Random Shots!

| Feb 1, 2005

A friend recently asked me what I have in the diabetes pack that I carry everywhere.

Well, for starters, there is my rapid-acting insulin (NovoLog) and long-acting insulin (Lantus)—each with a syringe rubber banded to the bottle.

I always have glucose tablets for treating low blood glucose, a tube of glucose gel for emergencies, and two extra syringes.

There is also a blood glucose meter and jar of test strips. I have tried many other good meters over the years, but this is the only brand for which my insurance (Kaiser) supplies strips—and I do like getting the results in five seconds.

People always ask me why I am not using an insulin pen. “I’m old fashioned,” I tell them.

Actually, attaching my syringes in this fashion keeps them from getting mixed up. When the syringe gets dull, I toss it into a sharps container and start using a new one.

Using a syringe instead of an insulin pen is like having a preference for a manual transmission over automatic—you have more control. Sometimes I need only 1 unit, or 1.5 units of NovoLog. This is easy for me to measure on a syringe with half unit markings.

Here are some shots of me taking my insulin and testing my blood glucose.

Scott King
Editor-in-Chief
Type 1, 30 years (and counting)

Please send me your comments and suggestions via e-mail through our Web site.


1. Here is what goes into my diabetes pack every day.
2. I always have these on hand to treat a hypo.
3. Lancing my little finger.
4. Getting the drop of blood on the meter’s strip.
5. Have you ever tested and taken insulin while standing in line at the movies?
6. NovoLog and Lantus insulin in different sized dispensers keeps them from getting mixed up.
7. Getting ready to take my rapid-acting insulin.
8. I take the rapid-acting NovoLog in my stomach.
9. Lantus gets drawn up.
10. Long-acting Lantus being shot into the leg. (Yes, through my jeans.)

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Categories: Blood Glucose, Columns, Diabetes, Diabetes, Insulin, Lantus, My Own Injection, Pens, Syringes


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