Got Gas?

For the person who has everything

| Jan 6, 2009

It's estimated that 20 percent of the United States population, or 60 million people, suffer from one or more medical disorders that cause flatulence. That's a lot of scented candles and extra-strength Febreze®.

Luckily, now there's a new product from Flat-D Innovations, Inc., that claims to solve this dilemma for sufferers around the globe. (Apparently, gaseous emissions afflict more than just us 60 million Americans.) 

The Flatulence DeodorizerTM Pad is an activated charcoal cloth pad that is worn taped inside your underwear. The manufacturers say that it's comfortable and "perfect for use on car rides, airplane trips, or for long days at the office." They also claim that users can "celebrate their freedom from malodorous gas with this extremely inconspicuous pad."

Now if they could just invent something that muffles sound.

You heard it here first.

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: Complications & Care, Men's Issues, Products


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Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 7 January 2009

Many people with diabetes suffer complications related to digestion and intestinal motility that can result in an excruciating build up of gas in the intestines. This is not a matter of embarassment. If serious, the pain can be so intense as to be completely debilitating. This probably is usually related to motility problems with the stomach and intestines (stuff not moving through due to nerve damage). Doctors - both endos and gastro-enterologists don't tend to take this seriously as they hear the word gas and simply can't believe it can be as painful or debilitating as it is. Recently a medication which helped this problem was removed from the market due to a small number of heart attacks in patients with serious pre-existing heart conditions. Given that this was the first medication to offer real relief to sufferers, it would have made a great deal more sense to put a black label warning on the box alerting doctors not to prescribe for pateints with heart problems and to only use where symptoms are a severe impairment to quality of life.


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