Next Generation Blood Glucose Meters

Polyaniline nanofibers may be useful in creating optical biosensors, like a continuous glucose monitoring system.

| Nov 5, 2009

Fingertip blood-oxygen monitors, called pulse oximeters, measure oxygen in the blood using light and color. The noninvasive device, which clips onto a fingertip or earlobe, typically has a pair of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) facing a sensor. Light of a certain wavelength (a certain color) travels through a translucent part of the body like the fingertip or an earlobe, and is picked up by the sensor. The amount of oxygen in the blood (actually, oxygenated hemoglobin) affects how much light from each diode finally makes it through the finger and reaches the sensor. The result is an effective measurement of the amount of oxygen in the blood.

A similar, no-finger-sticking-procedure using light and color for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood would be great, but the wavelengths of light that indicate glucose can't be detected through the skin. One idea scientists have proposed is using a glucose-sensitive material and implanting it just under the skin.

The glucose-sensitive material would change color depending on the amount of glucose in the blood and reflect the changes in color to a reader worn by the user. Sound like science fiction? Well, it may be a reality in the not too distant future. The materials needed have already been developed, and the sensor's color-changing abilities have been demonstrated in the lab.

Professor Arthur Epstein and doctoral student Louis Nemzer at Ohio State University have been working on attaching an enzyme that changes color in response to glucose concentration to a biocompatible (easily accepted by the body) polymer previously developed in Epstein's lab. Nemzer is studying the optical properties of polyaniline nanofibers, which may be used to make optical biosensors, like a continuous glucose monitoring system.

Licensing the technology is the next step, followed by more research in the lab and then on to humans!

* * *

Sources:

http://www.medcitynews.com/index.php/2009/10/ohio-state-university-researchers-work-on-stick-free-blood-glucose-monitor/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyaniline_nanofibers

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Categories: Blood Glucose, Blood Sugar, Monitoring, Pre-Diabetes, Type 1 Issues, Type 2 Issues


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Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 5 November 2009

It would be so wonderful for children to have non invasive devices. Their little fingers are not made for finger pricks and it will be a great step forward to have an alternative way of checking glucose levels.

Posted by Anonymous on 6 November 2009

i think this might be just the thing we might need Glucose


OrSense’s NBM-200G is a CE approved non-invasive continuous blood glucose monitor for people with demanding need for glycemic control in cases such as brittle, nocturnal, and gestational diabetes. The NBM-200G was tested on over 450 subjects, exhibiting comparable accuracy to invasive solutions, while providing superior ease of use and safety. Furthermore, the device enables the identification of glucose trends and the detection of hypo- and hyperglycemia events. In an additional clinical application, the NBM-200G may optimally answer the growing need for tight glycemic control in acute care setting.

OrSense's NMB-200MP multi-parameter sensor for non-invasive continuous hemoglobin, oximetry and pulse rate measurements will in the future also include the ability to accurately, non-invasively measure glucose levels in a various clinical environments.

Posted by Jerry1423 on 6 November 2009

Obviously I would like to see this happen .... but with most other positive news on diabetes related products they seem to fizzle away. Doing readings with a laser is possible, and the technology is over 10 years old, but we never saw it.
I am worried about the cost, as it will be based on what the test strips cost during the life of this device, and that will be huge.
I assume that it won't be for everybody, such as obese people, because reading thru the extra "stuff" may be difficult.
I really do hope this comes to be, but I am not holding my breath.

Posted by Anonymous on 6 November 2009

If they can detect the amount of glucose in the blood with the implants, they can take the next step and build a control system to maintain it in the desired range.

Posted by grey badger on 7 November 2009

M-200G is a CE approved non-invasive continuous blood glucose monitor for people with demanding need for glycemic control in cases such as brittle, nocturnal, and gestational diabetes. The NBM-200G was tested on over 450 subjects, exhibiting comparable accuracy to invasive solutions, while providing superior ease of use and safety. Furthermore, the device enables the identification of glucose trends and the detection of hypo- and hyperglycemia events. In an additional clinical application, the NBM-200G may optimally answer the growing need for tight glycemic control in acute care setting.
OrSense's NMB-200MP multi-parameter sensor for non-invasive continuous hemoglobin, oximetry and pulse rate measurements will in the future also include the ability to accurately, non-invasively measure glucose levels in a various clinical environments.

Posted by Anonymous on 27 November 2010

Needless to say, people have been working on this furiously for years. It is tough, and there are no solutions out there yet. This blogpost is a bit technical, but it explores a little bit of the technical status. http://thenemiirblog.ubiquilight.com


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