Kind of Depressed? You May Be Among the Sixty-six Percent of Type 2s Who Are, and It's Probably Affecting Your Self-Care

| Dec 19, 2007

A recent study about the interplay between diabetes self-care and depression surveyed 879 patients with type 2. Nearly a fifth had probable major depression, and a shocking 66.5 percent reported at least some depressive symptoms.

Only 14.2 percent claimed to be free of depressive symptoms.

The researchers found that the patients with major depression were significantly more likely to miss their medications and to drop the ball with regard to diet, exercise, and self-monitoring regimens. But they weren't the only ones. Among the two-thirds who just had some depressive symptoms, self-care deteriorated incrementally as depressive symptoms mounted.

The study suggests that even low levels of depression can hammer your ability to manage self-care routines. So if you're feeling low, perhaps with feelings of diminished interest, fatigue, poor concentration, or hopelessness, seek help. It could significantly improve your ability to manage your healthcare duties.

Sources: Medline Plus; Diabetes Care, September 2007

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Categories: Depression, Diabetes, Diabetes, Type 2 Issues


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Dec 19, 2007

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