Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Diabetes Health Reference Charts
Insulin Archives
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

Giving Your Pet Insulin

Feb 1, 1993

Giving Your Pet Insulin. What is an animal's regimen of insulin injections like? The best case scenario would be giving an injection once a day, and its a simple subcutaneous injection. We use disposable ultra-sharp needles just like they use in human medicine. We prescribe the same ones from the pharmacies. Most animals will take a daily injection, or even a twice-daily injection, without any complaint.

How many units?

For cats, we start out at about a unit or two of insulin for the easiest ones, and it goes up to maybe a unit per pound-up to eight or ten units. For cats we're almost always diluting the insulin.

What kind of insulin?

What's available for human use, which raises some problems of course because we don't have a purified canine of feline recombinant insulin available to us, which would probably help us in some of our cases.

Where are the injections usually given?

Usually the injection sights are up from the neck and shoulders on back about half way down the spine, because that's an area, especially in cats, that they don't mind little pin pricks. They seem to take their shots real well, and dogs and cats have a lot more loose skin than people do, so subcutaneous injections hurt a lot less.


Categories: Insulin, Pets



You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.