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Childbirth and Diabetes

Page 2
High Sugar Levels Can Cause Birth Defects: Joslin Study Tells How
High Sugar Levels Can Cause Birth Defects: Joslin Study Tells How

Women with diabetes are up to five times more likely than the general population to have a baby with birth defects, especially of the heart and spinal cord, organs that form within the first few weeks of pregnancy.

Comments 0 comments - Apr 17, 2007 - * * * *

NovoLog Approved for Pregnant Type 1's

On January 30, 2007, the FDA upgraded NovoLog (a fast-acting insulin analog from Novo Nordisk) from Category C to Category B, thereby indicating that NovoLog is safe and effective for pregnant women with type 1 and their unborn children.

Comments 0 comments - Apr 16, 2007 - * * * *

Joslin Researchers Discover a Surprising Culprit in the Search for Causes of Diabetic Birth Defects: Protein Makes It Possible for High Blood Glucose to Enter Embryonic Cells
Joslin Researchers Discover a Surprising Culprit in the Search for Causes of Diabetic Birth Defects: Protein Makes It Possible for High Blood Glucose to Enter Embryonic Cells

Boston - March 5, 2007 - Over the past several years, Joslin Investigator Mary R. Loeken, Ph.D., and her colleagues at Joslin Diabetes Center have unlocked several mysteries behind what puts women with diabetes more at risk of having a child with birth defects.

Comments 0 comments - Mar 21, 2007 - * * * *

Stop Right Where You Are! Finns Testing Kids at Birth for Diabetes.

A push to screen children for diabetes at birth in Finland has identified about 75 percent of those who later developed diabetes at an early age.

Comments 0 comments - Jul 1, 2003 - Not Yet Rated

Uncontrolled Diabetes Leads to More Birth Defects

Better get your blood glucose under control before you even think about getting pregnant.

Comments 2 comments - Mar 1, 2003 - Not Yet Rated

Shedding Light on Recurrent Miscarriages

Women who have repeated miscarriages are likely to be insulin-resistant, according to researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Comments 0 comments - Dec 1, 2002 - Not Yet Rated

Shedding Light on Recurrent Miscarriages: Insulin Resistance a Possible Culprit for Some

Women who have repeated miscarriages are likely to be insulin-resistant, according to researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Comments 0 comments - Dec 1, 2002 - Not Yet Rated

Studies Show No Major Association Between Breastfeeding and Diabetes

New parents who have type 1 diabetes can rest assured that breastfeeding does not increase their babies' chances of developing the disease.

Comments 0 comments - Oct 1, 2000 - Not Yet Rated

How Low Can a Pregnant Woman Go?

I am 28 years old and I've had juvenile diabetes for 21 years. I want to try for a family. I'm concerned about my frequent dropping out with low blood sugars at any given time, for a hundred different reasons (hormone levels is one). My big question is, how low can your blood sugars go before it starts to harm a fetus? Or, is it a matter of how long you have a low blood sugar?

Comments 0 comments - Nov 1, 1999 - Not Yet Rated

Can Type 1 Diabetes Be Detected at Birth?

Researchers in Sweden say that islet autoantibodies are already common at birth in children who develop type 1 diabetes later in life, and that screening for islet cell autoantibodies at birth could be a crucial step in identifying those at risk for developing type 1 diabetes.

Comments 0 comments - May 1, 1999 - Not Yet Rated

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