Gluc-O-Bar Fights Lows

| Jan 1, 1998

Another food designed for people with diabetes has entered the market. Gluc-O-Bar, from Apic USA, Inc., is especially notable because the bars are designed to stabilize blood sugars and keep patients from eating high fat foods like ice cream and peanut butter to avoid hypoglycemia.

Gluc-O-Bar contains several ingredients, each with a different glycemic index. This design enables the bar to stagger glucose release into the blood over a period of six hours to nine hours.

In the first phase of glucose release, Gluc-O-Bar's simple carbohydrate components produce a quick BG peak that usually lasts for 30 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, Gluc-O-Bar's protein components are converted into glucose in the liver. This accounts for its second phase of glucose release, raising BGs two to three hours after eating. Finally, Gluc-O-Bar makes use of uncooked cornstarch. According to Apic, the unusual make up of this starch allows for a slow release of glucose for up to nine hours.

For more information on Gluc-O-Bar call (888) GOOD4ME (466-3463).

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: Blood Sugar, Diabetes, Food, General, Low Blood Sugar


Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter

Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

You May Also Be Interested In...


Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Jan 1, 1998

©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.