Joslin Researchers Discover a Surprising Culprit in the Search for Causes of Diabetic Birth Defects: Protein Makes It Possible for High Blood Glucose to Enter Embryonic Cells

This press release is an announcement submitted by Joslin Diabetes Center, and was not written by Diabetes Health.

Mar 21, 2007

Boston - March 5, 2007 - Over the past several years, Joslin Investigator Mary R. Loeken, Ph.D., and her colleagues at Joslin Diabetes Center have unlocked several mysteries behind what puts women with diabetes more at risk of having a child with birth defects.

Even though those risks have decreased significantly over the years, thanks in part to advancements at Joslin, women with diabetes still are two to five times more likely than the general population to have a baby with birth defects, especially of the heart and spinal cord, organs that form within the first few weeks of pregnancy.

In past work, Dr. Loeken and her research team were able to establish through their studies in mice that the mother’s high blood glucose levels are the cause of these defects. This is one of the reasons why women with diabetes who are planning a pregnancy are encouraged to have their blood glucose levels under good control prior to conception. The Joslin researchers also have shown that the damage occurs because the extra glucose in the mother’s blood inhibits the expression of embryonic genes that control essential developmental processes.

Now, in this latest study done in mice, Dr. Loeken and her colleagues have discovered that the protein called glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) makes it possible for the high concentrations of glucose to get into the embryonic cells efficiently when the mother’s blood glucose concentrations are high. Also involved in the study was Rulin Li, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral fellow at Joslin. The study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, will appear in the March print edition of Diabetologia and was published online by the journal on Jan. 18.

“Glut2 is a gene that we wouldn’t have expected to be switched on in early embryonic development,” said Dr. Loeken, Investigator in the Section on Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Yet our research in mice shows that the expression of this gene in the early embryo enables the cells to absorb glucose about two to three times faster when the mother’s glucose levels are elevated, while other glucose transporters would be saturated at normal glucose concentrations. This makes the embryo very susceptible to the malformations that high glucose levels cause, such as neural tube defects.”

Researchers so far have identified 14 different glucose transporters, a class of proteins that sit on the membranes of cells and enable the cells to absorb glucose. Each type plays a different role in glucose uptake and is found in different cell types. “We knew that the embryo expresses a variety of glucose transporters that bring necessary glucose into the developing cells,” said Dr. Loeken, “but what caught my eye was that one of them was Glut2.” This protein, Dr. Loeken explained, is what is known as a high-Km glucose transporter, that is, it works efficiently only when glucose levels are high. Low-Km glucose transporters, on the other hand, become saturated at these higher levels and no longer work efficiently to get glucose into the cells.

Low-Km transporters can be thought of like a narrow doorway into a room that will only allow one person to pass at a time, whereas a high-Km transporter is like a wide-open door that will allow several people to pass at a time, explained Dr. Loeken. When very few people need to get through the doors at a time, the narrow doors will work just as well as the wide-open doors, but if a crowd needs to get through the doors, the narrow doors will be saturated, the wide open doors will allow the people to go through at a high rate, and the concentration of people in the room will be very high.

“After birth, the Glut2 transporter is expressed on insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas and in the liver, the tissues that receive blood carrying high concentrations of glucose absorbed from the intestine after a meal,” said Dr. Loeken. “It makes sense that Glut2 would be expressed in the pancreas where the high glucose level signals the beta cells to release insulin, and in the liver, where it signals the liver to store the glucose. In a normal pregnancy, the glucose in the mother’s blood that circulates to the uterus would never be as high as the blood that flows by the pancreas and the liver, and the embryo would not be exposed to high concentrations of glucose. Therefore, Glut2 won’t work any better than the other glucose transporters to absorb glucose. But glucose concentrations can be very high during a diabetic pregnancy, and if this highly efficient glucose transport is functioning, the embryo cells act like a glucose sponge, absorbing glucose at a much higher rate than normal.”

Using mice that lacked Glut2 genes, which were developed by one of the study’s co-authors, Bernard Thorens, Ph.D., of the Center for Integrated Genomics at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, Joslin researchers found that only embryos carrying normal Glut2 genes developed malformations when the mothers were diabetic, whereas embryos that lacked Glut2 genes were protected from malformations during diabetic pregnancy. “This shows that the high-transport Glut2 transporter was responsible for getting higher concentrations of glucose in the cell and causing the malformations.” The embryos were examined on the 10th day of gestation. The time span in the mice, Dr. Loeken explained, is comparable to about the fourth or fifth weeks of a human pregnancy, which is about the time a woman may discover that she is pregnant.

The Joslin researchers were also surprised to find that there were fewer embryos recovered on day 10 of gestation if they lacked the Glut2 genes, whether or not the mothers were diabetic, suggesting that there is a survival advantage in having the Glut2 transporter. “Recent research by our collaborator, Dr. Thorens, has shown that Glut2 is also a transporter for glucosamine, an amino sugar that serves important functions in the synthesis of proteins,” said Dr. Loeken. “Since glucosamine is synthesized in the liver, which the early embryo still lacks, it must get it from its mother’s circulation. Although we don’t know for sure, Glut2 could be needed by the embryo for glucosamine transport.”

Putting these findings together, Dr. Loeken said, “The early embryo must express Glut2 for some reason, because fewer embryos survived early development if they lacked this transporter. Perhaps it is because it is needed to transport glucosamine. However, because this transporter, which works so well after birth to allow the pancreas to produce insulin and the liver to store glucose, also makes the early embryo take up glucose very efficiently when glucose concentrations are high, as can occur during diabetic pregnancy, this explains why the embryo is so sensitive to the mother’s hyperglycemia.

“While it is too early yet to give any clinical recommendations to patients based on these new findings, the research does suggest that once the glucose reaches the concentration where the Glut2 transporter functions efficiently, that is probably sufficient to cause malformations,” said Dr. Loeken. “The best we can do now to prevent malformations in diabetic pregnancy is to help a woman establish good blood glucose control before she becomes pregnant, so that she will be better able make sure her glucose levels are as close to normal during pregnancy,” she added.

Working with high-risk maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Joslin’s medical staff has established a Diabetes and Pregnancy Program to help women with diabetes and women at risk for developing the disease to get the care they need to minimize these risks and give birth to healthy babies. More information about this program can be found by clicking on the following link: http://www.joslin.org/754_880.asp

About Joslin Diabetes Center

Joslin Diabetes Center, dedicated to conquering diabetes in all of its forms, is the global leader in diabetes research, care and education. Founded in 1898, Joslin is an independent nonprofit institution affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Joslin research is a team of more than 300 people at the forefront of discovery aimed at preventing and curing diabetes. Joslin Clinic, affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, the nationwide network of Joslin Affiliated Programs, and the hundreds of Joslin educational programs offered each year for clinicians, researchers and patients, enable Joslin to develop, implement and share innovations that immeasurably improve the lives of people with diabetes. As a nonprofit, Joslin benefits from the generosity of donors in advancing its mission. For more information on Joslin, call 1-800-JOSLIN-1 or visit www.joslin.org.

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: Blood Glucose, Childbirth, Diabetes, Diabetes, Insulin, Pregnancy, Type 1 Issues


Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter

Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.