder Why Exercise Helps Control High BG in Type 2s

Understanding which proteins help control blood glucose during and after exercise could lead to new drug therapies or more effective exercise to prevent type 2 diabetes and other health problems associated with high blood sugar.

comments 0 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2009

Study Shows Link Between Gum Disease and Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant women who have gum disease run a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes than pregnant women who have healthy gums, says a study from the New York University College of Dentistry.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 16, 2009

Low Birth Weight Could Increase Adult Risk of Diabetes

A study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism of The Endocrine Society says that low birth weight could be associated with a higher incidence of inflammation in adulthood, setting the stage for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 15, 2009

March 2009

Joint Statement Published from ADA and AACE on the NICE-SUGAR Study

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) released a statement last week in response to the study published online in the New England Journal of Medicine which suggested that intensive blood glucose control for critical care patients with hyperglycemia doesn't improve outcomes and is associated with an increase in deaths.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Sled Dogs’ Fat-Burning Capabilities Could Hold a Key to Type 2 Treatments

One of the most impressive feats of endurance in the animal world is performed by the sled dogs that run up to 100 miles per day in such races as Alaska's Iditarod, a grueling 1,161-mile trek from Simpson to Homer. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 31, 2009

Sleeping Less Than Six 6 Hours a Night? Your Risk of Developing a Type 2 Precursor Is Nearly 5x Higher

If you get less than six hours of sleep per night, your risk of developing impaired fasting glucose rises by a factor of 4.56, according to a report from the American Heart Association. 

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 25, 2009

July 2004

New Hand-Held Device Measures After-Meal Energy Expenditure

The MedGem, manufactured by HealtheTech, is a new hand-held metabolic rate device that measures after-meal energy expenditure.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

December 2001

An Extra Perk

A study in the September issue of Obesity Research suggests that the anti-depressant drug bupropion (Wellbutrin) is effective at producing weight loss.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 1, 2001

July 1996

Dead in Bed

A "dead-in-bed" syndrome related to diabetes, which was first reported in the United Kingdom in 1989, is the subject of a cohort study appearing in the February 1995 issue of Diabetic Medicine.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 1996

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