Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Type 2 Issues Archives
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

Current Highlights in Diabetes Research


Mar 6, 2008

Don’t make a run on the tea section of your neighborhood supermarket just yet, but keep this in mind: Scientists at the Neurosciences Institute of the University of Dundee in Scotland say that drinking black tea could help combat diabetes.


While emphasizing that their research is at an experimental, pre-clinical stage, the scientists report that black tea contains compounds, called theaflavins and thearubigins, that mimic the action of insulin.

Their findings are part of a general study of agents that might substitute for insulin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.  The researchers are seeking additional funding to see how the black tea constituents work like insulin.

When Kissing a Frog May Boost Your Insulin!  
    

Here’s a name to roll around your mouth: “pseudis paradoxa” which is the Latin name for the “paradoxical frog,” a South American amphibian whose skin secretions show promise in stimulating the release of insulin in type 2 diabetics.

Scientists at the United Arab Emirates University and the University of Ulster in the United Kingdom tested a synthetic version of a skin secretion the frog uses to ward off infection, applying it to type 2 pancreatic cells in the laboratory. The compound, called pseudin 2, stimulated the cells’ production of insulin with no apparent ill effects.

The scientists believe that with more extensive testing, pseudin-2 will join the ranks of powerful new drugs being developed to manage type 2.

(The “paradoxical” part of the frog’s name refers to its transition from a tadpole that is 27 cm long to its adult length of 4 cm – the opposite of what happens in most of the animal world.) 

Source: Xinhua News Agency
 


Categories: Diabetes, Diabetes, Diets, Food News, Insulin, Type 2 Issues



You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.