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Type 1 Diabetes Article Archives

August 2014

Genteel: A Pain Free Lancing Instrument

All Dr. Christopher Jacobs’ friend wanted a lancing device that didn’t cause pain.  And after hearing the longtime type 1 diabetic lament the discomfort he felt from the many finger pricks required to test his blood glucose levels, Jacobs was intrigued by the challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 22, 2014

Insulin Pumps: Myths And Reality

I don't come to praise insulin pumps, and I don't come to bury them. Instead, I am here to tell the truth, from my experience.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 21, 2014

Dompé Earns Orphan Drug

An Italian-based pharmaceutical company with subsidiaries in New York has been granted orphan drug status for a new drug to treat neurotrophic keratitis, a rare degenerative corneal disease that impacts less than 1 in 5,000 people worldwide.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 20, 2014

Researching the Cure Beyond The Mouse

For most of us with diabetes, diabetes cure research can feel like it's moving at a glacial pace. If you're a mouse, it's probably pretty exciting, considering researchers are discovering new ways to cure you almost every day. But what progress is being made in curing this disease? Is anyone moving beyond the lab rats and into people living with diabetes? The good news is yes, and there are a lot of people working on finding a cure, and many of them have started or will be starting clinical research in humans soon.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 19, 2014

Newly Discovered Virus Linked To Obesity

If you thought your obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnoses were genetic “gifts” from your family, it could be a virus instead.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2014

Carrying a Pancreas Outside My Body

One of the pluses of having a working pancreas is that you do not often lose it. The organ just comes along for the ride, as it were, safe inside your abdomen.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 16, 2014

New Device Spots Early Signs Of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, a common side effect of diabetes that is linked to a wide range of complications including digestive issues, erectile dysfunction, paralysis of the bladder and intestinal damage, is not only difficult to treat, it’s also difficult to diagnose.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 15, 2014

For Diabetics And Their Devices, The Present Is Never Enough

Type 1 diabetics seem to always be living in a transitional phase. The technology we have currently is always about to be replaced with newer, better, fresher technology, It's exciting on one hand and exhausting on the other.

comments 2 comments - Posted Aug 14, 2014

Death Risk Higher in Polytrauma Cases for People With Diabetes

Having diabetes increases the risk of complications or death in cases where patients have suffered polytrauma compared with patients who don't have any history of medical comorbidities. (Comorbidities are defined as the simultaneous presence of two chronic diseases in a patient.) Polytrauma is defined as multiple injuries to the body or organs where at least one is life-threatening and exacerbated by the trauma of the other injuries. Such injuries usually occur in situations where the likelihood of substantial injury is high---falls, auto accidents, violent crimes, industrial accidents.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 5, 2014

Insulin pumps lead to lower A1C levels for insulin-dependent type 2s

Insulin pumps can be as beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes that require insulin as they have become for those with type 1, according to a new trial.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 2, 2014

July 2014

Those with diabetes are more likely to develop head and neck cancers, research shows

While experts have long noted that those with diabetes have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular issues, a new study shows the risk of head and neck cancers is also higher for diabetics.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 29, 2014

USDA Announces $78 Million Available for Local Food Enterprises

The local food movement was given a big boost earlier this month with the announcement that the USDA has plans to invest $78 million into local and regional food enterprises.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Diabetes Health: Crossword Puzzle Solution for #13

If you would like to sign up to receive a weekly puzzle, please email puzzle@diabeteshealth.com. In the subject area write "add me to your weekly word puzzle list." If you would like us to create a puzzle for you and our players, send your 8 words to puzzle@diabeteshealth.com and we will post your challenge online. In the subject area write, "create my special puzzle". We can all have fun posting and solving your crossword puzzle.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 28, 2014

Novo Nordisk Introduces New Insulin Device to U.S. Market

Novo Nordisk has introduced the Levemir® FlexTouch® prefilled insulin delivery device to the U.S. market. The device, filled with insulin detemir [rDNA origin], the first of its kind that does not use a pushbutton extension. In a conventional insulin delivery device, a pushbutton extends out from the device. If the called-for dose is large, an extension may cause problems for the user.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 26, 2014

How Do You Stay So Positive?

