The Brave New World of Skin Grafting — From Foreskins to Foot Ulcers

| Mar 1, 1998

Dermagraft, a human skin replacement for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers has been recommended to the FDA for approval on the condition that Advanced Tissue Sciences, Inc. and its partner Smith & Nephew plc perform a post marketing study.

Dermagraft is a living skin replacement produced from foreskin tissue removed at circumcisions which is then cultured in a laboratory. Dermagraft is then frozen for storage and shipped to physicians to be administered to patients.

In the U.S., it is estimated that diabetic foot ulcers affect nearly 15 percent of the 16 million patients with diabetes. The vote to recommend approval by the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee to the U.S. FDA was made after the company presented clinical data demonstrating that diabetic foot ulcers could be completely healed within 12 weeks with the use of Dermagraft.

Advanced Tissue Sciences, Inc. based in La Jolla, Calif., and Smith & Nephew plc are pursuing the worldwide commercialization of Dermagraft through a fifty-fifty joint venture.

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Categories: Diabetes, Foot Care, Skin Care, Wound Care


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Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 4 August 2012

My name is Jack Headley and l've had a chronic diabetic ulcer on the heel of my left foot for 9 years now. l've gone through 2 operations and 3 skin grafts. The last skin graft in 2005 closed the wound 95% until March of this year. l made the mistake of letting a wound care specialist talk me into using duo derm on it to remove a callus in the center. Bad mistake, it removed the callus and all skin that had been grafted on and opened up the wound again. Now, l have a staff infection settled in on it. I am going to register with this site so that you can keep sending me news on all of the new good things that are happening with skin grafts and medications for ulcers like mine. Thank you for you time and effort


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