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LifeScan’s New One Touch Profile

Aug 1, 1995

According to LifeScan, the new One Touch Profile meter "is the most advanced system on the market, offering a complete diabetes tracking system."

The One Touch Profile uses the same simple three step test procedure as all One Touch systems but offers a much wider range of important information. For instance, a user can utilize event markers to tell the meter which blood glucose (BG) readings were taken after breakfast. The system can then provide a 14-day average for every after-breakfast BG level. Other event markers, 15 in all, can be related to exercise, bedtime, or any common significant occurrences in the user's life.

"The One Touch Profile is ideal for anyone who is actively involved in controlling their diabetes on a daily basis," says Nancy Katz, LifeScan's vice president of marketing.

The One Touch Profile stores up to 250 tests with time and date, easily accessible at any time. It records insulin types and dosages, also with time and date. It even allows users to track their carbohydrate intake.

The big display window with its bold readout can also display messages. If your BG level is 60 mg/dl or lower, the screen will say "Do you need a snack?" If your level reads 240 mg/dl or higher, you'll get the message, "Check Ketones." Should your blood glucose shoot up to 600 mg/dl or beyond, the screen will tell you to check your ketones and call a doctor.

If all this gets to be too much, never fear_you can simply switch off unwanted system features and use the One Touch Profile like any other One Touch meter.

The One Touch Profile replaces LifeScan's One Touch II meter, but the company is still producing the One Touch Basic, their value-priced meter. The One Touch Profile uses the same strips as other LifeScan meters.

The One Touch Profile can display messages in 19 languages, making it the meter of choice for non-English speaking people. The meter is priced around $100 to $120, depending on the retailer. However, LifeScan is offering a $40 rebate and $25 trade-in allowance for any non-LifeScan meter. That effectively brings the cost of the One Touch Profile down to around $35.

The One Touch Profile will be available beginning in July. In the near future, LifeScan will offer IBM PC-compatible software which will allow One Touch Profile users to download the data in their meters onto their home computers. This will augment the user's ability to track their self-care by creating customized reports and graphs. The software, which is not yet available, will have education modules providing animated care tips and offering quizzes so that users can test their knowledge.

For more information about the One Touch Profile system, call (800) 227-8862.


Categories: Blood Glucose, Diabetes, Insulin, Meters



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