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Updated 85 weeks ago
An Amazing Race Winner Connects With the Diabetes Community

To a casual observer, Dr. Nat Strand might look like an over-achiever. After all, she and her partner won Season 17 of her favorite television show, "The Amazing Race." Winning the race opened her world up to the diabetes community, which, interestingly enough, inspired her to take better care of herself. Her mission now is to encourage everyone with diabetes to connect with the diabetes community and benefit from knowing others who understand the daily challenges of managing type 1 diabetes. When I caught up with Dr. Strand, we began by talking about what drove her to enter the Amazing Race.

Comments 1 comment - Sep 5, 2012 - * * * * *

Sharps Disposal: Will Pharmacies End Up Footing the Bill?

As CEO of a company that manufactures insulin syringes and pen needles for the US and Canadian markets, I have been closely monitoring the regulations and trends pertaining to the safe disposal of the products we produce. Surveys indicate that less than five percent of the over three billion sharps devices sold in the US annually are disposed of in some type of closed container. Most of the remaining 95 percent are deposited, unprotected, in the household trash. Significant changes may be pending with regard to the disposal of used sharps devices, and it's likely that pharmacists will be affected by these changes.

Comments 12 comments - Aug 14, 2012 - * * * * *

Imagining the Unimaginable

As I listen to the news of the recent Mega Millions jackpot of over $600 million, my dreams aren't about fast cars, vast mansions, or plush vacations. My thoughts revolve around my diabetes. How awesome would it be to have the best care that money can buy?

Comments 0 comments - Apr 1, 2012 - * * * * *

Spring Break With Diabetes

It's spring break again, when thousands of people head to the beach. A lot of wonderful things come with being out and about on spring break, but if you have diabetes, there are also several things you should consider. There's going to be more traffic, fewer parking places, lots of people, an abundance of uncalculated carbohydrate sources, and longer waits for everything, to name just a few.

Comments 0 comments - Mar 26, 2012 - * * * * *

Traveling With My Diabetes

The first time I worried about traveling with diabetes was after the 9/11 tragedy. I had been offered a trip to New York to attend a writer's conference. I jumped at the chance, looking forward to the conference, sightseeing, shopping, and seeing the musical The Producers on Broadway.

Comments 9 comments - Jan 30, 2012 - * * * * *

Diabetes Supply Costs Rule My Life!

There's nothing quite like wondering how you're going to pay for prescriptions.  I find it odd that we usually don't know what our out-of-pocket cost will be until we're standing in front of the pharmacy staff and praying that we have enough in our wallet to cover it.  I often feel like a reality show contestant waiting for the grand total.  My pharmacy-based reality show would probably be called "The Biggest Payer," or perhaps "The Amazing Guess," or, aptly, "Survivor."  If you've ever walked away from the pharmacy counter embarrassed, panicked, or depressed, you know the feeling I'm referring to.  It's a pain no prescription can cure.

Comments 38 comments - Nov 26, 2011 - * * * * *

Devon Inglee Processes Diabetes Through Art

In one of Devon Inglee's artworks, a teddy bear, the symbol of childhood innocence, lies flat on its back with three menacing syringes piercing its furry tummy. In the background, the bear's owner, a small girl, stands above the teddy eating an apple. Inglee writes, "In ‘Tit for Tat,' a sweet girl contently eats an apple while hiding a large syringe behind her back, oblivious to her beloved, yet murdered toy. This piece deals with the process of anger, mourning, and denial associated with my personal diagnosis of a chronic disease." For the 33-year-old art student, this work is about mourning and letting go of preconceived notions and ideas of what the future will be.

Comments 0 comments - Nov 22, 2011 - * * * * *

We Still Have Hope

My son just turned twenty. For the first time, we didn't have a cake, ice cream, friends, balloons, or presents. He spent the day in jail. With vivid memories of his heroin-addicted evening in the ICU several months ago, we had nursed high hopes that his life would be on the mend. But healing takes time, and life doesn't always deliver the happy ending we long for.

Comments 9 comments - Sep 14, 2011 - * * * * *

Ketones, Shmeetones.

When you live with diabetes, there's a lot to do.  Checking blood sugars.  Counting carbs.  Exercising.  Not to mention all those fun-filled doctors' appointments.  So the last time your physician or diabetes educator suggested ketone testing, it's completely understandable that your head was nodding but your mind was thinking "No way, Jack."  But before abandoning the idea completely, there are a few things you should know.

Comments 5 comments - Sep 8, 2011 - * * * * *

Allie and Me

When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I was eighteen years old, scared, and confused.  Although bone thin, I was older than the usual juvenile diabetic, so the doctor didn't know if I had type 1 or type 2 diabetes.  At first, the doctor gave me pills to lower my blood sugar.  I avoided carbohydrates and threw myself into exercise, then watched helplessly as the numbers on my blood sugar meter continued to rise.

Comments 10 comments - Sep 1, 2011 - * * * * *

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