My class was discussing why we cannot just do pancreas transplants so we can cure diabetes,” said a dear friend that volunteers for me at work. It is a lot more complicated than that, sadly. I was touched that he and his college classmates were discussing ways to cure us. As we chatted about the challenges of diabetes and our wishes for a cure, a few other volunteers gathered. When they heard me mention that I have had Type 1 diabetes for twenty years and that I take 5 – 7 injections a day to stay alive and healthy, they all looked shocked and a silence fell over the group. My volunteer said “Wow, how do you stay so positive”?

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 25, 2014

A Primer on Gluten for Celiac Awareness Month

Many people first became aware of how dangerous a slice of bread could be for those with celiac disease when “The View” co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck shared her personal experiences with the genetic autoimmune disorder.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 24, 2014

Type 2 Drug Slashes Dementia Risk

A new study has surprising implications for a generic diabetes drug. Pioglitazone, which is often prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes, also appears to reduce the risk of developing dementia. The drug was not studied specifically to see if cut the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Instead, researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases combed through a giant database of German health care records. They looked at information from 2004 to 2010, with a gigantic group of subjects.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 23, 2014

Mixed Martial Arts Reveals Hidden Strengths After Type 1 Diagnosis

Rob Cooper isn’t one to shy away from a challenge.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 21, 2014

U.S. News & World Report Lists Best U.S. Hospitals for Diabetes

News magazine U.S. News & World Report has published a list of the top 10 American hospitals for treating diabetes and delivering endocrinological care.


comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 19, 2014

Key Steps in Diabetes Care

Living with diabetes means you need to take extra care to stay healthy. The good news is that even small changes in your lifestyle and habits can make a big difference in managing your blood sugar, staying healthy, and preventing complications.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jul 18, 2014

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 16, 2014

The Invisible Elephant in the Room

Diabetes is the invisible elephant in my room on a regular basis. As a type 1 diabetic, I think about it frequently even if my friends, family, doctors, and the people I encounter daily don’t see it. While diabetes truly is an invisible illness, my blood sugars affect everything I do or even think about doing. My diabetes elephant is there all the time. That elephant does not take days off or breaks. So when such an important medical issue goes unnoticed by a doctor after a lengthy visit, I see a red flag.

comments 18 comments - Posted Jul 15, 2014

Innovative Program: Offers People with Diabetes the Power to Improve Their Own Health

For most people with type 2 diabetes, successful outcomes of the disease usually rely more on living a healthy lifestyle, rather than a medicine chest of prescription drugs. Because it is such a self-managed disease, several high-profile groups are collaborating to create a new kind of the support group to help people stay on track and better manage their diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 8, 2014

After 50 years, type 1 Suzi Vietti Has Mastered Her Disease

One thing most people who know 63-year-old Suzi Vietti should realize by now is that saying, “never” to her is like issuing a double-dog dare, and it might be one of her most detested words, given the number of times she has heard it.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jul 3, 2014

Fewer Hypoglycemic Episodes With One Insulin in Head-to-Head Comparison

A recently completed study that compared two types of insulin for treating inadequately controlled type 2 patients showed that insulin degludec/insulin aspart produced fewer instances of hypoglycemia than biphasic insulin aspart 30.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 2, 2014

June 2014

Embryonic Cloning Takes Step Toward Treating Diabetes

For more than 100 years, scientists have been exploring the possibilities of cloning, which led to the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996 along with a wealth of other developments in the treatment of disease, including the recent embryonic cloning of a woman with diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 28, 2014

Belly Fat Linked to Metabolic Diseases in Kids

While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 27, 2014

High Birth Weights Could Put Babies at Risk Later On

Weight matters. Through all the research and studies, diseases and treatments, those two words possess a simple truth. The heavier people are, the more challenges they face in remaining healthy. The thinner we are, the more options we have to stay active and engaged in the world around us.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 25, 2014

911 - What's Your Emergency?

