A Call to Allow More People to Undergo Bariatric Surgery

Dr. Rubino has previously theorized that based upon the dramatic remissions experienced by type 2s after bariatric surgery, diabetes may well be an operable intestinal disease created by as yet unknown malfunctions—perhaps even at the molecular level—in the small intestine. He has argued that the success of bariatric surgery in eliminating type 2 symptoms indicates that diabetes may not be an irreversible condition.

Jun 23, 2009

A surgeon who has been at the forefront of exploring bariatric surgery as a potentially curative treatment for type 2 diabetes is calling for it to be made accessible to more people.

Francesco A. Rubino, MD, is the chief of gastrointestinal metabolic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and head of the Diabetes Surgery Center at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College.

During a seminar at the recent 69th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association, he told attendees that the criteria for determining who can undergo the surgery should be changed to allow more overweight people to use it.

Currently, people with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more are eligible for the surgery. Rubino would like to see the surgery made available to overweight people with BMIs under 40.

The surgery takes two forms: gastric banding, in which the opening from the esophagus into the stomach is made smaller; and gastric bypass, in which the stomach itself is made smaller. In each case, the digestive system cannot accommodate as much food as before, leading to often drastic weight loss.

Patients who undergo the procedure also experience a cessation of hypertension and a lowering of their risk for cardiovascular disease, often to levels below those of normal weight people in their same age group. In the great majority of patients with type 2 diabetes, the surgery produces a remission of the disease, as well as a 92 percent reduction in the mortality risks specifically associated with it.

Dr. Rubino has previously theorized that based upon the dramatic remissions experienced by type 2s after bariatric surgery, diabetes may well be an operable intestinal disease created by as yet unknown malfunctions-perhaps even at the molecular level-in the small intestine. He has argued that the success of bariatric surgery in eliminating type 2 symptoms indicates that diabetes may not be an irreversible condition.

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Categories: Bariatric Surgery, Diabetes, Diabetes, Food, Type 2 Issues, Weight Loss


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Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 30 June 2009

I am thrilled to hear this news. I am so down about trying to lose pounds while still on insulin. I was uninsured but now have Medicare and a supplement. I wish my doctor could refer me and Medicare would cover the cost.

Posted by Anonymous on 30 June 2009

I have had gastric bypass ,loss 120 lbs. and don't have diabetes or any other problems anymore. I feel like a new person I am 65 had my surgery Jan.30,2008.

Posted by Joceill on 1 July 2009

I have been reading allot about diabetes because I have been one for along time now and I am a big person. I have thought about the ban on the stomach but like everything else it is alot of money for some people to come into such as my self, why must you have to put $4,000-$6,000 down and have two years of testing done before they consider you? if it helps big people like me why not make it easier for us to have it done, if you talk me into something I want it done now not two years later, alot can happen in two years, if a person has shown that they can not loose the weight on their own help them out.

Posted by Anonymous on 1 July 2009

Why can't people who are not overweight and who have type 2 not able to have this operation?

Seems that if this really is a cure, the only way to be cured is to overeat and give up exercise.

Posted by Anonymous on 21 September 2009

if this is a cure then they should let anyone who has diabetes to be able to have this surgery if they want it.


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