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New Bar Is All About ‘Slow Carbs’


Feb 1, 2006

Solo Low GI bars

With the introduction of its new Solo Low GI bars, Solo GI Nutrition of Alberta, Canada, has coined the phrase “Slooow carbs.”

Solo GI says that its low glycemic diet and energy bars are the first on the market that provide clinically validated glycemic indexes.

“They contain a proprietary blend of food ingredients, balancing good carbs and fats, and they are also a good source of protein and fiber, plus 23 essential vitamins and minerals,” says Solo GI.

In addition, Solo Low GI bars contain no sugar alcohols, no high fructose corn syrup, no hydrogenated oils and zero trans fats.

The bars were awarded the Golden Egg Award from Specialty Nutrition Group as the Most Innovative Nutritional Product of 2004 for addressing the growing epidemic of diabetes and obesity with a delicious, science-based product.

Solo Low GI bars are available in four flavors: Chocolate Charger, Peanut Power, Berry Bliss and Mint Mania. They are available at Whole Foods Market, Kroger stores and natural foods and grocery stores across the United States at a suggested retail price of $1.99 per bar.

Source: Solo GI


About the Glycemic Index

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a scale that was developed by David Jenkins, MD, at the University of Toronto, Canada, to help diabetics manage their blood glucose levels. It ranks a food by comparing its immediate effect on blood glucose levels to that of glucose or white flour. Refined starchy foods—bread, rice, potato products and most processed breakfast cereals—are rapidly converted into sugar and have a high glycemic index, whereas most fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes are digested more slowly, providing more sustained energy and longer satiety, and are rated lower on the glycemic index.


Categories: Diabetes, Diabetes, Food, Food News



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Feb 1, 2006

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