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Page 4
Testosterone Gel in Older Men Leads to Increased Cardiovascular Problems

A clinical trial that used testosterone gel, a topically applied ointment, to increase muscle strength in older men with low testosterone levels was stopped because adverse cardiovascular events increased significantly among patients receiving the treatment.

Comments 0 comments - Jul 7, 2010 - * * * * *

More from ACCORD

In people with longstanding type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for heart attack and stroke, lowering blood sugar to near-normal levels did not delay the combined risk of diabetic damage to kidneys, eyes, or nerves, but did delay several other signs of diabetic damage, a study has found. The intensive glucose treatment was compared with standard glucose control.

Comments 0 comments - Jul 2, 2010 - * * * * *

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

A diet including coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA), helps combat insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of cells to respond to insulin and take in glucose for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate for insulin resistance by producing even more insulin, but eventually glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Over time, insulin resistance and obesity can lead to pre-diabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes. 

Comments 0 comments - Jul 1, 2010 - * * * * *

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

Comments 0 comments - Jun 24, 2010 - * * * * *

Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Benefit Younger Diabetes Patients

New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and two other major medical associations advise not prescribing low-dose aspirin therapy for women under 60 or men under 50 who have diabetes but no other risks for heart disease.

Comments 0 comments - Jun 12, 2010 - * * * * *

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Risk Increases with Diabetes and Diabetes Medications

A Seattle-based study has found that people with diabetes run a 40 percent increased risk of developing a common type of abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation*. The study also shows that as people with diabetes take drugs for the disease, their risk for developing atrial fibrillation increases three percent for each year that they use such medications.

Comments 0 comments - May 25, 2010 - * * * * *

Physician Survey Reveals That Early Team Approach Is Best Medicine

Early management of type 2 diabetes with an integrated team of specialists, including a dietitian, diabetes educator, endocrinologist, cardiologist, and nephrologist, can significantly reduce the incidence of complications and lower healthcare costs, according to an online survey of more than 300 endocrinologists and family practice physicians. The survey was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., with the goal of determining the most common obstacles for physicians in treating type 2 diabetes patients and preventing complications.  Sermo, the largest physician only online community, conducted the survey.  A significant number of these physicians (44 percent) reveal that 50 percent of their patients develop at least one of the following serious complications:  cardiovascular disease, nerve pain, kidney disease, stroke, blindness, or limb amputation.

Comments 2 comments - May 8, 2010 - * * * * *

A Promising New Drug for Treating Diabetic Macular Edema

Successful clinical trials of a topical drug called mecamylamine may lead to a potent new treatment for the diabetes-induced eye disease known as macular edema. Diabetic macular edema* involves the part of the retina called the macula. High blood sugar levels inflame its blood vessels, leading to leakiness and fluid accumulation. Left uncontrolled, those symptoms can lead to blurriness, impaired vision, and even blindness.

Comments 1 comment - Apr 14, 2010 - * * * * *

The "Obesity Paradox": Bigger Girth Means Lessened Risk of Cardiac Death

After generations of warnings that obesity is one of the biggest risk factors for heart failure and cardiovascular disease, a University of Rochester study says that it's actually skinny people who run a higher risk of sudden death from cardiac failure. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that non-obese patients who suffered heart failure had a 76 percent greater risk of sudden cardiac death than obese patients.

Comments 2 comments - Apr 3, 2010 - * * * * *

Valsartan (Diovan) Delayed Progression to Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Cardiovascular Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Results from a landmark study involving more than 9,000 people showed that the high blood pressure medicine valsartan (Diovan) delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a common pre-diabetic condition.

Comments 0 comments - Mar 20, 2010 - * * * * *

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