Recently I was working at the store I manage when a volunteer came into the backroom where my assistant and I were working. She informed us that something was wrong with her fellow cashier. I didn’t know what to expect, and wasn’t prepared for what I discovered.

comments 10 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2014

Low-carb, Vegan Diet Offers Benefits

The public perception of low-carbohydrate diets often involves mounds of bacon, piles of steaks and rivers of cheese. After all, when the Atkins Diet swept the country more than a decade ago, that was one of the ways people described it to their friends -- and one of the ways that critics tried to define it.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jun 23, 2014

May 2014

FDA Delays Decision on Inhaled Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has delayed until July 15th making a decision on whether to allow the inhaled insulin Afrezza entry into the American market.

comments 4 comments - Posted May 24, 2014

Solution to Crossword Puzzle #2

Solution to diabeteshealth.com-crossword puzzle #2

comments 0 comments - Posted May 12, 2014

April 2014

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Reducing Alzheimer's Disease

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that as many as half of all Americans who are alive today will end their lives in nursing homes, although it won’t be because their bodies cease to function, but because of their brains.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 16, 2014

January 2014

A Daughter's Apology

My mother is a diabetic--something that shouldn't be someone's identifier, but unfortunately it has defined her life. This is my apology to her and to everyone struggling with un-understanding families. This is my account of what it is like from the outside looking in, knowing it is my potential future, and coming to terms with how I wasn't there for my mother.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 2, 2014

July 2013

Type 1 Doesn't Stop Carrie Miller From Living Her Own Indiana Jones Life

Carrie Miller had one goal when she was a child-become the female counterpart to Indiana Jones. If nothing else, she wanted to live a life infused with that blockbuster's level of adrenaline rush.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 22, 2013

June 2013

Questions Follow Football Player’s Diabetes Diagnosis, Move to New Team

It's a nightmare scenario for a person who's been newly diagnosed with diabetes: You're fired after learning you have this chronic-yet-manageable disease. Everything the doctors told you about living a nearly normal life seems like a lie. Your visions and hopes for the future-already clouded with this scary medical news-darken.

comments 2 comments - Posted Jun 24, 2013

The Diabetic Parent Journals: Life With a Two Year Old

Life never stops. It's a truism that people with diabetes of all types know too well. Your responsibilities change. Your duties at your job shift. The people around you change. And you have to make the best you can of it all, racing to keep up and adjusting your treatment plan as best you can. It's exhausting.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 19, 2013

Despite the Fear

On some days living with a chronic disease and all its complexities for 15 years has the ability to force me into hiding.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2013

May 2013

Web Screener Tells If You Qualify for Type 1 Study

People who live in the San Francisco Bay Area know that the University of California San Francisco is one of the premier medical research facilities in the world. UCSF has particularly distinguished itself in the area of type 1 diabetes prevention, intervention, and islet transplantation trials.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 30, 2013

January 2013

Just Don’t Do Nothing!

On September 26, 1992, my daughter Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Since that time, we have immersed ourselves in the world of diabetes with two goals: First, to ensure that Kaitlyn has the very best tools, both medical and emotional, to manage her diabetes, and second, to dedicate our unyielding efforts in pursuit of a cure. For us, it's not either/or: It's both.

comments 3 comments - Posted Jan 21, 2013

He’s a Type 1 on TV and in Real Life

Forty-three year old stage and TV actor Stephen Wallem is a jack of all trades when it comes to entertainment. Best known for his one-man musical review, "Off the Wallem," he is also a playwright, composer, and director. Currently, he plays Thor, a gay nurse with type 1 diabetes, on the Showtime series "Nurse Jackie."

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 12, 2013

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 8, 2013

September 2012

When They Mean Well

Sometimes it isn’t a stranger or acquaintance giving you a hard time about your diabetes.  Sometimes it’s a family member or close friend that says something hurtful about your diabetes management. And that is far more difficult to hear than the guy at the table next to you in a restaurant or some lady sharing an office with you at work.

comments 14 comments - Posted Sep 13, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  In this second part of our interview, I asked him about his motivations. 

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 6, 2012

An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 5, 2012

Steve Richert’s Year of Rock-climbing for Diabetes Awareness

Steve Richert, who has type 1 diabetes, has embarked upon a 365-day climbing mission to demonstrate that managing diabetes and rock climbing present similar challenges and to inspire people with diabetes to surmount those challenges.  When I caught up with Steve on a rare day when he happened to be at sea level, I asked him about his mission.

comments 1 comment - Posted Sep 1, 2012

August 2012

Why Do We Crave Carbohydrates?

