Diabetes Health Professional
Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Diabetes Health Reference Charts
Professional Issues Archives
Print | Email | Share | Comments (2)

Human to Animal Cloning Has Problems

The shortage of human donor eggs has led to efforts to substitute animal oocytes, but there are problems...

Feb 20, 2009

This press release is an announcement submitted by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., and EurekAlert, and was not written by Diabetes Health.

We recently interviewed Dr. José Oberholzer, M.D., who works with stem cells at the Chicago Diabetes Project. Click here to read what he said about animal-to-human clones.

Lanza, et al., show for the first time that human oocytes have the capacity to change these patterns of gene expression and that interspecies (human-to-animal) cloning does not produce the same results.

Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been considered a promising way to generate human stem cells for therapeutic applications for more than a decade. The shortage of human donor eggs has led to efforts to substitute animal oocytes. However, a new study published online in Cloning and Stem Cells, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., demonstrates that animal oocytes lack the capacity to fully reprogram adult human cells. (The paper is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/clo.)

Robert Lanza, M.D., and colleagues from Advanced Cell Technology (Worcester, MA), Wake Forest University School of Medicine (Winston Salem, NC), Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (Morristown), Fertility Specialists of Houston (Texas), Stem Cell Source (Houston), and the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University (College Station) compared the reprogramming of human cells using oocytes obtained from cows, rabbits, and humans. They report their findings in a paper titled "Reprogramming of Human Somatic Cells Using Human and Animal Oocytes."

The ability to reprogram human cells using oocytes would enable the production of patient-specific stem cells that could then be differentiated to become any type of somatic cell and used for cell or tissue repair or placement therapy. This extensive reprogramming requires that the oocyte turn on, or up-regulate, a large number of genes in the donor nucleus.

Although previous reports have documented the formation of cloned embryos using both human and animal eggs, to date there have been no data indicating to what extent the donor human DNA was reprogrammed. Lanza, et al., show for the first time that human oocytes have the capacity to change these patterns of gene expression and that interspecies (human-to-animal) cloning does not produce the same results. 

Although the human-bovine and human-rabbit clones looked similar to the human-human embryos, the human-animal hybrids did not exhibit the changes in gene expression seen in the human-human clones and normal embryos. Specifically, they did not achieve up-regulation of critical pluripotency-associated genes needed for stem cell production.

"This very important paper suggests that livestock oocytes are extremely unlikely to be suitable as recipients for use in human nuclear transfer. This is very disappointing because it would mean that production of patient-specific stem cells by this means would be impracticable," says Ian Wilmut, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief of Cloning and Stem Cells and director of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh.

Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., and EurekAlert


Categories: Professional Issues, Research



You May Also Be Interested In...


Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Comments 2 comments - Feb 20, 2009

©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.