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Diabetes Community Rallies Against Insurance Providers for Repeated Denials of Life Saving Device

Jul 3, 2008

Editor’s note: This press release is about the diabetic community coming together in an online rally to raise their voices over continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) being denied by insurance companies. Gina Capone, one of diabetestalkfest.com’s founders and a type 1 pumper since age 25, hopes her site will keep this online rally going even after the deadline of July 4th. This topic is so important and we all need to agitate for insurance companies to stop denying claims by calling CGMS “investigational.”

“We have come together as a community, we are raising our voices.”

VALLEY STREAM, NY: July 2, 2008 -- On Tuesday, July 1 online community Diabetes Talkfest sponsored the first CGMS Denial Day online rally highlighting the excessively high rate of denials issued by insurance companies for continuous glucose monitors. CGMS have been proven to help people with diabetes control their blood sugar levels, and quality of life. The event was held in association with social network site Tudiabetes.com.

Diabetestalkfest.com and Tudiabetes.com community members were asked to make blog posts, video posts or art posts about why a CGMS is crucial to their diabetes care. Over 75 people participated on the first day of the rally, which ends on July 4. It is expected that several hundred will take part over the course of the week. Bloggers that are not currently members contributed as well.

The CGMS can be a life saving device for people with diabetes by preventing and reducing complications and alarming users who are no longer sensitive to hypoglycemia of approaching low blood sugars, especially during bed time hours. The device allows people to greatly reduce the number of times they have to check finger sticks, and has the ability to constantly monitor glucose levels by showing trends in blood sugars for people that experience hyperglycemia (high blood sugars).

“I want the best possible care to live a long and healthy life," Diabetestalkfest.com founder Gina Capone said. "A continuous glucose monitor will provide my healthcare team and I with crucial data, to prevent possible complications down the road. We have come together as a community, we are Raising Our Voices.”

About Diabetestalkfest.com

Diabetestalkfest.com is the first online diabetes website dedicated to live chats. It was created by Gina Capone and Jon Schlaman, who first met on a diabetes message board in February of 2001. Over the past six years the site has united thousands of people living with diabetes in its online diabetes chat room and social network DIABETEStalkfest. The DTF live chats provide members with cutting edge information from leaders in the field of diabetes. Diabetes Talkfest partnered with www.Tudiabetes.com, a community for people touched by diabetes, in March of 2008.


Categories: Blood Sugar, CGMs, Community, Diabetes, Diabetes, Health Insurance, Low Blood Sugar



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Comments

Posted by megan.etheridge on 3 July 2008

this thing isnt a "life saving device" its a peice of s--- thats more of a nuscence than a help

its never right and hurts like hell

so lets try the damn thing before you write an article about it

Posted by marytsmithh on 4 July 2008

Yes! i was one of those people. Never knew when my sugar was low. My insurance kept turning me down for the sensors, till one day i was driving and it happened.I had a major car accident and then i decided again to apply for it, only this time they approved it. My statement to them now was. Your lucky you did not have to pay thousands of dollars of medical if i had injured someone!! Its amazing how this syten works, It even wakes me up at night if i go low.Best decision i have ever made in my life.
Mary

Posted by Anonymous on 4 July 2008

IRONY:

After months of waiting we heard from the Dexcom rep that our insurance company had approved coverage for the Dexcom. Sound of trumpers and choir of angels. And THEN SHE SAID THAT IT WAS COVERED OUT OF NETWORK. Guess what that means .... They only pay 60% instead of 80%. Okay, not so bad so far. AND ... they have a separate $2000 a year deductible for out of network expenses. In other words, unless I have a bunch of other out of network expenses (and I won't) they'll pay nothing, zip, zero, zilch. SO, they've approved us, but they won't pay a dime. Sweet. If we'd gone for the Medtronic it would be in network and they would have paid some of it but we liked the Dexcom more and STUPIDLY assumed so would our insurer because the monthly costs are so much lower. We're in the process of appealing to get it treated as in network. Wish us luck.

Posted by Anonymous on 5 July 2008

Please--Those of you with neuropathy--I suggest you try Alpha Lipoic Acid--600mg daily for pain relief--I am an RN,CDE who has neuopathy--I was given LYRICA CYMBALTA,NEURONTIN, and nothing helped--I researched and tried the Alpha Lipoic Acid and after two weeks my symptoms decrease.
Now I have NO PAIN--I went from an
8 pain scale to a 2. It works---Over the counter suppliment---I researched--Low or no side effects and lots more good to it--Read up on it and PLEASE TRY IT--

Posted by Anonymous on 23 March 2010

I wish each member of these healt1h insurance companies, BCBS in particular, could live for one week with Type 1 Diabetes...I wonder how quickly thier minds would change on the approval of CGMs!!!

On a different note, YES!!!! TO ALPHA LIPOIC ACID!!!!! I too have found SALVATION and relief in it for neuropathy. I have never tried any of all the other very dramatic meds and creams that my doc had suggested, I just endured the hideous pain instead of going on all those drugs with all those terrible side effects. Then I found out about Alpha Lipoic Acid. A miracle for me. I take 1200 mgs a day, maybe I could do the 600 - - I know that the clinical trials and research says that 600 will work, but I started on 1200 (600 mgs tablets 2x a day) and it works wonders, so I'm sticking with it.
Try it if you have neuropathy!!!


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