Salsalate, an Aspirin-Like Drug, Shows Promise as a Type 2 Prevention

Scientists suspect that inflammation is a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. Dr. Goldfine said it is possible that salsalate could work to prevent the onset of the disease.

Oct 13, 2008

An aspirin-like drug discovered 132 years ago may prove to be a powerful weapon against type 2 diabetes.

Researchers in a small clinical trial conducted at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston report that salsalate, a drug commonly used to treat arthritis inflammation, lowers blood glucose levels and reduces inflammation.

Because of those effects, researchers are now looking into it as an agent to treat, and even prevent, type 2.

Salsalate, a “nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory medication,” is chemically similar to aspirin but does not cause the stomach bleeding commonly associated with it.

According to Allison B. Goldfine, MD, the study’s lead researcher, scientists have known for a long time that aspirin can reduce blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, as well as the inflammation caused by elevated inflammatory markers and proteins found in people with the disease.

But because the risk of stomach bleeding was too high in people with diabetes, medical experts have shied away from recommending its use. 

Dr. Goldfine recommended testing salsalate as an alternative. So she devised a small double-masked, placebo-controlled study based on 20 obese young adults who were at risk of developing diabetes but had not yet done so.

Members of the test group who took 4 grams of salsalate daily for 30 days experienced a 13 percent reduction in their fasting glucose levels. Their levels of C-reactive protein, a marker for inflammation, dropped by 34 percent.

Given that inflammation is suspected to be a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, Dr. Goldfine said it is possible that  salsalate could work to prevent the onset of the disease.

It could also be used as a supplementary treatment for people who already have the disease. Aside from its safety, the drug is cheap to produce and has a usage profile that stretches back to 1876.

Dr. Goldfine’s study, completed earlier this year, has inspired several larger, longer-term studies. One study, “TINSAL-T2D,” funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, is using salsalate to target inflammation.

Another study, “TINSAL-IGT,” at the Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center in Phoenix, is aimed at helping patients with impaired glucose tolerance improve their sensitivity to insulin.

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: Blood Glucose, Diabetes, Diabetes, Insulin, Medications, Medications Research, Type 2 Issues


Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter

Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Print | Email | Share | Comments (3)

You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 19 October 2008

very good article and i hope some more old time tested drugs are there yet to be revealed

Posted by Anonymous on 19 October 2008

very good article and i hope some more old time tested drugs are there yet to be revealed

Posted by Anonymous on 11 December 2008

HOW ABOUT FOR TYPE 1'S???????????????
I DON'T GIVE A DARN FOR TYPE 2.
FOR TYPE 2'S IF YOU EXERCISE, LOSE WEIGHT, AND LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE YOUR DIABETES WILL GO AWAY. ANOTHER OPTION IS TO DO THE GASTRIC BYPASS. TYPE 1'S DO NOT HAVE THAT OPPORTUNITY FOR REVERSAL IT'S PERMANENT.


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.