Aerobic and Resistance Exercise: Good Alone, but Best Together

| Oct 5, 2007

A study comparing the benefits of aerobic versus resistance training has found that either is good, but both are better, when it comes to lowering A1c's in people with diabetes.

The study examined 251 sedentary adults with type 2 diabetes and assigned them either 45 minutes of aerobic exercise, 45 minutes of resistance training, or 45 minutes of a combination of both, all performed three times a week. A fourth group did nothing at all.

After twenty-six weeks of this, the do-nothing group saw no change at all, of course. Both the aerobic and the resistance training groups saw a half percentage point drop in their A1c's. But the group that did both saw nearly a full-point drop in their A1c's.

In light of the fact that a one-point drop in A1c is associated with a 15 to 20 percent drop in risk of heart attack and a 25 to 40 percent drop in risk of diabetic eye or kidney disease, it might be wise to get that gym bag out again.

Source: EurekAlert; Annals of Internal Medicine, September 2007

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Categories: A1c Test, Diabetes, Diabetes, Exercise, Type 2 Issues


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Oct 5, 2007

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