We’ve all heard a lot of discussion about low carbohydrate diets and whether they are effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.. What most of us do not understand, however, is how diabetes affects the way that we process carbs. Beta cells make more than insulin: they also make another satiety hormone: amylin. If we are beta-cell deficient, then we are amylin-deficient as well. When the amylin hormone is not available to tell our brain that we are full, we crave more food, especially carbohydrates. Carbohydrates act as a mood stabilizer, making us feel good when we’re stressed.

comments 1 comment - Posted Aug 31, 2012

The 2012 Diabetes Health Pharmacist/AADE Scholarship Winner

Amy Powell, the first recipient of the Diabetes Health Pharmacist and American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) scholarship, was honored at the 2012 AADE conference in Indianapolis. As the winner, her conference fees and accommodation costs were paid, and she received a one-year AADE membership.

comments 0 comments - Posted Aug 18, 2012

July 2012

Adding Liraglutide to Insulin May Help Obese Type 1s

New York researchers have reported that obese patients with type 1 diabetes who do not respond well to insulin may be able to improve their blood sugar control by adding liraglutide to their therapy. Liraglutide (brand name Victoza) is an injectible GLP-1 analog* that was introduced to the US market in 2010 to treat people with type 2 diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jul 14, 2012

June 2012

I Hear You, But I'm Not You

I've had type 1 diabetes for nearly 14 years. I have fallen off the wagon a few times, battled diabulimia, survived numerous insulin shock comas and ketoacidosis episodes, and struggled with acceptance: I have my scars. Despite these mistakes, I've picked myself up countless times and have prevailed. I've persevered with a disease that doesn't take vacations for even a minute, and I've come out on top. I'm alive and healthy, with a full life and a child of my own.

comments 7 comments - Posted Jun 21, 2012

Another Day, Another Battle

Last year, I gave birth to my daughter and shared my pregnancy and birthing experiences with you. The pregnancy was a very difficult but extremely rewarding experience. A few months after our daughter was born, my husband and I discussed whether we'd have another child. On one hand, I went through several insulin shock comas, severe insulin resistance, and pre-eclampsia, ending in an emergency cesarean section. Because my first pregnancy was so tough, we weren't sure if we wanted to risk another one. On the other hand, if we did have two children, we wanted them to be very close in age so that they could bond well. We figured that if the two children were around fifteen months apart, then my daughter would be too young to feel any tension about having another baby in the house. We hoped they'd be close enough in age that they would always have one another as a companion.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 18, 2012

As I Blow Out the Candles

As I celebrate my birthday this month, I also recognize the anniversary of my diabetes. If it were a person, it would be legally old enough to move out.  Oh, how I wish it would! I was diagnosed at eighteen years old with type 1 diabetes, so this makes eighteen long years that the two of us have been living together.  I have so many mixed emotions about it.  On one hand, I feel stronger and more certain of my decisions with diabetes than ever before.  On the other hand, I feel pretty depressed that it's been so long and that, no matter how I try to push away the thought, complications could be looming around the bend.

comments 4 comments - Posted Jun 17, 2012

Even Without a Cure, My Life Is Good

If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably know that you're in it for the long haul.  No diet, nutrition, or exercise plan is getting you out of this one.  Our only hope for a life without insulin injections is a cure.  It's a wonderful idea, but I'm not holding my breath.    

comments 14 comments - Posted Jun 11, 2012

Type 1: FDA OKs Levemir for Two- to Five-Year-Olds

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Novo Nordisk's Levemir basal insulin for type 1 children aged two to five years. The FDA decision makes Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) the only basal insulin approved for use in this age group.
Levemir, introduced to the US market in 2006, was previously approved for older children and adults with type 1 diabetes, as well as insulin-using type 2s.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jun 7, 2012

A Celebrity Chef’s Documentary About Diabetes

Not long ago, celebrity chef Charles Mattocks, who was recently diagnosed with diabetes, came across the twitter account that I use to connect with the diabetes community. He called me and told me about his idea for making a documentary about diabetes and asked if I would like to participate. Charles saw the need for an up-close view of our disease that would be very supportive of the diabetes community. Having had type 1 diabetes for 12 years, I jumped at the opportunity to be a part of a film that focuses on the struggles of dealing with diabetes.

comments 6 comments - Posted Jun 2, 2012

May 2012

Women and Diabetes:  Adjusting Your Management Plan to Match Hormonal Changes

I've had type 1 diabetes for six years, and it never fails that during the dreaded "time of the month," I become increasingly insulin-resistant. Just looking at a carbohydrate makes my sugar skyrocket. I'm exhausted, and my mood goes from my usual positive to cranky and sensitive.

