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Kidney Care (Nephropathy) Archives
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Metabolic Syndrome Could Be Kidney Disease Precursor in Type 2s

Jan 6, 2009

A person who has three or more of the risk factors (including high triglycerides, abdominal obesity, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and low levels of “good” HDL cholesterol is considered to have metabolic syndrome.

Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong report that having metabolic syndrome may raise the risk of chronic kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes.

Most people with type 2 already have some of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, which include high triglycerides, abdominal obesity, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and low levels of "good" HDL cholesterol. A person who has three or more of these conditions is considered to have the syndrome. 

Metabolic syndrome is considered highly likely to lead to cardiovascular problems, and the Chinese scientists wanted to see if it might also predict kidney disease. After studying more than 5,800 Chinese adults with type 2, they found that the greater the number of metabolic syndrome factors present in a patient, the greater his or her risk of acquiring kidney disease. Overall, type 2 patients with metabolic syndrome had a 31 percent greater risk of kidney disease than those without it. 

The scientists concluded that addressing single factors in metabolic syndrome would not lessen the risk of kidney disease. Instead, they called for a "global risk reduction" approach, in which all of the indicators in metabolic syndrome are reduced and controlled as the only certain way to stave off kidney deterioration. 

Source: Diabetes Care, December 2008


Categories: Blood Sugar, Diabetes, Diabetes, Kidney Care (Nephropathy), Type 2 Issues, Weight Loss



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