Diabetes Conference in Mexico City Looks to the Future

Jan 1, 2001

In November 2000, three new products for people with diabetes were demonstrated at the 17th Congress of the International Diabetes Federation in Mexico City.

The Accu-Chek D-Tector-Manufactured by Roche, this non-invasive, optical sensor measures the fluorescence in the crystalline lens of the left eye using an eye-safe blue light. The fluorescence is associated with the amount of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) present in the lens. AGEs build up at a faster rate in people with diabetes, and with advancing age.

The entire testing process using the Accu-Chek D-Tector takes about 30 seconds. After placing your head against the instrument, you watch a red dot in the field of vision of your left eye. Once you're properly positioned, a blue light shines into your left eye for 15 seconds and the D-Tector measures the fluorescence. A numerical result is displayed immediately.

The D-Tector is an investigational device and has not yet received FDA approval.

The Accu-Chek Compact-Another Roche product, this blood glucose monitor uses a 17-strip cartridge in the shape of a small drum instead of individual test strips. Each drum is about the size of three or four Lifesaver candies stacked on top of each other. The drum is inserted into the meter, and the meter reads calibration information automatically.

Pressing the "on" button causes the meter to move a test strip into position automatically. The strips suck in the 3 microliters of blood and tests are completed in 15 seconds. The Accu-Chek Compact stores 100 glucose readings and has an infrared data port interface.

The Accu-Chek Compact is not yet available in the United States.

Innovo-Made by Novo Nordisk, this insulin-delivery pen uses 3ml insulin cartridges and has a built-in memory that indicates the last dose and time elapsed since the last dose. Dialing in the dose is very easy, and the large LCD display clearly shows the amount of insulin to be injected. Dosing is in one-unit increments, from one to 70 units. When injecting, the Innovo shows when the complete dose has been delivered, waiting six seconds after the last unit of insulin is injected to ensure that all insulin is delivered.

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: Blood Glucose, Diabetes, Diabetes, Events, Insulin, International, Novo Nordisk, Pens


Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter

Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.