comments 2 comments - Posted May 27, 2012

Five Ways to Rev Up Your Walking Routine

Warmer temperatures bring the opportunity to put on our walking shoes and step outside for our workouts.  But if you, like me, have been walking for many years, you may find yourself bored with the same old routine. To avoid burnout, try these five ways to rev up your walk.

comments 0 comments - Posted May 21, 2012

“Reprogrammed” Cells in Mice Reverse Late-stage Type 1 Diabetes

A successful experiment on mice with type 1 diabetes, which involved "reprogramming" their immune systems to stop attacks on pancreatic beta cells, may point the way to an eventual cure for the disease in humans.

comments 11 comments - Posted May 15, 2012

April 2012

All in the Family

My oldest nephew, James, has a double whammy to deal with.  His aunt, yours truly, has type 1 diabetes, and so does his father. I was in the room when my sister had an ultrasound during her pregnancy with James, and I clearly remember the doctor asking her if anyone in her family had diabetes.  We shared a look as she informed the doctor of my diabetes and her husband's diabetes.  I know we also shared a silent prayer as the reality hit us that diabetes might be passed on to her children.

comments 2 comments - Posted Apr 27, 2012

Summer Eating Tips for People With Diabetes

As we approach the summer season, our thoughts turn to barbecues, picnics, amusement parks, and road trips to the beach.  It is a season of fun, but it can be hard for people with diabetes to enjoy the festivities and still maintain healthy eating habits.

comments 1 comment - Posted Apr 23, 2012

March 2012

Type 1 Diabetes Researchers Reach Important Milestone

Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international network of researchers exploring ways to prevent and delay the progression of type 1 diabetes, has reached an important milestone: screening 100,000 people to detect who among is at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. This is a major achievement because it has helped researchers better predict who will develop diabetes and when it will require treatment. Earlier diagnosis helps patients avoid a severe, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 28, 2012

The First 25

A little more than 25 years ago, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

comments 2 comments - Posted Mar 21, 2012

Type 1s May Produce Insulin for Decades After Diagnosis

Massachusetts researchers have found that even years after they are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, some people continue to possess functioning beta cells. This finding departs from the conventional thinking that in type 1 diabetes beat cell activity inevitably ceases--the result of attacks on the cells by the body's immune system.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 19, 2012

Diabetes Camp: What You Should Know

There are more than 200 diabetes camps in North America, offering more than 400 programs to more than 30,000 youths and young adults with diabetes and their families. One in 400 children has type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in children, once rare, is increasingly common due to obesity. Education and motivation are vital to healthy management of the disease. Diabetes camps empower children and their families to meet the rigorous demands of diabetes, allowing them to be healthy, active, and motivated to reach their dreams.

comments 0 comments - Posted Mar 15, 2012

Little Diabetes Warriors

Sometimes I feel like an idiot. It usually happens when I read a blog by one of my favorite "D" parents telling about how their children are handling life with type 1 diabetes. These brave kids put up with the same things that adults with diabetes do, and some are literally too young to even understand what's going on. Reading about these little warriors makes me regret even more the fact that I wallowed in self pity all afternoon just because my blood sugar didn't cooperate flawlessly during my daily walk.

comments 1 comment - Posted Mar 6, 2012

February 2012

Hear Me, Doctor

During my 14 years with type 1 diabetes and my time spent interacting with the diabetes online community, I constantly hear the same theme: Doctors aren't listening to their patients, and their bedside manners are deteriorating. Every day, it seems, I hear about people who have been treated as if they are simply a number or dismissed as uneducated in their own health conditions.

comments 4 comments - Posted Feb 26, 2012

An Update on Bydureon

You've heard of the blockbuster drug Byetta, a daily injection for type 2 diabetes? Byetta's sister product, Bydureon, which is injected just once a week, has just been approved by the FDA and is available in pharmacies.

comments 14 comments - Posted Feb 17, 2012

Glooko's Logbook Is an Easy-to-Use iPhone App

Using a log book can be cumbersome, but it has many benefits. Tracking your blood sugars allows you to spot trends and provides a landscape view of how your body reacts to changing circumstances. It’s crucial to understand your body’s responses to food, illness, stress, and simply over-indulging in festive activities.  Keeping track of these variables helps you better manage your diabetes. 

