Liquid Fructose Gives Ratty A Fatty Liver

| May 18, 2007

Here's yet another bit of research connecting fat to fructose-laden beverages A study recently published in Hepatology shows that fructose-laden water (10% wt/vol) decreases liver fat breakdown and causes lipid accumulation in rats.

This change wasnt observed in glucose-fed rats. The rats that drank liquid fructose, unlike those getting glucose, had extra leptin in their blood. However, their livers did not behave as expected given the high levels of leptin, a hormone that generally accelerates fat oxidation in the liver and reduces its synthesis.

The researchers concluded that the fructose-caused lipid accumulation and fatty liver was caused by resistance to the extra leptin. The resistance to leptin decreased the action of a specific receptor (PPAR-alpha), which controls fatty acid oxidation. The researchers noted that because PPAR-alpha activity is lower in humans than in rats, liquid fructose ingestion could cause even worse effects in humans.

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Categories: Nutrition Research


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May 18, 2007

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