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Other Lab Tests Archives

Other Lab Tests Article Archives

May 2010

Why Drugstore Genetic Tests Upset the FDA

On Tuesday, Pathway Genomics announced that their personal genetic testing kit (InsightTM Saliva Collection Kit) would soon be available at the pharmacy chain Walgreens. The next day, the FDA released a letter it had sent to Pathway Genomics on Monday saying hold on, there was no approval on record for Pathway's Genetic Health Report. By Thursday, Wallgreens announced that it was delaying the sale of the genetic testing kits.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 15, 2010

May 2009

Plastic Fantastic: Protective Device Fends Off Immune System Attacks on Transplanted Precursor Cells

Significant relief for people with type 1 diabetes could soon come in the form of a device made from a thermoplastic resin commonly used as a coating for cookware, gaskets, and hoses.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 20, 2009

February 2009

Marrow Cells Heal Neuropathy in Mice

Bone marrow cells that the body normally uses to restore blood vessels can be cultured to stop neuropathy and restore nerve function in diabetic mice, according to researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

comments 12 comments - Posted Feb 12, 2009

October 2008

A Kind of Diabetes You May Have Never Heard Of
A Kind of Diabetes You May Have Never Heard Of

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease that, like the more familiar diabetes mellitus, causes frequent urination. Interestingly, the "insipidus" in its name means "without taste," which refers to the flavor of the urine associated with DI.  "Mellitus," which means "honey," also describes the taste of the urine associated with that condition, which is (so we are told) sweet.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 20, 2008

September 2008

More on the Sleep Apnea/Diabetes Connection: Doctors Urged to Take It More Seriously
More on the Sleep Apnea/Diabetes Connection: Doctors Urged to Take It More Seriously

Despite the fact that 94 percent of doctors are aware of the association between sleep apnea and diabetes, only 47 percent of them screen for the condition in their patients with diabetes. 

comments 3 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

On the Mouse front: Harvard Scientists Use a Benign Virus to Change Mouse Pancreas Cells Into Insulin Producers
On the Mouse front: Harvard Scientists Use a Benign Virus to Change Mouse Pancreas Cells Into Insulin Producers

By "reprogramming" adult exocrine cells in mice pancreases to function as beta-like insulin producers, Harvard biologists have taken a giant step toward the use of cell regeneration therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 4, 2008

May 2008

They've Done it in Mice... Now They Plan to Cure Type 1 in Humans
They've Done it in Mice... Now They Plan to Cure Type 1 in Humans

Researchers at Children’s Hospital in Pittsburgh have started an FDA-approved phase 1 test in humans of a lab procedure that successfully reversed type 1 diabetes in mice.

comments 8 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

Concerned About Your Friends or Family's Diabetes Risk? Tell Them About the VAP Test
Concerned About Your Friends or Family's Diabetes Risk? Tell Them About the VAP Test

If you have diabetes, chances are you are already taking cholesterol-lowering drugs or realize that they might soon join the list of your other medications.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 30, 2008

April 2008

Is That Soda Really Sugar-Free? Test It With Tes-Tape Before You Drink

Carol Whitton of Coral Springs, Florida, discovered that her blood sugar often increased sharply after she drank a diet soda while dining in a restaurant. So she started to test her diet drinks for sugar, a practice she learned from watching the “Living With Diabetes” television program.

comments 28 comments - Posted Apr 28, 2008

March 2008

New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life
New Home Kidney Dialysis Options Offer Hope for a Better Life

“You need dialysis” are words nobody wants to hear. But today kidney failure doesn’t have to mean driving to and from a clinic three times a week and having a lesser quality of life. Hemodialysis (HD) can safely be done in the privacy of your home in two new ways: daily and nocturnal home HD, both of which can help you feel better and live longer.

comments 6 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2008

August 2007

Hemochromatosis and Bronze Diabetes: Caused By Iron Overload

Hemochromatosis is the most common single gene disease in the United States, more common than cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease, and muscular dystrophy combined.

comments 7 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2007

July 2007

New $500 Mail-In DNA Test Reveals Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
New $500 Mail-In DNA Test Reveals Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

The average person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes is about seven percent. Now an Icelandic biotech company has developed the deCODE T2™ test, an assessment that tells you if your risk is double that.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2007

July 2006

New Technology "Vaporizes" Blockages in the Arteries

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects up to 12 million Americans, causing symptoms that range from leg pain to gangrene or ulcerations resulting from lack of blood flow. Untreated, PAD can lead to possible amputation.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2006

January 2006

Is Pargluva On the Ropes?