comments 0 comments - Posted Feb 15, 2012

The Blood Sugar Blame Game

Wiped out and dejected, that's my state of mind this morning. I had a really low blood sugar, and it's left me feeling like I've been in a fight. My arms and legs feel heavy, and my "low" headache lingers, but I remind myself that it could be worse. I'm fine, I treated it, and my day will go on.

comments 11 comments - Posted Feb 14, 2012

Keeping Up With Baby

My son learned to crawl last month. As a part-time stay-at-home dad, I found it both exciting and terrifying. Through crawling, my son has entered a new stage in life. He might have rolled or scooted a few feet before, but now he can see something in another room and make up his mind to go there.

comments 1 comment - Posted Feb 10, 2012

The Badge of Courage

Two years ago, I was a different woman. I was just beginning to come out of my diabetes shell, assessing my confidence with strangers by testing in public and telling friends about my disease. I can still feel the panic rising in my throat as I told people that I have diabetes and need to take injections multiple times per day. I was afraid of rejection, afraid that they would treat me like a sick person. But after eleven years of fighting for my life with type 1 diabetes, I was tired of being afraid. The more people I told, the easier it got.

comments 7 comments - Posted Feb 1, 2012

January 2012

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

comments 9 comments - Posted Jan 30, 2012

“Grip, Rip, and Sip”

Ethan Lewis, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12, founded GlucoBrands only 11 years later. The company produces a portable, inexpensive, tasty, fast-acting glucose gel that people can take to quickly restore healthy blood sugar levels when they experience hypoglycemia.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 16, 2012

Aussie Scientists Say a Complex Sugar Is Key to Beta Cell Protection

Australian scientists have discovered that when a complex sugar crucial to the survival of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells is degraded by the body's immune system, the beta cells die.

comments 0 comments - Posted Jan 14, 2012

There’s No Shame in Taking Insulin Injections in Public

Recently, there has been a great deal of discussion on the subject of testing your blood sugar and taking insulin shots in public. A shocking number of people on social networks have commented that their family members don't want them to test their blood sugar or take their shots in public. They report having to inject in restrooms or even through their clothing to avoid drawing attention or offending their families. One hypersensitive husband even objected when his recently diagnosed wife took a shot in the relative privacy of their car.

comments 40 comments - Posted Jan 12, 2012

Riding on Insulin

Professional snowboarder Sean Busby started competing at age 14 and began training for the Winter Olympics at 16. But in 2004, at age 19, Sean's troubling bouts of thirst and weariness were revealed as symptoms of type 1 diabetes.

comments 1 comment - Posted Jan 10, 2012

A Day in My Life With Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

What's it really like to have type 1 diabetes?  Every morning I start the day with a finger prick and two insulin injections.  It doesn't matter if I don't feel like it.  It doesn't matter if I'm tired.  There is simply no room for pre-coffee dosage errors, excuses, or whining.   Some mornings are good and some are bad, based upon my blood glucose reading. Its level varies greatly depending on whether my liver has released large stores of glucose during the dawn hours.

comments 25 comments - Posted Jan 1, 2012

December 2011

Birthing Options

Throughout pregnancy and all the way up until labor, I was adamant that I was not having a cesarean section. I was terrified of being cut open because I know that my healing time is longer due to my lowered immune system. In 2009, I had to go to the emergency room for an infection caused by cutting my leg while shaving, so how could I possibly heal after being opened up to birth a baby?

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 30, 2011

Support on the Diabetes Journey

Diagnosed with diabetes at age 15, Brandy Barnes went on to a successful career as a pharmaceuticals salesperson, but she deeply missed having other diabetic women in her life to whom she could relate. Finally, after a difficult pregnancy, long thought, and prayer, she founded DiabetesSisters (www.diabetes.sisters.org), a North Carolina-based nonprofit organization that provides education and support to women of all ages with all types of diabetes. DS offers conferences, websites, blogs, and a "sister match" program, all designed to lessen feelings of isolation and deepen bonds of connection among women with diabetes.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 28, 2011

Complications in the Third Trimester

Editor' Note: This article continues Katherine Marple's series on pregnancy with diabetes as a complicating factor. For previous articles, enter her name in the search feature at the top right-hand of this website. The next installment, "Birthing Options," will appear on December 30.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 27, 2011

