Rogue Enzymes Linked to Hypertension and Diabetes

Out-of-control enzymes make it hard for insulin to get the job done

The study is important because it connects information that high blood pressure and insulin resistance have the same cause—damage to receptors.

Jul 3, 2008

Molecular malfunction may explain the development of high blood pressure, diabetes and immune problems, says a new research report.

Rogue enzymes called proteases wander around the body, clipping off working segments of the receptors that allow insulin to enter cells and do its job, according to a report in the June 30 online issue of Hypertension.

The enzymes’ activity also reduces the immune system's response to infection and raises blood pressure, says the report.

The study authors are hoping that applying a protease inhibitor, can prevent the damage seen in laboratory animals."  Proteases function the same in rats and humans, so what has been seen in the laboratory rats likely occurs in people. Scientists are working together to start human trials.

The study is important because it connects information that high blood pressure and insulin resistance have the same cause—damage to receptors.

Researchers think the results might also explain why antioxidants such as vitamins C and E help against inflammation.

In addition to antibiotics such as doxycycline, drugs such as ACE inhibitors are protease inhibitors, DeLano said. Protease inhibitors are also used to control HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Source: HealthDay

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Categories: Diabetes, Diabetes, Insulin, New Cure Research, Research


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Comments

Posted by Green Lantern on 3 July 2008

How hard would it be to mention the lead author's name so folks could look up this article?!

Posted by Green Lantern on 3 July 2008

I've spent a good hour and a half trying to track down this article, and found nothing in this issue of this journal that looks like this description. :-(

Posted by Anonymous on 6 July 2008

Aren't protease enzymes used in the bread industry to strengthen gluton..."bread improvers"? Maybe we wouldn't need protease inhibitors if we didn't add protease to our food.

Posted by Anonymous on 27 February 2009

diabetes is caused by rogue testosterone so your cation article is correct!

Posted by Anonymous on 14 May 2009

Testosterone can be altered by drugs misuse and can cause disease,by altering dna example cancer oncor genes, radiation, sonic waves, intense micro waves. Testosterone that has been damaged in this way results in many diseases such as diabetes fibroid tumours, and cancer and manufactures viruses such as aids and complex flu srains, in science we call this process a 'medical hub' as it is a branching start off point for many diseases and viruses, as it is known the damged rogue testosterone alters cell transcription which results in rogue proteins and cells within the testes and ovaries intern gives rise to other hormones being altered example becoming rogue oestrogen, rogue progesterone and rogue ostridiol and also has detrimental effects on the thyroid glands resulting in desease. as it is known to change amino acid chains into incorrect formations!

Posted by andrew on 14 May 2009

Damaged testosterone molecules can alter cell transcription and cause diabetes and many other desease such as fibroid tumours, cancer, and the birth if viruses

Posted by andrew on 14 May 2009

The most common free testosterone molecules within the human body that have been damaged due to causes such as radiation or high energy sound waves or high energy micro waves and various prolific diseases, need to be isolated and identified and then dipping into bovine serum so a vaccine can be manufactured that will guard us against cardio vascular diseases that result in high blood pressures and diabetes and numerous other diseases example alzheimers fibroids cancers muscular distrophy etc etc

Posted by andrew on 15 May 2009

a new proposed vaccine for rogue testosterone would also arrest further damage to insulin producing cells within the pancrease so although not curing diabetes but would at least stop the disease getting worse! andrew langham please comment further!

Posted by andrew on 28 May 2009

type 1 diabetes is dramatically increaseing in children the cause is most probably testosterone that has been damaged due to mis-cell transcription within ribosomes.


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