It was the belle of the ball at last summer’s ADA Scientific Sessions in San Diego. Now it appears that muraglitazar (Pargluva) is clinging to life after a scathing report recently published by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

FDA Approves First Instant Anemia Test
FDA Approves First Instant Anemia Test

Biosafe Medical Technologies of Lake Forest, Illinois, offers an Instant Anemia Test—the first-ever disposable blood test for anemia detection approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2006

August 2004

Heart-Smart Supplements

Diachrome, a patented combination of chromium picolinate and biotin, significantly lowers coronary risk factors in type 2s. According to a small study presented at an American Heart Association meeting, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB), held in May in San Francisco.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 1, 2004

July 2004

More Pain, Less Gain

Patients with diabetes may require larger doses of morphine than nondiabetic patients for the most effective relief of postoperative pain.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 1, 2004

June 2004

Lipo Removes Fat But Not Type 2
Lipo Removes Fat But Not Type 2

Liposuction may suck fat from your body and take off pounds, but don’t expect it to improve your type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2004

Newly Diagnosed and Established Diabetics at Risk

A Swedish study showed that there is an increase in preclinical atherosclerotic changes and increased inflammation in men with newly diagnosed diabetes as well as in men with established diabetes, when compared with healthy control subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

White Blood Count and Blood Glucose Levels

An increase in white blood count (WBC), an indicator of inflammation, is associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Reduced insulin sensitivity, say researchers in Germany, can mostly explain this.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Getting to the Heart of Early Kidney Disease

The risk of cardiovascular events and death in people with diabetes and high blood pressure is two to eight times higher when microalbuminuria is present.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Type 2 Diabetes and Simvastatin

A South Carolina study indicates that simvastatin (Zocor), an oral “statin” lipid-lowering drug is a potentially beneficial treatment for the inflammatory reaction associated with atherosclerosis.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Can You Zap the Pain Away

A group of patients with diabetes receiving low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) for the painful symptoms of sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) showed a reduction in pain scores in a Toronto study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Watch That Waistline!

Waist circumference (WC), not only body mass index (BMI), indicates obesity-related health risk.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Continuity of Care Improves Outcome Quality

If you want the best quality care for your type 2 diabetes, see the same physician at each visit to your diabetes outpatient clinic (DOC), especially if that physician specializes in diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

Alternate-Site Testing for Diabetic Children Gets Thumbs Up

United Kingdom researchers argue that testing blood glucose at the forearm “is an acceptable alternative to finger-prick testing for blood glucose measurement in children and adolescents.”

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 1, 2004

May 2004

Angioplasty Outcomes Worse With Diabetes

Even with contemporary improvements in angioplasty (percutaneous coronary intervention) methods, such as stents and the administration of platelet antagonists, diabetes is still a major factor in mortality risk for heart-related complications.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

Q & A From Dr. Pankow

Dr. James S. Pankow works with the Division of Epidemiology at the University of Minnesota.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

Single Islet Cell Infusion Success

A joint study by the University of Minnesota and the University of California San Francisco, with one islet cell infusion from a single donor pancreas, has achieved insulin independence in four of six people with longterm type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 1, 2004

February 2004

Pravachol: How Cholesterol-Lowering May Help You

The cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol (pravastatin), when administered at 40 milligrams per day over six years, helps prevent cardiovascular events including stroke in people with diabetes or with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and established coronary disease.

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2004

September 2000

Interpreting Your C-peptide Values

Normal C-peptide levels for a fasting test are generally considered to be anything between 0.5 nanograms (ng) per millileter (ml) and 3 ng/ml, although people who do not have diabetes may occasionally stray out of this range. The following is a range of C-peptide values in people without diabetes, as compiled by Endocrine Sciences, Inc., a California-based laboratory that conducts the test. It should be noted that, in some cases, subjects fell below the normal range of C-peptide values, but were still not found to have diabetes. The range of values may also vary according to what lab your health care practitioner uses.

comments 11 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

What is the C-peptide Test?

The precursor to insulin produced by the pancreas's beta cells is a peptide chain known as proinsulin. Made up of amino acids bound into a u-shape by a connecting polypeptide, proinsulin is stored in beta cells until a glucose load demands the release of insulin. At this point, the connecting molecule is broken off the bottom of the "u"-its shape earning it the moniker C-peptide-freeing the insulin molecule for secretion.

comments 0 comments - Posted Sep 1, 2000

January 2000

An Old Test Teaches Doctors New Tricks: C-peptide Exam Becoming an Accepted Tool for Diabetes Treatment

If you're a person with diabetes who suspects your beta cells may still be hard at work, you may be more right than you know. Most people with diabetes, including type 1s, are still producing at least trace amounts of insulin. And while BGs and HbA1cs may be the foundation for any good diabetes treatment, when it comes to showing insulin production, they don't necessarily paint the full picture.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jan 9, 2000

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