Diabetes Diva Amanda Lamb’s “Christmas In Love” Arrives on YouTube

Diabetes Health readers who are Amanda Lamb fans can watch her first-ever Christmas single, "Christmas In Love," on YouTube.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 22, 2011

Standing Up For Sugar, the Hypoglycemia Alert Dog  

We are a tight-knit community.  I'm not talking about my neighbors in my hometown of Chicago.  I'm talking about my worldwide neighbors in the diabetic online community.  Anyone dealing with diabetes knows the bond that it brings.  When a person with diabetes is wronged, the rest of us feel the sting.  Most of us living with diabetes have stories about people badgering our diet choices, saying inappropriate or insensitive things, and, sadly, crossing the line even further.

comments 5 comments - Posted Dec 20, 2011

High-Tech Pump Helps Three Type 1s Swim the English Channel

On July 21, Claire Duncan was one of three people with type 1 diabetes on a six-person relay team that swam across the English Channel. The team, swimming to raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, covered the 22-mile route in 13.5 hours, starting from a beach between Folkestone and Dover in England and finishing in France near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais.

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 17, 2011

Ask a Diabetes Educator

"I have type 2 diabetes, diagnosed five years ago, and am 67 years old. I have worked very hard to manage this disease, but without the success I would like."

comments 0 comments - Posted Dec 16, 2011

Diabetes Shouldn’t Be Top Secret

Many people with diabetes admit to keeping their diabetes a secret.  Less than two years ago, I was one of them.  I hated the way people treated me when they found out about my diabetes.  I hated being told that I wasn't allowed to eat things by people who didn't have a clue about diabetes.  I hated the horror stories people told about their acquaintances with diabetes.  I hated people asking me if I had the "bad" kind of diabetes.

comments 10 comments - Posted Dec 9, 2011

Dog Sense

Forensic scientist Mark Ruefenacht, who has type 1 diabetes, tells Diabetes Health publisher Nadia Al-Samarrie how he realized that dogs can be a major defense against life-threatening episodes of hypoglycemia. That insight led him to found Dogs for Diabetics ("D4D"), a Concord, California-based organization that trains dogs to alert their masters when they sense low blood sugar. D4D's website is located at www.dogs4diabetics.com/

comments 3 comments - Posted Dec 4, 2011

Nick Jonas Receives DREAM Award From Disability Rights Legal Center

This year's DREAM Award, presented by the Disability Rights Legal Center (DRLC), was given to Nick Jonas, the musician and actor best known as one of the three Jonas Brothers. He was among the special recipients at the DRLC's annual Franklin D. Roosevelt Dinner, held this year on November 17, 2011.

comments 1 comment - Posted Dec 3, 2011

November 2011

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 22, 2011

Heather Shields Raises Diabetes Awareness in the Miss California Pageant

Heather Shields was thrilled when she got the opportunity to dance with the famous Joffrey Ballet School in New York City. At 11 years old, she dreamed of one day becoming a professional ballerina, and this trip would bring her dream a little closer. A long way from home for this California girl, Heather traveled with her family to the "Big Apple" for the month of July. During that month she remembers dancing six to seven hours a day in the heat of the summer. She began losing weight, but shrugged it off, assuming she'd caught her mom's stomach bug.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 17, 2011

What Not to Say to the Newly Diagnosed

When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I recall the numerous comments that people blurted out in an attempt to make me feel better about my situation.  But the truth was that I just needed to be treated like everyone else.  I was in the midst of a confusing, depressing, and life-altering diagnosis.  The last thing I needed was a pat on the back that felt more like a slap in the face.

comments 11 comments - Posted Nov 15, 2011

The Final Weeks of Pregnancy- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

Final weeks of pregnancy! The third trimester brings about many more ultrasound scans and measurements taken to judge the growth and health of your child. You'll likely be visiting your OB/GYN or maternal fetal medicine office twice per week for non-stress tests to ensure that your baby is healthy and active.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 9, 2011

Insulindependence

The search for a cure for diabetes is a noble pursuit, but a cure always seems to be another ten years down the road. Finding a way to be healthy in the here and now is what matters for people with diabetes. In 2005, Peter Nerothin started Insulindependence (IN), a nonprofit organization that aims to "revolutionize diabetes management" by leading experiential diabetes education expeditions for type 1 youths.

