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Reversing Complications Archives

Reversing Diabetes Complications

Updated 167 weeks ago
Vascular Complications of Diabetes: Due to One Missing Enzyme?

Many tragic complications of diabetes, including amputations, heart attack, stroke, and blindness, are due to blood vessel damage. According to Xiaochao Wei, PhD, of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, all that vascular damage may be caused by a shortage of one enzyme: fatty acid synthase, or FAS.

Comments 0 comments - Feb 11, 2011 - * * * * *

Wound Care Company Signs Sponsorship Agreement With ADA

Epic Wound Care, a subsidiary of New York-based United EcoEnergy Corp., has signed a three-year sponsorship agreement with the American Diabetes Association in support of the ADA's "Mission to Stop Diabetes®" campaign.

Comments 0 comments - Aug 20, 2010 - * * * * *

Intensive BG Control and the Onset of Organ Damage in Type 2s

Data from the massive ACCORD study on intensive blood sugar control shows that lowering blood sugar levels in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes to near-normal may delay the appearance of signs that point to damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys, but does not stop their progression toward it.

Comments 0 comments - Jul 9, 2010 - * * * * *

AARP's Fat-to-Fit Weight Loss Program Challenges Americans to Lose 10,000 Pounds

AARP today launched its second annual "Fat-to-Fit Summer Weight Loss Challenge," an online program challenging people to make positive, permanent lifestyle changes to improve their health. AARP's Fat-to-Fit challenge will be hosted on AARP's website (www.aarp.org/fat2fit). Fitness expert and author Carole Carson, a Nevada City, California, resident who lost more than 60 pounds at age 60, will lead Fat-to-Fit online community members through the summer-long program.

Comments 0 comments - Jun 24, 2010 - * * * * *

MACUGEN® Improved Vision in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

Results from a Phase 3 study demonstrate MACUGEN® (pegaptanib sodium) significantly improved vision in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), a complication of diabetes that is a leading cause of blindness in people of working age.¹ In the study, 37 percent of patients treated with MACUGEN gained two lines, or 10 letters, of vision on the ETDRS eye chart at 54 weeks, compared to 20 percent of patients who received a sham (placebo-like) procedure which consists of anesthesia and a simulated injection in the eye (p=0.0047). The data were presented at the World Ophthalmology Congress in Berlin by Frank G. Holz, an investigator in the trial and director of the University Eye Hospital at the University of Bonn in Germany.

Comments 0 comments - Jun 7, 2010 - * * * * *

Physician Survey Reveals That Early Team Approach Is Best Medicine

Early management of type 2 diabetes with an integrated team of specialists, including a dietitian, diabetes educator, endocrinologist, cardiologist, and nephrologist, can significantly reduce the incidence of complications and lower healthcare costs, according to an online survey of more than 300 endocrinologists and family practice physicians. The survey was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., with the goal of determining the most common obstacles for physicians in treating type 2 diabetes patients and preventing complications.  Sermo, the largest physician only online community, conducted the survey.  A significant number of these physicians (44 percent) reveal that 50 percent of their patients develop at least one of the following serious complications:  cardiovascular disease, nerve pain, kidney disease, stroke, blindness, or limb amputation.

Comments 2 comments - May 8, 2010 - * * * * *

Gestational Diabetes and Steps to Reduce Risks for Women and Their Children

Most women with gestational diabetes know that taking steps to manage the disease during pregnancy is critical for the health of both mother and child. What many women don't realize is that those steps need to continue even after the baby is born.

Comments 0 comments - May 7, 2010 - * * * * *

Combination Drug-Laser Therapy Shows Great Promise in Treating Diabetic Retinopathy

Clinical studies at 52 different sites nationwide have shown that combining standard laser treatments with injections of the drug ranibizumab (Lucentis) offers substantially better results for treating macular edema than laser treatments alone. The research showed that almost 50 percent of patients treated with the combination therapy showed substantial improvement in their vision after one year, compared with 28 percent of patients who had been treated solely with laser.

Comments 1 comment - May 1, 2010 - * * * * *

No More Slow-to-Heal Wounds

Researchers at Loyola University have discovered a group of immune system cells called natural killer T (NKT) cells that slow the wound healing process. Their findings pave the way for potential new treatments to accelerate the healing process in slow-to-heal wounds that can occur in people with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes.

Comments 0 comments - Apr 21, 2010 - * * * * *

Four

Four risk factors-all of them preventable-reduce life expectancy among U.S. men by 4.9 years and among U.S. women by 4.1 years, according to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. (According to U.N. figures, current U.S. life expectancy is 75.6 years for men and 80.8 years for women.)

Comments 0 comments - Apr 15, 2010 - * * * * *

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