comments 0 comments - Posted Nov 8, 2011

Blood Sugar Extremes Can Affect Young Brains

Sometimes it feels like diabetes is driving you crazy. But what if the disease is actually changing your brain? That's the disturbing suggestion of a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study suggests that both high and low blood sugars affect the brain development of young people with diabetes, but in different ways.

comments 4 comments - Posted Nov 7, 2011

Halfway Through Pregnancy: So Many Doctors- Pregnant with Type 1 Diabetes

By now you're halfway through pregnancy.  You've managed to get through the stresses of insulin shock in the first trimester and insulin resistance beginning in the second trimester, and you're well on your way toward your third trimester.  Congratulations!  A moment of applause, please.

comments 1 comment - Posted Nov 2, 2011

Four Tips for a Happier Life With Diabetes

When doctors hand out a diagnosis of diabetes, I wish they'd give you a list of tips that can make life happier living with the illness.  After my diagnosis, I felt ashamed of my diabetes, ashamed of my inability to control it with diet and exercise even though I literally worked out every single day for nine months straight.  I skipped nearly all carbohydrates and didn't eat meat at the time, so all I ate was nuts, cheese, eggs, and vegetables.  The doctor didn't put me on insulin right away because I was eighteen, and she wasn't sure if I had type 1 or type 2. But nothing I did was working. It was soon apparent that I was type 1 and that insulin injections were unavoidable.  I had no idea that it wasn't my fault.  I felt hopeless, hungry, exhausted, and alone.

comments 2 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

Thanks to Technology, We Never Have to Be Alone

If you've had diabetes for a number of years, chances are that you remember when there was no Internet access and no diabetes online community.  You had no way to look up information online and no instant connection to millions of others around the world living with diabetes.  Unless you had a friend nearby with diabetes, there was no one to understand how you felt when your blood sugar numbers were less than stellar, and no one to sympathize with how hard it can be to get your A1C down.

comments 3 comments - Posted Nov 1, 2011

October 2011

Scary and Sweet

October is my diagnosis month. At 14 years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few weeks before Halloween. I remember thinking, at least I'm too old for trick or treating. My younger sister had been diagnosed six months earlier, however, and at 10 years old, she still loved to trick or treat. To ease her pain, my parents got creative and shifted the emphasis of Halloween off sweets and onto scary: Haunted houses, hayrides, and parties with bowls full of smushed tomatoes for witches hearts and cold grapes for eyeballs became our annual tradition. My sister and I still said no to most of the sugary sweets, but we were the first ones to say yes when the doors of the haunted house opened.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 31, 2011

The Night I Needed a Glucagon Injection

The one time I needed a glucagon injection, I didn't have any. I had never been given a prescription for it, had no idea how to use it, and was absolutely clueless about what it did.

comments 1 comment - Posted Oct 29, 2011

What Are Ketones, and Why Are They Important to Diabetes Self-Management?

All blood tests are tools. Some are to diagnose diabetes, some are to help you manage your diabetes on a daily or long term basis and some are to keep you safe.

comments 0 comments - Posted Oct 28, 2011

My Quest for a Smaller Jean Size and A1C

Trying to lose weight as an insulin-injecting person with type 1 diabetes couldn't be more frustrating. It gets on my last nerve that exercise can trigger mind-numbing lows, lows that cause me to inhale a portion of those recently burned calories. That said, I don't skip exercise to avoid lows. I just check my blood sugars more often, use caution with my insulin dosing, and follow the advice of my doctors.

comments 22 comments - Posted Oct 21, 2011

Diabetes Rock Bottom: How It Led Me to the Greatest Gift of All

I'm just going to come out and say it, the way people do in addiction meetings when they have hit "rock bottom." Hi, my name is Meagan. I was a very uncooperative diabetic for a great many years. I felt lonely, and I hated being different. I rarely checked my blood sugars. In fact, there were times where I didn't even know where my meter was.

comments 12 comments - Posted Oct 17, 2011

Scientists Use Rats’ Own Stem Cells to Cure Their Diabetes

Using stem cells that they extracted from the brains of diabetic lab rats, and turning them into insulin-producing pancreatic cells, Japanese scientists may be on the road to a virtual cure for diabetes that comes from people's own brains.

comments 5 comments - Posted Oct 16, 2011

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